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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012
COVER PHOTOS BY BILL BOOCK AND JASON RIEDMILLER

3 NEWS
Page 4 – SPD officer won’t face criminal charges
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

NEWS

Page 5 – Council approves rental registration Page 8 – Tobyhanna celebrating a century Page 12 – County records system updated

Josh Kosin attempts to dunk over Imhotep Charter’s Nigel Grant on Wednesday. STORY: Page 27

16 ARTS
Page 16 – Matthew’s Mission Easter egg hunt set Page 17 – ’Grease’ the one West Side wants Page 21 – Slam poet headlines literary event

25 SPORTS
Page 25 – AH volleyball moves to Lack. League Page 27 – Holy Cross falls short in semis Page 28 – ROBINSON: Celebrate top athletes Page 37 – Youth hockey team in national playoffs

OUR TEAM
GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes 558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0483 rhowells@golackawanna.com Advertising Representative Karen Fiscus – 970-7291 kfiscus@timesleader.com Obituaries 558-0113 News Tips 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Hours of Operation 9a.m. – 6p.m.; M-F; 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton 18503

ARTS

Nights on the town well-deserved
Our respite came in the mail. Last week, my wife’s aunt sent an adorable invitation to the house. The special greeting was to request our daughter’s presence at her home from Friday night into Sunday afternoon. “Bring your brother and his stuff,” she added at the end. I’m not sure who was more excited about being away for the weekend – the kids or the grown-ups. Being a parent is consuming. Any good one will tell you that. With both parents working in most households today, ours is no different. My days are filled with headlines and deadlines, my nights with clean dishes

BEHIND THE BYLINES

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES
and playtime. Swap the hours around and you’ve got my wife’s schedule. So the opportunity to have the kids away for a bit was welcome. Lynz and I rarely get out, and when we do it’s either to the grocery store or with our respective friends on solo nights away from home. Friday and Saturday were different. We kicked off the weekend with a few drinks and some excellent music from our good friend, Mat Burke. The Abington Heights grad and I have

been close since he was one of my most reliable photographers at The Abington Journal. Now, a musician with a few discs under his belt, Mat was one of the opening acts for a headliner comprised of his buddies playing at The Keys. Catching up with Mat over a few brews as the missus sipped her Captain and coke was a great change. It was fun to see how Mat’s style and stage persona have evolved. His set list, built on original material and fantastic covers of hits by Alkaline Trio and Bouncing Souls, helped fuel a playlist that made deadline more bearable. On Saturday, we were set to travel to Wilkes-Barre for a production of “Chicago” starring another dear friend, Dane Bower.

Dane and I trace our roots to a college improv group as the only two members with enough knowledge of the alphabet to perform the AlphaLine skit forward and backward. Without seeing the show at the time of this writing, I’m sure we’re in for another treat. Dane knows how to command an audience, and this will be one of the few times I haven’t shared the stage with him. It is odd not having the kids around, though, and old habits die hard. I still found myself tip-toeing past their doors Saturday morning on my way to the bathroom, only to realize that there was no one to sneak past. This weekend provided a nice break, but it will be good to have them back home again.

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES needs more date nights. Email him at chughes@golackawanna.com

SPORTS

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Issue No. 2012-085
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GOLackawanna

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Providence inferno was arson
Tuesday fire displaced 19.
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

NEWS

S

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Slow response time to an East Mountain fire prompted the rehiring of 12 men back to the Scranton Fire Department. Returning men to the fire service helped reopen Engine 10.

CRANTON – Fire filled a North Scranton neighborhood as smoke billowed across the city late Tuesday night in a blaze that inspectors determined was deliberately set. Four homes on Langstaff Place, off Providence Road, were hit by the fire that Assistant Fire Chief Jeff White said began in 604-06 Langstaff Pl.

ARTS

FIRE REHIRES ANNOUNCED
Union, City Hall relax safety standards to better cover city
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

ast week’s decision from City Hall to rehire 12 men to the Scranton Fire Department was an easy one. “We still don’t have any money, but I’m not going to have somebody die,” Mayor Chris Doherty said Thursday. The March 16 decision came after 13 people were displaced from a fire on Swetland Street on March 12 that met appropriate response times. A second fire on March 16 was different, however. It took crews 10 minutes – almost twice the proper response time – to reach last week’s structure fire at 1125 Froude Ave. in the East Mountain section of the city. The engine company that would have responded first, Engine 10, had been permanently closed since January after council did not revise Doherty’s proposal to eliminate 29 fire fighters in the 2012 budget.

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Word quickly came down from City Hall later that day authorizing the rehiring of 12 men, who were put into service on Saturday, March 17. “The mayor met with the unions. The biggest problem was staffing,” explained Fire Chief Tom Davis on Thursday. “We rode with two men for the past 10 years. When they went to court, they were handed down a four-man staffing (requirement per apparatus). The mayor asked them if they would go to three for the simple reason that we could open another company. If they agreed, he said he would bring back the 12 men. That’s exactly what happened. “They were darn relieved and happy to come back.” While fire fighters stationed at the reopened Engine 10 on East Mountain Road on Friday afternoon could not comment on being rehired by the city, two of the men who were among the dozen first hired in Feb. 2003 couldn’t help but smile.

Plan was in place Doherty had directed Deputy Fire Chief Al Lucas to build a plan in January on how the city could rehire men through savings from a retiree prescription savings grant approved by council in Dec. 2011. The plan was projected by council to save $600,000, but officials questioned if and when that money would materialize. It’s now believe the city should receive those funds in June. “There were 13 positions in the budget based on council’s funding of the prescription rebate plan,” Lucas said Friday. “I was asking the administration, ‘If this is going to be real, I really need those 13 men to reopen Engine 10.’” The Oct. 2011 Supreme Court ruling concerning past arbitration and the city’s status as a distressed municipality included the language that required four fire fighters working on each apparatus. “On Mayor Doherty’s direction, I
See REHIRES, Page 10

“Three out of the four structures, they’re gone,” White said at about 1:50 a.m. Wednesday morning as fire crews continued to pour water onto the structures to eliminate hot spots that continued to erupt. The first call came in at 11:06 p.m. and the blaze occupied fire fighters for hours. The last company didn’t clear the scene until 8:04 a.m., according to the Scranton Fire Department website, www.scrantonfire.com. Crews spent parts of the day Wednesday and Thursday demolishing those structures. White estimated that 50 men from Scranton and Dunmore responded to the fire. Twenty-six men initially responded from the city. Chief Tom Davis said Thursday that the fire was ruled arson through a joint investigation by the Scranton and Pennsylvania State police departments. Fire crews were able to respond quickly after Engine 7 was cleared from an initial investigation called in at 10:54 p.m. to 1019 Albright Ave. for reports of a trash can on fire, according to www.scrantonfire.com. Crews spotted the fire on Langstaff, allowing them to respond in just over two minutes after the 11:06
See ARSON, Page 10

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012
stops before he was detained by police. Owens, who allegedly told police his name was Jamie, also allegedly swore at and “flipped off” The following criminal complaints police during the incident. were filed in Lackawanna County He was arraigned March 16 on one Court between Feb. 9 and March 19. All information is derivative of police count each of providing false identification, disorderly conduct, and affidavits, all charges are pending following preliminary hearings, and all harassment, and he was released on suspects are presumed innocent until $2,500 unsecured bail. A preliminary hearing is set for March 26. proven guilty. Hotel guest touched worker State worker allegedly bilked inappropriately businesses South Abington Police say MahThe Attorney General’s Public Cormoud Bakr Aqeel, 28, of Jackson ruption Unit arrested James McDonnell, 53, of Sanderson Ave., Scranton, Street., Scranton, allegedly grabbed an auditing supervisor with the State the buttocks of a hotel employee at the Inn at Nichols Village on March Workman’s Insurance Fund, on six 17. Aqeel allegedly asked to women counts of filing false statements of to come into a bathroom on the third financial interest, five counts of bribfloor of the hotel and asked her to ery, three counts of restricted activities, and two counts each of conspir- “come in to ‘see something.’” The employee, believing something was acy and dealing in proceeds of unbroken, entered the bathroom and lawful activity. Aqeel allegedly asked her to show McDonnell’s wife, Michelle, 44, is him her privates. She refused, and also charged with two counts of conwhen she turned to replace a trash spiracy. bag, he allegedly grabbed her butAuthorities allege Mr. McDonnell tocks. solicited and accepted bribes from Aqeel was arraigned March 17 on businesses between 1999 and 2011 in charges of indecent assault, disexchange for reductions in worker’s orderly conduct, and harassment. He compensation insurance premiums. Further, Mrs. McDonnell was allegedly was held for $5,000 bail, and a preliminary hearing is set for March 26. placed on the payroll of some affected businesses as a “ghost employee” Providence burglar wanted copper to arrange the payments. The McDonnell’s allegedly received pipes Police arrested 24-year-old Chrismore than $80,000 through the topher Burton, of Roach Court, scheme. Scranton, on March 17 after he was Both were arraigned March 19 and discovered inside a condemned proppreliminary hearings are set for March 26. Mr. McDonnell was released erty at 1152-54 Providence Rd., Scranton. Burton allegedly admitted on $50,000 unsecured bail, and Mrs. to police that he was “trying to steal McDonnell was released on $10,000 the copper pipes and (was) going unsecured bail. into the house because he needed Thief eyed dental hygiene money for food.” He also told police that he had smoked synthetic mariPolice allege Francis Robert Lomjuana that morning. bardo, 49, of South Webster Ave., Burton was arraigned March 17 on Scranton, attempted to steal two charges of theft by unlawful taking, packs of Crest whitening strips from receiving stolen property, criminal the K-Mart store in Moosic on March trespassing, and criminal mischief. 16. In an interview with police, LomHe was held for $10,000 bail, and a bardo allegedly said he stole the preliminary hearing is set for March items worth $54.99 each to sell for 26. $30 because “he needed the money for rent.” The retail theft was LombarKids’ clothes, intimates shoplifted do’s second, according to the comHolly Jill Huey, 36, of Tedrick plaint. Street, Pittston, allegedly attempted He was arraigned March 16 on one to steal $177.88 in toddler’s clothing count of retail theft and released on $5,000 unsecured bail. A preliminary and intimate apparel including bras and socks from the K-Mart on Moosic hearing is set for March 26. Street on March 17. When she was Man spit on doughnut shop stopped by loss prevention officers customers in the parking lot, she refused to Twenty-two-year-old Jeremy Owens, return to the store and fled with of South Main Street, Old Forge, alleg- another woman in a blue Pontiac G6. When police stopped the vehicle at a edly spit on two women inside the Curry Donuts on Wyoming Avenue on nearby Fidelity Deposit and Trust March 16 and yelled derogatory terms Bank on Birney Avenue, Huey was in the passenger seat and the alleged at bystanders waiting at nearby bus

NEWS

No charges in local officer investigation
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

POLICE BLOTTER

stolen items were in plain sight inside the car. Huey was arraigned on March 17 on two counts each of retail theft, receiving stolen property, and driving with a suspended license. She was released on $2,000 unsecured bail, and a preliminary hearing is set for March 26. Driver waived handgun at woman Anthony J. Allen, 31, of Royal Oaks Drive, South Abington Township, allegedly waived a hand gun at a woman driving along Sanderson Avenue on Feb. 9. The victim, Mary Ellen Walsh, told police that the driver of an older model Mercedes Benz honked his horn at her while she was stopped at a stop sign and began “waving a black hand gun at her.” She told police that he wasn’t pointing the hand gun at her but that the incident caused “extreme fear.” Police seized two weapons from Allen’s vehicle following a traffic stop with permission from Allen and his girlfriend, Rebecca Segall. Allen was arraigned Feb. 9 on charges of terroristic threats. The preliminary hearing has been continued twice, and the current hearing is set for April 23. Allen posted $5,000 bail on Feb. 10. Woman waives lip-biting hearing Talisa Nicole Collins, 24, of Stafford Ave., Scranton, waived a March 6 preliminary hearing on allegations that she bit her boyfriend’s lip following an argument. Police said Corey Cureton’s lip “was only attached by a small piece of skin.” Collins allegedly told police that she “bit his lip in self defense. Police said the injury would likely require plastic surgery. Collins was arraigned March 1 and waived all charges of aggravated assault, simple assault, harassment, and disorderly conduct on March 6. She was released on $5,000 unsecured bail. Stabbing case moves forward A man accused of stabbing a woman outside the St. Francis of Assisi soup kitchen on March 3 waived his hearing on March 21. Bruce Timothy Wild, 39, of Luzerne Street, Scranton, allegedly stabbed Donna Fuller earlier this month “because he was accusing her of seeing another man.” Wild was located by police near the railroad tracks on the 300 block of Olive Street. He was arraigned March 12 and waived all charges of aggravated assault, simple assault, and reckless endangerment at a March 21 preliminary hearing. He was held for $5,000 bail. - CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES

SCRANTON – The Lackawanna County District Attorney’s Office will not file criminal charges against a Scranton police officer that was placed under investigation in late February. The Pennsylvania State Police confirmed on Feb. 22 that they were investigating the officer. District Attorney Andy Jarbola said Friday, March 23 that the “allegations that came to us were thoroughly investigated by the state police, and we are of the opinion that the conduct does not rise to the level of crime that can be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.” Police Chief Dan Duffy said he was informed by the district attorney’s office that the officer would not be charged at about 3 p.m. The personnel matter, he added, would be under internal investigation. The officer in question, who both Jarbola and Duffy declined to identify, will be placed on administrative leave pending the completion of the department’s investigation. Duffy did not clarify if the officer would be paid or unpaid and estimated that an investigation could be completed in as little as two weeks. “Internal department violations can go anywhere from a verbal reprimand on up to termination,” Duffy said of possible repercussions for violating policy, procedure, rules, and regulations. Findings in personnel matters are not made public, he added. If the conduct rises to the level of termination, the suggestion would be handed over to Mayor Chris Doherty. “The only person that can hire and fire is the mayor,” Duffy said. The case has offered a complex problem to the department, the chief acknowledged. “It’s not routine for one of our own to be investigated for criminal matters. When we receive internal complaints, it’s not uncommon for us as a police agency to police our own to ensure that we’re doing what’s appropriate,” he said. “We have a tremendous department with a phenomenal group of people, and this is a rarity.” Duffy said he was pleased that the state police and district attorney’s office found no criminal conduct. He said no officers have been reassigned to other duties after the beginning of the investigation.

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Sunday, March 25, 2012

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SCRANTON CITY COUNCIL

Revised rental registration plan approved
RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

NEWS

RICH HOWELLS PHOTO

Christopher Trevisani speaks to council about the proposed senior housing development in the city’s Green Ridge section on March 15.

