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Dallas County Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM Version 2.0

Authorized by: Jeffrey J. Barnard, M.D., Director and Chief Medical Examiner Effective Date: January 23, 2008

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences EHS Manual Summary of Changes from Previous Manual Version Previous Version: EHS Manual, version 1.0 Current Version: EHS Manual, version 2.x 1. Entire document Typographical and grammatical errors were corrected and the document was moved to an electronic format. 2. Overview EHS Program Section was reorganized and responsibilities of Emergency Wardens was added. 3. Facility Emergency Response Facility Lock Down and Staff Accountability During NonStandard Work Hours were formally added to the manual. Expanded instructions for Emergency Wardens were added to EHS Resource Documents. 4. General Safety Procedures Minor revisions were made to the section on handling firearms. 5. Biological Exposure Control The section was significantly reorganized and redundant information was removed. Expanded instructions for use of PPE were added to EHS Resource Documents. PPE requirements for the Medicolegal Death Investigators and Autopsy staff were revised based upon job duties and procedural changes. Job titles were updated in the section identifying occupationally exposed staff. A section regarding occupational exposure testing for tuberculosis was added. Instructions were improved for diluting bleach. 6. Chemical Safety Plan Components of the Dallas County Hazardous Chemical Safety Training Manual were incorporated into the plan where applicable; the County document is no longer used. 7. Radiation Safety Plan Current UT-Southwestern radiation procedures were added to the EHS Resource Documents. 8. Smoking Policy This section was moved from the IFS Security Manual to the EHS Manual. 9. Reporting Injuries and Exposures This section received minor revision reflecting changes in County policy. 10. EHS Audits and Inspections This section received minor revision.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

Summary of Changes Version 2.0

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences EHS Manual Revisions and Corrections, Version 2.x Date Description Approval

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

Revisions and Corrections Version 2.x

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Program OVERVIEW 1. Policy Statement 1.1. It is the goal of the Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences to provide a safe and healthy workplace for employees and visitors. 1.2. Per Dallas County policy, working safely is a condition of employment. 1.3. No employee is required to work at a job he or she knows is not safe or healthful. 1.4. The nature of work performed at forensic facilities inherently offers a variety of potential risks from biological, chemical, electrical, ergonomic, radiological, and other hazards routinely found in the workplace. 1.4.1. Therefore, safe and healthy work practices must be routinely incorporated as a part of every process and procedure. 1.4.2. All employees must constantly be aware of conditions in work areas that can produce injuries and/or illness and act accordingly. 1.4.3. The cooperation of each employee is critical in detecting hazards and, in turn, controlling them. 1.4.4. Employees must immediately inform supervisors, the EHS Manager or Deputy, the EHS Committee (in writing), or the Director of any EHS situation beyond their ability or authority to correct. 1.5. It is the intent of the Institute to conform to industry-standard environmental, health, and safety practices through adherence to standards developed by the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) and the American Society of Crime Lab Directors (ASCLD). 1.6. It is the intent of the Institute to comply with applicable environmental, health, and safety regulations such as Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) biological and hazardous waste disposal regulations and Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) regulations including Control of Radiation, Bloodborne Pathogen Control, Texas Hazard Communication Act, etc. 1.7. To implement and oversee these environmental, health, and safety goals, the Institute has developed a written EHS Program, designated an EHS Manager and Deputy Manager, and established an EHS Committee. 1.8. Environmental, health, and safety concerns should be directed to your supervisor, the Director, the EHS Manager or Deputy, or in writing to the EHS Committee. 2. Objectives of the EHS Program 2.1. The objectives of the Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program are to

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

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2.1.1. Provide a safe and healthy workplace for employees and visitors 2.1.2. Advise employees of safe and healthy work practices which must be followed 2.1.3. Advise employees of regulatory requirements 2.1.4. Conform to industry-standard health and safety practices 3. EHS Committee, Manager, and Deputy Manager 3.1. The Director will appoint an EHS Manager and members of the EHS Committee. 3.2. The EHS Manager will appoint a Deputy Manager. 3.3. Membership of the EHS Committee will provide representation from each functional unit and include a mixture of supervisory and non-supervisory personnel, the EHS Manager, EHS Deputy Manager, Lead Emergency Warden, and the Director or his designee. 3.4. The EHS Committee will meet as needed; quarterly meetings are encouraged. 3.5. The EHS Committee will serve as the Biological Exposure Control Committee. 3.6. Minutes of EHS Committee meetings will be taken. 4. Emergency Wardens 4.1. Emergency Wardens lead and direct staff response to the Facility Emergency Response Plan under the direction of the Deputy EHS Manager who serves as the Lead Warden. 4.1.1. The Assistant Lead Wardens are the Chief Field Agent and the Deputy Field Agent. 4.2. Wardens are staff volunteers who are trained to assist and account for staff during a facility emergency. 4.2.1. There are typically a minimum of two emergency wardens per floor. 5. Components of the EHS Program 5.1. The following programs are included in this Environmental Health and Safety Program: 5.1.1. Facility Emergency Response Plan 5.1.2. Safe Operating Procedures 5.1.3. Biological Exposure Control Plan 5.1.4. IFS Chemical Safety Plan 5.1.5. IFS Radiation Safety Program 5.1.6. Workplace Exposure and Injury Reporting 5.1.7. Quarterly Safety Inspections and Annual Safety Audit 6. Program Responsibilities 6.1. Employees have the responsibility to work safely and to 6.1.1. Follow environmental, health, and safety procedures outlined in this Program, communicated by your supervisor, received in training, and/or known to you based upon your education, experience, and training.
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6.1.2. Use, store, and dispose of chemicals safely. 6.1.3. Use, store, and dispose of biologicals safely. 6.1.4. Use x-ray equipment safely. 6.1.5. Use proper and safe techniques, standard operating procedures, good personal hygiene, and personal protective equipment (PPE). 6.1.6. Take responsibility for learning and knowing the environmental, health, and safety hazards associated with chemicals, biologicals, instrumentation/equipment, and procedures used in your work area. 6.1.7. Diligently identify unsafe and/or unhealthy conditions within the workplace; immediately correct and/or report unsafe or unhealthy conditions to your Supervisor, the Director, EHS Manager or Deputy, and/or EHS Committee. 6.1.8. Be prepared to act appropriately in an emergency situation. 6.1.9. Report suspected workplace exposures timely and seek medical treatment as needed. 6.1.10. Advise supervisors if additional personal protective equipment or other safety equipment is indicated. 6.1.11. Attend initial and annual environmental, health, and safety training sessions. 6.1.12. Know the location and effective use of safety showers, eyewash stations, first aid kits, fire extinguishers, MSDSs, etc. 6.1.13. Know your floor emergency wardens. 6.1.14. Provide written inquiry to the EHS Committee as needed to resolve environmental, health, and/or safety related concerns. 6.1.15. Forward MSDSs received with merchandise to the EHS Deputy Manger. 6.1.16. Participate in exercises and drills of this Program. 6.1.17. Drive safely at all times. Follow Dallas County policies and procedures located in each County vehicle including the immediate reporting of all accidents. 6.2. Supervisors have the responsibility to 6.2.1. Support and implement the EHS Program. 6.2.2. Communicate procedural or laboratory-specific environmental, health, and safety information to employees. 6.2.3. Ensure that employees receive initial and follow-up environmental, health, and safety training as applicable. 6.2.4. Oversee occupational exposure reporting and exposure monitoring including lead testing, hepatitis vaccination, workers compensation reporting, etc. 6.2.5. Immediately correct and/or report unsafe or unhealthy conditions to the Director and/or EHS Manager or Deputy. 6.2.6. Support and participate in the EHS Committee. 6.2.7. Receive and respond to requests for personal protective equipment and other safety equipment. 6.2.8. Take appropriate supervisory and/or disciplinary action when safety rules are violated. 6.3. EHS Manager reports to the Director for issues related to environmental, health, and safety and has primary responsibility for oversight of the EHS Program including but not limited to
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6.3.1.1. Maintaining and updating the EHS Program and reviewing annually. 6.3.1.2. Monitoring laboratory practices to verify continuing compliance with policies and procedures. 6.3.1.3. Performing quarterly environmental, health, and safety inspections. 6.3.1.4. Scheduling, coordinating, and overseeing an annual EHS Audit of the Institute EHS Program and drills or exercises of the Plan. 6.3.1.5. Maintaining applicable records. 6.3.1.6. Investigating EHS issues, proposing corrective action as applicable to Section Chief, Executive Committee, and/or EHS Committee, and verifying implementation of corrective action. 6.3.1.7. Proposing corrections and improvements in the EHS Program. 6.3.1.8. Overseeing generation of annual Chemical Inventory List and filing Texas Tier Two forms as applicable and maintaining documentation as required. 6.3.1.9. Maintaining and distributing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs). 6.3.1.10. Making MSDSs available to applicable staff upon request. 6.3.1.11. Overseeing biological and hazardous waste disposal for the Institute and filing annual waste summaries as applicable. 6.3.1.12. Keeping abreast of changes in laws and regulations applicable to the Institutes EHS Program. 6.3.1.13. Organizing and overseeing meetings of the EHS Committee and generating meeting minutes. 6.3.1.14. Overseeing the IFS Radiation Safety Program and interfacing with UTSouthwestern Radiation Safety. 6.3.1.15. Overseeing occupational exposure testing for lead, formaldehyde, etc. 6.3.1.16. Overseeing safety related training including first aid, CPR, fire extinguisher use, etc. 6.4. EHS Committee (Biological Exposure Control Committee) has responsibility to 6.4.1. Maintain current awareness of the EHS Program, diligently implement the Program within IFS, and resolve or refer potentially unsafe conditions for review. 6.4.2. Serve as a liaison for each IFS functional unit as it relates to flow of environmental, health and safety issues and information. 6.4.3. Participate in EHS audits as applicable, review results of audits, and recommend changes in the EHS Program as applicable. 6.4.4. Investigate and respond to EHS concerns brought to the attention of the Committee; both the request and the response should usually be in writing. 6.4.5. Review and recommend changes in environmental, health, and safety practices including use of personal protective equipment and the EHS Program. 6.4.6. Review use of sharps and make recommendations to move to engineered sharps products as appropriate. 6.4.7. Address issues brought to the attention of the Committee. 6.4.8. Assist in implementing new EHS programs. 6.5. Director has the responsibility to 6.5.1. Ensure that an active EHS Program exists within the Institute. 6.5.2. Support and promote this EHS Program.
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6.5.3. Review and respond to the annual EHS Audit. 6.5.4. Seek adequate funding for environmental, health, and safety issues. 6.5.5. Authorize changes in the EHS Program. 6.5.6. Appoint an EHS Manager and members of the EHS Committee. 6.5.7. Delegate environmental, health, and safety responsibilities as applicable. 7. Audit and Inspection of the EHS Program 7.1. Quarterly inspections and an annual audit of the EHS Program will be conducted under the direction of the EHS Manager. 7.2. Other inspections, announced or unannounced, may be conducted at the discretion of the EHS Manager or upon request of the EHS Committee, the Director, or Section Chief. 7.2.1. The goal of these activities is to assist in maintaining a safe working environment, to further compliance with environmental and safety regulations, and to implement the EHS Program. 7.3. Results of environmental, health, and safety inspections and the annual Program audit will be communicated to the EHS Committee and the Director. 8. Reporting EHS Concerns 8.1. Staff requests for review of environmental, health, and safety issues should be discussed with a supervisor and/or submitted in writing to the EHS Manager. 8.1.1. The supervisor will evaluate the request for review and implement resolution as applicable and/or refer the review to the EHS Manager. 8.1.2. The EHS Manager will investigate the request for review and refer it to an appropriate supervisor, the EHS Committee, and/or the Executive Committee for evaluation. 8.1.3. Corrective action as applicable will be coordinated through the EHS Manager. 8.2. As needed, the EHS Manager may convene the EHS Committee or Executive Committee to review staff requests or any aspect of the EHS Program. 9. EHS Training and Retraining 9.1. All employees will receive initial training in applicable aspects of the EHS Program prior to performing work which may reasonably be expected to involve potential occupational exposure. 9.2. All employees will also receive annual refresher training in selected environmental, health, and safety areas including the Biological Exposure Control Plan. 9.3. Selected staff located throughout the facility will receive training and maintain certification in first aid and CPR. 9.4. Training records will be maintained under the direction of the Quality Manager as outlined in the Quality Manual.

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9.5. Supervisors will provide additional procedure and laboratory specific training as necessary to new employees, newly assigned employees, retraining of employees, and during implementation or modification of procedures. 9.6. As a means of addressing environmental, health, and safety concerns, supervisors may require that an employee receive training or retraining in selected environmental, health, and safety areas. 10. Authorization of the EHS Program 10.1. Implementation of this EHS Program requires authorization of the Director. 10.2. The official EHS Program manual is maintained under the direction of the Quality Manager and is available to staff in electronic format. 10.3. The Program is reviewed annually by the EHS Manager and Committee. 10.4. Changes in the written EHS Program must be authorized by the Director prior to implementation. 10.5. Outdated versions of the manual are archived under the direction of the Quality Manager. 11. Recordkeeping 11.1. Training records will be maintained under the direction of the Quality Manager as outlined in the Quality Manual. 11.2. Written materials related to the EHS Committee, safety inspections, and audits reside with the EHS Manager and will be kept a minimum of five years. 11.3. The Sharps Injury Log and other personnel records reside in Administration. 11.4. Availability and retention of information is consistent with the policies and procedures of IFS and/or policies, procedures, and direction from Dallas County Human Resources, District Attorneys Office, and/or Sheriffs Office. 12. Visitors 12.1. Visitors, interns, or other non-Institute personnel are required to follow this EHS Plan as a condition of facility access. 12.2. It is the responsibility of the hosting IFS employee to ensure that visitors receive necessary training prior to conducting activities that may reasonably result in occupational exposure, and sign the Visitors Waiver located in the Security Manual as appropriate. 12.3. It is the responsibility of the Institute host to ensure that non-Institute personnel follow proper procedure. 12.4. The IFS host is responsible for ensuring that all visitor exposures and injuries are immediately reported to a supervisor and/or Administration.

