INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X

University of Massachusetts Boston University College Instructional Design Graduate Program Instructor Information
Apostolos Koutropoulos, MBA, MSIT, MEd, MA Email: (W): a.koutropoulos@umb.edu Phone (W): 617-287-5990 Office Hours: Wednesdays & Fridays 16:00-17:00 [online via Skype] Note: Throughout the semester, I will communicate with you via your UMB email account. Please review the following website for a job aid that will assist you in forwarding your UMB email account to your personal account if you prefer: http://howto.wikispaces.umb.edu/Forward+Student+UMB+Email+to+Personal+Account

Course Information
Course Title: Research Methods for Instructional Designers

Prerequisites: INSDSG 601 (Intro to Instructional Design), INSDSG 602 (The Adult as Learner), INSDSG 604 (Communications Theory) - or - permission of the instructor Course Description:

Research is an important aspect of instructional design. In this course instructional design students will develop skills to analyze existing research to determine if research findings are valid, replicable, and applicable to their own specific contexts. In addition, they will become familiar with a variety of research design methodologies that they can apply to their own research projects.

Technical Requirements: An Office Suite (Microsoft Office, Apple iWork, etc.), Computer, Internet connection. Required Text(s):

1) Wiersma, W. & Jurs, S. G. (2008). Research methods in education: An introduction. 
Pearson. ISBN: 0205581927 [Click here to view on Amazon] 2) Publication Manual of the APA, Sixth Edition. ISBN: 9781433805615 [Click here to view on Amazon]

Other Reading:

Other reading as assigned will be available on Blackboard. Page 1

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Purdue Owl APA will help you with correct citation of articles: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Course Objectives:

By fully participating in this course, you should be able to: • • • • • Identify the role of research in instructional design and begin to apply this research to their own practice. Identify, retrieve, and critically evaluate primary research articles. Successfully summarize published research and examine the credibility and limitations of the conclusions of the author’s research. Describe the general aspects of educational research design. For a specific research project: ◦ Formulate research questions. ◦ Conduct a literature review. ◦ Identify appropriate research frameworks. Make informed decisions regarding research design.

Core Competencies: The objectives for this course focus on the following core competencies: 1. Professional Foundations a) Communicate Effectively in Visual, Oral and Written Form (Essential) b) Apply current research and theory to the practice of Instructional Design (Advanced) c) Update and Improve One’s Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes Pertaining to Instructional Design and Related Fields. (Essential) d) Apply fundamental research skills to instructional design projects e) Identify and Resolve Ethical and Legal Implications of Design in the Work place. 2. Planning & Analysis a) Conduct a Needs assessment b) Identify and Describe Target Population Characteristics c) Analyze the Characteristics of the Environment d) Analyze the Characteristics of Existing and Emerging Technologies and their Use in an Instructional Environment

Required Assignments: 1. Participation This is a seminar course, implying active engagement in discussions and other class activities. Participation includes completing pre-class readings, online exercises, and participating in class discussions; both in-class and online. If you choose to participate online on a given week, you should expect to participate in one or more online discussions focused on applying concepts derived from the weekly topic. Online discussions are Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 2

INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
available to in-class students as well, but are not always required. The agenda for each class session will clearly identify required activities for a given week.
 Participating in weekly discussion on the class discussion board includes both responding to the posed discussion questions in a substantive way, and commenting on the responses of other participants. Again, this participation is not graded, but is required to receive credit for being “in class” that week (if you are attending online only). On-campus students aren’t required to participate in online discussions if they attend and participate on-campus, however there is a wealth of knowledge and experience to be gained by taking all available opportunities to participate, this means that you will get more out of the course if you participate both on-campus and online discussions. 2. Article Critiques Each week groups will be presenting overviews and critiques of academic articles and lead a class discussions on the contents, methodology and potential shortcomings of these articles. Depending on how many students are in the class, a student may present once or multiple times in a semester. These article presentations are meant to hone your skills as researchers to evaluate the content and the validity of published research. Your critique is due in the designated discussion forum by Wednesday evening. You should attach a Word or PDF document, or link to a Google Doc. (the assumption is that this is a Thursday class on campus) Articles at the beginning of the semester will be chosen by the instructor and students will be asked to sign up for the articles they wish to present. As the semester progresses and students find their own research articles, students, with instructor approval, will have the ability to present articles that they have discovered in the course of researching their final project. Grading rubrics for this assignment will be available on Blackboard. 3. Semester Project Your final project is meant to prepare you for presenting a research proposal to an institutional review board (IRB), which is the campus authority on approving and reviewing research. It will consist of three parts: 1. PART I: Abstract, Introduction, Initial Literature Review, Initial Bibliography 2. PART II: Updated Part I segments, Research Methodology, Expected Outcomes 3. Presentation: Presentation of your Research Proposal to the class 
 Once you submit Part I, I will give you feedback on how you can improve your submission. In Part II, I expect both new sections to your project, as well as improvements made based on comments I have provided as well as any peer reviews. If you submit Part II a week before (or earlier) its due date I can provide you with feedback for improving Part II before you submit it for final grading. For additional information about this project, including grading rubrics, there is a folder on the Blackboard in the “Course Information” section of Blackboard titled "Assignment Information," which contains details about the due dates and requirements for the semester project. Semester Projects (Part I and II) are due in Google Docs format. You may share your document with the instructor a.koutropoulos@umb.edu Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 3

INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Course Rubric: Rubrics for Article Critiques, and the Semester Project, are available on Blackboard Assignment/Deliverable 1. Article Critiques (3-4 critiques per student depending on enrollment) 2. Semester Project (part I) 3. Semester Project (part II) 4. Semester Project (presentation) 5. Participation (as defined in Methods of Instruction) Relevant Course Objective 1a, 1d, 1e Points 84-112 (28 per critique) 250 250 100 65 (5 per course session) 65 (5 per course session) Grade % 25

1d, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d 1d, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d 1d, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d 1a

20 20 10 15

6. Attendance (as defined in Methods of Instruction)

10

Course Policies:  Attendance – You are required to attend every course session for this class. If you can’t make it in person you have the online environment (via Blackboard) to attend the class. If you are more than 15 minutes late coming to class you won’t get attendance points for that session. If you participate at any point during the week online, you will be counted as having attended class that week.  Participation – Participation presupposes attendance. If you don’t attend you can’t participate in class. Participation includes completing all required reading and writing assignments prior to attending class in person (or before Wednesdays online), thoughtfully participating in discussions, and taking responsibility for helping create a positive learning situation by arriving promptly, listening respectfully, and participating constructively.  Late Work – Late work for full credit will be accepted only if it’s late due to demonstrable unforeseen circumstances such as a medical or family emergency. Late work is due within two weeks of due date, no later. Work turned in late, without extenuating circumstances will drop half a grade for every day it’s late.  Collegiality – It is expected that work will be turned in on time. Feedback is available from the instructor, provided that you give adequate time (at least a week’s notice) to the instructor for this feedback request. At times debate in class could get heated. If you disagree with someone, please do it in a respectful manner and if in the end you can’t agree, then you agree to disagree. Disrespectful language is not an option.  Course Social – Traditionally online courses have contained a course café discussion forum where non-course social conversations could take place. Our program has an online community for current students and alumni at http://www.umassid.com. I Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 4

INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
encourage you to use this space for socializing with classmates, as well as other students and alumni. This is also a good space to ask for advice, ask fellow instructional designers to take surveys that you create, and a place to find and post news (and jobs) pertaining to instructional design, educational technology, teaching and learning.

Grading
Grading: Grade type for the course is a whole or partial letter grade. (Please see table below) Note: the lowest passing grade for a graduate student is a “C”. Grades lower than a “C” that are submitted by faculty will automatically be recorded as an “F”. Please see the Graduate Bulletin for more detailed information on the University’s grading policy.

UMass Boston Graduate Grading Policy
Letter Grade A AB+ B BC+ C F INC INC/F W AU NA

Percentage
93-100% 90-92% 87-89% 83-86% 80-82% 77-79% 73-76% 0-72%
Given under very restricted terms and only when satisfactory work has been accomplished in majority of coursework. Contract of completion terms is required. Received for failure to comply with contracted completion terms. Received if withdrawal occurs before the withdrawal deadline. Audit (only permitted on space-available basis) Not Attending (student appeared on roster, but never attended class. Student is still responsible for tuition and fee charges unless withdrawal form is submitted before deadline. NA has no effect on cumulative GPA.)