LERTA decision still outstanding
RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – City Council discussed granting a New Yorkbased developer tax abatement on a planned senior housing development in the Green Ridge section during a public caucus held before council’s March 15 meeting. According to Christopher Trevisani, director of development for Affordable Senior Housing Opportunities of New York, Inc., the $8 to $10 million project would contain 121 one- and twobedroom apartment units at $700 to 800 a month including heat and hot water. The 115,000square-foot, three-story building wouldbelocatedonalotonDelawareStreetandDicksonAvenue, a portion of the former Daron Northeast site. “This proposed use is kind of an ideal situation. It’s surroundedbyanexistingresidentialcommunity and it’s in need of some type of development. I think industrial use is inappropriate there,” Trevisani said of the zoning of the proposed building site. The “self-sustaining building” would contain exercise rooms, a private post office, and other amenities to “cater to (the) needs” of seniors and would employ three to five full-time staff

members. The venture would be the company’s second in Pennsylvania, the first located in Erie. “It is on an old coal mine, so we do have some very extensive foundation costs,” Trevisani pointed out. “The cost of developing the facility construction is in the $10 to $15 million dollar range.” To help pay down this cost, the company is seeking approval of a Local Economic Revitalization Tax Act program, which providers developers with a real estate tax freeze as opposed to tax elimination offered through the Keystone Opportunity Zone program. The Scranton School Board of Directors approved the LERTA last September, but the program must be approved by at least two taxing bodies, leaving either the city or Lackawanna County. “Affordable Senior Housing is obligated under the statute to pay the current real estate taxes. If it were to acquire this site and develop this site, the current real estates on the land portion would be paid. It’s the improvement portion that would be postponed in accordance with the LERTA statute,” Atty. Frank Hoegan explained, adding that the LERTA would give a oneyearyeartaxabatementforevery

$1 million in improvements invested with a cap at $10 million. Council agreed with Trevisani that the project would be a significant improvement to a troubled area. “When I condemned this for the Scranton Redevelopment Authority, there were a lot of delinquent taxes on the building that was there. The neighbors were complaining at that time because of drug addicts, fires in the building,” council solicitor Boyd Hughes recalled. While Trevisani presented council with a petition signed by neighbors saying that they would be in favor of such a development, several citizens who spoke during council’s subsequent meeting were opposed to granting the LERTA, saying that taxpayers were more in need of a break than a large developer. Council has yet to introduce legislation to approve the LERTA but seemed largely in favor of it. “It seems like a very noteworthy project from first glance. The $700-800 a month range for rent does seem affordable, and the creation of some green space is definitely something that I believe would benefit that neighborhood,” Councilman Frank Joyce said.

SCRANTON – City Council unanimously repealed an old ordinance and gave final approval to a new rental registration program on March 22 that will add fees and stronger provisions to a previously ineffective law. Council believes the previous rental program dissolved in 2008 due to employment cuts within the city, and penalties for noncompliance lacked weight and enforcement. It took over a year for the legislation to materialize before its passage on Thursday. Property owners will now owe an annual rental registration fee of $15 per rental unit and an annual permit fee of $50 per site. The ordinance lists the duties of owners and requires all owners to obtain a minimum of $50,000 in fire legal liability insurance and “casualty insurance in an amount sufficient to either restore or remove the building.” Several city officials are authorized to enforce the program, and the Licensing, Inspections, and Permits department may close a rental unit if multiple violations of the ordinance occur, among other provisions. Councilman Bob McGoff met with Councilman Pat Rogan during the week to decide on amendments based on feedback from council and the Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS. “The safety inspection was included so that it would not hinder property owners and enforce unnecessary inspections for properties that were up to code and operating with of the safety of the tenants in mind,” McGoff explained. While he said some things “maybe have been left out,” amendments can be made in the future to address those issues as they arise, including the possible hiring of a program coordinator. Rogan said it was a “good first step” that will hopefully “cut down on some of the blight in our neighborhoods.” Insurance services approved, but questioned

In other business, council unanimously approved the first reading of a contract with Knowles Associates, LLC for insurance brokerage services from April 1 through March 31, 2013, a contract which was put out to bid at the request of council, through Knowles was the lone bidder, Councilman Jack Loscombe said. Examining the coverage, he said the buildings, not including the content of the Albright Memorial Library, 500 Vine St., and the Nancy K. Holmes Branch Library, 1032 Green Ridge St., are insured “for well over” $4 million, but he questioned the city’s insurable interest in the libraries. “Since the deeds are in the hands of the Library Authority, that has taken the insurable interest away from the city, as we do not have the deeds. I was just wondering if we could check with them, if the Library Authority could be billed for that part of the insurance policy. That was one of the reasons they wanted to form an authority, so they could properly insure their buildings. It just doesn’t seem right when all the other authorities handle their own insurance,” Loscombe said. Firemen reinstated Council expressed approval of Mayor Chris Doherty’s reinstatement of 12 firefighters laid off in the 2012 budget. Council President Janet Evans emphasized that the mayor had to make the reinstatements, but council will provide and approve legislation for their funding, which is currently being drafted. She said the union had to agree to reduce the number of personnel per apparatus from four to three in order to provide increased fire protection. The positions will be paid for with Urban Development Action Grant funds, contingency funds, and funds set aside for unemployment, street salting and snow removal, and overtime. A prescription health care savings grant worth $600,000 will be used to reimburse the budgetary accounts.

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CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

University’s free tax service going strong
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program enters its final week Monday. University of Scranton, Brennan Hall, Room 111 – no appointment necessary Mon., March 26 and Wed., March 28, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Tues. March 27, noon to 6 p.m.; and Fri., March 30, 9 a.m. to noon. University of Scranton, Brennan Hall, Room 111 – appointments required Sun., April 1, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Make appointments by calling the United Way at (570) 343-1267, ext. 222.
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

LEARN MORE

SCRANTON – With the deadline to file federal and state taxes quickly approaching, a core group of students and volunteers continue to gain valuable experience while helping residents of Lackawanna and Wayne counties. TheUniversityofScrantoncontinued its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program this year with a kick-off in February. Since that time, accounting majors and volunteers have traveled the area to help senior citizens and those with low-to-moderate incomes with free assistance in filing their local, state, and federal tax returns. “We do tax returns pretty much all over the county,” said Joe Hammond, University of Scranton adjunct professor of accounting and coordinator of VITA, noting that the program began in the 1970s. VITA served more than 1,500 people in 2011, returning more

than $1.3 million to the community, according to the University of Scranton. “We’re at 1,300 and change now,” Hammond said this week. “More than likely, we’ll go over 1,500 again.” The program reaches many

Accounting majors Rory Lynch and Mark McNally review documents inside Brennan Hall as part of the University of Scranton’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program.

more residents from Taylor to Honesdale with the help of volunteers and interpreters trained through the United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne Counties. United Way President Gary Drapek said the Scranton-based program has been recognized by

the Internal Revenue Service as one of the best programs in the state. University accounting majors who work on the program walk away with priceless perspectives on how to file tax returns. Senior accounting major Mark McNally, a native of Pocono Pines, first volunteered in 2011. “I’ve learned tons of skills for

doing tax returns. It’s good experience,” McNally said this week between returns he filed at Brennan Hall on the university’s campus. The work, McNally admitted, can be stressful, especially on busy days. “You get a return, finish it, and you’re immediately on to another return.” People, however, are almost always appreciative of the service provided. “We get a lot of people that say it’s a great service. ‘This saves me a lot.’ If feels great to hear that,” McNallysaid,addingthatareturn prepared by a commercial organization can cost about $200. “It’s a really great marriage of a need in the community and qualified people to address that need,” Drapek said. As tax time approaches, the system is still in high demand. VITA served 42 people on Monday. The service ends with an appointment-only session on April 1.

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GOLackawanna
finding and meeting with potential sponsors. Cadden holds professional membership in the Greater Scranton Board of Travis Realtors and is a local radio and television host with WILK radio and Electric City Television. She also volunteers on various community boards, including Scranton Tomorrow, Friendship House, the Community Intervention Center, YMCA, and the Society of Irish Women, among others. Morrison is currently the secretary for development at the Diocese of Scranton where he assists Diocesan parishes, departments, and ministries in their development efforts. He was previously executive director of the Lackawanna Bar Association and has a wide range of experience in the areas of stewardship, donor relations, and Catholic school development. He serves on the board of directors of St. Joseph’s Center and is involved in various other community activities.
Send news about recent promotions, awards, or new hires in your organization to news@golackawanna.com, via fax at (570) 558-0854, or by phone at (570) 558-0113.

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CORPORATE LADDER
Regional Hospital names employees of year
Three employees of Regional Hospital of Scranton are being honored as top employees of the year. Employee of the Year Patricia Slusser, RN, intensive care unit (ICU), has worked at Regional since 1997. She was nominated by ICU Nurse Manager Maureen Kane who says that she is a strong resource for the department and the hospital. Slusser lives in Yatesville with her husband, Shawn, and their infant daughter, Mia. Clinical Manager of the Year Gordon Travis, RNFA, BSN, director of surgical services, has worked at Regional since 1986. He was nominated by Patricia Dei Tos, chief nursing officer, who notes that since Gordon began to manage surgical services in 2008 he has created an atmosphere of mutual respect and developed a first-rate staff where clinical competency and compassion are highly valued. Travis serves as a youth soccer coach in Archbald. He and his wife, Rosemary, have three children - Kristin, Erin, and Daniel. Non-Clinical Manager of the Year Gerald J. Korea, executive

COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Northeast Broadcast Employment Fair, Mon., March 26, 4-6 p.m., WVIA Studios, 100 WVIA Way, Pittston. ‘Women and Health Disparities,’ Fri., March 30, noon, Medical Sciences Building of The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine St., Scranton. Cost: Free. Info: www.thecommonwealthmedical.com. Alley-Oop for Autism, 3-on-3 charity basketball tournament to benefit the Northeast Regional Autism Center, hosted by The Commonwealth Medical College, Sat., March 31, Lackawanna College Student Union, 500 Jefferson Ave., Scranton. Registration from 8-8:45 a.m., games begin at 9 a.m. Cost: $40 per team before March 29. Info: www.thecommonwealthmedical.com/ basketball. Marley’s Mission Hoops for Hope Tournament, Sat. and Sun., March 31 and April 1, Scranton High School, 63 Munchak Way, Scranton. 3-on-3 format with one alternate player. Cost: Sixth to eight grade or high school division, $80 per team; adult teams, $120. RSVP by March 24.

Bauman

Cadden

Morrison

Korea

NEWS

director of information technology, worked for Regional from 1997 to 2008 and was rehired in 2010 as executive director of information technology. He manages the day-to-day operations of the information technology department and the telecommunications department. Korea was tasked with completing multiple information technology conversions with the hospital ownership change in 2011. He completed the IT cutover in four months while also maintaining daily operations. His technical knowledge, experience and professionalism have been described as exceptional. Korea lives in Duryea with his wife, Kelly, and their children, Marissa and Mark.

John W. Cosgrove, president of the Board of Directors of Neighborhood Housing Services of Lackawanna County, announced the recent appointment of Kurt

Three join NHS board

Bauman, Laurie Cadden, and Jason Morrison to the Board of Directors. Bauman serves as the executive director of the Nonprofit & Community Assistance Center (NCAC) and Government Services Manager for the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA). He has over 15 years experience providing professional project and contract management services and program development for private, non-profit and government entities. He serves on the board of directors of the Greater Scranton YMCA and the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) NEPA Chapter, as well as several other nonprofit advisory boards. Bauman is also an adjunct faculty member at Marywood University. Cadden is owner of Laurie Cadden Enterprises and a real estate agent at ERA Real Estate in Scranton. At Laurie Cadden Enterprises, she is responsible for securing sponsorships, working with media partners, planning and organizing special events, and

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Milestone for army depot
T
ANDREW M. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com

NEWS

he Tobyhanna Army Depot will celebrate 100 years of military presence in the Poconos this summer -- a milestone that was uncertain 17 years ago. In 1995, the depot found itself on a short list of U.S. military installations identified by an independent review panel charged with deciding which facilities to close.
since there are Department of Defense line items specific to depots. Depots operate on revenue generated from contracts with the armed forces, not dedicated allocations. “We operate as a business. Depots are the closest thing in government to the private sector. It’s our corporate philosophy that has made the organization successful,” said Col. Charles C. Gibson, commander of the Tobyhanna Army Depot. That business philosophy also dictates that there’s always a better, more efficient way to do things and employees are urged to come up with ideas and methods that could achieve that goal. “Tobyhanna has survived and grown because of the quality of its products and services, and the efficiency and productivity of our workforce. We constantly stress to our managers and employees that we must continually improve in all areas of our operations if we are to remain the best value for our customers,” Gibson said. Emphasis on quality Thinking back to1985, Katulka recalled “it was a different world … there were many more depots.” But as technology has evolved and conflicts have raged in Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia and Bosnia, the depot has continually met the challenges and stepped up production. “Our employees take pride when repairing equipment for our war fighters,” Gibson said. “Best quality, lowest cost, ontime delivery. Our foremost mission is providing the highest quality support to our armed forces, but we also believe we have an obligation to the people of northeastern Pennsylvania to maintain Tobyhanna as a key component of the regional economy.”

Residents and leaders throughout northeastern Pennsylvania rallied around the region’s largest employer and staved off closure. “It was an emotional time,” said James Antonelli, 54, of Sugarloaf Township, who has worked at the depot since 1985. Robert Katulka, 48, of Mountain Top, started a year after Antonelli and recalled the fight to save his workplace. “There was a lot of activity and a lot of interest both in the depot and with local officials. In some ways it was very exciting; in some ways stressful,” Katulka said. “It was a display of what the area can do when they focus on a common task. It was an example of a shining moment.” While thousands of their neighbors work at the facility, it wasn’t until they almost lost the depot that area residents really understood what it meant for the region’s economy. “That (1995) was the first time the community realized what was here,” said Antonelli. Large regional footprint Sue Rudat, 50, of Duryea, said the depot’s footprint is so large – drawing employees from an 11 county area – that rallying around it is unusual. “It took the BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure Commission) to pull it together,” said Rudat, who has worked at the installation for seven years. While Tobyhanna was spared in the 1995 and more BRAC closures in 2005, other regions weren’t so lucky. But their loss was northeastern Pennsylvania’s gain. More than 100 workers were transferred from California’s McClellan Air Force Base to Tobyhanna. As depots and work performed at bases nationwide were cut, Tobyhanna continued to pick up new contracts, which in the military world means survival

COURTESY PHOTO

The Tobyhanna Army Depot employs more than 5,500 people.

PUBLIC INVITED
The Tobyhanna Army Depot will open its gates to the public on Sat., June 23, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a celebration of the army’s century long affiliation with Tobyhanna. Guided tours of the depot, a car show, Humvee rides, historic military equipment and vehicles will be on display, a children’s carnival and drop-ins from the Army’s Golden Knights parachute team will be part of the celebration. There will also be a 5K run and parade at the depot.

ARTS

Katulka, a Meyers High School graduate, said the region’s work ethic is partly to credit for the depot’s success. “I’ll stack our people up against any installation in the country,” Katulka said. When the discussion turns to the potential loss of Tobyhanna and its impact on the region, the word multiple people interviewed for this story used was “devastating.” Antonelli said that what a major downsizing or closing “would do to the local unemployment rate, the local tax base, the value of people’s homes, I would think it would be a significant negative impact. ‘Devastating’ would probably be a good word.” Steve Zaricki, with the NEPA Alliance, an economic development organization serving the region, said Tobyhanna is unique in that it impacts people and businesses in such a large geographic area. “I’m not familiar with any other

A helicopter is on display at theTobyhanna Army Depot.

DON CAREY PHOTO

SPORTS

industry that comes close to these numbers,” Zaricki said after reeling off the economic impact associated with the depot. More than 5,500 people are employed by the Monroe County facility and some estimates show that it generates $4.4 billion in regional economic activity. Other than Wyoming Countybased Procter and Gamble, Zaricki said nothing even comes close. “Four point four billion dollars,” Zaricki said, “is a lot of money.” Unique position now Even with the challenges and uncertainties the depot has faced over its history, those working there believe its future is safe. “There’s really no other facility that can duplicate what Tobyhanna has,” Rudat said. “So that’s an

advantage we have within the (Department of Defense).” The depot has become so essential that shutting it down would not only hurt the region but could hurt the military, too. “This is an enduring installation,” said Katulka. “That’s not me saying that. That’s the Army that’s said that. We’re going to be around in some shape or form. Like everything else we’re going to continue to evolve. … We’ll be around. We think we have a bright future not withstanding the challenges that we’ve got ahead of us.” Those challenges, Antonelli said, include “declining defense budgets, the changes to the Army force structure. As they go down there will be less need for our equipment. Disposable technology means big changes. Money’s driving most of it.”