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences FACILITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN 1. Purpose 1.1. The purpose of this plan is to outline the expected response of building occupants to various emergency situations which could occur at the Institute of Forensic Sciences including those emergencies which require evacuation or relocation of occupants. 1.2. This procedure outlines expected response to a wide range of potential natural and manmade emergencies including but not limited to fire, severe storm, flammable and toxic material release, bomb threat, civil disturbance, and physical plant emergency. 2. Dispatching Emergency Responders 2.1. In activate fire or policy emergency response, 911 must be called. 2.1.1. The Fire Department is not automatically notified when the fire/emergency alarm activates. 2.2. Where possible, 911 should be called by the Lead Emergency Warden or a knowledgeable supervisor. 2.3. However, all employees are authorized to contact 911 should the need arise. 2.3.1. The Lead Emergency Warden, Administration, and the Dallas County Fire Marshal should be notified immediately when this action is taken. 3. Responsibilities 3.1. All Employees have the responsibility to 3.1.1. Know location of fire/emergency alarms and emergency exits. 3.1.2. Know your Emergency Wardens and be prepared to follow their direction. 3.1.3. Be prepared to warn coworkers and activate fire/emergency alarm as necessary for example in a fire situation or when staff needs to evacuate the building such as in a large chemical spill. 3.1.4. Immediately evacuate the building at the sound of the fire/emergency alarm or relocate, evacuate, or shelter in place (lock down) as directed by emergency wardens or supervisory staff. 3.1.5. Ensure all in the immediate area know an emergency exists and are preparing to evacuate, relocate, or shelter in place (lock down). 3.1.6. Close (and lock if time allows) room/lab doors upon exiting for evacuation/relocation. 3.1.7. Advise visitors of appropriate action to follow in an emergency and be prepared to account for visitors at the relocation or evacuation checkpoint or via office telephones or the emergency warden radio system. 3.1.8. Check in with your emergency warden at the relocation or evacuation checkpoint or using an office telephone or the emergency warden radio system. 3.1.9. Remain in the evacuation, relocation, or lock down area until advised by the Director, Fire Marshal, Lead Emergency Warden, or their designee.
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3.1.10. Participate in drills and training. 3.1.11. Do not use elevators during an evacuation/relocation. 3.1.12. Immediately (and prior to an incident), advise supervisors if you are physically unable to evacuate/relocate using the stairwell or unable to hear the fire alarm. 3.2. Emergency Wardens have the responsibility to 3.2.1. Attend training as provided by Dallas County and be prepared, able, and willing to implement procedures outlined in this manual and the Dallas County Emergency Warden Handbook. 3.2.2. Know the location of the IFS emergency stretcher and know how to assemble and use it. 3.2.3. Upon hearing the fire/emergency alarm or receiving instructions from the Lead Emergency Warden or Fire Marshal, instruct individuals on your assigned floor to begin evacuation/relocation procedures: 3.2.3.1. Know areas in which the fire/emergency alarm may not be heard well (for example walk-in refrigerators and freezers) and search these areas for people. 3.2.3.2. Know people who may need physical or auditory assistance and ensure that they can safely evacuate/relocate. 3.2.3.3. With the assistance of other wardens and supervisory staff, ensure all people have left your assigned floor during an evacuation. 3.2.3.4. Take a phone list or roster to the evacuation/emergency checkpoint and account for staff and visitors on your floor. 3.2.3.5. Maintain a phone list or roster in the primary work area for us during a lock down to account for staff using office phones or the emergency warden radio system. 3.2.3.6. Provide your roster reconciliation report to the Lead Emergency Warden or designee. 3.2.3.7. Assist the Lead Emergency Warden and the Dallas County Fire Marshal as directed. 3.2.4. Provide area-specific emergency orientation to new employees and retraining to staff as applicable. 3.2.5. Assess effectiveness of drills and relocations and make recommendations to improve emergency response. 3.3. Lead Emergency Warden has the responsibility to 3.3.1. Work with supervisors, Director, IFS EHS Manager, and Fire Marshal to implement emergency response procedures. 3.3.2. Identify and train Emergency Wardens. 3.3.3. Coordinate activities of Emergency Wardens and communicate instructions to Emergency Wardens in an emergency situation. 3.3.4. Be a liaison between the Fire Marshal and IFS staff during an emergency situation. 3.3.5. Oversee accountability of staff and visitors during an evacuation, relocation, or shelter in place (lock down). 3.3.6. Advise Administration and the Fire Marshal immediately if the emergency response plan is activated. 3.3.7. Plan emergency drills and assess response to drills and activation of the plan. 3.3.8. Update and post emergency evacuation and fire warden information.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

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3.3.9. Review condition of emergency evacuation routes, availability of emergency equipment such as fire blankets, and the availability of IFS stretcher. 3.4. Records Department Staff and Autopsy Staff Assigned to Back Dock have the responsibility to 3.4.1. Instruct individuals in the lobby and morgue bay to immediately exit the building during an emergency situation (Autopsy staff). 3.4.2. Bring applicable Visitor Logs to the evacuation/relocation checkpoint and give to the applicable Emergency Warden (Autopsy and Records staff). 3.5. Supervisors have the responsibility to 3.5.1. Support the Emergency Warden program. 3.5.2. Work with the Emergency Wardens to ensure effective and efficient emergency response including accountability of personnel. 3.5.3. Ensure staff is trained and actively participates in this program. 3.6. Director has the responsibility to 3.6.1. Support the Emergency Response Program and ensure effective facility emergency response. 4. Emergency Procedures Major Event 4.1. Evacuation 4.1.1. Upon hearing the fire alarm, employees will implement the Facility Emergency Response Plan and evacuate the building as noted below unless directed otherwise by supervisors or Emergency Wardens. 4.1.2. First through Fourth Floors 4.1.2.1. Take the closest stairwell to the first floor and exit the building via the two back emergency doors and assemble in the UT-Southwestern parking lot. 4.1.2.2. Check in with your Emergency Warden. 4.1.2.3. Stay calm. 4.1.2.4. Remain at the assembly point until advised otherwise by the Director, Fire Marshal, Lead Emergency Warden, or their designee. 4.1.3. Basement (Morgue) 4.1.3.1. Immediately exit using the dock bay exit and assemble in the IFS back parking lot. 4.1.3.2. Check in with your Emergency Warden. 4.1.3.3. Stay calm. 4.1.3.4. Remain at the assembly point until advised otherwise by the Director, Fire Marshal, Lead Emergency Warden, or their designee. 4.2. Severe Weather Relocation 4.2.1. Emergency Wardens will advise staff to relocate due to imminent severe weather. 4.2.2. Where possible staff will relocate based upon their assigned work area. 4.2.2.1. Morgue Staff 4.2.2.1.1. Emergency Wardens will instruct employees and visitors to remain in the basement. 4.2.2.2. First Floor 4.2.2.2.1. Emergency Wardens will instruct employees and visitors to move into the first floor hall and close office doors.
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4.2.2.3. Second, Third, and Fourth Floors 4.2.2.3.1. Emergency Wardens will instruct employees and visitors to move to the assigned stairwell. 4.2.3. Staff will check in with their Emergency Warden. 4.2.4. Staff will remain at your assembly point until advised by Emergency Warden or supervisor. 4.3. Facility Lock Down 4.3.1. A facility lock down will be initiated in response to a threat of violence within the facility or to protect staff in place. 4.3.2. The first staff to perceive the potential threat will immediately leave the area of danger and go to the nearest room which can be physically locked from the inside. 4.3.3. Staff will immediately call the switchboard operator or Field Agent Office (0 or 5900) to initiate a lock down of the entire building. 4.3.4. Records Staff 4.3.4.1. Records Staff will likely be the first to perceive a threat. 4.3.4.2. Staff will alert other staff in the area and go immediately into telephone room through back door. 4.3.4.3. Staff will immediately call the switchboard operator or Field Agent Office (0 or 5990) to initiate a lock down of building. 4.3.4.4. If necessary and if safe to do so, Records staff will exit the building through the Parkland entrance and evacuate to UT-Southwestern outside cafeteria. 4.3.4.4.1. They should physically lock the Parkland entrance as they leave if possible. 4.3.5. Switchboard Operator and Lead/Assistant Lead Wardens 4.3.5.1. Operator should immediately notify Administration and/or Senior Field Agent (Lead or Assistant Lead Wardens) to initiate appropriate response. 4.3.5.2. Operator may be directed to initiate building lock down by calling Emergency Wardens. 4.3.6. Lead/Assistant Warden should determine the need for outside response and seek assistance as applicable: 4.3.6.1. Call 911, DSS, Parkland Security, and/or Dallas County Sheriffs Office dispatch. 4.3.6.2. Initiate Field Agent Emergency Cell Phone Backup Plan if appropriate. 4.3.7. First through Fourth Floors 4.3.7.1. Staff should immediately proceed to the nearest physically lockable room and stay there until notified. 4.3.7.2. Staff will not use elevators until notified by Emergency Wardens or Institute Administration. 4.3.7.3. Floor Wardens will initiate roster check by phone and using the IFS emergency radio system. 4.3.8. Morgue 4.3.8.1. Staff will remain in basement until notified. 4.3.8.2. Staff will not use elevators until notified by Emergency Wardens or Institute Administration.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

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4.3.9. If a threat begins in loading dock area, IFS staff in the area should immediately leave the area, proceed to the far stairwell, and alert all staff along the way to go to the first floor. 4.3.10. Staff in the Morgue should immediately report to the Field Agent Office for lock down and initiate building-wide response as noted above. 4.4. Other Response 4.4.1. Follow instructions of the Emergency Wardens and supervisors. 4.4.2. In some cases, staff and visitors may be directed to evacuate through the covered walkway to UT-Southwestern. 4.4.2.1. In this case, the assembly point is the hallway outside the UT-Southwestern cafeteria. 5. Emergency Procedures Minor Event 5.1. Any unsafe or suspected emergency situation must be immediately reported to a supervisor and Administration for assessment. 5.2. When in doubt, activate the Facility Emergency Response Plan by contacting an Emergency Warden or a supervisor or by activating the fire/emergency alarm. 6. After-hours Emergency Response 6.1. After regular business hours (8:00 am 4:30 pm Monday through Friday), all staff and visitors are expected to evacuate the building at the sound of the fire/emergency alarm. 6.2. The main building entrance will be the evacuation point for the first through fourth floors. 6.3. Individuals in the basement will exit through the dock exit. 6.4. The assembly point for all staff and visitors will be the parking lot in front of the building. 6.5. The senior field agent on-duty will act as the Lead Emergency Warden, immediately call 911 if required, and take the main entry Visitor Log to the assembly point. 6.6. The senior field agent on-duty will contact the Chief Field Agent, Administration, and the Dallas County Fire Marshal. 7. Staff Accountability During Non-Standard Work Hours 7.1. Purpose 7.1.1. This procedure is intended to assist Field Agents during a facility emergency in accounting for IFS staff in the building outside normal working hours. 7.1.1.1. Crime Lab staff working outside the hours of 6 AM 6 PM Monday through Friday must log in and out on the Visitors Log. 7.1.1.2. OME staff working outside the hours of 6 AM 6 PM Monday through Friday and outside their assigned shift must log in and out on the Visitors Log. 7.2. Logging in procedure 7.2.1. To log in, the staff member must 7.2.1.1. Sign in using the visitor form at the front office window indicating on the form:
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7.2.1.1.1. The staff members name. 7.2.1.1.2. The date and time of arrival. 7.2.1.1.3. The section/laboratory where the staff member will be working. 7.2.1.1.4. The primary contact phone number to be used in the event of an emergency. 7.3. Logging out procedure 7.3.1. To log out, the staff member must: 7.3.1.1. Sign out using the visitor guest form at the front office window indicating the date and time of departure on the visitor form. 7.4. Procedures for arriving to work before 6 AM on a scheduled work day. 7.4.1. A Crime Lab staff member who arrives to work before 6 AM on a regular work day and works into the regular work hours must log in as noted above but does not need to log out. 7.4.2. This section does not apply to OME staff. 7.5. Procedures for working after 6 PM on a scheduled work day. 7.5.1. A Crime Lab staff member who works beyond 6 PM on a scheduled work day must log in before 6 PM and log out of the building upon leaving as noted above. 7.5.2. This section does not apply to OME staff. 8. Physical Plant Emergency 8.1. Any physical plant emergency such as major water leak, electrical outage, etc. - will be immediately reported to Administration who will contact Facilities Management as directed in the Dallas County Telephone Directory. 8.2. After regular business hours, these emergencies should be reported to an on-duty Field Agent who is responsible for contacting Facilities Management and supervisors/Administration as appropriate. 9. Location of Emergency Exits and Identification of Emergency Wardens and Staff Trained in First Aid and CPR 9.1. Location of emergency exits and a list of area Emergency Wardens and staff trained in first aid and CPR are posted near each stairwell.