Quality Points
4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Methods of Instruction
Methods: This course in Research Methods for Instructional Design is a designed using the HyFlex1 methodology to provide learners with both the benefits of face-to-face courses and the benefits of online learning. Students may attend class in person each week or alternatively participate in online activities. This choice may be made on a weekly basis. (This is the Flexibility part of HyFlex.) The attendance and participation policy will be discussed during class the first week, and will be available on Blackboard for purely online students. Additional questions should be addressed to the instructor. See the “What’s a HyFlex Course?” website for more information. In a HyFlex course the online components are a different type of experience from those of meeting face-to-face each week, and the online activities of the class will reflect these differences. In the instructional design vernacular, while our instructional goals and objectives are similar, we will use some different instructional strategies (and probably materials too!) that are more appropriate to our learning context. This course is divided into sessions, each of which will run for one week. Each new session begins on Monday at 12:00 am EST. Any work due during a previous session must be submitted BEFORE that time. Sessions will be available two weeks in advance, so that you can be prepared for upcoming modules and get a head start if you’d like. Keeping up with the work is one of the keys and challenges to being a successful graduate student; and this course does require more readings that the typical instructional design course. Typically, students should plan to spend approximately 9-12 hours each week completing the activities outside of class for each session (3-4 hours per credit depending on the student). So, if you are attending on-campus you have 3 hours in class, and 9-12 out of class. In an online environment you should plan for 12-15 hours of work per week for this course. Weekly work may include the following activities: • Listening to a brief module introductory lecture. • Readings from the course textbook. • Readings from a selection of research articles. • Completing an warm-up task that applies to the weekly topic . • Completing a more in-depth task that applies the concepts in the weekly reading (optional for f2f attendees). • Article Critiques & Discussions These tasks may include Internet research, working with a case study, peer-reviewing another student's work and providing feedback, or working on a piece of your semester project. These assignments will not be graded, but you must complete them to receive credit for being “in class” that week. In addition to these weekly activities, each student will complete a semester project consisting of a research proposal. This project will be submitted in 2 deliverable parts giving you an opportunity to receive feedback and improve your drafts.

1

http://itec.sfsu.edu/hyflex/hyflex_home.htm

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Accommodations
Section 504, 508 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer guidelines for curriculum modifications and adaptations for students with documented disabilities. If applicable, you may obtain adaptation recommendations from the UMass Boston Ross Center (508-287-7430. You need to present and discuss these recommendations with me within a reasonable period, prior to the end of the Drop/Add period. You are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in your personal files for use when applying for future degrees, certification, licensure, or transfer of credit.

Code of Student Conduct
Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including requirements for the Academic Honesty Policy, delineated in the University of Massachusetts Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin and relevant program student handbook(s). http://media.umassp.edu/massedu/policy/3-08%20UMB%20Code%20of%20Conduct.pdf You are encouraged to visit and review the UMass website on Correct Citation and Avoiding Plagiarism: http://umb.libguides.com/GradStudiesCitations

Other Pertinent and Important Information
Writing Style: Everything in this course (except discussion posts) should be written following the Style Guide of the American Psychological Association (APA). This format is the academic standard among social scientists in the United States. As such, you should be able to write in this format as a graduate student in Education, and especially if you plan to pursue additional post-graduate studies. Your professional writing in the instructional design profession may not follow APA style,
but part of your graduate education in the Instructional Design program is to learn how to communicate to a variety of audiences – both formal and informal. Learning how to write following these guidelines will help you demonstrate excellent written communication skills to your own future stakeholders. In addition to the APA Style Manual (required readings) you can find many excellent resources to help you learn APA Style; A good bootcamp overview for APA is provided by Purdue’s Online Writing Lab: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/

Assignment Submissions:

All assignment submissions will be through using Google Docs. During the first class session I will demonstrate how to create a new Google Doc and share it with me, and any Page 7

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
teammates or peer-reviewers. Google Docs doesn’t have as many features as Microsoft Word, but it was what you need to complete your assignments. The reason we are using Google Docs is because as a program it provides a better platform for collaboration and for providing comments and feedback. There is a dummy assignment available on Blackboard that will get you acclimated to creating a new Google Doc and sharing a link with the instructor. Changes to Syllabus: This syllabus is subject to change throughout the semester due to emergent student needs, important new learning opportunities, guest speakers, inclement weather, or other unforeseen situations. In the event a change must be made, I will notify you as soon as practically possible, and provide an updated syllabus on our course website.