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

PAGE 9

10

GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

ARSON
Continued from page 3

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Maj. Gen. William D. Razz Waff; John Belcher, military affairs constituent adviser to U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta; Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty; and Maj. Gen. Wesley E. Craig cut the ceremonial ribbon outside the Scranton Armed Forces Reserve Center on March 22.

Battle cry welcomes new military center
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – With a hearty “hooah” at the request of Maj. Gen. Wesley E. Craig, members of the Pennsylvania National Guard and United States Army Reserve filled a brand new assembly hall with the battle cry on Thursday, March 22, during a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Scranton Armed Forces Reserve Center. The new $25 million, 125,000-square foot complex will be the home of multiple National Guard and Army Reserve units. “Together, the soldiers of these diverse units will use the state-of-the-art facility to ensure that the Army continues to provide ready and trained troops to support our nation,” said master of ceremonies Nick Taylor of the 99th Regional Support Command The construction of the new center at 3401 Olyphant Ave., Scranton, was the result of a base realignment and closure act approved in 2005 that replaced reserve and guard centers with consolidated armed forces centers across the county. In Scranton, the Watres Armory an Adams Avenue and Serrenti Memorial Army Reserve Center on Colfax Avenue were closed, along with an additional Army Reserve center in Wilkes-Barre. “In doing this, we’re trying to make sure we have the best possible facilities in the 21st century for our soldiers who will be using these buildings,”

explained Maj. Gen. William D. Razz Waff, commanding general of the 99th RSC. Waff lauded the “beautiful, historic” Watres Armory, commonly referred to as “The Castle” on Wednesday. “You great soldiers come together and make this your new military home,” he said. “Bring that same spirit of the Castle with you and use this wonderful facility to continue to keep those skills honed that you have so well polished.” “I have spent many times in the Castle, and it is indeed historic. It’s a beautiful, but very old, facility. We will miss the history,” Craig, adjutant general of Pennsylvania and commander of the Pennsylvania National Guard, added. “Guard and reserve soldiers have served together on the battlefield, from World War II to the current day, and now they have a place to work together and train together in the same environment.” While the ribbon cutting was just held Thursday, the center played a critical role as the site of the state’s emergency active duty mission in response to flooding caused by tropical storms in Sept. 2011. The center was built on the site of a former culm dump, according to Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty. “We are thrilled with the investment the military has made in this site,” he said. “It will change the neighborhood, and it has changed the neighborhood.”

p.m. call. It’s unclear if the trash fire and arson are connected in any way. The fire spread quickly, Davis said. “Unfortunately, when you have a fire that’s coming out windows and doors, it’s so hot that the exposures are going to go, and that’s exactly what happened,” he said. No lives were lost and no injuries were reported from Tuesday’s blaze. Among the 19 people displaced by the blaze were four adult consumers, two supported living tenants, and two staff members from Keystone Community Resources at a home at 608 Langstaff Pl. The agency serves both children and adults with intellectual disabilities, developmental disabilities, and autism. “We’re really happy for the first responders who got there and did such a great job,” said Don Barney, director of clinical services at KCR. “The good news from out point of view is that everyone came out safely… We’re really proud of our staff and their response.” KCR operates “about 50 homes around Scranton” that are designed to provide resident consumers and tenants various

ARTS

NEWS

PHOTO COURTESY BILL BOOCK / SCRANTON FIRE DEPT.

levels of assistance with daily living skills. Those displaced Tuesday will soon be transi-

Crews battle the massive fire along Langstaff Place late Tuesday night.

tioned into a permanent home after leaving temporary housing.

“Unfortunately, when you have a fire that’s coming out windows and doors, it’s so hot that the exposures are going to go, and that’s exactly what happened.”
— Chief Tom Davis

REHIRES
Continued from page 3

put together what could be done to keep three men on a piece and what that would do,” Lucas said. “The safety language is very important and will come back into play once we financially get back on our feet. We haven’t given up on the safety language. At this point, we said if we could get these 12 guys back that we would relax the standards that have been put forth by the Supreme Court.” Baptism by fire The men were needed soon after being put back into fire com-

SPORTS

panies across the city on Tuesday night when Davis said an arsonist torched one home on Langstaff Place in the Providence section that spread to three neighboring homes. Additional men on duty, coupled with the agreed-upon three men per piece of fire equipment, put two other engine companies in service to fight the 11 p.m. fire until 8 a.m. Wednesday. Money talks The “totally unacceptable” response time on March 16 caused by company closures was key to last week’s action by Doherty. A mild winter and savings from the retiree prescription plan didn’t hurt the cashstrapped city either.

“Through (Urban Development Action Grant) money, I had $95,000. We’ve had a good winter and saved almost $200,000 in plowing and salt,” Doherty explained. Both Doherty and Davis said they hope a Staffing for Adequate Fire & Emergency Response grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency will bring more men back. “We put in for the SAFER grant, and I was in Washington Tuesday where I met with Sen. (Bob) Casey, went to the vice president’s residence, and made our plea,” Doherty said. Davis said last week that the city has applied for $12 million in SAFER grants.

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

PAGE 11

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

Online records system improved
“We have piles and piles of documentation that is now available on your computer, in your home, in your office. I think what we have done with this online, free service to the public is something that will change the course of history in Lackawanna County.”

MEETING NOTICES
• Planning commission, work session, Tues., March 27, 5:30 p.m., administration building, 801 Boulevard Ave., Dickson City.

p.m., City Hall, 340 N. Washington Ave.

SCRANTON – When Lackawanna County leaders introduced their online database of records ranging from marriage licenses and wills to judicial records in Oct. 2011, it was lauded as a “giant leap forward in open government.” The system, officials soon learned, was rather more of a small step as it was not accessible to many users, primarily those using Apple products. That changed Tuesday, March 20, when officials unveiled improvements to the system that make it compatible with a number of Internet browsers and no longer require users to download a program to gain access. “We had a couple of telephone calls from some people that weren’t happy,” Register of Wills and Clerk of the Orphans’ Court Linda Munley explained. “When the public spoke, we answered.” In cooperation with Clerk of Judicial Records Mary Rinaldi and Lackawanna County Chief Information Officer Jeff Mando, the new searchable database has been embedded into a page accessible through the county’s website, www.lackawannacounty.org. There is a 24-hour turnaround time for new docu-

Mary Rinaldi Clerk of Judicial Records

ments from the Clerk of Courts and other affiliated offices. “It’s an amazing amount of information out there,” Munley said. “Millions of documents have been scanned.” “We have piles and piles of documentation that is now available on your computer, in your home, in your office,” Rinaldi said. “I think what we have done with this online, free service to the public is something that will change the course of history in Lackawanna County.” Mando said the system will also work with the iPad, iPhone, and other mobile browsers without any unneces-

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sary downloads. The Lackawanna County Records Improvement Committee funded the system through state-mandated fees set aside for records improvement. County leaders said last fall that INFOCON was contracted to provide the service for a monthly fee of $3,225. Commissioners Jim Wansacz and Pat O’Malley lauded the collaborative effort that brings more government access to the general public. “Now, it’s about providing access to everyone who lives in Lackawanna County,” Commissioner Corey O’Brien added in addressing some of the pitfalls of the previous system. “Today is a great day for access in Lackawanna County. “It’s a great gift, I think, to the taxpayers.” County leaders said they believed the Lackawanna system was the only free one in the commonwealth. Users should allow pop-ups on the records website and are encouraged to report any errors they see in the course of their research.

DICKSON CITY

THROOP

NEWS

DUNMORE

• Council work session, Mon., March 26, 6:30 p.m., municipal building, 436 Sanderson St., Throop. Meeting immediately follows.

• Conditional use hearing, Mon., March 26, 6:30 p.m., Dunmore Community Center, 1414 Monroe Ave., on the application of NEPA SMSA to construct a stealth telecommunications antenna tower at the rear of the borough property located at 1414 Monroe Ave. • Borough council, Mon., March 26, 7 p.m., Dunmore Community Center, 1414 Monroe Ave., Dunmore. • Zoning hearing board, Thurs., March 29, 7 p.m., municipal building, 400 S. Blakely St. Business includes construction of an advertising sign at 620 N. Blakely St. for Joe’s Kwik Mart, work by Lamar Advertising, Scranton.

• Commissioners meeting, Wed., March 28, 10 a.m., sixth floor, 200 Adams Ave., Scranton. • Prison board, Wed., March 28, noon, county prison, 1371 N. Washington Ave., Scranton.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

ARTS

SCRANTON

• School board, Mon., March 26, 7”30 p.m., administration building, 425 N. Washington Ave. • City council, Thursdays, 6:30

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

PAGE 13

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

NEWS BRIEFS
Toddler killed in fall
SCRANTON - Authorities say a toddler died after falling from the window of a fifth-floor Scranton apartment on Monday Officials in Scranton said 2-year-old Brian Kochis fell more than 60 feet from an open window of a relative’s apartment at about 10:40 a.m. Monday. Lackawanna County Coroner Tim Rowland said following an autopsy performed Tuesday that Kochis died as a result of multiple traumatic injuries from the fall, and the manner of death was accidental. Police Lt. Martin Crofton said the child was visiting his great-grandfather, Charles Williams, at his apartment in the Washington West complex, 537 N. Washington Ave. Williams told police his great-grandson liked to look out the window at cars traveling on Wyoming Avenue behind the building, which is operated by the Scranton Housing Authority. The boy was pronounced dead at 11:01 a.m. in the emergency department of Community Medical Center in Scranton. STEVE MOCARSKY / smocarsky@timesleader.com

Shareholders: Bank lost $44.3M in 2009 by making unsound loans

NEWS

BILL TARUTIS

Mellow departs boards, plea set
Former state Sen. Robert J. Mellow has resigned from his positions as director of Penseco Financial Services Corp. and its subsidiary, Penn Security Bank and Trust Co., according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing made public Tuesday. Mellow, 70, of Peckville, had served on the board of Penseco since the bank merged with Old Forge Bank in 2009. The resignation, according to the form 8-K filing, was effective March 15. Last week Mellow, the former Democratic leader of the state Senate, signed paperwork agreeing to plead guilty to two federal corruption charges. His guilty plea has been scheduled for April 27 before U.S. District Judge Joel H. Slomsky in federal court in Philadelphia. Mellow also resigned from his position as a board member of Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania, based in WilkesBarre, this week. ANDREW M. SEDER / aseder@timesleader.com

Attorney Joseph R. Solfanelli, left, explains a lawsuit against First National Community Bancorp., Inc., Dunmore, for ’unsafe and unsound business practices’ as Atty. Todd J. O"Malley looks on.

ARTS

FNCB ACCUSED OF DUBIOUS LOANS
TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

S

CRANTON – Blinded by the desire to help their friends attain wealth, board members of First National Community Bancorp grantedmillionsofdollarsinquestionableloanstofellowbankdirectorsand other insiders who later defaulted, said two attorneys who filed a lawsuit on behalf of shareholders Wednesday.

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The unsound lending practices, which included loans to former Luzerne County Judge Michael Conahan, helped fuel significant losses at the bank and cost shareholders more than $50 million, said attorneys Joseph Solfanelli and Todd O’Malley of the O’Malley and Langan law firm. The lawsuit seeks to force the bank to turn over all records related to loans made to board members and persons or businesses related to them, known as “insider” loans by federal regulators. The suit, filed on behalf of shareholder Lori Gray of Pottstown, seeks to recover losses the attorneys contend were the result of “egregious” conduct by board members, whom they allege breached their fiduciary duty to protect the interests of shareholders by making unsound loans that led the bank to lose $44.3 million in 2009.

The bank’s stock fell from $18.95 in December 2007 to just $3.85 per share as of Monday. Some of those losses are attributed to a large volume of insider loans made to directors and/or their family members, Solfanelli said. “The most plausible explanation is, in their desire to help friends, their vision became blurred and they approved loans theyotherwisewouldnothaveapproved,” Solfanelli said. “If this was the directors’ own money and they desired to help a friend acquire wealth, I would applaud them. But they didn’t risk their own money.Seventypercentofthemoneytheyrisked belonged to shareholders.” The bad loans include $4.5 million in debt guaranteed by Conahan, who served on the bank board until he was indicted on corruptionchargesin2009,andrealestate developer Michael G. Cestone, who also served on FNCB’s board until 2009. That money was used by W-Cat, a corporation owned by Conahan, former Judge Mark Ciavarella, attorney Robert Powell and others, to fund the failed Sanctuary townhouse project in Wright Township. Cestone’s construction company was the builder for the project. First National Community Bancorp is the parent company of First National CommunityBankofDunmore,whichwas once controlled by area business magnate Louis DeNaples. DeNaples, the former owner of Mount

Airy Casino Resort, served on the bank’s boardfordecadesbeforesteppingdownas chairman in 2008 after he was charged with perjury for allegedly lying to state officialsinvestigatinghissuitabilitytoholda gaminglicense.Thechargewaslaterwithdrawn, but federal regulators have barred DeNaples’ return to the board. His brother, Dominick, now chairs the board. Steve Tokach, president and CEO of FNCB, did not return a phone message Thursday seeking comment on the lawsuit. In a letter to Solfanelli, attorneys for the bank said a committee has been formed to investigate questions raised by the attorneys.Thatcommitteehasnotyetcompleted its report. The suit, filed in Lackawanna County Court, is based partly on the annual report FNCB, which is publicly traded, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in Dec. 2011. The report showed the bank had made $105.7 million worth of loans to insiders as of the end of 2009, a figure that equaled 128 percent of its net assets. More troubling, Solfanelli said, is that $8.9 million worth of the loans FNCB made to insiders are in default and are uncollectible.Another$7.5millionininsider loans have been deemed to be at high risk for default. Solfanelli said the amount of insider loans FNCB made is way out of line with
See FNCB, Page 15

SPORTS

Sunday, March 25, 2012

GOLackawanna

15

SPRING BREAK FOR AUTISM SET

The new Susquehanna Brewing Company, 635 S. Main St., Pittston, will host Spring Break for Autism on Friday, March 30 from 6 to 10 p.m. The event benefits the Northeast Regional Autism Center at Friendship House and the autism services it provides. Beer, wine, light fair, and music will be provided. Tickets are $25 or $250 for a table of ten, or $30 at the door. For more information, call (570) 342-8305, ext. 2063 or visit www.friendshiphousepa.org. Committee members planning the event include, from left, seated, Deb Dudley, director of development at Friendship House; and Peter Sabia. Standing, Sue Keating and Patti Duguay.

FNCB
Continued from page 14

otherbanks.HepointedtoFirstFidelity Bancorp of Scranton as an example. That bank has just $2.5 million in loans to insiders, which equates to about 5 percent of its net worth, he said. A banking consultant contacted by The Times Leader concurred with Solfanelli’s assessment. Stuart Greenberg, a banking

consultant based in Baltimore, Md., said insider loans typically should not exceed 20 to 30 percent of a bank’s net worth. “One hundred plus percent? That’s way too high,” Greenberg said. “It doesn’t pass the smell test.” The lawsuit targets directors who were on the board during the time frames in which the insider loans were made and the losses were sustained. In a letter to the bank, Solfanelli identified those directors as Conahan, Michael G. Cestone, Michael

J. Cestone Jr., Joseph Coccia, Dominick DeNaples, Louis DeNaples, Joseph Gentile, and J. David Lombardi. Solfanelli and O’Malley said they don’t know yet what role each director played in causing the problems at the bank. That information will come out as they obtain documentation, they said. The attorneys say their investigation into FNCB’s banking practices was spurred by the bank’s refusal to provide documents. The lawsuit asks a judge to order the bank to turn over the information.