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences GENERAL SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES 1. Purpose 1.1. The purpose of this section is to review general safe operating procedures. 1.2. More specific and detailed policies and procedures may be found in other sections of the EHS Manual and/or unit procedure manuals. 2. Routes of Exposure 2.1. Reagents, samples, specimens, and other evidence submitted to IFS are potential sources of chemical, biological, and physical hazards. 2.1.1. During the collection, processing, and testing of all materials, employees should remain aware of potential sources of hazards and minimize exposure. 2.2. Absorption 2.2.1. Open cuts or scratches on the skin, particularly the hands, provide a point of entry for chemicals and biologicals. 2.2.2. Some infecting agents and chemicals can penetrate intact skin, the conjunctiva of the eye, and other mucous membranes. 2.2.3. Protection 2.2.3.1. Protection is provided by wearing proper gloves, safety glasses, face shield, lab coat, and other personal protective equipment (PPE) which shield the body from potential exposure. 2.3. Aerosols 2.3.1. Biologicals and chemicals may become airborne through a variety of laboratory procedures or accidents including spills, broken containers, centrifuging, vortexing, pipet transfer, sample homogenization, splashing and flaking of materials, removing caps or stoppers, firing weapons, mechanical handling of clothing and other specimens, and autopsy procedures such as sawing. 2.3.2. Aerosols may be inhaled into the lungs and absorbed into the body. 2.3.3. Protection 2.3.3.1. Protection against inhalational hazards is provided by proper fitting masks and use of ventilation such as hoods. 2.3.3.2. Centrifuges should come to a complete stop prior to opening to avoid breathing any materials aerosolized during centrifugation. 2.3.3.3. Vacutainer tubes should be opened using a gauze covering or similar device to trap any materials aerosolized as the vacuum is broken. 2.4. Direct Inoculation 2.4.1. Broken glassware, needles, syringes, forceps, staples on packaging materials, and other sharp objects provide a direct means of injection of infecting agents or chemicals into the body. 2.4.2. Other sources of direct inoculation include sharps used in specimen collection, ticks, fleas, body lice and other ectoparasites. 2.4.3. Protection
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2.4.3.1. Use of safer sharps, personal protective equipment, and safe work practices can provide protection. 2.5. Ingestion 2.5.1. Smoking, eating, or drinking after handling evidence, reagents, or specimens and prior to washing hands may result in oral ingestion of infective agents or chemicals. 2.5.2. Mouth pipeting, placing objects such as pens and pencils in ones mouth, or hand/glove contact with skin or mucous membranes may also result in contamination. 2.5.3. Protection 2.5.3.1. Eating and drinking is only allowed in designated clean areas. 2.5.3.2. Smoking is not allowed within IFS or in County vehicles and is only permitted in specifically designated areas outside the building. 2.5.3.3. Staff should wash hands frequently with soap and water. When this is not available, staff should use waterless degermer (hand sanitizer) followed by hand washing at the first available opportunity. 2.5.3.4. Do not place foreign objects in your mouth. 2.5.3.5. Remove gloves before contacting unprotected skin, eyes, or mucous membranes. 2.6. Radiation 2.6.1. Energy emitted from various instruments poses a special danger to skin and eyes. 2.6.2. Protection 2.6.2.1. Protective glasses should be worn to guard against ultraviolet, infrared, or laser radiation. 2.6.2.2. Shielding and distance protocols must be followed to minimize exposure to radioactive materials or X-ray generating instrumentation. 2.6.2.3. Radiation dosimetry badges must be worn when operating x-ray equipment. 2.6.2.3.1. Radiation dosimetery badges must be handled as required by the Radiation Safety Program. 3. General Safety Procedures 3.1. Routinely wash hands with disinfectant soap and water. 3.1.1. When hand washing is not possible, disinfect hands using waterless degermer (hand sanitizer) until hand washing facilities become available. 3.2. Use personal protective equipment such as gloves, safety goggles, lab coats, aprons, tyvek suits, and masks to minimize exposure. 3.3. Avoid touching unprotected body areas or clean items with gloved or unwashed hands. 3.4. Use hoods or increased ventilation to decrease the potential for exposure in applicable processes. 3.4.1. Ensure that filters (such as HEPA or charcoal filters) on hoods and vents are changed per manufacturers instructions. 3.5. Develop a written general housekeeping procedure for each area and document compliance. 3.6. Keep your work area neat and clean. 3.7. Do not smoke within IFS or County vehicles or outside specifically permitted areas. 3.8. Do not pipet by mouth.
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3.9. Eat, drink, and store food or beverages only in designated areas; do not store food in laboratory or morgue refrigerators. 3.10. Do not use lab or morgue glassware or materials for the preparation or consumption of food or beverages. 3.11. Do not wash items used in the preparation or consumption of food or beverages with lab or morgue glassware. 3.12. Avoid creating and inhaling chemical or biological dusts or aerosols. 3.13. Wear dosimeters as issued. 3.14. Operate all equipment that generates X-rays from a shielded location. Ensure that coworkers are also in a shielded location and that the doors to the X-ray room are closed. 3.15. Take advantage of occupational exposure testing (such as for lead and TB) and vaccinations (such as for hepatitis B) as available and appropriate. 3.16. Do not wear open-toe shoes in the lab or morgue areas. 3.17. Do not store corrosive chemicals above eye level. 3.18. Use a dolly to transport capped gas cylinders and make sure cylinders are securely fastened to the wall or bench top. Use proper and compatible fittings, gauges, and regulators. 3.19. Dispose of broken or damaged glassware in designated containers. 3.20. Use proper lifting techniques; get assistance if an item is too bulky or too heavy to be moved by one person. 3.21. Adjust your workstation to prevent ergonomic strain. Take a short break from typing each hour and exercise your arm. Alternate typing with other non-typing job duties. 3.22. Remove lab coats and other personal protective equipment prior to leaving a chemical or biological work area. Wash hands after removing gloves. 3.23. Clean up spills of biologicals and chemicals as soon as possible. Seek assistance from your supervisor or the EHS Manager or Deputy with large spills or if spill exceeds your capacity and training to respond. 3.24. Suspected explosive materials and other dangerous materials not routinely tested at IFS will not be accepted as evidence. Submitters will be directed to appropriate agencies as available. 3.25. IFS staff are not authorized to carry firearms (personal or otherwise) while on duty. This restriction does not refer to appropriate handling or processing of evidence by authorized individuals. 3.26. All items used as personal protective equipment including lab coats must be laundered or properly disposed at IFS. These items may not be laundered or disposed at home. 3.27. Dispose of chemicals and biologicals properly; see applicable parts of the EHS Manual or contact the EHS Manager. 3.28. For both safety and quality concerns, all broken or malfunctioning equipment must be labeled as such. 3.29. Do not use cracked or broken glassware. 3.30. Practice Universal Precautions at all times while working with biologicals. 3.31. Read the MSDS and container label prior to working with a chemical. 3.32. Do not use chemicals from unlabeled containers. 3.33. Keep exits and stairwells clear of obstructions; do not store items in stairwells. 3.34. Do not take chances; ask for help. 3.35. Seek supervisory assistance if you are unsure.
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3.36. Use common sense and professional training. 3.37. Report unsafe conditions to your supervisor, the EHS Manager, and/or Committee. 4. Area Specific Issues 4.1. Handling and Use of Firearms and Ammunition 4.1.1. Loaded firearms will not routinely be accepted as evidence. 4.1.1.1. Loaded firearms which are physically unable to be unloaded may be accepted provided that a supervisor or Firearms examiner immediately takes possession of the weapon. 4.1.2. All firearms and ammunition will be handled as if it is functionally operational. 4.1.3. All firearms will be treated as if they are loaded until a safety inspection ensures that the weapon is unloaded. 4.1.4. No firearm should be loaded except in designated test-firing areas. The bore of the weapon will be checked for obstruction prior to loading. 4.1.5. Firearms will not be pointed at another person. 4.1.6. Supervisors are responsible for instructing the firearms examiner in the proper handling of firearms. 4.1.7. Eye and ear protection will be worn when test firing. 4.1.8. If doubt exists as to the safety of direct firing, a remote device will be employed. 4.1.9. Test firing observers will view from a window or other shielded location. 4.1.10. As available, filters and fans will be used to minimize exposure to airborne materials. 4.1.11. All shooting will be performed by Firearms staff, observed by Firearms staff, or specifically approved by the Section Chief or Director. 4.1.12. Proper maintenance and care of bullet recovery systems will be performed on a routine basis. 4.1.13. Occupational testing for lead and hearing will be offered annually to occupationally exposed individuals. 4.1.14. Ammunition and similar materials will be handled and stored following applicable regulations. 4.1.15. Non-routine use of a firearm (including classroom instruction) must be approved by the Section Chief or Director. 4.2. Handling and Use of Alternate Light Sources 4.2.1. Goggles, other appropriate filters, or other safety measures will be used to minimize radiation exposure form alternate light sources which may cause eye or skin damage. The operator and any observers must be provided with adequate protection. 4.2.2. Alternate light sources will be operated by individuals trained in their use. 4.2.3. Operators and observers may never look directly into an alternate light source aperture when the unit is emitting light; protection must be provided against both direct and reflected light. 4.2.4. Procedures should be developed to minimize stray reflections; for example, optical elements or shiny objects should not be moved into or out of the light path of the alternate light source unless filter barriers or other approved safety measures are used.
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4.2.5. Instrument safety mechanisms such as interlock devices may not be tampered with. 4.2.6. The alternate light source should be turned off or power decreased when not in use. 5. Safety Equipment 5.1. Be familiar with the location and use of safety equipment in your work area. Contact your supervisor or the EHS Manager for assistance or training. 5.2. Fire Extinguishers are located throughout the building. 5.3. Eyewash fountains and/or bottles are located in all laboratories and in the morgue. 5.4. Hand washing facilities and/or waterless degermer are located in restrooms, laboratories, the morgue, and throughout the building. 5.5. Hoods and other ventilation devices are available to prevent exposure to airborne substances. 5.6. Labels and safety notices/warnings are posted as applicable throughout the building. 5.7. Spill kits are located in labs, the morgue, and back dock. 5.8. Chemical storage areas, including flammables and corrosives cabinets, are located throughout the lab areas. 5.9. The gas cylinder dolly is located in the vicinity of the gas storage area. 5.10. Designated waste containers are located throughout the lab and morgue areas. 5.11. Safety showers are located on the second floor (Toxicology Lab and hallway), third floor (hallway near Firearms), fourth floor (laundry), and morgue (autopsy area and morgue clerk area). 5.12. First aid kits are located in all labs, morgue, and the Field Agent area. 5.12.1. The first aid kit in the Field Agent area contains a selection of over the counter pharmaceuticals available for employee use. 5.13. Fire blankets are available in the morgue and all lab areas. 5.14. The IFS stretcher chair is located near the safety shower on the 3rd floor. 6. Inspection of Safety Equipment 6.1. Safety equipment is checked as part of the quarterly EHS audit. 6.2. Hoods are checked quarterly to assure function and to mark flow of 100 ft/min. 6.2.1. Hoods should be operated with the sash near the 100 ft/min mark. 7. Infrastructure Safety Features 7.1. Maintenance of building infrastructure is the responsibility of Facilities Management. 7.1.1. Electrical outlets used in close proximity to running water in the Morgue must be equipped with a ground fault interrupt which should be tested annually under the direction of Facilities Management. 7.1.2. Autopsy dissecting sinks must be equipped with back flow protection and tested under the direction of Facilities Management as required by regulation.

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Dallas County/Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences BIOLOGICAL EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan 1. Goals and Regulatory Compliance 1.1. The Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences is committed to providing a safe and healthful work environment for all staff and others who work or visit in this facility. 1.2. To support this commitment, a biological exposure control plan has been developed to minimize occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens in accordance with the Texas Health and Safety Code, Chapter 81, Subchapter H which is consistent with the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard. 1.2.1. Additional information may be found in the Texas Administrative Code, Title 25, Part 1, Chapter 96. 2. Relationship to Dallas County Policy and Procedure 2.1. Dallas County policies and procedures will be followed in responding to a suspected biological exposure. 2.1.1. Specific instructions detailing how to receive a post biological exposure evaluation may be found in the Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Protocol notebook located in the Field Agent area; evaluations are available 24 hours a day. 2.1.2. An employee involved in a suspected biological exposure incident must immediately notify his supervisor if available. 2.2. The Biological Exposure Control Plan is administered jointly with the Dallas County Workers Compensation Program and Family and Medical Leave Act Program and does not replace or supercede any portion of Dallas County policy, specifically the Workers Compensation or Dallas County occupational control process. 3. Selected Definitions: Refer to regulations listed in Section 1 for additional definitions. 3.1. Bloodborne pathogens Pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and that can cause diseases in humans, and include hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). 3.2. Contaminated The presence or reasonably anticipated presence of blood or other potentially infectious material on an item or surface. 3.3. Employee An individual who works for a governmental unit or on premises owned or operated by a governmental unit whether or not he or she is directly compensated by the governmental unit. 3.4. Exposure incident A specific eye, mouth, or other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that results from the performance of an employees duties. 3.5. Occupational exposure A reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employees duties.
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3.6. Other potentially infectious materials Semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures; any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood; all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human, living or dead. 3.7. Parenteral Piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needlesticks, human bites, cuts, and abrasions. 3.8. Personal protective equipment (PPE) Specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for protection against a hazard. General work clothes (e.g., uniforms, pants, shirts, or blouses) not intended to function as protection against a hazard are not considered to be personal protective equipment. 3.9. Sharp An object used or encountered in a health care setting that can be reasonably anticipated to penetrate the skin or any other part of the body and to result in an exposure incident and includes: needle devices, scalpels, lancets, broken glass, broken capillary tube, exposed dental wire, dental knife, drill, or bur. 3.10. Sharps injury Any injury caused by a sharp, including a cut, abrasion, or needlestick. 3.11. Universal precautions All human blood and certain human body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, hepatitis, and other bloodborne pathogens. Therefore appropriate preventive measures must be used by employees when working with contaminated materials. Preventive measures encompass using both engineering and work practice controls and personal protective equipment. 4. Employee Exposure Determination 4.1. The Texas Department of Health (TDH) Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan requires employers to perform an exposure determination to identify employees who have occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. 4.1.1. The exposure determination is made without regard to the use of personal protective equipment or frequency of exposure. 4.2. Because of the widespread presence of biologicals at the Institute, all employees will receive biohazard training. 4.3. In the situation in which an employee moves from performing job duties with no occupational exposure to duties with occupational exposure, it is the responsibility of the supervisor to ensure that the employee receives additional training as necessary and personal protective equipment as appropriate. 4.4. The following is a list of all job classifications at the Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences in which all employees within the job title have occupational exposure: Job Title
Drug Chemist II Drug Chemist III Drug Supervisor Forensic Chemistry Chief Forensic Chemistry Deputy Chief Laboratory Aide Toxicology Chemist II

Department/Section
Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry

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Toxicology Chemist III Toxicology Supervisor Firearms Examiner Firearms Supervisor Forensic Biologist II Forensic Biologist III Forensic Biology Supervisor Physical Evidence Chief Physical Evidence Deputy Chief Trace Evidence Examiner Trace Evidence Supervisor Director Utility Clerk Autopsy Room Assistant Supervisor Autopsy Room Supervisor Autopsy Technician Medical Examiner Medical Examiner Chief Deputy Pathologist Field Agent Field Agent Assistant Chief Field Agent Chief Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Medical Examiner/Administration Medical Examiner/Administration Medical Examiner/Autopsy Services Medical Examiner/Autopsy Services Medical Examiner/Autopsy Services Medical Examiner/Autopsy Services Medical Examiner/Autopsy Services Medical Examiner/Autopsy Services Medical Examiner/Medicolegal Death Investigation Medical Examiner/Medicolegal Death Investigation Medical Examiner/Medicolegal Death Investigation

4.5. The following is a list of all job classifications at the Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences in which some employees within the job title have occupational exposure. Job Title Department/Sections Tasks or Specific Position with Potential Biological Exposure
Toxicology and PES Evidence Registrars Back-up Evidence Registration by PES Secretary Back-up Laboratory Aide and Evidence Registration functions by Toxicology Clerk II

Evidence Registrars Secretary Clerk II

Crime Lab/Physical Evidence and Forensic Chemistry Crime Lab/Physical Evidence Crime Lab/Forensic Chemistry