Course Schedule Week 1: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Introduction to Research Methods Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2
 Introduction to the basics of research  Identification of where research fits in the Instructional Design Process and the

Instructional Design Profession
 Chapter 1: Educational Research: Its Nature and Characteristics (pp 1-27)  Chapter 2: Identification of a Research Problem (pp 28-50)

 In-class Discussions  Online Discussions No written assignments due today. Please note that readings assigned need to be completed before you attend the on-campus seminar

Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Week 2: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Library Resources & Scholarly Work Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library – 2nd Floor- Center for Library Instruction    Finding appropriate literature online Evaluating existing research Finding appropriate research using library resources  Chapter 3: The Review of the Literature (pp 51-75)  Chapter 5: Evaluating Research Reports (pp 103-117)  In-class field trip to the Healey Library for a workshop on library resources and information retrieval  Online tutorials on library resources and information retrieval None

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 3: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Research Proposals Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2  
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Creating a framework for research proposals Gaining a critical understanding of the Digital Native Chapter 4: Communicating about Research (pp 76-102) Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5). Retrieved on October 23 2011 from: http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part II: Do they really think differently?. On the Horizon, 9(6). Retrieved on October 23 2011 from:http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part2.pdf Corrin, L., Bennett S., Lockyer, L. (2010) Digital Natives: Everyday life versus academic Page 9

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
study. Proceedings of the 7th international conference on Networked Learning. Corrin Bennett Lockyer.pdf Wilber, D. J. (2007). MyLiteracies: Understanding the Net generation through LiveJournals and Literacy Practices. Innovate 3(4). Retrieved on October 23 2011 from: http://innovateonline.info/pdf/vol3_issue4/MyLiteracies__Understanding_the_Net_Generation_through_LiveJournals_and_Literacy_Practices. pdf Helsper, E. J. and Eynon, R. (2010). Digital Natives: Where is the evidence? British Educational Research Journal, 36(3). pp 503-520 Digital_natives_(LSERO).pdf Jones, C. and Healing, G. (2010). Net generation students: agency and choice and new technologies. Journal of computer assisted learning, 26. pp 344-356 Click here to access Jones & Healing article from library Bennett, S. and Maton, K. (2010) Beyond the 'digital natives' debate: towards a more nuanced understanding of students' technology experiences. Journal of computer assisted learning, 26. pp 321-331 Click here to access Bennett & Maton article from library.

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Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date:

 Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus)  Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments.  Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Week 4: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Quantitative Research (Part I) Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2   
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Acquisition of a basic understanding of Quantitative Research Acquisition of a basic understanding of Experimental Design Gaining a critical understanding of Mobile Learning Chapter 6: Research Design in Quantitative Research (pp 118-133) Chapter 7: Experimental Research (pp 134-164) Viljoen, J-M., Sebastiaan du Preez, C., Cook, A. (2006). Transforming learning through technology: he case of using SMS to support distance students in South Africa. Retrieved from: http://www.learningmaterials.co.za/resources/Transforming_learning_through_t echnology.pdf Waycott, J., Jones, A., Scanlon, E. (2005). PDAs as a lifelong learning tools: An activity theory based analysis. Learning, Media and Technology, 30(2). Retrieved on November Page 10

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X

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13, 2011 from: http://www.tlu.ee/~kpata/haridustehnoloogiaTLU/pda_s.pdf Zoraini, W. A., Lim, T., Woo, T-K (2009). Mobile Learning Initiative through SMS: A Formative Evaluation. ASEAN Journal of Open and Distance Learning, 1(1) pp 49-58. Retrieved from: http://eprints.oum.edu.my/300/ Williams, P. (2010) Assessing Mobile Learning Effectiveness. In Retta, G. (Ed.) Mobile Learning Pilot Projects and Initiatives. pp 105-122. Retrieved from: Google Books (free) Traxler, J. (2007) Defining, Discussing and Evaluating Mobile Learning: The moving finger writes and having writ... International Review of Research in Online and Distance Learning, 8(2). Retrieved on November 13, 2011 from: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/viewArticle/346

Class Activities Assignment( s): Due Date:

 Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus)  Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments. Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Week 5: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Quantitative Research (Part II) Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2   
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Acquisition of a basic understanding of Quasi-Experimental Research Acquisition of a basic understanding of Nonexperimental Research Gaining an understanding of teaching and learning in a variety of disciplines Chapter 8: Quasi-Experimental Research (pp 165 -188) Chapter 9: Nonexperimental Quantitative Research (pp 189-231) Quinn Allen, L. (2004). Implementing a culture portfolio project within a constructivist paradigm. Foreign Language Annals , 37 (2), 231-237 Altvater, F. (2009) Words on the Wadsworth: Podcasting and the Teaching of Art History. Journal of Effective Teaching. 9(3) pp 77-88. retrieved on October 23, 2011 from: http://www.hartford.edu/academics/faculty/faculty_senate/files/PDFs/CARS/Fran Article.pdf Brown, P. S., & Hargis, J. (2008). Undergraduate research in art history using project based learning. The Journal of Faculty Development, 22(2), 152-152-158. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.lib.umb.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/21458 6915?accountid=28932 Page 11

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X

Class Activities Assignment (s): Due Date:

Ackerley, K. and Coccetta, F. (2007). Enriching language learning through a multimedia corpus. ReCALL. 19(3) pp 351-370. doi:10.1017/S0958344007000730  Chang, M.-M., & Ho, C.-M. (2009). Computer Assisted Language Learning: Effects of locus of control and student-control on web-based language learning. ReCall, 22 (3), 189-206  Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus)  Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments. Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Week 6: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Qualitative Research (Part I) Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2   
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Acquisition of a basic understanding of Qualitative Research Acquisition of a basic understanding of Historical Research Gaining a critical understanding of learning theories Chapter 10: Research Design in Qualitative Research (pp 232-253) Chapter 11: Historical Research (pp 254-273) Kop, R. & Hill, A. (2008) Connectivism: Learning theory of the future of vestige of the past? International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 9(3). Retrieved on November 13, 2011 from: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/523/1137 Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105. Wenger, E. (2000). Communities of Practice and Social Learning Systems. Organization 7(2), pp. 225-246 Laurillard, D. (2008) Open Teaching: The Key to Sustainable and Effective Open Education. in T. Liyoshi and M.S. Vijay Kumar (Eds) Opening Up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content and Open Knowledge. pp. 319-336. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press Downes, S. (2008) Places to go: Connectivism & Connective Knowledge. Innovate, 5(1). Retrieved November 13, 2011 from: http://innovateonline.info/pdf/vol5_issue1/Places_to_Go__Connectivism_&_Connective_Knowledge.pdf Page 12

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Class Activities  Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus)  Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments. Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 7: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: SPRING BREAK – Week Off

None None None

Week 8: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Qualitative Research (Part II) Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2   
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Acquisition of a basic understanding of Ethnographic Research Acquisition of a basic understanding of Mixed, Modeling & Delphi Methods. Development of student’s critical understanding of research literature Chapter 12: Ethnographic Research (pp 273-305) Chapter 13: Mixed, Modeling, and Delphi Methods (pp 306-324) Scholarly Articles to be supplied by students Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus) Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments. Page 13

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INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Assignment(s): Due Date:  Students are expected to turn in their final draft of their Semester Project (Part I)  Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Week 9: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Data Collection Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2     Basic Review of INSDSG 618 (Needs Analysis) Acquisition of a basic understanding of Sampling Designs Acquisition of a basic understanding of Measurement & Data Collection Development of student’s critical understanding of research literature  Chapter 14: Sampling Designs (pp 325-351)  Chapter 15: Measurement and Data Collection (pp 352-380)  Scholarly Articles to be supplied by students  Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus)  Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments. Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Reading Assignment Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 10: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Descriptive Statistics Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2  
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Acquisition of a basic understanding of Descriptive Statistics Development of student’s critical understanding of research literature Chapter 16: Data Analysis: Descriptive Statistics (pp 381-403) Scholarly Articles to be supplied by students Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Page 14

Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Campus)  Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments. Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 11: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Inferential Statistics Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2   Acquisition of a basic understanding of Inferential Statistics. Development of student’s critical understanding of research literature  Chapter 17: Data Analysis: Inferential Statistics (pp 404-435)  Scholarly Articles to be supplied by students  Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus)  Discussion of book chapters: questions, comments and “aha” moments. Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 12: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Brining it all together, Final Scholarly Article “winners & losers” Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2 
 

Development of student’s critical understanding of research literature

Scholarly Articles to be supplied by students Croveli, M. R. (2006) What Empiricism Can’t Tell us and Rationalism Can. Retrieved March 10, 2012 from: http://mises.org/daily/1999  Presentation of Articles & Critiques of Articles, and Discussion (Online & On Campus)  Discussion online about the best articles they read (and why) and the worst articles they read this semester (and why) Page 15

Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 - Syllabus- Spring Research Methods for Instructional Designers 201X
Assignment(s): Due Date: Students doing an article critique this week are expected to post their critique in the appropriate discussion board by Wednesday evening.

Week 13: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): On Campus meeting Date: Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Brining it all together, Proposal Presentations Online (for students who can’t come to campus) On-Campus (for people who can meet face to face): H-LL-Presentation Room 2 Thursday 00/00/2013 Healey Library - Lower Level – Presentation Room 2  Development of student’s critical understanding of research literature  Mende, J. (2005) The Poverty of Empiricism. Informing Science: The International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline. 8. pp 173-187.  Final Presentations of Research Proposals  Students are expected to come prepared to present their proposals, and discuss their initial findings  Students are expected to turn in their final draft of their Semester Project (Part II)

Updated: March 16, 2012 This Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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