Who knew otters snore? Poor Bernard is just trying to get some shut eye, but all of his otter friends are yelling “Stop Snoring, Bernard!” “Stop Snoring, Bernard!” has been chosen as Pennsylvania’s “One Book, Every Young Child” selection for 2012. It was written and illustrated by Zachariah O’Hora for children ages 3 to 6. Published in 2011, this engaging book follows the loveable sea otter Bernard as he tries to find a place in the zoo where his loud snoring won’t disturb the other animals. “Stop Snoring, Bernard!” encourages young readers to appreciate what makes each of us different. The book is O’Hora’s first for children and is the recipient of the 2011 Society of Illustrators’ Founders Award. This is the seventh year of “One Book, Every Young Child,” a valuable program that highlights the importance of early literacy development in preschoolers. In its inaugural year, “One Book, Every Young Child” won the coveted, national John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award. The statewide program officially kicks off on Tuesday, March 27 and emphasizes the importance of reading early and often to children, as well as engaging them in conversation and other activities around books. The goal is to increase awareness among parents, other family members, and the early childhood community of the need for practices that promote early literacy development. Activities include • Reading with children daily, • engaging children in the

Literacy development celebrated
500 VINE
story, • discussing new words to build vocabulary, • asking open-ended questions, • and visiting your local library to find other books and materials. Throughout the year, many local events will be held including author visits; library and museum programming for families; and activities for parents, early child care providers, and educators. O’Hora will be touring Lackawanna County Library System libraries on Thursday, April 26. He will speak at the Abington Community Library at 10 a.m., the Carbondale Public Library at 1 p.m., and Lackawanna County Children’s Library at 6 p.m. He will present a slide show, read from his books, and draw characters from “Stop Snoring, Bernard!” Registration is required and can be made by contacting individual libraries. Reach the Abington Community Library at (570) 587-3440, the Carbondale Public Library at (570) 282-4281and the Lackawanna County Children’s Library at (570) 348-3000, ext. 3015. For further information, go to www.lclshome.org or www.paonebook.org. These programs are available to the community, free of charge. If you don’t have a library card, come in and sign up for one today!
‘500 VINE’ focuses on library events and services. Find it biweekly in Go Lackawanna.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

ARTS CALENDAR
VISUAL ARTS
AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 969-1040, www.artistsforart.org. Paintings by Heather Martyak and Annmarie Ciccarelli. ArtWorks Gallery and Studio, 503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 207-1815, www.artworksnepa.com. Works of David Bender, through March 29. Beko Sushi and Grill, 414 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: (570) 341-0205, www.bekosushi.com. ‘Paint the Town,’ paintings by Sheila Sankar. The Bog, 341 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 341-6761, www.thebogscranton.com. ‘Coal Country,’ photographs of Moira Hauer. Camerawork Gallery, 515 Center Street, Scranton, (570) 344-3313, www.cameraworkgallery.org. ‘Factorium: A Pictorial Essay of American Factories,” photographs of Rebecca Battle, continues to April 2. The Fanciful Fox, 342 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 558-3001, www.fancifulfox.com. ‘Personal Works of Derek Zielinski,’ charcoal and oils. Laura Craig Gallery, 307 Linden St., Scranton, (570) 963-7995. ‘Open Your Heart,’ small works to benefit the American Heart Association. Marquis Art & Frame, Scranton, 515 Center St., Scranton, (570) 3443313, www.marquisartframe.com. ‘Shine,’ paintings by Leigh Pawling. New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Info: (570) 878-3970, www.newvisionsstudio.com. Adult figure drawing, fourweek class, Wed., March 28-April 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $100. ‘Nature’s Finest Art,’ works of Dana Gabel, Mark Charles Rooney, Amy Lynn Wyman, and Bethel Wyman, continues to March 30.

Easter egg hunt set
CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

S

NEWS

CRANTON – Event organizers at Matthew’s Mission expected about 100 children and families to attend their first Easter EGGstravaganza in 2011. “We did it last year, and over 2,000 people showed up,” recalled Scranton resident Kathleen Haikes.
PHOTO COURTESY MATTHEW’S MISSION

BULLS HEAD NEIGHBORS SPONSOR ANOTHER HUNT

The Weston Field/Bulls Head Residents Group will present an Easter egg hunt on March 31 at noon at the Weston Field House. The event is free for children from 2 to 12. For more information, call (570) 348-4186.

ARTS

Needless to say, the group is prepared for a crowd when the Easter egg hunt filled with other activities returns to Harmon Field in South Scranton on Saturday, March 31. The event begins at 11:30 a.m. and ends at about 2 p.m. Matthew’s Mission is named for Haikes’ brother, Matthew James Newell, who passed away at age 24 on Aug. 19, 2010, while vacationing with family in Avalon, N.J. Haikes said her brother, who lived with Down syndrome,

Juggler Rob Smith performs during the 2011 Easter EGGstravaganza for Matthew’s Mission. The event returns on March 31.

died in his sleep after suffering a grand mal seizure. “My two sisters, my brother, and I felt that we should do something to keep his name alive. He always donated his own money to St. Joseph’s Cen-

ter or the autism center (at Friendship House). We wanted to do that work for him,” she said. Their work quickly began with a “Breakfast with Santa” in Dec. 2010 and expanded with the egg hunt last April. The organization has found success through word-of-mouth and social networking. “The support from the community is absolutely amazing,” Haikes said. This year, the Easter EGGstravaganza will welcome former television star Chris Burke, who portrayed Charles “Corky” Thatcher on the 1990s ABC program “Life Goes On.” Burke, a goodwill ambassador for the Na-

tional Down Syndrome Society, will perform with John DeMasi on Saturday. In addition, the March 31 event will offer face painting, kids’ crafts, juggler Rob Smith, music from DJ Pat Dougher, a raffle for special prizes, and more. “It’s a great day, and it’s a great way to celebrate Matt’s life. Everything about the day has my brother Matthew in mind,” Haikes said. Past proceeds raised by Matthew’s Mission have aided St. Joseph’s Center, Friendship House, families of children with special needs, and the Scranton Police Department’s K9 Division.

The Matthew’s Mission Easter EGGstravaganza is Sat., March 31, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Harmon Field on Meadow Avenue in South Scranton. There is a $2 charge for anyone entering the field. For more information on the organization, search for Matthew’s Mission on Facebook or email matthewsmission@yahoo.com

THEATER

F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 32 Public Square, WilkesSee CALENDAR, Page 20

If you ask a fashion expert where to find the best deal on brand name clothing or accessories, they will probably respond with the name of a consignment shop. Faced with an economic meltdown, bargain hunters are tossing aside department store coupons and heading to a local consignment stores. Shoppers can find steals on high end items by big brand designers like Coach, Calvin Klein, Louis Vuiton, and Prada. Consignment shopping is the new black for retail shoppers. Years ago, people would be embarrassed to shop second hand, but now they are bragging about their finds and the money they are saving. It seems that people are trying to upstage each other with finding the best deals. Not only will you be shocked by the price tag but also by the quality of the item. Most items still have original price tags attached. Consignment stores are selective about the items that they sell and make sure they are in good shape and carry authentic brand names. Many stores specifically market women, men, or children and sell mostly clothing

Save money by shopping second hand
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NEPA CONSIGNMENT SHOPS
Esther’s Consignment Boutique, 419 S. Blakely St., Dunmore, (570) 243-1119. Deb’s Consignment Shop, 2239 Pittston Ave., Scranton, (570) 341-9885. Two Ladies Consignment, 724 Pittston Ave., Scranton, (570) 558-7216. Consign It, 801 Wyoming Ave., West Pittston, (570) 655-6055. Co Kids Quality Consignments, 126 Depot St., Clarks Summit, (570) 586-4020. Design 2 Consign Boutique, 213 Lackawanna Ave., Olyphant, (570) 383-7190. Plato’s Closet, 1029 Commerce Blvd., Dickson City, www.platoscloset.com.

and accessories. Think about buying a $300 Coach purse for only $40 that is in excellent condition. Buying second hand is a terrific way to save on kids clothing, since most of the clothing is still in great condition. If you’re looking to find a great gift, stop by a consignment shop where you can find some great costume jewelry for under $5.

The advantage of buying in a consignment shop is that there is something new almost every day. The disadvantage, however, is that items sell out very quickly and only come in one size. Consignment selling is a great way to earn extra money. People who previously gave away clothing are looking for an opportunity to cash in on their unwanted clothing. A consignment operates by splitting profits 50/50 with the original owner. It’s a great way to earn money on items that are just sitting in a closet. Most consignment stores require an appointment to review items, but some may also be looking for specific items. I recommend calling ahead to make sure that the items are in good shape. With the rise in social media, many consignment shops are posting and tweeting when hot items come into stores. Check out some of the Facebook pages for local consignment shops to see some of the items in stock. Do you know of a great consignment shop? Share with us at www.facebook.com/ golackwanna.

SPORTS

Sunday, March 25, 2012

GOLackawanna

17

NEWS ARTS
RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS

hen Director Angela Franek asked her West Scranton High School drama students what play they wanted to perform this season, they had only one word in mind – “Grease.” “My seniors are a great group, and they wanted to do this play for four years, and they’re such a good group of kids that I really picked it because they like it, and it’s a popular show. Everybody likes ‘Grease,’” Franek explained. Set in 1959, the popular musical follows the story of two teenagers, Sandy Dumbrowski and Danny Zuko, who unwittingly meet again at the fictional Rydell High School after a summer romance. Zuko is a member of the greaser gang the T-Birds, and Dumbrowski joins their female counterparts, the Pink Ladies. While they both pine for
See GREASE, Page 21

W

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com.

Members of the West Scranton High School production of ’Grease’ rehearse numbers featuring The Pink Ladies, above, and The T-Birds, left.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Give the people what they want
Any fanboy will tell you – let the Wookiee win. Some in the entertainment industry have learned this valuable lesson this past week, while others stubbornly fight against the wingman that has helped them become what they are today. My first example is the season finale of AMC’s “The Walking Dead.” For much of the second season of the series, which follows a group of survivors during the zombie apocalypse, I heard a lot of the same criticism from fellow fans: “They need less drama and more zombies.” Humans have always been the more important aspect of any zombie mythos, but I could concede that a little more action, or at least accuracy to the comic series on which it’s based, could have been added. Spoilers ahead. It’s great that the comic’s creator, Robert Kirkman, approved of many television adaptations personally, but a few deviations seemed unnecessary. Why did they transform Lori from a sympathetic mother who makes a mistake in a moment of emotional weakness to a Lady Macbeth-like manipulator? Why kill off Dale so much earlier in the show and leave us with awful characters like T-Dog? In the end, the show won fans like me over because the finale gave us all what we wanted. Zombies attacked en masse, and comic nerds got their first glimpse of the katana-wielding Michonne and a parting shot of the prison where the characters will seek shelter next, a major plot point in the source material. Reviews the next day were overwhelming positive. If something worked the first time, after

NEWS

INFINITE IMPROBABILITY
RICH HOWELLS

SPORTS

all, why mess with it too much? Director Michael Bay has yet to learn this lesson. Bay, responsible for the big action, no plot “Transformers” movies as well as other lackluster remakes, announced recently that his upcoming reboot of the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” would make the titular characters aliens instead of mutants. This, by default, would not make them turtles, as those are creatures originated from Earth, or ninjas either, considering those came from Japan. It screws up the title and makes the premise that much more outrageous. Having an entire planet of walking, talking, pizza-eating turtles doesn’t make these four very special anymore. Will they have to stop by a rat planet to pick up their wise Master Splinter? It raises more questions than it answers, the main being, “Why change what has been held true in adaptation after adaptation?” When you only have two hours to tell a story about those rad reptiles fighting the armor-clad Shredder and his Foot Clan, why waste time with the origin no one asked for? Fans flooded the Internet with instant criticism, but Bay quickly responded. “Fans need to take a breath, and chill. They have not read the script. Our team is working closely with one of the original creators of Ninja Turtles to help expand and give a more complex back story. Relax, we are including everything that made you become fans in the first place. We are just building a richer world.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The second season finale of ’The Walking Dead’ reportedly had nine million viewers, the highest ratings yet for the series and an episode that gave fans more of what they wanted.

A “richer world”? This is coming from the guy who put testicles on a robot. They’ve already rebooted this franchise so many times that it’s become more of a steel-toed stomping at this point, and while he assumingly has co-creator Kevin Eastman’s support, Peter Laird didn’t seem as open to the idea on his blog: “I think a planet of turtles is not, in and of itself, a bad idea for some kind of science fiction/ fantasy story. But as a way to explain any aspect of the backstory of TMNT, I think it is awful and unnecessary.” He encouraged fans to wait and see, though, unlike actor Robby Rist, who voiced Michelangelo in the original live action films. Rist called it the “rape of our childhood memories.” While I wouldn’t exactly use that terminology, I understand the emotional investment, similar to the outrage gamers felt when com-

pleting “Mass Effect 3.” The best-selling video game has made national news since its March 6 release because its developers promised an ending to the popular series that would give closure to fans and answer their burning questions, not a confusing, plot hole-laden conclusion. One fan even filed a false advertising complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, which brings up a valid point – Why are salesmen allowed to lie about entertainment but not about cars and other products that suck up our hard-earned money? Maybe it’s because entertainment is subjective, but with the invention of the Internet, there’s just no excuse these creators have for not knowing what the majority of people want. BioWare co-founder Ray Muzyka has backpedaled, saying that the team is working “on a

number of game content initiatives” that will attempt to fix what they have broken, but guys like Bay have an attitude like they know what’s best, which, in the long run, just doesn’t pan out. The reason that most film franchises only last three or four movies is because they paint themselves into corners with sloppy writing that goes against what fans expect. You make your money on name recognition alone, but when the substance doesn’t live up to its title, these entertainment know-it-alls have to go back to the drawing board when the writing was on the Facebook wall the entire time. Take a cue from “The Walking Dead” and just give fans what they want. The masses aren’t exactly right about a lot of things, but when it comes to our movies, games, comics, books, and television shows, let that big hairy beast have his way. If you do, he’ll always have your back in the end.

ARTS

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012
Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 344-1111, www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. ‘South Pacific,’ Sun., March 25, 1 and 6 p.m. Cost: $37, $47, $57. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts. ‘The Goonies,’ Sat., March 31, 2 and 6:30 p.m. Cost: Free. forming Arts. Malt Shop Memories, Fri., March 30, 7:30 p.m. Cost: $29.50, $39.50, $49.50. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 344-1111, www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. Listen Local series, featuring Red, Blue, Green and AAYU, Fri., March 30, 6 p.m. cocktail hour, 7 p.m. show. Cost: $10. New Visions Studio and Gallery. Writers Showcase, Sat., March 31, 7 p.m., with national SLAM poet William James, Keith Gilman, Charlie O’Donnell, Reena Renells, Rachael Goetzke, and Sandee Gertz Umback.