5. Methods of Implementation and Exposure Control 5.1. Biological exposures at the Institute are controlled through a combination of methods including the implementation and use of universal precautions, engineering and work practice controls, personal protective equipment (PPE), housekeeping measures, management of biological spills, disposal of regulated biological waste, laundry procedures, and hepatitis B vaccine. 5.2. Universal Precautions 5.2.1. Universal precautions are observed throughout the Institute to prevent exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. All blood or other potentially infectious materials are considered infectious regardless of the perceived status of the source individual. 5.3. Engineering and Work Practice Controls
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5.3.1. Engineering and work practice controls are used to prevent or minimize exposure to bloodborne pathogens. 5.3.2. Employees and supervisors must examine and maintain engineering and work practice controls within a biological work area. 5.3.3. Hand washing 5.3.3.1. Hand washing must be performed routinely throughout the day, for example, after handling biological materials, after a suspected biological exposure, after removing gloves, after removing personal protective equipment, when leaving a biological work area. 5.3.3.2. Hands should be washed thoroughly on both sides, between fingers, and above wrist with antimicrobial soap and running water. Designated hand washing sinks should be used where they are available. 5.3.3.3. In certain situations, hand washing facilities are not readily available, for example, field work, removal of shoe covers in morgue, etc. In these circumstances, employees must ensure availability of and use antiseptic cleanser with clean paper towels, antiseptic towelettes, and/or waterless disinfectant as available. 5.3.3.3.1. Hands must be washed with soap and running water as soon as feasible. 5.3.4. Suspected Biological Exposure 5.3.4.1. If an individual suspects biological exposure to skin or mucous membranes, those areas must be washed with soap and water as soon as possible following contact; after an eye exposure, the eye should be flushed with water as soon as possible. 5.3.4.2. Information regarding post-exposure medical assessment may be found in the Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Protocol notebook located in the Field Agent Office. 5.3.5. Needles and Sharps 5.3.5.1. Where applicable and approved by the EHS Committee, safer designed sharps must be used. 5.3.5.2. Contaminated needles and other contaminated sharps should not be bent, recapped, removed, sheared, or purposely broken. 5.3.5.2.1. In some cases for example when syringes are submitted as evidence for analysis an exception to this may be made if no alternative is feasible and the action is required to analyze the item or render it safe for future handling as evidence. If such action is required, recapping or removal of the needle must be done by the use of a device or a onehanded technique. 5.3.5.3. Sharps evidence must be contained in a hard-sided container for storage and transport. 5.3.6. Sharps Containment and Disposal 5.3.6.1. Contaminated sharps including broken glass must be discarded immediately or as soon as feasible in containers that can be closed, are leak-proof on sides and bottom, and are labeled or color-coded as a biohazard. 5.3.6.2. Use forceps, a scoop, or some other mechanical means to remove the broken glass or other sharps to avoid a sharps injury. 5.3.6.3. Sharps disposal containers must be located in an easily accessible location as
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close as feasible to the immediate area where sharps are being used or can be reasonably anticipated to be found. 5.3.6.4. The containers must be maintained upright throughout use, may not be overfilled, must be closed and replaced routinely, and must be handled as a biohazard waste when discarded. 5.3.7. Work Area Restrictions 5.3.7.1. In work areas designated by supervisors as having reasonable likelihood of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials, employees are not to eat, drink, apply cosmetics or lip balm, smoke, or handle contact lenses. 5.3.7.2. Food and beverages may not be kept in refrigerators, freezers, shelves, cabinets, or on counter/bench tops where blood or other potentially infectious materials are present. 5.3.7.3. Mouth pipetting of blood or other potentially infectious materials is prohibited. 5.3.7.4. All procedures must be conducted using good laboratory/medical technique and in a manner which minimizes splashing, spraying, spattering, and generation of droplets of blood or other potentially infectious materials. 5.3.8. Biohazard Labeling and Color Coding 5.3.8.1. The universal biohazard symbol and/or color (red or orange) will be used to warn of the presence of potential biohazard substances, situations, and locations within the Institute. 5.3.8.2. Biohazard labeling and/or color coding are used to identify regulated biological waste, refrigerators and freezers containing blood and other potentially infectious materials, and other containers used to store, transport, or ship blood or other potentially infectious waste. 5.3.9. Designated Biological Handling Areas 5.3.9.1. Areas are marked to advise of the presence of potentially infectious biological materials. 5.3.9.1.1. Specific areas within a biohazard area may be labeled as a clean area in which no biologicals are allowed. 5.3.9.1.2. Alternatively biohazard areas may be designated within otherwise nonbiological work areas. 5.3.9.1.2.1. It is not appropriate to designate a clean food consumption area in an otherwise biohazard area. 5.3.9.2. Suggested language for biohazard warning signs in biological work areas is as follows: CAUTION BIOHAZARD: Eating, drinking, applying cosmetics or lip balm, smoking or handling contact lenses are prohibited in this area. 5.3.10. Specimen Handling and Labeling 5.3.10.1. All potentially contaminated evidence and biological specimen collected or stored at the Institute must be handled as a potential biohazard until the item is decontaminated or rendered non-infectious (for example by fixation, washing in bleach solution, solvent extraction, etc.). 5.3.10.2. Specimens of blood or other potentially infectious materials must be placed in a container which prevents leakage during the collection, handling, processing, storage, transport, or shipping of the specimens. 5.3.10.3. Although the Institute uses universal precautions, the outer biological
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specimen container must be marked with a biohazard label or the specimen must be handled or stored only in a designated biohazard area. 5.3.10.4. Contaminated materials/evidence must be marked with a biohazard label prior to releasing to an outside entity or leaving the Institute. 5.3.10.5. If the outside of the primary container becomes contaminated, the primary container must be cleaned as possible and stored in a designated biological storage area or placed into a secondary container which prevents leakage during the handling, processing, storage, transport, or shipping of the specimen or other materials. 5.3.10.5.1. The secondary container must be labeled as a biohazard. 5.3.10.6. Any specimen which could puncture a primary container must be placed into a puncture proof secondary container for transport. 5.3.11. Equipment 5.3.11.1. Equipment which cannot be easily washed and decontaminated should be protected from potential biological exposure during use. 5.3.11.1.1. This may be accomplished by covering the operational parts of the equipment with a plastic bag, plastic wrap, or aluminum foil or by designating as a clean item. 5.3.11.1.1.1. The disposable covering must be changed as soon as feasible upon contamination or on a routine basis such as the end of the shift. 5.3.11.2. It is recommended that keyboards used in biological areas should be covered with a plastic keyboard cover which can be cleaned on a regular basis. 5.3.11.3. Contaminated equipment must be marked with a biohazard label or decontaminated prior to service on or off site. 5.3.12. Case Files 5.3.12.1. Case files are designated as clean items. 5.3.12.1.1. Case files must be maintained in clean areas. 5.3.12.1.2. Should case contents become contaminated with biologicals, contaminated paperwork must be photocopied using the copier in the morgue designated for this purpose. 5.3.12.1.2.1. The copy will be marked as a true and exact copy with explanation, initialed, and the original properly disposed. 5.3.13. Identification Badges 5.3.13.1. Employees must position or temporarily remove identification badges so that they do not become contaminated with biologicals. 5.3.13.2. In the event that possible contamination occurs, badges must be cleaned with disinfectant. 5.3.14. Building Ventilation 5.3.14.1. As a general rule, employees may not open windows since this interferes with proper building pressurization. 5.3.14.2. Facilities is responsible for maintaining air flow systems and changing filters. 5.3.15. Designated Clean Items 5.3.15.1. Certain items such as case files, phones, elevator buttons, and cameras are designated as clean items. 5.3.15.1.1. They must be handled in designated clean areas and may not be
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touched with contaminated gloves or hands. 5.4. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 5.4.1. Use of PPE is required when engineering and work practice controls do not eliminate potential occupational exposure to biohazards. 5.4.2. PPE is chosen based on the anticipated exposure to blood or potentially infectious materials. 5.4.3. PPE is considered appropriate only if it does not permit blood or other potentially infectious materials to pass through or reach the employees clothing, skin, eyes, mouth, or other mucous membranes under normal conditions of use and for the duration of the time which the protective equipment is used. 5.4.4. Examples of PPE include gloves, eyewear with solid side shields, gowns, lab coats, aprons, shoe covers, face shields, and masks. 5.4.5. All PPE must be fluid resistant. 5.4.6. PPE is provided at no cost to the employee. 5.4.7. PPE is cleaned, laundered, and/or disposed as applicable by the Institute at no cost to the employee. 5.4.8. Employees should contact their supervisor to request additional or different PPE. 5.4.9. All PPE which is penetrated by blood must be removed immediately or as soon as feasible and placed in an appropriate container. 5.4.10. All PPE must be removed before leaving the biological work area. 5.4.11. Routine Use of Personal Protective Equipment 5.4.11.1. Routine use of PPE is outlined for each functional area and is available to staff in the EHS Resource Document file. 5.4.11.1.1. Staff should contact a supervisor for direction in selection and use of PPE. 5.4.11.2. Employees will select appropriate personal protective equipment to avoid reasonably anticipated contact of the skin, eye, mouth, and mucous membranes with biological materials. 5.4.11.3. Variance from procedures established in this Plan must be approved by a supervisor or the EHS Manager prior to implementation. 5.4.12. Gloves 5.4.12.1. Gloves are required when handling any material which may reasonably be expected to have potentially infectious biological contamination. 5.4.12.2. Latex-sensitive employees should advise their supervisors who will arrange for suitable alternative personal protective equipment. 5.4.12.2.1. If non-latex gloves are worn, it is recommended that they be covered with a second latex glove to provide additional protection. 5.4.12.3. Disposable gloves may not be re-used and must be replaced as soon as practical when they become contaminated or as soon as feasible when they are torn, punctured, or otherwise unable to provide an effective barrier. 5.4.12.4. Reusable utility gloves may be decontaminated for re-use provided that the integrity of the glove is not compromised. 5.4.12.4.1. When utility gloves are used as a barrier to biological exposure, it is recommended that disposable gloves be worn underneath the utility glove. 5.4.12.4.2. Utility gloves must be discarded if they are cracked, peeling, torn,
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punctured, exhibit other signs of deterioration, or are unable to provide an effective barrier. 5.4.12.5. Vinyl and latex gloves are not puncture proof. 5.4.12.5.1. Cut-resistant gloves are available in the morgue and should be considered for use when manipulating broken bones, bodies with broken glass, etc. 5.4.13. Lab Coat 5.4.13.1. A fluid resistant lab coat or similar garment is required when it may be reasonably expected that potentially infectious material may flake, drip, splash, spray, drop, or otherwise contaminate work clothes. 5.4.13.2. Medical Examiner lab coats are not worn as PPE. 5.4.13.3. Crime Lab lab coats are used as PPE. 5.4.14. Shoe Covers 5.4.14.1. Fluid resistant foot covering is required when it may be reasonably expected that employees will walk in areas containing potentially infectious materials. 5.4.14.2. Shoe covers are required in the Morgue. 5.4.14.3. Shoe covers or boots are required in the field when biologicals are present on the walking surface. 5.4.15. Plastic Garments 5.4.15.1. Fluid impervious garments such as plastic aprons and sleeves, autopsy smocks, tyvek suits, and similar garments are required when biological splashes may be expected, when large quantities of blood are present or anticipated, or when moving a body. 5.4.15.2. These types of garments are indicated in the hot zone at autopsy, at a scene with extensive biological contamination, when moving a decomposed body, etc. 5.4.16. Head Covering 5.4.16.1. Surgical caps or other head covering is required when biological splashes or spatter may reasonably be expected to reach the head such as in the hot zone at autopsy. 5.4.17. Face and Eye Protection 5.4.17.1. Eye protection includes devices such as goggles, glasses with solid side shields, or chin length face shields. 5.4.17.2. A face shield or eye protection must be used when biological exposure to eyes may be reasonably expected due to a splash, spray, splatter, flaking, or droplets of blood or other potentially infectious materials. 5.4.17.3. Face shield or eye protection and mask are required when a biological splash to the face may reasonably be anticipated such as in performing an autopsy. 5.4.18. Mask 5.4.18.1. A mask must be worn when biological exposure to nose, mouth, and breathing zone may be reasonably expected due to a splash, spray, spatter, flaking, or droplets of blood or other potentially infectious materials. 6. Housekeeping

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6.1. The workplace must be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. 6.1.1. General building cleanliness is the responsibility of Dallas Countys cleaning contractor. 6.1.1.1. Facilities Management oversees contract compliance; questions regarding the cleaning contract should be referred to Institute Administration who will consult with Facilities Management contract administration staff. 6.1.2. Biological decontamination and related cleaning is the responsibility of knowledgeable Institute staff working in or assigned to an area. 6.2. Biological Work Areas 6.2.1. Each area or laboratory in which potentially infectious materials exist must develop a housekeeping checklist or standard operating procedure. 6.2.2. The checklist/procedure will take into consideration the location within the facility, the type of surface to be cleaned, type of soil present, and tasks or procedures performed in the area. 6.2.3. Biologically contaminated work surfaces must be decontaminated as soon as feasible when contamination occurs. 6.2.4. Where possible, biological materials should be handled on impervious surfaces or surfaces covered with disposable covering. 6.2.5. All bins, pails, trashcans, and similar receptacles must be inspected and decontaminated on a regular basis as specified in the checklist/procedure. 6.3. Cleaning Procedures 6.3.1. Gloves should be worn while cleaning and disinfecting. 6.3.2. When gross contamination is present, it must be removed with soap and water, where appropriate, prior to disinfection. 6.3.3. Chemical Decontamination and Disinfection of Biologicals 6.3.3.1. Various chemical products are available to decontaminate work surfaces. 6.3.3.2. Read the container label and follow instructions for use and appropriate PPE. 6.3.3.2.1. Different chemical products have varying activity against pathogens. 6.3.3.2.2. Most chemical decontaminants require contact time with the surface to be maximally effective. 6.3.3.2.3. Commercial disinfectant products should be registered with the EPA. 6.3.3.3. High Level Disinfection (sporocides) These products kill all microorganisms except high numbers of bacterial spores; they typically require a 5 10 minute exposure time to be maximally effective. These products typically contain aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, or paracetic acid. 6.3.3.4. Intermediate Level Disinfection (tuberculocides) These products kill M. tuberculosis var. bovis and all vegetative bacteria, fungi, and most viruses. Dwell time for maximum effectiveness is 20 minutes. These products typically contain phenolics, iodophores, chlorine compounds (10% bleach), and alcohols. This is the level of disinfectant required for most activities at the Institute. 6.3.3.5. Low Level Disinfection (routine hospital grade germicides) These products kill most vegetative bacteria and some fungi but not M. tuberculosis var. bovis. Dwell time for maximum effectiveness is 20 minutes. These products typically contain quartenary ammonium compounds. 6.3.4. Use of Bleach as a Routine Disinfectant
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6.3.4.1. Bleach solutions are the primary disinfectant used at the Institute. 6.3.4.2. Clean the area of gross biological contamination using soap and water, apply bleach solutions. Bleach solutions should remain on a surface for approximately 5 minutes to obtain maximal effectiveness. 6.3.4.2.1. Diluted bleach solutions must be made fresh daily. 6.3.4.2.2. 10% bleach solution 6.3.4.2.2.1. Use 10% bleach to clean areas with gross biological contamination; a 5 minute dwell time is tuberculocidal. 6.3.4.2.2.2. Add cup of household regular (not scented) bleach to 1 gallon of water; or 6.3.4.2.2.3. Add 1 tablespoon of household regular bleach to 1 quart (or 4 cups) of water. 6.3.4.2.2.4. It may be useful to have a spray bottle made fresh daily available for routine use. 6.3.4.2.3. General surface disinfection 6.3.4.2.3.1. Use a 1% (1:100 dilution) bleach solution. 6.3.4.2.3.2. Add 1 tablespoon of household (non-scented) bleach to 1 gallon of water. 6.3.4.3. Caution 6.3.4.3.1. Bleach vapors can cause irritation to the respiratory system and contact with bleach can cause irritation to skin. 6.3.4.3.2. The stronger the bleach solution and the greater the volume of bleach used, the more PPE is needed to safely work with bleach. 6.3.4.3.3. Use bleach solution with adequate ventilation. 6.3.4.3.4. Wear gloves and fluid resistant garment. 6.3.4.3.5. For large volumes or high concentration bleach, wear face shield or goggles to protect against a chemical splash. 6.4. Decontamination of Personal Protective Equipment 6.4.1. Reusable personal protective equipment (e.g. rubber boots, heavy-duty neoprene gloves, etc.) must be cleaned and decontaminated as soon as feasible after contamination with potentially infectious materials and/or on a regular schedule which should be included in the housekeeping checklist/procedure. 6.4.2. Reusable items that cannot be cleaned in the area in which they are used must be placed in a sealed biohazard bag and transported to the washing/decontamination area (such as the decomp autopsy room); this includes items used in the field. 6.4.3. Reusable items must be washed with soap and water and disinfected with bleach solution or other disinfectant. 6.5. Decontamination of Vehicles 6.5.1. All items with potential biological contamination (such as used PPE and evidence with actual or suspected biological contamination) must be placed in biohazard bags or other plastic bags which have been marked with a biohazard symbol prior to being placed into a vehicle. 6.5.1.1. Usually these items should be placed into the trunk. 6.5.2. All personal protective equipment must be removed prior to entering the passenger compartment of the vehicle. 6.5.3. If any part of the vehicle should become contaminated with a biological material,
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the contaminated material must be removed as soon as possible with soap and water and the area disinfected. 6.5.4. The cargo compartment of the Morgue van should be washed with soap and water and disinfected on a routine schedule. 7. Shipping and Mailing Biologicals 7.1. Biological materials transported, shipped, or mailed outside the Institute must be labeled as a biohazard and/or placed into a biohazard bag prior to packaging for shipping or transport 7.2. Biological specimens should be shipped in appropriate shipping containers. 7.2.1. Liquid samples must be double bagged and absorbent placed win the secondary container; the shipping container must be hard sided. 7.2.2. Contact the shipper for additional information. 8. Biological Spills 8.1. For a suspected biological exposure, follow procedures in the Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Protocol notebook located in the Field Agent Office. 8.2. Alert co-workers to request assistance and avoid their exposure. 8.3. Notify supervisor. 8.4. Define and isolate the contaminated area. 8.5. Put on appropriate PPE. 8.5.1. Gloves and fluid resistant garment are minimal PPE. 8.5.2. Where splash, spray, or splatter of liquids or flaking of dried material may reasonably be expected, use face shield or goggles, mask, shoe covers, and/or more extensive fluid resistant clothing. 8.6. Remove glass and solid materials with forceps or scoop. Never remove broken glass from a biological spill with hands. 8.7. Apply absorbent towels to the spill; remove bulk material and reapply towels if needed. 8.8. Apply disinfectant to towel surface to decrease spatter and splashing. Allow adequate contact time (5 minutes when using 10% bleach solution). 8.8.1. Remove towel. 8.8.2. Disinfect again. 8.8.3. Clean with alcohol or soap and water. 8.8.4. Dispose of materials in a leak proof, labeled biohazard container. 8.8.4.1. If chemicals are also involved in the spill; choose a proper disposal method for both types of hazards. 9. Regulated Biological Waste Disposal 9.1. Regulated biohazard waste is described in 30 TAC Sections Part 1 Chapter 330 Subchapter Y. 9.1.1. Regulated biohazard waste cannot be disposed in the regular trash. 9.1.1.1. Most regulated biohazard waste at the Institute includes biological lab specimens, human organs/tissues, and other materials in which the blood or
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other biological fluids pool, puddle, cake, or flake. 9.1.1.2. In addition to the biological waste defined and regulated by TDH and TCEQ, the Institute routinely handles all waste which has been exposed to potentially infectious materials as a biohazard waste. 9.1.1.2.1. Therefore, all gloves and other materials that come in contact with a potentially infectious substance must be discarded in biohazard waste boxes or sharps containers or decontaminated prior to reuse. 9.2. All contaminated sharps must be discarded as soon as feasible in sharps containers located as close to the point of use as feasible in each work area. 9.2.1. Sharps containers must not be overfilled. 9.2.2. Prior to disposal, the container must be closed and the entire box placed into a biohazard waste box. 9.3. Regulated waste other than sharps must be placed in appropriate containers that are closable, leak resistant, labeled with a biohazard label or biohazard color code, and closed prior to removal. 9.3.1. Do not overfill or pack down biological waste. 9.3.2. If free flowing liquids are expected to be a part of the waste stream, add an adsorbent such as vermiculite to the bottom of the plastic bag prior to adding waste. 9.3.3. If outside contamination of the regulated waste container occurs, it must be placed in a second container that is also closable, leak-proof, labeled with a biohazard label or biohazard color code, and closed prior to removal. 9.4. Dallas County contracts with a licensed biological waste vendor who is responsible for transporting and disposing of regulated biological waste in accordance with federal, state, county, and local requirements. 10. Laundry Procedures 10.1. Although soiled linen may be contaminated with pathogenic microorganism, the risk of disease transmission is negligible if it is handled, transported, and laundered in a manner that avoids transfer of microorganisms to personnel and the environment. 10.2. Institute Laundry 10.2.1. Biologically contaminated personal clothing including scrubs and lab coats may not be taken home to be laundered; these items must be laundered at or by the Institute. 10.2.1.1. Scrubs are not considered PPE. 10.2.2. Reusable PPE provided by the Institute must be cleaned/laundered at or by the Institute and may not be taken home to be cleaned/laundered. 10.2.3. Laundry services are provided at the Institute. 10.2.3.1. Routine laundry is not wet with biological contamination. 10.2.3.1.1. Therefore, laundry is routinely collected in standard laundry bags. The bags must be closed prior to transporting upstairs to the laundry. 10.2.3.2. In the unusual situation when an item to be laundered is wet with biological contamination, the item must be placed in a biohazard bag and sealed prior to transporting to the laundry room. 10.2.3.2.1. The bag must be taken to the laundry room and washed as soon as feasible.
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10.2.4. Laundry Procedure 10.2.4.1. Gloves must be worn when processing routine IFS laundry. 10.2.4.2. Prior to processing laundry in a biohazard bag, staff must wear gloves, a face shield and plastic apron. 10.2.4.3. Laundry must be carefully placed into the washer with as little agitation as possible. 10.2.4.4. Normal laundry cycles should be used according to the clothing, washer, and detergent manufacturers recommendation. 10.2.4.5. After drying, scrubs and lab coats should be removed promptly and placed on hangers prior to transporting back to the applicable area. 10.2.4.6. Laundry submitted in a biohazard bag must be washed separately with hot water, bleach, and laundry detergent or as directed by the manufacturer. 10.3. Body Sheets 10.3.1. Upon request, body sheets are collected and returned to the appropriate entity. 10.3.2. Sheets are collected in leak-proof biohazard bags located in the autopsy area. 10.3.3. Bags must be sealed prior to moving them. 10.3.4. If the collection bag becomes contaminated with biologicals, it will be placed into a new, leak-proof biohazard bag and sealed. 10.3.5. Sealed biohazard bags will be released to the appropriate entities. 11. Hepatitis B Vaccine 11.1. All employees identified as having occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials are offered the hepatitis B vaccine at no cost to the employee under the supervision of a licensed physician or licensed healthcare professional at the Dallas County Health and Human Services department. 11.2. The vaccine is offered after bloodborne pathogens training and within 10 working days of their initial assignment to work unless the employee has previously received the complete hepatitis B vaccination series, antibody testing has revealed that the employee is immune, or that the vaccine is contraindicated for medical reasons. 11.2.1. Employees who decline the hepatitis B vaccine must sign a declination statement. 11.2.2. Employees who initially decline the vaccine but who later elect to receive it may then have the vaccine provided at no cost. 12. Tuberculosis Testing 12.1. Testing for tuberculosis is available to occupationally exposed staff at no charge through Dallas County Health and Human Services. 13. Post Exposure Evaluation and Follow-up 13.1. Dallas County provides for post exposure evaluation and follow-up. 13.2. Procedures are available to staff 24 hours a day in the Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Protocol notebook located in the Field Agent Office. 13.3. The employee must also notify their supervisor and/or Institute Administration as soon as reasonably possible.
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13.4. Staff should advise their supervisor of the case number for the source of the exposure if it is known. 13.5. The Dallas County workers compensation process should also be followed by the employee and supervisor; information regarding the Countys Workers Compensation policy can be found in the County Code (online), Article VIII. Workers Compensation. 13.6. The Family and Medical Leave Act may also be applicable; information regarding the Countys FMLA policy may be found in the Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Protocol notebook or in the Dallas County Code (online), Article IX. Family and Medical Leave. 13.7. Dallas County provides confidential, post-exposure medical evaluation for exposed employees. Per regulation, a confidential medical evaluation and follow-up includes: 13.7.1. Documentation of the route(s) of exposure and the circumstances related to the incident. 13.7.2. Identification and documentation of the source individual, unless the employer can establish that identification is infeasible or prohibited by state or local law. After obtaining consent, unless law allows testing without consent, the blood of the source individual should be tested for HIV/HBV infectivity, unless the employer can establish that testing of the source is infeasible or prohibited by state or local law. 13.7.3. The results of testing of the source individual are made available to the exposed employee with the employee informed about the applicable laws and regulations concerning disclosure of the identity and infectivity of the source individual. 13.7.4. The employee is offered the option of having his/her blood collected for testing of the employees HIV/HBV serological status. The blood sample is preserved for at least 90 days to allow the employee to decide if the blood should be tested for HIV serological status. If the employee decides prior to that time that the testing will be conducted, then testing is done as soon as feasible. 13.7.5. The employee is offered post exposure prophylaxis in accordance with the current recommendations of the US Public Health Service. 13.7.6. The employee is given appropriate counseling concerning infection status, results and interpretations of tests, and precautions to take during the period after the exposure incident. The employee is informed about potential illnesses that can develop and advised to seek early medical evaluation and subsequent treatment. 13.7.7. The Dallas Human Resources Department is designated to assure that the policy outlined in this section is effectively carried out and maintains records related to this policy. 13.8. Interaction with Healthcare Professionals 13.8.1. Written medical opinions are not routinely provided to the Institute. 13.8.1.1. Medical information received by the Institute will be placed in the Health and Safety file located in the employees departmental personnel jacket. 13.8.2. Institute staff provides information and/or source specimens as requested by Dallas County or their healthcare contractor. 13.8.3. Interaction with healthcare professionals is conducted according to County policy and overseen by Dallas County Human Resources. 13.8.3.1. A written opinion is obtained from the healthcare professional who evaluates employees of this facility after an exposure incident. In order for the healthcare professional to adequately evaluate the employee, the healthcare
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professional is provided with the following upon request: 13.8.3.1.1. A copy of the Institutes Exposure Control Plan; 13.8.3.1.2. A description of the exposed employees duties as they relate to the exposure incident; 13.8.3.1.3. Documentation of the route(s) of exposure and circumstances under which the exposure occurred; 13.8.3.1.4. Results of the source individuals blood tests or a sample of the source fluid where available and applicable; and, 13.8.3.1.5. Medical records relevant to the appropriate treatment of the employee. 13.8.3.2. Written opinions are obtained from the healthcare professional in the following instances: 13.8.3.2.1. When the employee is sent to obtain the Hepatitis B vaccine, or 13.8.3.2.2. Whenever the employee is sent to a healthcare professional following an exposure. 13.8.3.3. Healthcare professionals are instructed to limit their written opinions to: 13.8.3.3.1. Whether the hepatitis B vaccine is indicated; 13.8.3.3.2. Whether the employee has received the vaccine; 13.8.3.3.3. The evaluation following an exposure incident; 13.8.3.3.4. Whether the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation; 13.8.3.3.5. Whether the employee has been told about any medical conditions resulting from exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials which require further evaluation or treatment (all other findings or diagnosis shall remain confidential and shall not be included in the written report); and, 13.8.3.3.6. Whether the healthcare professionals written opinion is provided to the employee within 15 days of completion of the evaluation. 14. Training 14.1. Training for all employees is conducted prior to initial assignment to tasks where occupational exposure may occur. 14.2. All employees also receive annual refresher training. 14.3. Training for employees is conducted by a person knowledgeable in the subject matter and includes an explanation of the following: 14.3.1. TAC Title 25, Part 1, Chapter 96. Bloodborne Pathogen Control 14.3.2. OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Final Rule, 29 CFR Part 1910.1030, Federal Register, December 6, 1991. 14.3.3. Epidemiology and symptomatology of bloodborne diseases 14.3.4. Modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens 14.3.5. Institute Biological Exposure Control Plan (i.e. points of the plan, lines of responsibility, how the plan will be implemented, where to access the plan, etc.) 14.3.6. Procedures which might cause exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials at this facility 14.3.7. Control methods which are used at the facility to control exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials
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14.3.8. PPE available at this facility (types, use, location, etc.) 14.3.9. Dallas Countys hepatitis B vaccine program 14.3.10. Procedures to follow in an emergency involving blood or other potentially infectious materials 14.3.11. Procedures to follow if an exposure incident occurs including the US Public Health Service Post Exposure Prophylaxis Guidelines 14.3.12. Post exposure evaluation and follow up 14.3.13. Signs and labels used at the Institute 14.3.14. An opportunity to ask questions with the individual conducting the training 15. Recordkeeping 15.1. According to OSHAs Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, medical records are maintained by the employer; records are maintained by Dallas County Human Resources and/or Health and Human Services. 15.1.1. Hepatitis B Vaccine 15.1.1.1. When notification of vaccination is received by the Institute, it is retained in the Health and Safety file located in the employees departmental personnel jacket. 15.2. Training records are maintained under the direction of the Quality Manager. 16. Sharps Injury Report and Log 16.1. Supervisors are responsible for completing a Sharps Injury Report form documenting any biologically contaminated sharps injury occurring to one of their employees or to a non-Institute individual injured in an area under the supervisors control. The Sharps Injury Report form must be completed and submitted to Institute Administration within 24 hours of the incident. 16.2. The Director is responsible for reporting each contaminated sharps injury to the Director of Dallas County Health and Human Services Department in the capacity of Local Health Authority. 16.2.1. Reports are due no later than ten working days after the end of the calendar month in which the contaminated sharps injury occurred. 16.2.2. The Institute will also forward a copy of the Contaminated Sharps Injury Reporting Form to the Risk Management Unit of the Dallas County Human Resources Department. 16.2.2.1. Institute Administration will maintain two copies of the Sharps Injury Report: one will be placed in the Employees Health and Safety File and the second will be maintained in the Institute Sharps Injury Report file. 16.3. Confidentiality of Information 16.3.1. Certain information collected as part of TAC Title 25, Part 1, Chapter 96, Bloodborne Pathogen Control may be confidential. 16.3.1.1. Release of information will be in compliance with Dallas County and/or Departmental policies and directives from the Dallas County Human Resources and/or Dallas County District Attorneys Office.