CALENDAR
Continued from page 16

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GOLackawanna
a very tight-knit group of friends, and the T-Birds love clowning around. They are the T-Birds,” Haggerty concurred. This doesn’t mean, however, Continued from page 17 that the West Scranton Players each other, their social groups haven’t had to practice hard. and ensuing drama may keep Auditions and production started in mid-January, with them apart. “I think they like the little the 44 actors in the show rehearsing Monday love story in the through Thursshow. And they like IF YOU GO day from 6 to 9 their groups of p.m.. friends and the WHAT: The West Scranton Players “When I’m here dances. There’s a lit- Present “Grease” rehearsing 6 to 9 tle bit of rivalry and WHERE: West p.m., I’m in front, gossip that high Scranton High and then on Saturschool kids can re- School, 1201 Luzerne days I come in and late to. It’s a little St., Scranton work on the set, different from the WHEN: March 30 and 31 at 7:30 p.m., and then my prep movie. That’s how April 1 at 2 p.m. high school kids COST: $8, adults; $5, periods, I’ll do the program. And are,” Franek contin- students, military, and seniors; free, then I’m running ued. children under 5. to the Salvation Seventeen-yearArmy looking for old seniors Galen Tickets are available costumes, I went Haggerty and John in the main office or at the door. to AC Moore toKearny, respectiveday looking for ly playing wire to hang Sandy and CAST something from Danny, not Galen Haggerty – Sandy the batons – it’s only resem- Nicole James – Rizzo just a lot of little ble the iconic Victoria Kusy – Frenchy details to make a roles played Aryssara Bryndzia – Marty really good by Olivia Rachel Fitz – Jan show,” Franek Newton-John John Kearny – Danny said. and John Tra- Chris Galdieri – Kenickie Christian Luciano – Roger “It’s hard for volta in the fa- Isaac Charleson – Doody the kids, too, bemous 1978 Justin Luciano – Sonny cause some of film adapta- Marisha Lozada – Cha-Cha them have track tion, they Andrew Simpson – Johnny Casino 3 to 5 p.m. and agree that then they come they also re- Asialena Bonitz – Regina Starr here 6 to 9 p.m., late to their Kelsie Kiehart – Miss Lynch or some are in characters. Mike Baranowski – Eugene baseball. It’s all “‘Grease’ is Layla Bryndzia, Shania Burns – Patty Simcox day after they’ve one of those been in school things that Alex Lozada – Teen Angel all day, so it’s reeveryone grew up with, so when we had ally a demanding schedule for a chance to pick what we want- these couple of months.” She also acknowledged the ed to do, ‘Grease’ was the first thing that popped in all our dedication of the stage and heads,” Kearny enthused. “Be- lighting crews, the live band ing torn between wanting to led by musical director Ken do the right thing and wanting McGraw, dances led by choreto fit in with your friends – I ographer Dave Ragnacci, students and faculty selling tickcan definitely relate to that.” “It’s one of my favorite mo- ets, ads, and refreshments, and vies…It’s so lighthearted and the school’s textiles class, who fun. All the songs are usually handmade the ’50s poodle upbeat and happy,” Haggerty skirts. “Seeing everything come toadded. The rest of the cast had no gether is the fun part,” she adtrouble getting into their char- mitted. The players also found acters, either. “My boys, the T-Birds, they themselves coming closer toact kind of goofy, and the Pink gether “like rama lama lama ka Ladies girls are cliquey and get dinga da dinga dong” throughtogether and have their pajama out the production, resulting parties and dances,” Franek in a show that’s likely to stand out from other versions of the pointed out. “With the Pink Ladies, we’re crowd-pleasing play.

21

GREASE

NEWS

COURTESY PHOTO / JOE LOWREY PHOTOGRAPHY

Slam poet William James, right, will perform as part of a writers’ showcase at New Visions Studio and Gallery on March 31.

SLAM Visions event POET highlights New
RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

IF YOU GO

With a shaggy beard, gauged ears, and tattoos running up and down his arms, William James looks more like a hardcore punk rock singer than a poet. That isn’t a coincidence. It took him many years to come to terms with being labeled a poet, writing his “preteen angst” out in middle school before taking writing more seriously in college. “That wasn’t necessarily trying to write poems. That was, ‘I want to be in a punk rock band and all I can do is yell, so I’m going to write song lyrics and hope that somebody will start a band with me,’” James admitted. Many failed bands later, he began to realize that penning poetry wasn’t as far away from his original goal as he has originally thought. “The lyricist of a band will end up writing far more than what his musician bandmates can keep up with, so he’ll have this whole backlog of words written, and at some point you decide, ‘What the hell? I might as well let them stand on their own merit, put them in a chapbook, and say that now I’m a poet, too,’” he explained. Residing just outside of Pittsburgh, James discovered the city’s slam poetry scene in 2007, which he felt had a mindset towards structure that “really, really appealed to the leftover remnants” of his “angsty, teenage punk rock years.” He has

WHAT: Writers Showcase with William James, Keith Gilman, Charlie O’Donnell, Reena Ranells, Rachael Goetzke, Sandee Gertz Umbach, hosted by Brian Fanelli and Jason Lucarelli WHERE: New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton WHEN: Saturday, March 31 at 7 p.m. COST: Free

since become a member of the Steel City Slam and the host of the Young Steel Youth Slam. “After years and years and years of trying to figure out how to be a poet, I realized that it wasn’t as difficult as I was making it out to be…There’s this whole other world that doesn’t have to follow rules of rhyme scheme and form. I mean, I couldn’t even spell ‘iambic pentameter,’” he joked. He found his own voice through stubborn persistence, writing thousands of pages constantly, expanding his influences to classic poets, and immersing himself in the vibrant and diverse writing and poetry scene in his area. He eventually took his act on the road, performing nationally at over 300 readings, slams, and even punk shows with accompaniment from bands. Now 29, he finds inspiration in man’s struggle to survive at all costs. “Any time I’m performing in front of an audience, be it of one

or one thousand, everything that I write and everything that I perform can essentially, in some way, be traced back to the basic premise of this whole being alive and being human thing is kind of an awful struggle and it’s difficult. The only way we’re ever gong to get through it is to kind of hold each other up, so let’s do this thing,” he explained. The parallels between music and poetry also continue to this day for James. Much like he turned to his favorite bands to get through these hard times, he has found that his own work has had the same impact on others. “They say to me, ‘You had that poem that you closed your set with that was talking about when you tried to commit suicide and you didn’t, and I’ve never told anybody this, but I was there just not too long ago,’” he said. With three self-published chapbooks and a new mini-chapbook under his belt, James is currently working with an editor on a full manuscript and will make his third appearance in Scranton at New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., at its third free Writers Showcase on Saturday, March 31, He promises the show will have all of the “energy” and “violence” of the punk rock shows that inspired his origins as a writer. “I’m just going to get up, I’m going to stand in the middle of the floor, and I’m going to yell at you, and it’s going to sound like poetry.”

ARTS SPORTS

PAGE 22

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Sunday, March 25, 2012

GOLackawanna

25

A

TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Comets bump out of WVC play
bington Heights moves another program to the Lackawanna League while North Pocono hangs on for one final season in the Wyoming Valley Conference in one of its sports this spring. The move by Abington Heights from the WVC to the Lackawanna in boys’ volleyball, where it will now be by far the league’s largest school, leaves North Pocono behind as the latest Lackawanna County school playing in the WVC.

North Pocono went 14-2 and finished second in the 17-team league last season when Abington Heights was13-3 and tied for third. North Pocono also remains in the WVC for girls’ season, which heads into what is expected to be its final season of spring competition. The Lady Trojans were 7-4-2 last year to finish second in Division 3. Mike Labagh is in his first season as coach of the Abington Heights boys, but he is able to share some experiences with his players. “I definitely think they need to get used to playing different teams,” Labagh said. “I think there is more competition in the WVC than in the (Lackawanna League).” Labagh was also the coach last fall when the Abington Heights girls made the same transition. The Lady Comets went 9-7 in the WVC in 2010 then moved to face smaller schools in the Lackawanna League, only to have their record slip to 7-6. “They might have been caught a little by surprise,” he said of the girls’ team. “They might have gotten caught being a little too comfortable. “I don’t think the boys will be taking the season as lightly as

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Jake Roba spikes a ball set by Mike Pettinato as Abington Heights head coach Mike Labagh looks on Tuesday afternoon.

the girls did at first.” The Comets return many experienced players, including starters Mike Pacyna, James Connolly, Jake Roba, Mike Pettinato, and Kevin Schumacher. Pacyna, a senior, and Roba, a junior, are middle hitters. Connolly is an outside hitter. Pettinato

will be a setter and Schumacher the libero although each has experience at the other’s position. North Pocono returns seven seniors – goalkeeper Meghan Utter, midfielders Michelle Stefanelli and Kaylee Banfield, forward Desirae Santarsiero, and backs Lizzy Lisiecki, Alyssa Ha-

mill, and Carly Mischello – and sophomore forward Alissa Kincel on what is otherwise a young girls’ soccer roster that has expanded to 33 players. North Pocono begins WVC play in boys’ volleyball Monday at Wyoming Area and in girls’ soccer Thursday at Wyoming

Seminary. Winter sports will have been over for less than a week when the spring sports season moves into league play with openers Monday and Tuesday in the Lackawanna League. Boys’ tennis opens Monday. Boys’ volleyball and boys’ and girls’ track open Tuesday. Baseball and softball are still a week away from league openers. Abington Heights and Scranton Prep were each unbeaten division champions in boys’ tennis last season when Holy Cross defeated Dunmore in a playoff to win Division 3. Defending District 2-4 Class AAA team champion Abington Heights opens at home against Wallenpaupack, Scranton Prep is at Western Wayne, and Holy Cross is at Elk Lake. Lackawanna Trail went 11-1 to win the Lackawanna League boys’ volleyball title last season. It opens at Mountain View while Abington Heights is home with Blue Ridge. The eight-team league also includes Elk Lake, Western Wayne, Susquehanna, and Forest City. The Valley View boys and Abington Heights girls will try to continue long runs of success after taking Lackawanna Track Conference Division 1 titles last season. Dunmore won the Division 2 boys’ title last season when Western Wayne won the Division 2 girls’ title and Elk Lake swept the Division 3 titles. Valley View, which also won last season’s District 2 Class AAA boys’ title, has won six straight division titles and 41 straight conference meets, beginning with its time in Division 2. Brandon Jackson is back after winning a 300-meter hurdles district title. Abington Heights has won five straight division titles and 31 straight league meets in Division 1 girls. Tuesday’s track openers include Lakeland at Valley View, Wallenpaupack at Abington Heights and Dunmore at Scranton.

NEWS ARTS SPORTS

PAGE 26

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GOLackawanna

27

NEWS ARTS
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS

Imhotep Charter swats away final shot for 37-35 win to advance to final

B

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

ETHLEHEM – Holy Cross fought off serious foul trouble and a height disadvantage of more than three inches per player to give itself several shots at pulling out a victory over defending state champion Imhotep Charter Wednesday night. The Crusaders were unable to convert those chances down the stretch, however, and fell just short of a first state title game appearance with a 37-35 loss at Liberty High School in the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Class AA boys’ basketball semifinals. Although neither team resorted to holding the ball, the Crusaders and Panthers scored just one point apiece in the final 3:42.

With each misfire offensively, Holy Cross fought to get the ball and another shot at the lead. Ryan McGoff alone drew an offensive foul, made a steal, and tracked down a loose offensive rebound in the backcourt for three additional possessions in the final two minutes. “You can’t beat the effort,” Holy Cross coach Al Callejas said. “They’re an incredible group of kids. “They’re not going to fold. They never fold.” The Crusaders managed to get Josh Kosin, who scored a team-high 14 points, an open 18-footer with 17 seconds left and a one-point deficit. It bounced off the
See CRUSADERS, Page 29

ABOVE: Connor Collejas and Josh Kosin react to the Crusaders’ close loss in the PIAA semifinals. AT LEFT: Josh Kosin shoots over Imhotep Charter’s Nigel Grant.

SPORTS

28

GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Title trips special, no matter the outcome
Rebekah Campo had a career full of highlights before she ever settled in for the start of the Class AA girls’ 100-yard breaststroke at last weekend’s Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Swimming and Diving Championships at Bucknell University in Lewisburg. Campo’s qualifying effort in the event earlier in the day on March 17 had clinched a seventh individual state medal to go along with the five relay medals she had already won at Scranton Prep. Three of those medals, including one from a relay, was silver. Another, from a relay race two years ago, was gold. It is hard to say anything was missing from one of the most prolific careers, in terms of state medals, of any Lackawanna County high school athlete ever. But Campo did enter the Kinney Natatorium pool for her last event with the Classics still searching for her first individual gold medal. By finishing just 1:03.84 later, faster than any of the other finalists, she was able to exit the pool and take in her last appearance on the state medal stand from the top step. Campo completed a stellar weekend for Scranton Prep girls’ swimmers and a successful winter for Lackawanna County’s best high school athletes and teams. She stands alone, however, with the title of “state champion.” No other District 2 individual had won a state title this school year and only Wyoming Seminary’s field hockey squad had done so from the district as a team. One more look at Campo’s career reminds of just how special an athlete it often takes to claim that title. Campo earned the first two of her dozen state medals as a freshman in 2009, taking fifth in the 50 freestyle and sixth as a member of the 200

NEWS

KEEPING SCORE

TOM ROBINSON
freestyle relay. The fifth-place finish was the first of three state medals as a sprinter in the 50 freestyle. The first gold came a year later as part of a four-medal day in the first half of the Class AA competition. Campo joined Emma Blake, Maria Telincho, and Megan Jones for a time of 1:37.79 to win the 2010 state 200 freestyle relay. She also placed fourth in the 50 freestyle and sixth in the 100 butterfly. Last season, Campo picked up individual medals in the same two events. She was second in the butterfly, the first of two straight silver medals in that event, and sixth in the 50 freestyle. A senior season that got off to a rocky start for Campo ended about as well as it conceivably could have. Scranton Prep finished fifth in the final team standings with the help of a secondplace finish in the 200 medley relay and fourth-place finish in the 200 freestyle relay on the first day. Campo was part of those teams, along with repeating her butterfly silver medal March 16. With a day to prepare for one last event, she closed her high school career in style. She led the 32 breaststroke swimmers in qualifying, then was first again among the eight finalists. A long climb to the top had been completed. Others came close but never got to or could not get back to the top. Lackawanna Trail’s Eric Laytos went on one of the most improbable runs ever as a 215-pound sophomore in 2010, winning a Class AA state wrestling championship. After slipping back to eighth last season, Laytos remained unbeaten all the way to the state final.
See ROBINSON, Page 29

SPORTS

ARTS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Josh Kosin goes up for a dunk over Imhotep Charter’s Nigel Grant during the Crusaders’ March 21 PIAA semifinal game. The Holy Cross team was the last local basketball team in the state playoffs.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

GOLackawanna
Each had 27 rebounds. Imhotep Charter committed 20 fouls to18 by Holy Cross but had more free throw attempts, 22-16. The Crusaders committed 15 turnovers to 13 by the Panthers. Holy Cross shot 34.4 percent while Imhotep Charter shot 33.3 percent from the floor. “The key was whether we were going to get enough turnovers caused to make up for the fact that they were a better shooting team,” Noble said. The turnover difference was minute, but so was the difference in shooting percentage. “We broke their pressure,” coach Callejas said. “We ran into trouble finishing. “That’s where we had our problems.” Connor Callejas hit two of three free throws for the last Holy Cross lead just 16 seconds before Jordan’s 3-pointer. Kosin went 1-for-3 from the line over the next minute. The Crusaders turned the ball over twice then missed consecutive shots while still trailing by a point. Brandon Austin, who finished with 16 points, 11 rebounds and five steals, hit the front end of a one-and-one with 15.5 seconds left for the final point. Holy Cross had a 17-7 lead early in the second quarter when foul trouble slowed its momentum. Kosin opened the game with a 3-pointer from the top of the key. The Crusaders closed the first quarter on a 10-point streak which featured four more points by Kosin before McGoff and Jones hit 3-pointers in the final 37 seconds for a 15-7 lead. A team that started 5-3 won 20 of its next 22 and claimed the Lackawanna League Division 2 championship along the way. Nothing else will match the glory of a state championship, but there were many winter efforts of which to be proud. Scranton Prep sophomore Mia Nonnenberg finished second in the 200 individual medley and third in the 500 freestyle. Nonnenberg joined Campo, Kaitie Voitik, and Telincho for the two medal-winning relay teams. Scranton’s Mark Granahan finished seventh in the state at 160 pounds for the county’s only Class AAA wrestling medal. Unlike their team sport counterparts, top-eight finishers in most individual sports receive medals. The other county teams to make it to the final eight in their class in basketball were Abington Heights in Class AAA boys and Old Forge in Class A girls. The Crusaders, Comets, and Lady Devils all have key players returning, which provides no guarantees for the future. Finding a path to the top, however, is much more manageable when part of the climb has been made in the past. The streak reached 12 points when Casey Gaughan hit a runner in the lane 30 seconds into the second quarter. Kosin went to the bench with his second foul a minute later and the Crusaders did not score for 5:37 while the Panthers rallied to tie. When Kosin returned later in the quarter, he was called for his third foul while chasing a loose rebound. Gaughan picked up his third 18 seconds later and both had to sit out the end of the half. Gaughan and Heyen were assessed their fourth fouls during the third quarter and Gaughan eventually fouled out after playing just 8:02 in the final three quarters. Imhotep Charter ran into foul trouble later and had two starters foul out.