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Hepatitis B Vaccine Statement Printed Name: ____________________________________ Agreement to Seek Hepatitis B Vaccination By signing this consent, I affirm that my job duties require tasks involving potential occupational exposure to human blood, body fluids, or non-fixed tissues. I have received training regarding the Institute of Forensic Sciences Biological Exposure Control Plan which includes hepatitis B vaccination as a means of decreasing the likelihood of contracting hepatitis B should a biological exposure occur. I choose to seek hepatitis B vaccination through Dallas County and will advise my supervisor immediately if I elect not to continue with the vaccination process for any reason. ____________________________________ Signature _____________________________ Date

Notification of Previous Hepatitis B Vaccination I affirm that my job duties require tasks involving potential occupational exposure to human blood, body fluids, or non-fixed tissues. I have received training regarding the Institute of Forensic Sciences Biological Exposure Control Plan which includes hepatitis B vaccination as a means of decreasing the likelihood of contracting hepatitis B should a biological exposure occur. I have previously had hepatitis B vaccination as noted below and/or as noted on documentation which I have attached. Provider: ________________________________________ Dates: 1st _______ 2nd ______ 3rd _______ _____________________________ Date

____________________________________ Signature

Hepatitis B Vaccine Declination I understand that due to my occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials I may be at risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. I have been given the opportunity to be vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine, at no charge to myself. However, I decline hepatitis B vaccination at this time. I understand that by declining this vaccine, I continue to be at risk of acquiring hepatitis B, a serious disease. If, in the future, I continue to have occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials and I want to be vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine, I can receive the vaccination series at no charge to myself. ____________________________________ Signature
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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences IFS CHEMICAL SAFETY PLAN 1. Goals and Regulatory Compliance 1.1. The Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences is committed to providing a safe and healthful work environment for all staff and others who work or visit in this facility. 1.1.1. All IFS employees will receive chemical safety training prior to performing work with chemicals. 1.2. To support this commitment, a chemical safety plan has been developed to minimize occupational exposure to chemicals in accordance with the Texas Health and Safety Code, Chapter 502. 1.2.1. Additional information may be found in the Texas Administrative Code, Title 25, Part 1, Chapter 295. 1.3. Disposal of chemicals is regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and local requirements of the Dallas Water Utility. 1.4. The Chemical Safety Plan is administered jointly with the Dallas County Workers Compensation Program and Family and Medical Leave Act and does not replace or supercede any portion of Dallas County policy, specifically the Workers Compensation or the Dallas County occupational exposure program. 2. Definitions - Refer to regulations listed in Section 1 for additional definitions. 2.1. Appropriate Hazard Warning Any works, pictures, symbols, or combination thereof, appearing on a label or other appropriate form of warning, which convey the health and physical hazards, including the target organ effects, of the chemicals in the containers. 2.2. Container Any bag, barrel, bottle, box, can, cylinder, drum, reaction vessel, storage tank, or the like that contains a hazardous chemical. 2.2.1. Primary Container A container in which the hazardous chemical is received from the supplier. 2.2.2. Secondary Container A container to which the hazardous chemical is transferred after receipt from the supplier. 2.3. Employee For purposes of the Texas Hazard Communication Act, an employee is a person who may be or may have been exposed to hazardous chemicals in the persons workplace under normal operating conditions or foreseeable emergencies. 2.3.1. Workers such as office workers who encounter hazardous chemicals only in nonroutine, isolated instances are not considered employees under the Act. 2.4. Expose - Subjecting an employee to a hazardous chemical in the course of employment through any route of entry including inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, or absorption. 2.4.1. The term includes potential, possible, or accidental exposure under normal conditions of use or in a reasonable foreseeable emergency. 2.5. Hazardous Chemical or Chemical An element, compound, or mixture of elements or compounds that is a physical hazard or health hazard. 2.6. Health Hazard A chemical for which acute or chronic health effects may occur in exposed employees and which is a toxic agent, irritant, corrosive, or sensitizer.
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2.7. Label Any written, printed, or graphic material displayed on or affixed to containers of hazardous chemicals, and which includes the same name as on the MSDS. 2.8. Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) A document containing chemical hazard and safe handling information that is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the federal OSHA standard for that document. 2.9. Physical Hazard A chemical which is a combustible liquid, a compressed gas, explosive, flammable, an organic peroxide, an oxidizer, pyrophoric, unstable (reactive), or water-reactive. 2.10. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Protective equipment provided to an employee by the employer which provides a level of protection to chemicals to which the employee may be exposed that will be adequate to ensure their health and safety based on current industry standards. 2.11. Technically Qualified Individual An individual with a professional education and background working in the research or medical fields, such as a physician or registered nurse, or an individual holding a minimum of a bachelors degree in a physical or natural science. 3. General Chemical Safety 3.1. Chemicals are routinely used throughout the labs and in the morgue. 3.2. Before using a chemical 3.2.1. Know the hazards involved with using the chemical and follow safe work practices. 3.2.1.1. Read the product label. 3.2.1.2. Refer to the MSDS. 3.3. Treat all chemicals as hazardous. 3.4. Wear PPE. 3.4.1. Routine use of PPE is outlined for each functional area and is available to staff in the EHS Resource Document file. 3.5. Work in a hood when using volatile substances. 3.6. Never mix chemicals without prior knowledge of how they react. 3.7. Be aware of possible ignition sources in your work area when working with volatile chemicals. 3.8. Staff may not eat, drink, apply cosmetics, or apply contact lenses in chemical use areas. 3.9. Submitted evidence may also be a source of potential chemical exposure and should be handled using safe work practices. 3.10. Ask your supervisor if you have questions about use of chemicals or PPE. 3.11. Do not use unlabeled or out of date chemicals. 3.12. Label secondary containers properly. 3.13. Store routinely used chemicals and all corrosives below eye level. 3.14. Follow written laboratory procedures. 3.15. Report all chemical spills or other accidents to your supervisor. 3.16. Dispose of chemicals properly. 3.16.1. Place chemical waste in proper storage containers. 3.16.2. Do not dispose of chemical waste in the sanitary sewer or trash. 3.17. Always add acid to water.
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3.18. Store chemicals in designated areas by chemical type. 4. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) 4.1. MSDSs give information and details on the chemical and physical dangers, safety procedures, safe handling, and emergency response techniques for a particular substance. 4.2. MSDSs are readily available to staff. 4.2.1. Commonly used chemical MSDSs are found in the MSDS binder at the safety station in each work area. 4.2.2. MSDSs are readily available on-line from most chemical manufacturers. 4.2.3. MSDSs may be requested from the EHS Manager or Deputy Manager. 4.3. MSDSs contain the following information: 4.3.1. Manufacturers identity 4.3.2. Chemical identity 4.3.2.1. Trade name, chemical name, synonyms, and various identification numbers are listed. 4.3.2.2. If the product is a mixture, the hazardous components of the mixture will be listed. 4.3.3. Physical and chemical characteristics 4.3.3.1. Items such as appearance, odor, boiling point, melting point, specific gravity, evaporation rate, solubility, vapor pressure, and vapor density are listed. 4.3.4. Physical hazards and fire fighting data 4.3.4.1. The fire hazard of the substance is described by flash point or explosion hazard and fire fighting instructions are provided. 4.3.5. Reactivity 4.3.5.1. Incompatibility with other materials or conditions is noted. 4.3.6. Health hazards 4.3.6.1. A description is provided of how the chemical may enter the body, the type of potential health hazard from exposure, and first aid measures. 4.3.6.2. If the chemical is a carcinogen, it will be noted. 4.3.6.3. Symptoms and signs of overexposure are noted. 4.3.7. Precautions for safe handling and use; spill and leak procedures 4.3.7.1. Proper handling and storage instruction is provided. 4.3.7.2. Procedures are provided for responding to a leak or spill. 4.3.8. Control measures and use of PPE 4.3.8.1. PPE and other measures for safe chemical handling are noted. 4.3.9. Special precautions and special information 4.3.9.1. Special precautions and special handling is noted. 5. Container Labels 5.1. Container labels provide information about chemical identity and possible hazards in using a chemical. 5.2. Staff should read labels before using a chemical.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

IFS Chemical Safety Plan Version 2.0

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5.3. The Institute purchases chemicals from reputable suppliers and relies on the chemical manufacturer or distributor to provide labels which are consistent with regulatory requirements. 5.3.1. Primary containers are not relabeled unless the label becomes illegible or is found to be inconsistent with regulatory requirements. 5.4. Primary container labels include the identity of the material, the manufacturer, and precautionary warnings typically communicated via the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) diamond. 5.5. Secondary containers are labeled with the identity of the material and precautionary warning typically communicated via the NFPA diamond. 5.6. NFPA diamond 5.6.1. The four quadrants of the diamond contain hazard specific information: 5.6.1.1. Blue health hazards 5.6.1.2. Red flammability hazards 5.6.1.3. Yellow instability or reactivity hazards 5.6.1.4. White special hazards 5.6.1.4.1. water reactive 5.6.1.4.2. strong oxidizer 5.6.1.4.3. corrosive 5.6.1.4.4. radioactive 5.6.2. The number in each quadrant categorizes the degree of hazard: 5.6.2.1. Extreme hazard = 4 5.6.2.2. Serious hazard = 3 5.6.2.3. Moderate hazard = 2 5.6.2.4. Slight hazard = 1 5.6.2.5. Minimal or no hazard = 0 6. Chemical Hazards 6.1. Health Hazards 6.1.1. Chemical exposure may cause health effects depending upon the nature of the chemical, how much of the chemical enters the body, and how long the person is exposed to the chemical. 6.1.2. Health hazards include substances that are 6.1.2.1. Carcinogens may cause cancer 6.1.2.2. Toxic or highly toxic agents 6.1.2.3. Reproductive toxins 6.1.2.4. Irritants 6.1.2.5. Corrosives may cause chemical burns 6.1.2.6. Sensitizers may cause allergic reactions 6.1.2.7. Hepatotoxins may cause damage to the liver 6.1.2.8. Nephrotoxins may cause damage to the kidney 6.1.2.9. Agents which may cause damage to the hematopoietic (blood forming) organs 6.1.2.10. Agents which damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes 6.1.3. Upon exposure to chemicals health effects may occur
Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program 4 IFS Chemical Safety Plan Version 2.0

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6.1.3.1. Acutely immediately upon exposure. 6.1.3.2. Chronically upon repeated exposure. 6.1.4. In order for a chemical to produce a health effect, it must enter or touch the body; chemicals may enter the body in the following ways: 6.1.4.1. Inhalation breathing in the chemical 6.1.4.2. Dermal absorption absorption across intact or cut skin 6.1.4.3. Ingestion by swallowing into the digestive system 6.1.4.4. Injection by puncturing the upper layer of skin 6.2. Physical Hazards 6.2.1. Physical hazards include chemicals that are 6.2.1.1. flammable liquids flash point below 100 degrees F (38 degrees C) 6.2.1.2. combustible liquids flash point between 100 and 200 degrees F 6.2.1.3. compressed gasses pressure exceeds 40 psi at 70 degrees F 6.2.1.4. oxidizers cause or promote fire in organic materials 6.2.1.5. explosives cause a sudden release of heat and pressure 6.2.1.6. organic peroxides explosive 6.2.1.7. pyrophorics ignite spontaneously in air 6.2.1.8. reactive chemicals polymerize or decompose 6.2.1.9. water reactive release gas upon exposure to water 7. Health Effects and Safe Handling by Chemical Category 7.1. For information on specific chemicals, consult the MSDS. 7.2. Solvents and Flammable or Combustible Liquids 7.2.1. Solvents are commonly used throughout the Lab areas; examples include methylene chloride, n-butyl chloride, ether, chloroform, etc. 7.2.2. Health Hazards 7.2.2.1. Solvents typically produce vapors which can be inhaled. 7.2.2.2. Solvents may cause irritation to the skin, eyes, and lungs. 7.2.2.3. In higher concentration, solvents may cause nausea, dizziness, drowsiness, unconsciousness, convulsions, and death. 7.2.2.4. Some solvents such as chloroform, benzidine, and methylene chloride are human carcinogens. 7.2.2.5. Solvents represent a potential hazard from a splash or spill. 7.2.3. Safe Handling 7.2.3.1. Solvents are volatile and may become airborne. 7.2.3.1.1. Work with solvents in well ventilated areas and hoods. 7.2.3.2. Many solvents are flammable and thus potential fire hazards. 7.2.3.2.1. Do not use flammables around open flames or other sources of ignition. 7.2.3.2.2. Some solvent vapors are heavier than air and may pool on floors or sinks and become a fire hazard. 7.2.3.3. Wear recommended PPE and use hoods to minimize exposure. 7.3. Non-flammable Liquids 7.3.1. Health Hazards 7.3.1.1. Non-flammable liquids may splash or spill during use.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

IFS Chemical Safety Plan Version 2.0

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7.3.1.2. Some chemicals release toxic fumes when mixed with other compounds, for example mixing cleaning agents containing ammonia with bleach. 7.3.1.3. Safe Handling. 7.3.1.3.1. Wear recommended PPE to minimize exposure. 7.3.1.3.2. Consult the label and MSDS before mixing chemicals 7.4. Solid Chemicals 7.4.1. Solid chemicals are commonly used throughout the Lab areas; examples include drug standards and other chemicals. 7.4.1.1. Health Hazards 7.4.1.1.1. Chemical dusts may cause irritation to the skin, eyes, lungs, and gastrointestinal track. 7.4.1.2. Safe Handling 7.4.1.2.1. Chemical dusts may become airborne. 7.4.1.2.1.1. Wear recommended PPE and use hoods to minimize exposure. 7.4.1.2.2. Some chemicals may explode when used or stored improperly; consult the container label or MSDS. 7.4.1.2.3. Consult the label and MSDS before mixing chemicals. 7.5. Corrosive Chemicals: Acids and Bases 7.5.1. Corrosive chemicals are used throughout the Labs and Morgue and include hydrochloric acid, bleach, sodium hydroxide, ammonia, etc. 7.5.2. Health Hazards 7.5.2.1. Corrosive chemicals and their mists or vapors can cause damage to the skin, eyes, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract ranging from irritation to severe burns. 7.5.3. Safe Handling 7.5.3.1. Wear recommended PPE and use hoods to minimize exposure. 7.5.3.2. Do not store acids and based above eye level. 7.5.3.3. Read container labels and MSDSs before mixing chemicals. 7.6. Compressed Gases 7.6.1. Compressed gases are used throughout the Lab areas. 7.6.2. Health Hazards 7.6.2.1. Compressed gases are under pressure and may violently release if the container is not handled properly. 7.6.2.2. Compressed gases will expand upon release and may displace oxygen. 7.6.2.3. Some compressed gases such as hydrogen and acetylene are flammable; oxygen supports combustion. 7.6.2.4. Some compressed gases may cause freezing burns upon contact. 7.6.3. Safe Handling 7.6.3.1. Transport compressed cylinders chained and on an appropriate cart. 7.6.3.2. Keep the main valve stem capped when cylinder is not in use. 7.6.3.3. Keep cylinders chained to a stationary object at all times. 7.6.3.4. Check that gas lines are leak free. 7.6.3.5. Do not expose skin to compressed gas. 7.6.3.6. Do not obstruct a pressure vent or relief valve. 7.6.3.7. Keep gas from sources of ignition. 7.7. Formaldehyde/Formalin 7.7.1. Formaldehyde is used in the Morgue area and some laboratory areas.
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7.7.2. Health Hazard 7.7.2.1. Formaldehyde is a suspected human carcinogen. 7.7.2.2. Formaldehyde may cause burns to the skin, eyes, and respiratory track. 7.7.2.3. Formaldehyde may cause allergic respiratory and skin reaction. 7.7.2.4. In high concentrations, formaldehyde may cause depression of the central nervous system. 7.7.2.5. Formaldehyde may cause liver and kidney damage. 7.7.2.6. Formalin contains methanol which may cause blindness when ingested. 7.7.3. Safe Handling 7.7.3.1. Wear recommended PPE and use ventilation to minimize exposure. 7.7.3.2. Follow procedures particularly when pouring formalin. 7.7.3.3. Participate in formaldehyde exposure monitoring. 7.8. Lead 7.8.1. Lead particulate and vapor is emitted during the firing of weapons; lead vapor can be inhaled and lead particulate can be ingested when lead containing items are placed into the mouth. 7.8.2. Health Hazard 7.8.2.1. Chronic exposure can cause loss of appetite, metallic taste in the mouth, anxiety, constipation, nausea, pallor, excessive tiredness, weakness, insomnia, headache, irritability, muscle and joint pain, tremors, numbness, and dizziness. 7.8.2.2. Lead may damage blood forming organs, nervous system, urinary system, and reproductive system. 7.8.3. Safe Handling 7.8.3.1. Follow proper lab technique when firing weapons. 7.8.3.2. Use PPE. 7.8.3.3. Wash hands. 7.8.3.4. Use tank ventilation. 7.8.3.5. Follow housekeeping protocols. 7.8.3.6. Participate in biological exposure monitoring for lead. 7.9. Picric Acid 7.9.1. Picric acid should be purchased as a diluted, liquid solution; pure picric acid should not be purchased. 7.9.2. Pure picric acid must be kept damp. Should it dry out, it may become an explosion hazard. 8. Use of PPE 8.1. PPE is used to prevent or minimize exposure to chemicals. 8.2. Refer to the general and area specific PPE guidance in the EHS Resource Document. 8.3. Staff should contact a supervisor for direction in selection and use of PPE. 8.4. PPE should not be worn outside of the work area. 8.5. Employees will select appropriate personal protective equipment to avoid reasonably anticipated contact of the skin, eye, mouth, and mucous membranes with chemical materials. 8.5.1. Variance from procedures established in this Plan must be approved by a supervisor or the EHS Manager prior to implementation.
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8.6. Gloves 8.6.1. Gloves are required when handling hazardous chemicals. 8.6.1.1. Latex sensitive employees should advise their supervisors who will arrange for suitable alternative personal protective equipment. 8.6.1.1.1. If non-latex gloves are worn, it is recommended that they be covered with a second latex glove to provide additional strength. 8.6.2. Disposable gloves may not be re-used and must be replaced as soon as practical when they become contaminated or as soon as feasible when they are torn, punctured, or otherwise unable to provide an effective barrier. 8.6.3. Reusable utility gloves may be decontaminated for re-use provided that the integrity of the glove is not compromised. 8.6.3.1. Utility gloves must be discarded if they are cracked, peeling, torn, punctured, exhibit other signs of deterioration, or are unable to provide an effective barrier. 8.6.4. Insulated gloves should be used to protect hands from temperature extremes such as handling hot glassware or frozen items. 8.6.5. Choose a glove made of materials resistant to the class of chemicals being used. 8.6.5.1. Refer to manufacturers specifications. 8.6.5.2. Suitability may be checked by partially filling a finger of the glove with the substance in question and allowing it to stand in a ventilated area for 24 hours. If the glove remains intact then it should provide adequate protection. 8.6.6. If a glove is not long enough to provide protection, add a lab coat and/or tyvek sleeve. 8.6.7. Hands should be washed after removing gloves. 8.7. Lab Coat 8.7.1. A fluid resistant lab coat or similar garment is required when it may be reasonably expected that chemical material may flake, drop, drip, splash, spray, or otherwise contaminate work clothes. 8.7.1.1. Medical Examiner lab coats are not worn as PPE. 8.7.1.2. Crime Lab lab coats are used as PPE. 8.8. Face and Eye Protection 8.8.1. Eye protection includes devices such as goggles, glasses with solid side shields, or chin length face shields. 8.8.2. A face shield or eye protection must be used when chemical exposure to eyes may be reasonably expected due to a splash, spray, splatter, or flaking of hazardous chemical. 8.9. Hoods 8.9.1. Work in a hood or otherwise use ventilation as appropriate to minimize chemical exposure to the breathing zone. 9. Housekeeping 9.1. Knowledgeable IFS staff are responsible for cleaning in areas with suspected chemical contamination. 9.2. Each functional area, as applicable, is responsible for developing a cleaning checklist or procedure to ensure the work area remains free of chemical contamination.
Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program 8 IFS Chemical Safety Plan Version 2.0