29

CRUSADERS
Continued from page 27

back rim. Unable to get the ball to Kosin coming out of a timeout with 8.2 seconds left, the Crusaders instead got a drive to the basket by Connor Callejas. Deion Evans blocked the shot with three seconds left. Al Callejas thought there was a foul on the play, which would have given two fouls shots to Connor Callejas, who was 6-for-6 from the line. “I was fine with Connor’s shot,” coach Callejas said. “He should have gone to the line. “That’s my opinion.” The blocked shot resulted in a loose ball that was not recovered by either team before the time ran out. “Deion Evans is our ninth or 10th guy,” Imhotep Charter coach Andre Noble said. “He doesn’t play much, but he came up with a great block at the end of the game.” Holy Cross managed just three points – all on free throws – after Kosin took in a Connor Jones lob pass and scored inside for a 32-20 lead with 4:54 remaining. Kamani Jordan’s 3-pointers from the right side with 3:42 left gave the Panthers a 36-34 lead and was the last field goal. “We had a lot of good looks that just didn’t go,” coach Callejas said. “Sometimes it goes that way.” The teams ended nearly even statistically.

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There is no guarantee, however, regardless of the accomplishments or efforts along the way. When Laytos arrived at his second state final, he ran into a three-time champion making the uncommon move down in weight as a senior. Laytos wound up settling for second place. Campo had a similar experience in the butterfly where she was second each of the last two years to Margaret Gruber of Mars, the state record-holder in the event. The top team effort of the winter was turned in by the Holy Cross boys, who finished the equivalent of a tie for third place as one of two semifinal losers in Class AA. The Crusaders managed to battle on even terms with an Imhotep Charter team that should have outrebounded them and kept the bigger Panthers from getting to the rim. On the other end, however, a few too many shots rolled out and Holy Cross was unable to overcome serious foul troubles in a 37-35 loss to the defending state champions from Philadelphia.

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

Easter Church Services
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Dalton United Methodist Church 125 South Turnpike Road, Dalton, PA Maundy Thursday April 5th 7:00 pm Easter Sunday April 8th 11:00 am Easter Cantata April 15th 11:00 am

The Church of the Epiphany 25 Church Hl, Clarks Summit, PA Maundy Thursday April 5th 7:00 pm Maundy Thursday Liturgy Good Friday April 6th 8:00 pm Tenebrae Service Holy Saturday April 7th 8:00 pm Easter Vigil Easter Sunday April 8th 8:00 am Holy Eucharist – Rite I (spoken) 10:30 am Holy Eucharist – Rite II (choral) Church of St. Gregory 330 North Abington Road, Clarks Summit, Pa Holy Thursday April 5th 7:30 pm Good Friday April 6th 1:00 pm Holy Saturday April 7th 8:00 pm Easter Vigil Easter Sunday April 8th 8:00 am, 10:00 am and 12:00 pm Clarks Green United Methodist Church 119 Glenburn Road, Clarks Green, PA Maundy Thursday April 5th 6-9:pm Reflection and Prayer Good Friday April 6th 7:00 pm Tenebrae Service Easter Sunday April 8th 10:00am Easter Worship Countryside Community Church 14001 Church Hill Rd. Clarks Summit, PA Maundy Thursday April 5th 6:30 pm Good Friday April 6th 11:00 am Crosswalk Easter Sunday April 8th 7:30 am Worship 11:00 am Worship

Factoryville United Methodist Church 162 College Avenue, Factoryville, PA Easter Sunday April 8th 7:00 am Sunrise Service with Breakfast to follow 9:00 am Main Service Easter Cantata April 14th 7:00 pm First Presbyterian Church 300 School Street, Clarks Summit, PA Maundy Thursday April 5th 7:30 pm Communion and Tenebrae Service Easter Sunday April 8th 9:00 am Worship with Communion 11:15 am Worship with Communion Trinity Lutheran 205 West Grove St, Clarks Summit, PA Maundy Thursday April 5th 6:15 pm Covered Dish Supper 7:30 pm Maundy Thursday Eucharist Good Friday April 6th 7:30 pm Tenebrae Service Easter Saturday April 7th 7:00 pm Easter Vigil and Eucharist Easter Sunday April 8th 8:15 am Eucharist 10:30 am Eucharist

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PAGE 31

Easter Church Services

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

Sunday, March 25, 2012

GOLackawanna

33

am Pientack is having another super season with the Bloomsburg softball team. Pientack (Valley View) hit .406 (28-for-69) in the first 18 games for the 13-5 Huskies. She had six doubles and 11 home runs. The latter mark is seventh best in NCAA Division II. She also had 26 RBI and 23 runs scored. A standout catcher, she handled 163 chances and made just two errors.
“Sam is a great athlete,” coach Susan Kocher said. “She’s doing a good job leading as a senior, and we expect her to do that. We’re also looking for her to stay consistent with her batting. Obviously she has tremendous power, but we look for her to lead by example with consistent play both offensively and defensively.” Pientack hit .394 with eight home runs and 31 RBI last season and .357 with 10 home runs and 44 RBI as a sophomore. Her 29 career homers rank fifth in the Bloomsburg record book. The Huskies also got a big effort from sophomore Chrissy Belko (Old Forge) in the first 18 games. She hit .304 (21-for-69) with six doubles, four home runs, 14 RBI and 12 runs scored. She saw limited action with the team last season. “Chrissy has improved tremendously from her freshman year to her sophomore year,” Kocher said. “She came in this year playing like a veteran and doing a great job leading on the field. She has amazing power.” DANZIG PROUD OF SON Ross Danzig (Abington Heights) had a standout freshman season with the Scranton men’s basketball team, having been named Landmark Conference Rookie of the Year. The 6-foot-4, 200-pound guard was second on the team in scoring (12.0) and also averaged 5.2 rebounds with 52 assists, 37 steals and 18 blocked shots. He hit 35-of-94 3-point attempts (.372). He started all 23 games

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for the Royals, who ended 17-6 after losing 78-58 to Cabrini in the second round of the NCAA Division III Tournament. Carl Danzig, Ross’s dad and coach, was happy with his son’s play this season. “It’s nice (for him) to be recognized by the coaches in the conference,” Carl Danzig said. “It was a competitive race and I know he was excited to receive the honor.” Dad was impressed with his son’s play all season long. “He was a steady contributor since day one,” the coach said. “That’s a large part of why he received the award.” SCHROTH PITCHING IN Sophomore Adam Schroth (Scranton Prep) is pitching for the Catholic University baseball team. The 5-foot-11, 185pound right-hander pitched in four games and started three to start the season and had a 2-1 record with a .491 earned run average. He pitched 14.2 innings and gave up 15 hits and 10 runs, eight earned, and walked eight and struck out 10. His best game in the young season came in a 7-2 victory over King’s College. He worked six innings and gave up six hits and an earned run while walking three and fanning four to pick up the win. HOFFMAN THIRD Cazenovia senior equestrian Katie Hoffman (North Pocono) finished third in the high-point rider standings at the Zone II, Region 3 Western Semifinals recently in Cazenovia, N.Y. She totaled 52 points. Hoffman finished fourth in open reining but only the top two finishers advanced to the championships. PODRASKY KNOWS THE SCORE Senior Tina Podrasky of Scranton (Wyoming Seminary) had two goals and five assists in the first three games for the 1-2 Rochester Tech women’s lacrosse team. She also had three ground balls, a draw control and a caused turnover. Scoring is not new for the 5-foot-2 attack. She entered this season with 41 goals and 11 assists for 52 points.

NEWS ARTS SPORTS

PAGE 34

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

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GOLackawanna

37

Knights skate into national tourney
By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS ROUNDUP

Lady Falcons drop two to end season
GO ONLINE
For daily roundups of local college sports, including results from Saturday’s action, see www.golackawanna.com/sports.

The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Knights 1997 AAA hockey team has lost just once this calendar year. With a berth at the USA Hockey Under-14 Tier I National Championships at stake, the Knights emphatically avenged that loss in the Atlantic District championship series. The Knights handled the Philadelphia Junior Flyers twice in the same day, 5-2 and 11-2, March 17 at the Flyers Skate Zone in Voorhees, N.J. to earn their shot at a national championship. The USA Hockey Tier I youth titles will be decided Wednesday through Sunday at Williamsville, N.Y. in the Buffalo area. This is the first shot at a national tournament for any of the teams in the five-year-old Knights program. Scott Lewis, an Erie native who moved to the area in 1993 to manage the Olympia Sporting Goods store when the Steamtown Mall opened, is the assistant coach and team manager. “This is the first appearance by any team at any level from this area, let alone at the highest level of Triple-A (Tier I),” Lewis said. Daniel Sprong, a native of Finland who came to the team

from Canada, led the way in the best-of-three district championship series. He had a goal and two assists in the first win then two goals and two assists in the second. Alex Rowella had a goal and an assist in each game. Cody Petawabana also had a goal and an assist in the opener. Ivan Provorov led the second game rout with five goals and an assist. Denis Smirnov joined Sprong in producing two goals and two assists. The team is coached by Alex Vasko, a former professional player from the Ukraine who lives in Union Dale after spending some time in Scranton. “Obviously, kids coming over from Russia and Canada where our coach has all the contacts, has helped,” Lewis said, “but also, a lot of our local kids go to Montreal to train in the summer.” The Knights are ranked first nationally among Bantam Major teams, according to www.youthhockeyreports.com. They are listed second nationally by www.myhockeyrankings.com behind ShattuckSt. Mary’s, a Faribault, Minn. prep school which has the defending national U-18 champions and also placed its U-16 team in the championship game last year.
history. The junior had seven points in a 70-64 loss to Kansas that ended a 21-game winning streak by the seventh-ranked Blue Hens.

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, which plays out of the Revolution Ice Centre in Pittston, won the Nike Bauer Invitational and Silver Stick International tournaments this year. The Knights are 65-4-7, including 23-1-1 since the New Year. They have outscored opponents, 500-141, on the season. The team for players born in 1997 or later includes Louis DeNaples III and Paul DeNaples from Moscow, Patrick West from Dickson City, and Elijah Latimer from Carbondale. The national tournament field is split into two six-team pools in which each team plays three games. The Knights are in the National pool with Shattuck St. Marys, the St. Louis Blues, Belle Tire Hockey Club, the Mid-Fairfield Blues, and the Amherst Knights. Registration and practice are set for Tuesday. The Knights will travel there early in the day. The Knights open Wednesday at 10:05 a.m. against MidFairfield. They face St. Louis Thursday and Belle Tire Friday. The top four teams in each pool advance to Saturday morning’s quarterfinals. The semifinals are Saturday night, followed by the Sunday championship game.
and Mike Striefsky; Holy Cross’ Ryan McGoff; and two players from Montrose. The Lackawanna League girls’ basketball game is scheduled for Monday night at Forest City. Vince Bucciarelli of Abington Heights and Al Smith of Montrose will serve as coaches.

The winter sports season came to an end when Lackawanna College dropped two games at the National College Athletic Association Division II women’s basketball tournament in Peoria, Ill. to finish in a tie for the 13th through 16th spots in the country. Lackawanna fell to Cincinnati State, 91-68, Tuesday and Lake Land, 66-56, Thursday. Cincinnati State rallied from a six-point deficit by scoring 62 second-half points. Megan Campbell had 16 points, 14 rebounds, six assists, and four blocked shots. Terika Turner had 10 points, 10 rebounds, and six steals against Cincinnati State, then 16 points and 12 rebounds against Lake Land in the final game of the Scranton High graduate’s Lackawanna career. The Lady Falcons finished 22-9.

TOP STORY

SEASON OVERVIEW

SPORTS BRIEFS
Pens goalie wins 100th
Scott Munroe picked up his 100th career American Hockey League victory when the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins defeated the Binghamton Senators, 3-2, March 18. The Penguins are home again today against the Springfield Falcons.

Basketball all-star games set
Lackawanna Trail’s Andrew Kettel and Scranton’s Tony Battaglia will serve as coaches for the Lackawanna League All-Star Game Tuesday at Valley View. A 3-point shooting contest at 7 p.m. will be followed by the game at 7:30. Kettel will coach the Blue team, which includes North Pocono’s Jack Williams and Justin Haddix, Lackawanna Trail’s Stephen Miller and Matt Lochen, Abington Heights’ Patrick Calvey and John Vassil, and Valley View’s Cory Callejas and Brian Lalli, along with players from Delaware Valley, Honesdale, and Blue Ridge. Battaglia will have Malik Draper, Terry Turner, and Joe McCarthy from his team; along with Riverside’s Jerry Kincel; West Scranton’s Malcolm Sweeting; Dunmore’s Jordan Dempsey; Scranton Prep’s Mike McDonald and Matt Walsh; Lakeland’s Alex Filarsky

Montrose falls in semifinals
Karli McFatridge scored 20 points Tuesday night to lead York Catholic to a 60-37 victory over Montrose, the last District team left in the state girls’ basketball tournament, in a Class AA semifinal. Montrose was led by Myra Lattimore with 17 points and six rebounds. The Lady Meteors (27-3) had a 26game winning streak broken.

Locals reach NCAA tourney
Two teams with former Lackawanna League players in their starting backcourts reached the second round of the NCAA Division I women’s basketball tournament before being eliminated. Louisville, with Abington Heights graduate Becky Burke, and Delaware, with Dunmore graduate Lauren Carra, each won once. Burke had a team-high 14 points in a 67-55 win over Michigan State. She had five points in the final game of her career, a 72-68 loss to Maryland. Carra had 12 points in a 73-42 rout over host Arkansas-Little Rock, the first NCAA Tournament win in Delaware

Both University of Scranton tennis teams were picked to finish second in the Landmark Conference this season. The men’s team was picked behind four-time defending champion Drew University. Tim McGurrin, a junior from Scranton Prep, and David Teres were each first-team conference all-stars last season when Teres was also named Landmark Rookie of the Year. The Royals opened the league schedule March 18 when they defeated Goucher, 9-0. Scranton was 2-2 overall heading into Saturday’s second conference match, against Drew. The women’s team was picked behind Moravian, which it lost to 5-4 in last season’s championship match. Elisha Connell is back after earning second-team, all-star honors last year. The Royals were 1-0 in the Landmark and 4-3 overall heading into the weekend. Marywood is off to a 1-5 start in non-league play, but the two-time defending champion Pacers are favored to win the Colonial States Athletic Conference men’s title. Marywood won last year’s title in the championship match against Baptist Bible College. BBC won the only CSAC match contested so far this season and is picked to finish third out of eight teams. Caleb Evans, a former CSAC Rookie of the Year, was a first-team, all-star last season. Keystone, which is 0-1, was picked to finish fifth. The Marywood women’s team is 1-2 in its abbreviated spring season schedule.

over Philadelphia Biblical University. DeFebo was named to the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association (NCBWA) Division III Pitcher of the Week Honor Roll along with being selected Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) South Region Pitcher of the Week and CSAC Pitcher of the Week. DeFebo took a no-hitter into the seventh inning of the game and finished with a five-hitter. He became the first Marywood player to receive weekly recognition from the ECAC or NCBWA. A total of four Marywood athletes were honored by the CSAC. Diana D’Achille was named women’s lacrosse Player of the Week while men’s lacrosse player Sam Trill and baseball player Nicholas Pasqualichio were named to the Honor Rolls for their sports. D’Achille, a sophomore midfielder, had nine goals, including the 100th of her career, and two assists in two CSAC wins. Pasqualichio, an Abington Heights graduate, went 11-for-24 (.458) with four doubles, three triples, a homer, 10 runs, and 13 RBI when the Pacers went 5-1 for the week. Trill made the Honor Roll for the second straight time. Scranton had four players honored by the Landmark Conference. Freshman Megan Azzalina was the women’s tennis Player of the Week, McGurrin was the men’s tennis Player of the Week, Christine Capalbo was named softball Pitcher of the Week, and Ben Worthington was named men’s lacrosse Player of the Week. Azzalina went 5-0 in singles and 4-1 in doubles to help Scranton go 4-1. McGurrin won three times each in singles and doubles. Capalbo won all four of her starts with 16 strikeouts and four walks in 27 innings. Keystone named softball player Sara Schraden and baseball player Michael Meszoros its Players of the Week. Schraden helped the softball team to its best start ever at 8-3. She went 2-1 as a pitcher during the week and batted .455 (5-for-11) with four RBI and three runs scored. Meszoros allowed one hit in shutout innings of a 4-0 win over Messiah College.

NEWS ARTS

Softball tournament April 14-15
Spots are available in a men’s slow pitch softball tournament in Taylor April 14-15. For more information, call Dave at 591-3359.

SEASON HONORS

Lackawanna’s Kim Yencho was named NJCAA District O Coach of the Year in women’s basketball.

WEEKLY HONORS

Nicholas DeFebo received three awards for the March 16 game in which he set a Marywood University strikeout record with 17 in a 12-2 win

Capalbo threw a four-hitter in the second game to help Scranton to a shut out of Keystone College in a softball doubleheader sweep, 9-0 and 3-0, on Wednesday. Kyle Frank scored two goals in the first quarter and another early in the second to help Scranton to a 13-8 men’s lacrosse victory over Centenary College Wednesday. Scranton High graduate Shane Miller went 5-for-5 with two doubles, a homer, and five RBI Tuesday when Marywood extended its baseball winning streak to six with a 19-hit outburst in a 9-4 win over host King’s College. Emily Goss and Kerry Sullivan scored five goals each and Scranton scored seven times in the first 10 minutes of Tuesday’s 19-4 women’s lacrosse rout of Misericordia University. - Compiled by Tom Robinson

TOP GAMES

SPORTS

PAGE 38

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

The Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS®, Inc.

Open House Directory
SUNDAY MARCH 25TH, 2012 ,
$285,000 1-3PM $79,900 $150,000 12-2PM

12-1:30PM

12-1:30PM

$109,900 1-3PM

$324,900

307 Grand Ave., Clarks Summit
ERA One Source Realty

Dir: From the Casey Highway, take the Jermyn Dir: State Street in Clarks Summit to left at Winola Rd. Pass traffic Exit, turn left on Washington 1.2 mi, turn left into light and bear right at Summit Square and continue up the hill onto Dir: Abington Road to Waverly. Right on Carbon- Dir: Boulevard Ave in Green Ridge straight to Charles St in Dir: Pittston Ave to Brook St (McCarthy Flowers). ‘’Woodlands Dev.’’,take first left and home is on Throop. House on right, see sign. MLS#11-3657 Go all the way to the top. Sign. MLS#12-820 dale Road, house on left 2.2 miles. MLS#12-90 Grand Avenue. Third house on left(before VFW hall). MLS#12-993 the left side. MLS#11-4696

367 Carbondale Rd., South Abington
Century 21 Sherlock Homes

Coldwell Banker Town & Country

540 Charles St., Throop

824 Brook St., Scranton
Realty Network

3 Old Mill Road, Jermyn
Realty Network

1-2:30PM

$135,000 1-3PM

$166,800 1-4PM

$224,900

12-2PM

$189,900 12-1:30PM

$149,000

404 Summit Ave., Clarks Summit
Prudential Preferred Properties

752 S. Main St., Taylor
28 Slocum St., Tunkhannock
ERA Brady & Associates

Realty Network Dir: I-81 to Montage/Davis St Exit 182. Take DaDir: Do not use GPS, Winola Road to top of hill, right Dir: From traffic light at Bridge & Tioga St., west Dir: I380 Moscow Exit/Rt 690 to Left at Light on Rt 307 to a Right vis St to Main Street. At light (Wells Fargo Bank) onto Earl, go 2 blocks turn right onto Summit, house on on Tioga (Rt6) 3 blocks, right on Slocum. House at Light at Rt 502. Follow Rt 502 to a right on Laurel Road. Left on make left onto S. Main Street. Traveling south, Dir: Main Ave to Ferdinand St. Home is on the corner of Ferdinand and Wayne. MLS#12-1078 left about 1 block! MLS#11-4685 house is on the right. MLS#12-871 Jones to end of street. House on left. MLS#11-2540 on right. MLS#12-24
RE/MAX Home Team

81 Jones St., Moscow

Atlas Realty

324 Ferdinand St., Scranton

1-3PM

$282,000 2-4PM

$217,000 2-3:30PM

$269,000

12-2PM

$299,000 12:30-2PM

$129,900

721 Willard Ave., Jefferson Twp.
Century 21 Sherlock Homes

542 Garfield Ave., Jermyn
Realty Network

1102 Witko St., Dickson City
ERA One Source Realty

4111 Fourth Ave, Jefferson Twp.
Realty Network

River Street, Scranton
Realty Network

Dir: 81S to 380 exit 2 (Elmhurst, Rte 435), L on Rte 348 to L on Rte Dir: From Casey Hwy, take Jermyn exit (107) and go straight Dir: Main Ave. in Dickson City to Dundaff St., bear left to get Dir: From 84, Mt.Cobb exit, take Rt 348 W, turn Dir: Heading up Moosic Street, turn right on 247, R on Jefferson Ave, L on Second, property on corner of Second onto Rushbrook. Turn left onto Lincoln Ave, right on Franklin, on Scott Rd.(by LaSalle Academy), R on Witko OR take Rt.6 right on Jefferson Blvd, go to top of hill and turn Stafford. Make a left onto River St. Home on and Willard. MLS#12-1012 left on Fourth Ave, home on right. MLS#12-973 right. MLS#12-742 in DC to Scott Rd and L on Witko. MLS#12-177 left on Garfield. Home on left. Sign. MLS#12-320

2:30-3:30PM

$154,900 11AM-12:15PM

$257,000 1-2:30PM

$265,900

SUNDAY APRIL 1ST, 2012 ,

1-3PM

$121,900 1-3PM

$199,900

517 Spruce St., Dupont
Realty Network
Dir: Main Street in Dupont,(rt 315), Left on Hillside Ave., to left on Spruce St. Home on left. MLS#11-5364

1814 Monsey Avenue, Green Ridge
Realty Network

505 Brian Dr., South Abington
Coldwell Banker Town & Country

102 Powell Ave., Jessup
Prestige Realty Group

8 Paul St., Scott Twp.
Prestige Realty Group

Dir: Take the Jessup exit off the new Rte.6. Take Dir: North Washington Ave. to left on Electric Street. Dir: South Abington Rd to Rt on Edella Left on Brian first left after Stop Sign. Home on the corner. Sign. Dir: Rt 247 N. to intersection at Lakeland High Follow Electric Street to Monsey. Turn left. Home on school, turn right about l mile to Right onto Paul St. @ the end on right. MLS#11-5420 MLS#12-389 left. MLS#11-4767 House on right. MLS#11-203

Visit timesleader.com & Click “Buy A Home” to see the most up to date list of Open Houses

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

MARKETPLACE
300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

PAGE 39

100 Announcements 200 Auctions

golackawanna.com
500 Employment 600 Financial

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com

PAGE 40 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 412 Autos for Sale
112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

GT CONVERTIBLE Red with black

WANTED ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS
HEAVY EQUIPMENT DUMPTRUCKS BULLDOZERS BACKHOES

412 Autos for Sale

Hard Top. AM/FM. 6 disc CD. 117 K miles. Stage 2 Dinan suspension. Cross drilled rotors. Cold air intake. All maintenance records available. $11,500 OBO. 570-466-2630

BMW `99 M3with Convertible

HONDA ‘02 CIVIC EX

garage kept 18’ chrome wheels, Raptor hood with a Ram Air package. $10,000, negotiable (570) 852-1242

PONTIAC `02 FIREBIRD 42,000 miles,

SUBARU FORESTER’S

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVY ’77 CORVETTE Red & red, all

original. Non hits, restoration. Rides and looks new. Exceptionally clean. A/c, pb, ps, pw, 51K $12,400 570-563-5056

To place your ad call...829-7130
412 Autos for Sale

6

Highest Prices

FREE REMOVAL Call Vito & Ginos Anytime 288-8995

Paid!!!

4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd row seat, runs good, needs body work $1900. 570-902-5623

DODGE `02 DURANGO SPORT VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE

Auto, moonroof, 1 owner. $8,888 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CROSSROAD MOTORS
700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! ‘11 DODGE DAKOTA CREW 4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl. 14k, factory warranty. $21,999 ‘11 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 3950 miles. Factory Warranty. New Condition $17,499 ‘10 Dodge Nitro SE 21k alloys, cruise, tint, factory warranty $18,599 ‘09 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED Power sunroof. Only 18K. Factory Warranty. $19,199 ‘09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0 AutomatiC 24k Factory Warranty! $11,399 ‘08 Chrysler Sebring Conv. Touring 6 cyl only 32k $12,999 ‘08 SUBARU Special Edition 42K. 5 speed AWD. Factory warranty. $12,499 ‘08 CHEVY IMPALA LS 4 door, only 37K! 5 Yr. 100K factory warranty $11,199 ‘05 HONDA CRV EX One owner. Just traded. 65K. $12,799 ‘06 FORD FREESTAR Rear air, 62k $7999 ‘02 DODGE CARAVAN 87k, 7 passenger $4499 ‘01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR Executive 74K $5,599 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

starting at $11,450 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

to choose From

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STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

509

570-825-7988

IMPREZA’S

SUBARU

To place your ad call...829-7130
415 Autos-Antique & Classic

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

To place your ad call...829-7130
509 Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

HONDA ‘03 ACCORD EX
Leather, moonroof $9,977

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
All original $12,000

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

$49,000

is now hiring – PA Blasters/Shooters
Required: Valid PA Blaster’s License OR 1. 21 years of age 2. 1 year blasting experience (general experience working with explosives) AND 3. Ability to pass the Notice of Clearance by successfully completing the US Dept. of Justice Employee Possessor Questionnaire (felony criminal background check) Please email resume to US.landjobs@cggveritas.com, or apply online and view job description at www.cggveritas.com/careers (Keyword: shooter) or call 832-351-8904 or 403-819-6136.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

7

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
Found

412 Autos for Sale

CHEVY ‘07 IMPALA LS
Only 40k miles $12,280

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

starting at $12,400 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

to choose From

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL MERCEDES ‘29
$24,000

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com
Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

120

FOUND. Shiba Enu/ Pomeranian mix. Brown with white chest. male, 3-4 years old. Found in Wright Twp. Park, Mountain Top. 570-474-5273

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

CHRYSLER ‘07 SEBRING

new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE 4 door sedan. Like

To place your ad call...829-7130
566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

412 Autos for Sale

FOUND. Silver necklace on Lee Park Avenue. Call to describe. 570-262-6721 FOUND. Single key, with Toyota emblem, in Kirby Park. Has a key ring with hearts. 570-287-1368

Low miles, heated seats, moonroof, 1 owner. $12,780 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

AWD, auto, alloys $15,950

HYUNDAI FE ‘07 SANTE

AWD, Alloys, PW & PL, 1 Owner $12,450

DODGE ‘07 CALIBER

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

310

Attorney Services

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
HYUNDAI ‘11 SONATA
GLS, 1 Owner, only 11k miles $18,800

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

To place your ad call...829-7130
TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder. $12,880

V-8, power windows & seats, cruise control. Recent inspection. Asking $1,000. Call 570-604-9325

FORD `95 CROWN VICTORIA

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 522 Education/ Training 522 Education/ Training 415 Autos-Antique & Classic 415 Autos-Antique & Classic 415 Autos-Antique & Classic 421 Boats & Marinas 439 Motorcycles

PAGE 41 442 RVs & Campers

Education

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

McCann School of Business & Technology is seeking immediate part-time day/evening Instructors at our New Wilkes-Barre Campus for the following programs:

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Reduced price to $26,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

Johnson, Bow mounted trolling motor, 2 fish finders, live well, bilge, lights, swivel seats and trailer. Garage kept. $5,900.

MIRRORCRAFT ‘01 FISHING BOAT LOADED. 30 hp

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

BUSINESS, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, COMPUTERS, MASSAGE THERAPY
Bachelor’s Degree or Related Experience Required AND Master’s Degree Required

Good interior & exterior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $1,300 or best offer 570-362-3626 Ask for Lee

MERCEDES 1975

Find the perfect friend.
The Classified section at timesleader.com

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200
45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727
• All original

To place your ad call...829-7130
427 Commercial Trucks & Equipment

Call Chuck at 570-466-2819

442 RVs & Campers

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

MATH, ENGLISH, PSYCHOLOGY Please send resume to: TJ.Eltringham@mccann.edu
No Phone Calls Please

To place your ad call...829-7130

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

COLEMAN POP UP CAMPER 1991. Very good condition. Used very little. $950. 570-825-2665 WINNEBAGO ‘02 ADVENTURER 35 Foot, double slides, V-10 Ford. Central air, full awnings, one owner, pet & smoke free. Excellent condition and low mileage. $68,000. Call 570-594-6496

To place your ad call...829-7130
451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
ONLY ONE LEADER. ONL NL NL LY N LE D LE LEADER.
timesleader.com

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

439

Motorcycles

Low mileage. Many extras. Clean. $9,000 (570) 646-2645

BMW ‘07 K1200 GT BMW 2010 K1300S

with beige leather interior. 22” rims. Runs great. $8,500 Call 570-861-0202

CADILLAC `99 ESCALADE 97k miles. Black
557

557

Project/ Program Management

Project/ Program Management

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

2012 SUBARU

LEGACY
$0 Down Payment $0 Security Deposit $269 1st Month Payment $125 Registration Fees $394 Total Due at Signing
2.5i

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for Call 570-262-0914 Leave message.