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10. First Aid for Chemical Exposure 10.1. Identify the chemical involved and review the container label and MSDS for hazards and recommended first aid response. 10.2. If possible, remove the person from the area of exposure; remove contaminated clothing; wash affected areas with copious amounts of water using the eyewash and safety showers as applicable. 10.3. Contact IFS staff with first aid and/or CPR training. 10.4. Advise Emergency Warden or supervisor to initiate facility emergency response plan as applicable. 10.5. Give a copy of the MSDS to the health care provider or emergency responder as applicable. 10.6. Contact Poison Control if needed as a resource. 11. Chemical Emergency Spill Response 11.1. Immediately seek medical attention for any injury. 11.1.1. Contact IFS staff trained in first aid and CPR as needed. 11.1.2. Provide appropriate MSDS to health care provider or emergency responder as applicable. 11.2. Cease activity. 11.3. Advise your coworkers. 11.4. Discontinue use of open flames, electrical devices, heaters, and other sources of ignition. 11.5. Move to an area of safety. 11.6. Advise your supervisor of all chemical spills. 11.7. Advise an Emergency Warden or supervisor if implementation of the Facility Emergency Response Plan is needed. 11.8. Call 911 if an emergency situation exists 11.9. Contact the EHS Manager and Administration if applicable. 11.10. Use a spill control materials to contain the spill if this will not place you at risk. 11.11. Work with the EHS Manager and Deputy to determine if the spill can be cleaned up or if assistance is needed from the Dallas County Fire Marshall. 11.12. Handle all waste properly. Hazardous waste cannot be flushed into the sanitary sewer or placed into the regular trash. 12. Chemical Waste Handling 12.1. Hazardous Waste 12.1.1. EPA defines hazardous waste in 40 CFR, Section 261. In general terms, a hazardous waste is a substance which meets one of the following criteria: 12.1.1.1. Exhibits one of the following characteristics: 12.1.1.1.1. Ignitability Flash point < 140 deg F 12.1.1.1.2. Corrosivity 2> pH> 12.5 12.1.1.1.3. Reactivity Unstable, water reactive, explosive

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12.1.1.1.4. Toxicity Characteristic Contains one of more than 40 chemicals which leach in excess of listed concentrations 12.1.1.2. Contains one or more of the approximate 350 listed hazardous substances 12.1.2. IFS generates three hazardous waste streams. 12.1.2.1. Chlorinated solvent waste stream 12.1.2.2. Non-chlorinated solvent waste stream 12.1.2.3. Lab-pack chemical waste 12.1.3. Hazardous waste may not be disposed into the sanitary sewer. 12.1.3.1. It is collected and segregated by type at the point of generation in labeled waste containers located in chemical use areas. 12.1.3.2. These portable containers are consolidated by type into drums located on the dock. 12.1.3.3. The EHS Manager oversees collection and disposal of hazardous waste. 12.1.4. Adding Waste to Storage Drums 12.1.4.1. Use applicable PPE. 12.1.4.2. Choose the appropriate storage drum for your waste type. 12.1.4.3. Inspect the condition of the drum. 12.1.4.3.1. If the drum is corroded or misshapen, immediately contact the EHS Manager or Deputy. 12.1.4.3.2. Do not attempt to open or move the drum. 12.1.4.4. Use a drum wrench to slowly open the small vent. 12.1.4.4.1. This will release any pressure that may be in the drum. 12.1.4.5. Use the drum wrench to slowly open the large vent. 12.1.4.6. Using a funnel, add waste to the appropriate drum. 12.1.4.7. Reseal both vents. 12.1.4.8. Log the amount of waste added, date, composition of waste and initials on the appropriate log sheet. 12.1.4.9. If you have problems with this process, contact your supervisor or the EHS Manager or Deputy. 12.1.4.10. Hazardous waste is disposed by the Countys hazardous waste vendor. 12.2. Non-hazardous Chemical Waste 12.2.1. Formaldehyde waste is collected in storage drums and disposed by the Countys hazardous waste provider. 12.3. Waste generation and disposal is documented by the EHS Manager and Deputy. 13. Annual Chemical Inventory 13.1. The EHS Manager will oversee development of the annual IFS chemical inventory. 14. Employee Training 14.1. The Institute provides a chemical safety training program to all employees who use or handle hazardous chemicals in their workplace. 14.2. Training is provided under the direction of the EHS Manager and Deputy. 14.3. New employees are trained prior to using or handling hazardous chemicals. 14.4. Ongoing training is provided during the annual safety training and by supervisors.
Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program 10 IFS Chemical Safety Plan Version 2.0

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14.5. Initial training includes 14.5.1. The use of MSDSs and chemical container labels. 14.5.2. The location of hazardous chemicals present in the employees work areas. 14.5.3. The physical and health effects of exposure. 14.5.4. Proper use of PPE. 14.5.5. Safe handling of hazardous chemicals. 14.5.6. First aid treatment for exposure to hazardous chemicals. 14.5.7. Clean-up and disposal of hazardous chemicals. 14.6. Records are kept regarding employees trained, dates of training, and the subjects covered in training. 15. Regulatory Notifications 15.1. IFS Administration will notify the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) of any employee accident that involves a hazardous chemical exposure or asphyxiation and that is fatal to one or more employees or results in the hospitalization of five or more employees within 48 hours after the occurrence. 15.1.1. Notification is made as follows: 15.1.1.1. Texas Department of State Health Services, Division for Regulatory Services, Enforcement Unit, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756, 512834-6665. 15.2. The EHS Manger or Deputy will post the TDH Notice to Employees related to the Texas Hazard Communication Act in all workplaces where hazardous chemicals are used or stored. 15.2.1. The notice will be clearly posted and unobstructed. 15.3. The Institute shall not discipline, harass, or discriminate against any employee for filing complaints, assisting inspectors of the Texas DSHS, participating in proceedings related to the Texas Hazard Communication Act, or exercising any rights under the Act. 15.4. Employees cannot waive their rights under the Texas Hazard Communication Act. 15.4.1. A request or requirement for such a waiver by an employer is a violation of the Act.

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences IFS RADIATION SAFETY PROGRAM 1. Oversight of the Radiation Safety Program 1.1. Radiation Safety Officer (duties performed by UT-Southwestern Radiation Safety) 1.1.1. By interlocal agreement with Dallas County, UT-Southwestern provides the following services for the Institute: 1.1.2. Provision of Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) who will act as the liaison with the State of Texas regulatory agencies for the purposes of all licensing, registration, reporting and inspection activities; 1.1.3. Performance of internal and external personnel radiation dose exposure monitoring; 1.1.4. Provision of radiation safety training for using radioactive materials to current and new employees through a routinely offered 4 hour seminar; 1.1.5. Provision of radiation area monitoring to ensure compliance with the 100mRem/year limit to non-occupational exposed individuals in non-restricted areas; 1.1.6. Consultation concerning health physics, radiation protection matters and updates of regulatory changes; 1.1.7. Licensing of the use of radioactive materials; 1.1.8. Performance of semi-annual compliance audits; 1.1.9. Performance of semi-annual independent physical radiation and radioactive contamination surveys; 1.1.10. Registration of x-ray equipment; 1.1.11. Performance of mandatory compliance inspections (TRCR 21, 32, and 42); 1.1.12. Performance of annual inspection of analytical x-ray equipment (TRCR 34); 1.1.13. Provision of the Radiation Protection Program as established and documented in UT-Southwesterns Radiation Safety Handbook. 1.1.14. Maintenance of required records. 1.2. Institute EHS Manager 1.2.1. The IFS EHS Manager is the Institutes liaison with the UT-Southwestern Radiation Safety Officer. 1.2.2. The IFS EHS Manager is responsible for implementing the Radiation Safety Program at the Institute and reporting health and safety concerns to the Director and RSO. 1.2.3. The EHS Manager will perform the following as it relates to radiation safety: 1.2.3.1. Implement policies and procedures outlined by the UT-Southwestern RSO; 1.2.3.2. Develop safe operating procedures for x-ray equipment and disseminate these procedures to appropriate supervisors/users; 1.2.3.3. Coordinate distribution of dosimetry badges; 1.2.3.4. Post notices as instructed by the RSO; 1.2.3.5. Maintain x-ray equipment inventories;

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1.2.3.6. Review and distribute dosimetry reports: maintain original bimonthly report, forward copy to Autopsy Supervisor for posting in morgue, and provide Administration with annual radiation exposure report for personnel file; 1.2.3.7. Follow-up on lost or damaged dosimetry badges; 1.2.3.8. Oversee replacement, purchase, and disposition of x-ray equipment; 1.2.3.9. Maintain a copy of current technique charts. 1.2.3.10. Arrange for applicable x-ray equipment performance check and compliance inspection as required by Texas DSHS. 1.2.3.10.1. Maintain documentation of performance check and compliance inspection results for at least three years. 1.2.3.11. Collect and dispense bimonthly radiation safety badges. 1.3. Autopsy Supervisor has the responsibility to perform and document the following for xray equipment used in Office of the Medical Examiner. 1.3.1. File a copy of all instrument maintenance and repair paperwork by year and retain for at least 3 years. 1.3.1.1. Provide a copy of all instrument maintenance and repair paperwork to Administration for payment processing. 1.3.1.2. Provide a copy of all instrument maintenance and repair paperwork to the EHS Manager. 1.3.2. File all x-ray film processor maintenance and repair paperwork by year including paperwork related to changing out chemicals in processor. 1.3.2.1. Retain paperwork for at least 3 years. 1.3.2.2. Provide a copy of all processor maintenance and repair paperwork to Administration for payment processing. 1.3.2.3. Provide a copy of all processor maintenance and repair paperwork to the EHS Manager. 1.3.3. Perform and document visual processor room light leak check every month. 1.3.3.1. Go into the processor room. 1.3.3.2. Close the door, and turn off the light. 1.3.3.3. Allow your eyes to become accustomed to the dark. 1.3.3.4. Look for light leaks. 1.3.3.5. If none are found, document result on checklist. 1.3.3.6. If light leaks are found, repair the area and retest with a visual light leak check and document results. 1.3.3.7. Keep documentation for 3 years. 1.3.3.8. Provide a copy of documentation to the EHS Manager. 1.3.4. Ensure that applicable technique charts are available near each x-ray unit and are routinely used in equipment operation. 1.3.5. Post bimonthly dosimetry reports. 1.3.6. Ensure that staff wears radiation safety badges appropriately. 1.3.7. Ensure that x-ray equipment is operated only by trained staff and that proper operating procedures are followed. 1.3.8. Advise the EHS Manager immediately regarding radiation safety concerns. 1.3.9. Train new employees in the operation of x-ray equipment. 1.3.9.1. Document training and competence using the X-Ray Training Checklist; send the original signed Checklist to the Quality Manager.
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2. Procedures for Operation of X-Ray Producing Equipment 2.1. Compliance 2.1.1. IFS staff are responsible for following: 2.1.1.1. This EHS Radiation Safety Plan. 2.1.1.2. UT-Southwestern procedures which are found in the Radiation Safety folder of the EHS Resource Documents section. 2.1.1.3. Texas Administrative Code, Title 25, Part 1, Chapter 289, Radiation Control. 2.2. Purpose 2.2.1. The purpose of this document is to advise users of x-ray equipment about the potential hazards associated with the use of x-ray equipment, proper operating procedures, and safety precautions required to minimize radiation exposure to X-ray personnel, other staff, and the public without sacrificing x-ray quality. 2.3. Use of X-ray Equipment 2.3.1. X-ray equipment may not be used on living humans or animals. 2.4. Radiation Equipment: 2.4.1. IFS has four x-ray instruments: 2.4.1.1. A fixed x-ray unit. 2.4.1.2. A portable x-ray unit. 2.4.1.3. Two portable dental units. 2.5. X-Ray Hazards 2.5.1. X-ray equipment generates x-ray radiation when activated. 2.5.2. Exposure to radiation can cause permanent bodily injury including cancer and genetic damage. 2.6. Safety Precautions and Devices 2.6.1. Technique Chart 2.6.1.1. Use technique charts to minimize the number of x-rays that must be made. 2.6.1.1.1. A technique chart relevant to the particular x-ray unit is provided in the vicinity of the control panel and must be used by all operators. 2.6.1.2. Never exceed the maximum operating voltage and current recommended by the manufacturer. 2.6.2. Procedures 2.6.2.1. IFS staff may not hold a body while x-rays are being taken. 2.6.2.2. IFS staff should operate x-ray equipment from behind the lead lined operator wall. 2.6.2.3. The door to the x-ray room must be closed to take x-rays. 2.6.2.4. Staff must wear dosimeters (x-ray badges) when taking x-rays. 2.6.2.4.1. Dosimeters must be handled as described in Section 2.8. 2.7. Annual Dose Limits 2.7.1. Annual allowable x-ray dose limits are established by the Texas Department of Health and limit x-ray exposure to protect employees, embryo/fetus, and the public. 2.7.2. Occupational Workers 2.7.2.1.1. Total effective dose equivalent < 5 rem. 2.7.2.1.2. Sum of deep dose equivalent and committed dose equivalent to any individual organ or tissue < 50 rem.
Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program 3 IFS Radiation Safety Program Version 2.0

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2.7.2.1.3. Eye dose equivalent < 15 rems. 2.7.2.1.4. Shallow dose equivalent of 50 rems to the skin or to any extremity. 2.7.3. Embryo/Fetus 2.7.3.1.1. Dose to an embryo/fetus during the entire pregnancy < 500 mrem. 2.7.3.1.2. Efforts shall be made to keep exposure < 50 mrem per month. 2.7.4. Members of the Public 2.7.4.1.1. Total effective dose equivalent < 100 mrem. 2.7.4.1.2. Total effective dose equivalent from exposure to radiation from radiation machines < 500 mrem. 2.7.4.1.3. Dose in any unrestricted area does not exceed 2 mrem/h. 2.8. Personnel Monitoring Requirements 2.8.1. All staff present in the x-ray room and/or near the control panel must wear radiation badges (dosimeters) to measure x-ray exposure. 2.8.2. A radiation safety badge (dosimeter) must be worn at the unshielded location of the whole body likely to receive the highest exposure. Typically the dosimeter is worn at the neck (collar) of the autopsy scrubs. 2.8.3. As applicable, an embryo/fetus-monitoring device shall be located at the waist under any protective apron being worn by the woman. 2.8.4. Dosimeters must be worn during x-ray procedures. 2.8.5. Dosimeters should be left at Forensic Sciences when not in use. 2.8.6. Dosimeters should be protected from excessive heat. 2.8.7. Employees should ensure that dosimeters do not go into the laundry. 2.8.8. Unusual events related to dosimeters should be immediately reported to EHS Manager. 2.9. Room Shielding and Protective Devices 2.9.1. The x-ray room and control panel area is shielded by lead to prevent x-rays from leaving the x-ray room. 2.9.2. All routine x-rays should be taken in the x-ray room. 2.9.3. All staff must be behind lead shielded walls or leaded glass when x-ray equipment is operated in the x-ray room. 2.9.4. Protective devices such as lead aprons are not needed or used since cadavers are never to be held during an x-ray exposure. 2.10. Holding of Patients or Film 2.10.1. Although allowed by regulation in some cases, by IFS policy no individual may hold cadavers or film during x-ray exposure. Mechanical holding devices must be used if body positioning is required. 2.11. Film Processing Program 2.11.1. Film should be processed as recommended by the film manufacturer. 2.11.2. The processor is inspected and serviced as needed by an authorized vendor. 2.12. Posting Notices to Workers in Accordance with Texas DSHS Regulations 2.12.1. The following items are located in EHS Managers office and may be viewed by contacting her: 2.12.1.1. Radioactive Material License 2.12.1.2. Certificate of Registration 2.12.1.3. Operating Procedures applicable to License or Certificate of Registration

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

IFS Radiation Safety Program Version 2.0

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2.12.1.4. Notice of Violations issued by Texas Dept of HealthBureau of Radiation Control 2.12.2. The following items are posted in the Morgue: 2.12.2.1. Bureau of Radiation Control Notice to Employees 2.12.2.2. Current dosimetry exposure report 2.13. Posting of Radiation Areas 2.13.1. Radiation Area 2.13.1.1. Each radiation area shall be posted with a conspicuous sign bearing the radiation symbol and the words Caution, Radiation Area. 2.13.2. Radioactive Material Area 2.13.2.1. Each room in which there is used or stored radioactive material shall be posted with a conspicuous sign bearing the radiation symbol and the words Caution, Radioactive Materials. 2.14. Reporting Actual or Suspected Employee Exposure to X-Rays 2.14.1. Any actual or suspected exposure to x-rays must be immediately reported to your supervisor, and EHS Manager (x5990) or UT-Southwestern Radiation Safety at 214-648-2250. 2.15. Pregnancy 2.15.1. If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, it is recommended that you contact UT-Southwestern Radiation Safety for additional information. 3. Operating and Safety Procedures for Use of Anti-Static Bars for Balances 3.1. Radiation Hazard 3.1.1. Radiation hazard does not exist provided the integrity of the anti-static bars remains intact. 3.1.2. The device contains Polonium 210, an alpha emitter. 3.1.2.1. This radiation is harmless externally and cannot penetrate skin. 3.1.2.2. Functionally, alpha rays from the Po-210 travel through and ionize air, and the ionized air dissipates static charge. 3.2. Safety Precautions 3.2.1. Do not remove the protective grid or otherwise damage the integrity of the device. 3.2.2. Do not dispose of the device in the regular trash or send to County surplus. Send it back to the supplier. 3.2.3. Follow attached procedures. 3.3. Reporting Actual or Suspected Exposure 3.3.1. Any actual or suspected exposure to radiation must be immediately reported to your supervisor and Environmental Health and Safety Manager (x5990) or UTSouthwestern Radiation Safety (214-648-2250). Medical attention should immediately be provided to the injured employee.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

IFS Radiation Safety Program Version 2.0

This is an uncontrolled copy of a controlled document.


Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences SMOKING POLICY 1. Purpose 1.1. It is the purpose of this policy to provide areas for Institute staff and visitors to smoke and at the same time facilitate Institute safety and compliance with Dallas Countys Smoking and Tobacco Use Policy and the smoking policies of neighboring institutions, UT-Southwestern and Parkland. 1.1.1. All Dallas County buildings, including the Institute, are designated non-smoking and tobacco free facilities. 1.1.2. All Dallas County vehicles, including Institute vehicles, are designated nonsmoking areas. 1.1.3. UT-Southwestern and Parkland are designated non-smoking and tobacco free facilities both inside and outside with designated smoking locations only as noted below. 2. Designated Smoking Areas 2.1. IFS 2.1.1. Smoking is permitted for Institute staff and visitors in the following outdoor locations: 2.1.1.1. Near the fence in the back parking lot across from the loading dock. 2.1.1.2. On the back porches 2.1.1.2.1. This area is covered; however due to security measures, this area cannot be reached through the porch exit doors; staff will be required to walk around the building to reach this site. 2.1.1.3. Smoking is not allowed near the front entrance of the Institute or on the back dock since this is a public entrance for selected Institute vendors or in the vicinity of the walkway from the Institute to UT-Southwestern. 2.2. UT-Southwestern 2.2.1. Designated smoking area is the E Loading Dock (between Aston and the cafeteria). 2.2.2. Smoking is prohibited in any other indoor or outdoor location on the south campus. 2.3. Parkland 2.3.1. Designated smoking areas include the hut near the ER Garage and the McDonalds patio. 2.3.2. Smoking is prohibited elsewhere on the Parkland site, inside or outside. 3. Employee Responsibilities 3.1. It is the responsibility of all employees to abide by smoking policies of Dallas County, the Institute, Parkland, and UT-Southwestern. 3.2. Failure to comply with this policy is subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination. 3.3. Employees are also subject to fines and/or legal action imposed by other institutions.
Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Plan 1 Smoking Policy Version 2.0

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences WORKPLACE EXPOSURE AND INJURY REPORTING 1. Purpose 1.1. The goal of this program is to ensure that employees immediately report all job-related exposures and injuries, receive prompt medical attention if needed, and comply with Dallas County, state, and federal job-related injury reporting requirements. 2. Workplace Exposure and Injury Reporting Responsibilities 2.1. Dallas County Policy and Procedures 2.1.1. Procedures for reporting workplace exposures and injuries are established by Dallas County and overseen by Dallas County Human Resources. 2.1.2. Staff is required to be familiar with County policy. 2.2. Employee 2.2.1. It is the responsibility of each employee to immediately notify a supervisor of suspected workplace exposure and/or injury. 2.2.1.1. If a supervisor is not readily available, the Senior Medicolegal Death Investigator on duty should be notified and should contact a supervisor. 2.2.2. Failure of an employee to report timely is a violation of Dallas County policy and may jeopardize the employees legal rights in this regard. 2.3. Supervisor 2.3.1. It is the responsibility of a supervisor to consult with the injured employee, if possible, to assist with determining if medical attention is required, or if the employee is not able to communicate, to summon emergency assistance. 2.3.2. Supervisors are responsible for activating the Facility Emergency Response Plan as applicable. 2.3.3. Supervisors must remain knowledgeable about and follow Dallas County policy in reporting workplace exposures and injuries. 2.3.4. Supervisors must remain knowledgeable about and follow other reporting requirements as applicable: 2.3.4.1. Sharps Injury Reporting see the Biological Exposure Control Plan 2.3.4.2. Chemical Injury Reporting see the Chemical Safety Plan 3. Overview of Reporting Process 3.1. Supervisor and employee (as able) call Nurse on Call at 1-877-740-5017. 3.1.1. Advise nurse of your department name 3.1.1.1. Crime Lab 3.1.1.2. Crime Lab Breath Alcohol Technical Supervisor 3.1.1.3. Medical Examiner 3.2. Supervisor will assist the employee in completing the Workers Compensation Leave Authorization Form (Form Aud PR-1) and forward the completed document to IFS

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

Exposure and Injury Reporting Version 2.0

This is an uncontrolled copy of a controlled document.


Administration for distribution to Dallas County Human Resources Risk Management and the Dallas County Auditor. 3.3. Options for medical treatment: 3.3.1. The employee may seek medical treatment through the employee health center, a local emergency room, Parkland Occupational Health (biological exposure), or a physician of the employees choice. 3.3.1.1. Advise the health provider that this is a work related injury and provide them with workers comp claim information provided by Nurse on Call or Dallas County Human Resources. 3.3.1.2. If the employee is unable to drive or would prefer for someone else to drive them, a supervisor will arrange transportation to receive medical treatment. 3.4. Reporting lost time from work 3.4.1. No additional reporting is needed to visit a health care provider on the day of injury. 3.4.2. Lost time after the day of injury is reported by the supervisor using the Supplemental Report of Injury Form. 3.4.3. If an employee looses time from work beyond the day of the incident, the employee must have a health care provider release to come back to work. 3.4.3.1. If there are work restrictions, the employee must also provide the details of the work restrictions on the appropriate Workers Compensation reporting form (P/CS Form 200) that has been completed by the physician or other medical professional. 3.4.4. Supervisors and IFS Administration must review all modified or light duty medical releases prior to the employees return to work to ensure the return to work is appropriate and consistent with Dallas County policy. 3.4.4.1. Depending on the circumstances of the injury and the essential job duties of the affected employee, additional consultation with Dallas County Human Resources staff and County physicians by the supervisor and employee may be required. 3.5. Procedures and Reference Materials 3.5.1. Detailed workers compensation instructions are available to employees and supervisors 24 hours a day in the Field Agent area. 3.5.1.1. See the notebooks labeled Blood/Body Fluid Exposure Protocol and/or Workers Compensation Reporting. 3.5.2. Dallas County policies and procedures regarding workers compensation injury and illness may be found on-line in the Dallas County Code, Article VIII. 3.5.3. Questions about exposure and injury reporting should be referred to a supervisor or IFS Administration.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

Exposure and Injury Reporting Version 2.0

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Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences QUARTERLY INSPECTIONS AND ANNUAL SAFETY AUDIT 1. Overview 1.1. Quarterly inspections and an annual audit of the EHS Program will be conducted under the direction of the EHS Manager. 1.2. Other inspections, announced or unannounced, may be conducted at the discretion of the EHS Manager or upon request of the EHS Committee, the Director, or Section Chief. 1.2.1. The goal of these activities is to assist in maintaining a safe working environment, to further compliance with environmental and safety regulations, and to implement the EHS Program. 1.3. Results of environmental, health, and safety inspections and the annual Program audit will be communicated to the EHS Committee and the Director. 2. Annual Audit 2.1. An annual audit of the Environmental Health and Safety Program will be conducted by the EHS Committee led by the EHS Manager. 2.2. The audit will include but is not limited to the following: 2.2.1. Staffs awareness and compliance with environmental, health, and safety policies and procedures 2.2.2. Chemical safety compliance with IFS Chemical Safety Plan, hazardous chemical disposal, container labeling, chemical storage, use of hoods, preparedness for spills and releases, compliance with applicable laws and regulations, etc. 2.2.3. Biological safety compliance with the IFS Biological Exposure Control Plan, disposal of biological waste, container labeling, storage of biologicals, use of hoods, preparedness for spills and releases, compliance with applicable laws and regulations, etc. 2.2.4. Radiological safety - compliance with the IFS Radiation Safety Plan, UTSouthwestern Radiation Procedures, compliance with applicable laws and regulations, exposure history, etc. 2.2.5. Inspection for use of general safe-operating procedures 2.2.6. Inspection of the facility for slip/trip hazards, obstruction of exit routes, marked and lighted exits, etc. 2.2.7. Fire and emergency preparedness including fire extinguishers, exits, posting of evacuation routes, review of IFS Facility Emergency Response Plan and Emergency Warden System, first aid kits, stretcher/chair, safety shower, eye wash, etc. 2.2.8. Facility and staff exposure monitoring and reporting including lead in ranges, formaldehyde exposure monitoring, workers compensation reporting, etc. 2.2.9. Compliance checks such as hood velocity and x-ray equipment maintenance 2.2.10. Review of quarterly EHS Inspections 2.2.11. Review of staff environmental, health, and safety training 2.2.12. Other environmental, health, and safety issues

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

Inspections and Audits Version 2.0

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2.3. Problem areas will be addressed through the audit process or referred as a Request for Review to the Executive Committee and/or the EHS Committee as applicable. 2.3.1. Corrective action will be coordinated through the EHS Manager 2.4. As a part of the audit process, the EHS Committee and Manager will review this Program annually to ensure that procedures and policies reflect standard accepted practices in forensic laboratories and current legal requirements. 2.5. The EHS Committee will prepare a written report of the audit for the Director including identification of unresolved problem areas and recommendations for action. 2.6. The Director will review the report and respond in writing to the EHS Manager for implementation as appropriate. 2.7. A copy of the report will be made available to employees upon request to the EHS Manager. 3. Safety Inspections 3.1. Quarterly environmental, health, and safety inspections will be performed under the direction of the EHS Manager. 3.2. Other inspections may occur; these may be announced or unannounced. 3.3. Items identified in inspections and audits as needing action are communicated to applicable staff by the EHS Manager. 3.4. Unresolved issues or recurring issues are communicated to the EHS Committee or directly to the Director. 3.5. The EHS Committee reviews results of safety inspections.

Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences Environmental Health and Safety Program

Inspections and Audits Version 2.0