Junior Achievement of Northeastern PA, Inc.
Junior Achievement of Northeastern Pennsylvania is currently seeking to fill the position of Capstone Manager to plan and oversee all aspects of capstone programs, including JA BizTown and JA Finance Park. Bachelor’s degree in education preferred, people-oriented, selfstarter with the ability to lift 50 pounds and stand for long periods of time are required. Email cover letter, resume and salary requirements to mturlip@janepa.org. No phone calls please. EOE

$15,000 FIRM.

• Automatic • All Wheel Drive • 31 MPG Highway • Alloy Wheels • Heated Seats

$

269

CAB-11

PER MONTH LEASE 36 MONTHS 30,000 TOTAL MILES

Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. Warranties until 2016 SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

O/O's & CO Flatbed Drivers
Hazleton/Scranton, PA Growing dedicated account needs Drivers Now! SIGN ON BONUS: $1,000 after 3 months & $1,000 after 6 months for Owner Operators & company drivers. Driver Home Locations: Hazleton, PA, or surrounding Area. Miles per Week Target is 2,275. Runs will go into North east locations. $1.15 all dispatched miles plus fuel surcharge for ALL Dispatch/Round Trip Miles at $1.50 Peg, paid at $.01 per $.06 increments. Truck must be able to pass a DOT inspection. Plate provided with weekly settlements and fuel card. Also needing up to 10 Company Drivers. Excellent Benefits! .45cents a mile, with tarp pay. Flatbed freight experience required. Class A CDL drivers with 2 years of experience. Feel free to contact Kevin McGrath 608-207-5006 or Jan Hunt 608-364-9716 visit our web site www.blackhawktransport.com

SIGN ON BONUS

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

HOURS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 8:30 P.M. FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 2:00 P.M. • CLOSED SUNDAY
EPA estimated fuel economy for 2012 Legacy 2.5i CVT models. Actual mileage may vary. Tax not included. Financing contingent on lender approval. Other lease terms available. Call for details.

www.minookasubaru.com

570-346-4641 1-800-982-4054

HSoft riding FLH. ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 OBO 570-905-9348

GREAT PAY, REGULAR/SCHEDULED HOME TIME & A GREAT/FRIENDLY/PROFESSIONAL STAFF TO WORK WITH!

PAGE 42 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans 509

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades 542 Logistics/ Transportation 542 Logistics/ Transportation

Auto. V6 Vortec. Standard cab. 8’ bed with liner. Dark Blue. 98,400 miles. $4,999 or best offer 570-823-8196

CHEVY `99 SILVERADO

HONDA ‘09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner. $16,670 1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

$4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHRYSLER ‘02 TOWNLike new! & COUNTRY V6.

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

4x4. Extra clean. Local new truck trade! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY ‘03 SILVERADO

To place your ad call...829-7130
FORD `10 F150 BLACK KING RANCH

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

MITSUBISHI `11

MERCURY `03 MOUNTAINEER

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Supercharged 59,000 miles, fully loaded. Impeccable service record. $36,000 570-283-1130

RANGE ROVER ‘07 SPORT

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

Moonroof. Alloys. 1 Owner. $17,575

CHEVY ‘10 EQUINOX LT

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Auto. V8. Bargain price! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY 99 SILVERADO 4X4

5.4L V8 engine Electronic 6 speed automatic. Brown leather “King Ranch” interior. Heat/cool front seats. Power moonroof, rear view camera, 18” aluminum wheels, tow package, navigation system. 23,000 miles. Asking $33,000 Call Jeff @ 570-829-7172

4X4 LARIAT 145” WB STYLESIDE

Leather, alloys & moonroof $16,995

FORD ‘08 ESCAPE XLT

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
451 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

To placeyour adcall. .829-7130
460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts

AWD. Third row seating. Economical 6 cylinder automatic. Fully loaded with all available options. 93k pampered miles. Garage kept. Safety / emissions inspected and ready to go. Sale priced at $7595. Trade-ins accepted. Tag & title processing available with purchase. Call Fran for an appointment to see this outstanding SUV. 570-466-2771 Scranton

An architectural woodworking company located in Kingston, PA is looking for Experienced Custom Woodworker/ Cabinetmaker & Finishers. Great pay & benefits. Only solid, mature & positive people should apply. Call: 570-283-5934 or email: agata@ 4daughters.net

CABINET MAKERS/ FINISHERS NEEDED

DRIVER/WAREHOUSER Full time position.
Local work. CDL required with 1 year experience. Straight truck & material handling. Benefits included. Apply in person at: Specialty Products and Installation Co. 2 Stevens Road Wilkes-Barre, PA EOE

Drivers CDL-A: Local Hazleton dedicated route! Home every night! Great Pay, Benefits! Estenson Logistics Apply: www.goelc.com 1-866-336-9642

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

518 Customer Support/Client Care

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

CHRYSLER `02 TOWN & COUNTRY

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

Clean SUV! $5995 WD. Extra cab. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD ‘04Clean, EXPLORER 2V6.

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

TOYOTA ‘08 4 RUNNER

Experience preferred but will train the right candidate. Must have a valid drivers license. We supply company vehicle and tools. Must be available to work 6 days/week. Company offers a voluntary Health Benefit Package and 401K Plan. Competitive wages. Please call Stephanie @ 888-514-8883 or fax resume to 570-517-5003

CATV INSTALLERS/ TECHS NEEDED

No experience necessary. Must have clean criminal & MVR. Will train. Sign On Bonus & Safety Bonus.

DRIVERS

Krise/STA 570-451-1972

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!
796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

533
1 Owner, moonroof & alloys. $23,775 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD ‘02 F150 Extra Cab. 6

Good Miles. Extra Clean. $10,880

GMC ‘04 ENVOY

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted
Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

clean driving record. Experience a plus. Call for an appointment. 570-472-0472

SEASONAL HELP Full time, must have
LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

LANDSCAPING

39 S. Prospect St. Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487 GOLD - SILVER COINS - JEWELRY Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM
No nonsense guarantee We will beat any competitors advertised price by up to 20%

HDI METALS

451

Luxury people mover! 87,300 well maintained miles. This like-new van has third row seating, power side & rear doors. Economical V6 drivetrain and all available options. Priced for quick sale $6,295. Generous trade-in allowances will be given on this top-of-the-line vehicle. Call Fran 570-466-2771 Scranton

1500 Cargo Van. AWD. V8 automatic. A/C. New brakes & tires. Price reduced $10,250. Call 570-474-6028

GMC `05 SAVANA

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans
TRD 4 WD Extra Cab $22,500

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

TOYOTA ‘09 TACOMA
560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

570-574-1275

FREE PICKUP

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

AUTOMOTIVE SALES CONSULTANTS
Valley Chevrolet is seeking individuals who are self-starters, team-oriented and driven. (No experience necessary)

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

538

HONDA ‘05 CRV

Janitorial/ Cleaning

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

4x4. Sunroof. Like new. $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

4WD, AUTO, CRUISE. $12,940 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

509

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

CARPENTERS NEEDED
Call 570-654-5775

Healthcare Services Group is currently looking to fill full time and part time positions. Please apply in person at Golden Living East Mountain, 100 East Mountain Blvd, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

HOUSEKEEPERS, FLOOR CARE AND LAUNDRY

We Offer: • Salary & Commission • Benefits • 401k Plan • 5 Day Work Week • Huge New & Used Inventory
Apply in person to: Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager Rick Merrick, Sales Manager

601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 542 Logistics/ Transportation 554 Production/ Operations 708 Antiques & Collectibles 716 Building Materials 744 Furniture & Accessories 748 Good Things To Eat
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR. SIGN UP NOW

PAGE 43 758 Miscellaneous
REAR WINDOWS 1955 Chevy, 1 tinted, 1 clear, black glass. Good condition. $80 for both. 825-3371 RIMS: Honda 4 pair 15” will fit any model Accord, Civic, & Del-Sol. Brand new. Asking $200. 570-239-6011 WALL MURAL Tuscan, beautiful, same as the one at local Bartolei Wine place. Brand new in box, comes with paste and is supposed to be easy to remove. $99. BOOKS South Beach & Atkins for life diet book, hard cover. New York Times best seller. Both retails at $24.95, selling for $12 each. WOK hand hammered with stand & lid. Used twice. $40. PANCAKE PAN $5. 735-2661

776 Sporting Goods

Due to our continued growth, Bolus Freight Systems is expanding its fleet of company drivers. Company drivers will enjoy dedicated runs or regional runs. You can be home every night or every weekend, the choice is yours. You can earn in excess of $1400 per week, and you will be driving a new or late model truck. Part time and weekend work also available. This is a career opportunity for dependable drivers to work for an industry leader and one of the highest paying companies in the business. We offer a performance bonus, paid vacations and holidays, medical and life insurance as well as 401K. For more information call: 1-800-444-1497 ext 721 or hit ‘0’ and ask for Carl or Joe D.

DRIVERS

To perform maintenance on trim dies/ casting dies. Experience running lathes, milling machines. Dayshift, 401K, health benefits. Bardane Manufacturing Co., Jermyn, PA

MACHINIST

600 FINANCIAL
610 Business Opportunities

ANTIQUES 3 piece Mahogany stack bookcase with drawer, 6ft x 20” hand carved Hitler made of pine, Dersuhrer carved on bottom signed by carver Gallagher. Needs some repair. Tiffany style lamps with stained glass shades, caramel in color. 1912 Gustave Stickley rocking chair with new rush seat, tag on bottom. Jewelry armoire, (4) 1912 chairs, original paint with newly rushed seats. 12 OldPA metal hunting licenses, 1927 & up. Two Oak bow china closets, one very ornate. Lots of smalls. 134 Route 11 Larksville, PA 570-283-3987 570-328-3428

PATIO PAVERS about 300 8” x 16” gray pavers & 30 red ones. All brand new selling for $1.42 at Lowes. Selling for $1 each. Prefer to sell as a lot. 570-735-2661

DESK: small computer desk - light oak & metal $25. Wood bench, storage, beautiful waiting for your finish, back & arm rests. $155.Bistro Set, French country white & oak, 2 swivel chairs, table, countertop tall 42” Solid wood $155. 570-824-6533

C.S.A. www.hails familyfarm.com 570-721-1144

750

Jewelry

Two years old, used very little. Paid $5,000, sell for $2,000. 570-899-9723

WALK IN TUB With seat and door.

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

710

Appliances

CEMETARY PLOTS 4 Plots at Saint Mary’s Polish Cemetary in Plymouth, PA. 570-368-2272

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 LOVESEAT & matching Recliner. Brown suede, excellent condition, almost new. $200. KITCHEN TABLE & CHAIRS Black metal with oak venere top. Great condition. $50. 570-328-3234 LOVESEAT blue & tan shades $30. Sofa, blue floral $50. End Table octagon, closed storage, light bottom, fruitwood top. $35. Wicker peacock chair, brown $40. All in good condition. 570-693-2329 LOVESEAT Green stripe, $50. 570-675-3890 MATTRESS & box spring, full set, new in bag $349. Call after 10am 570-602-1075 Mattress Set, BRAND NEW, Queen P-Top $150. Can Deliver 570-280-9628 MATTRESS TOPPER Very thick, brand new, with gel & feathers. Full size. $75. AIR MATTRESS full size, new with pump. 19” rise. $45 SOFA beige with rust tones, 8 way hand tied springs. Great condition. $300. 823-2709 PATIO SET Rattan, Floral. 1 couch, 1 loveseat, 3 end tables, glass tops, lifetime fabri-coat. Excellent condition. 570-903-8596

FURNISH FOR LESS

DIAMOND RING 1 carat, size 8, hardly worn. $750. OBO 570-655-5049

FISH FINDER Toughest Underwater System. On screen water temperature & direction display. 65” of cable with infrared red LED bulbs. New, never used. $200. 825-5386 TURKEY BOX Calls, assorted woods, new listed $35. selling $20 each. 570-287-2073

780

JACK IS PAYING TOP DOLLAR !!!!!
for gold and silver, diamonds, platinum, watches. Also buying scrap jewelry. Cash on the spot!!!!! We make house calls. 328-3428, 855-7197 or visit us 134 Route 11 Larksville, Pa

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION Panasonic, 52” projection screen. Very good condition. $150. 328-3234

784

Tools

FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!!
“WORK FOR YOURSELF” INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH JAN – PRO

726

Clothing

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING: Boys - Newborn to 7, Girls Newborn to 7-8. Very good condition, call for details 570-466-6499 GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130
762 Musical Instruments
DRUM sticks, cymbals, First Act brand drum, red. $20. Accordion, blue, $20. Both like new other then sticks have dents as expected. 735-2661 PIANO upright, antique dark wood, bench included $50. 570-693-2329

LASER GUIDE Retrofit for most 10” miter saws, works great! $8. 696-1267

754

Machinery & Equipment

To place your ad call...829-7130
PAINT SPRAYER with gun extension, 2 extension ladders, drop cloths, 4’ ladder, lights, extension pole & more. Call for price 570-262-0708 SCROLL SAW Craftsman, $85. Delta table saw converted to a router shaper table with Craftsman router attached. $90. 570-288-9260

TRUCK DRIVER
R EQUIREMENTS : 2 years Truck Driving Experience, able to drive 20’ box truck, must be able to meet DOT requirements, must be able to work flexible hours, must be able to meet physical requirements. Pay based on experience. Standard benefits available to include medical, dental and vacation. Apply at: U’SAGAIN RECYCLING 486 S. EMPIRE ST. WILKES-BARRE 570-270-2670 Full Time

*Guaranteed Clients * Steady Income *Insurance & Bonding * Training & Ongoing Support * Low Start Up Costs *Veterans Financing Program * Accounts available through 0ut Wilkes-Barre & Scranton

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385
COAT Leather, medium-extra large. Brown, new, very heavy. $75. 570-468-3052 DRESSES fancy, semi, prom, size 5-7 tea length, cute. colors are mint, buttercup, & brown satin. $75 each. 570-823-2709

COAT

BATTERY: Auto Craft Gold size 34/ 78, 800 cca - never used, truck junked. $70. 570-824-6533 FREEZER, commercial Frigidaire, heavy duty. $150. FREEZER Upright Frigidaire, excellent condition. $150. 570-929-1634 SEWING MACHINE portable, new box $52. Call after 10am. 602-1075

(570) 819-1966
JUICE EXTRACTOR Waring, commercial quality, stainless steel blade, internal mechanisms plus powerful 550 motor. Easy to disassemble & dishwasher safe. Citrus juice attachment PCA45 Excellent condition, bought for $200. Sell for $120. OBO 735-2661 MINI FRIDGE Haier, 19” cubed with freezer. $55 obo. Roomba automatic vacuum, original still in box, never used $125. 570-824-6533

768

Janpro.com

570-824-5774

Personal Electronics

756

630 Money To Loan
“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Medical Equipment

744

Furniture & Accessories

BED Queen, White metal, excellent condition, paid $500. asking $100. Is 5 years old. 570-371-3148 BEDROOM SUITE. Beautiful 3 piece birch queen size. Unusual modern design boasts headboard with two large cabinets, integrated night stands with pull out shelves, large mirror & large 8 drawer dresser with mirror. A must see at $700. 570-814-4835 DESK old wooden desk 1 drawer need to be fixed. Top part of desk need to be finished. Needs to go asap asking $50 or best offer call 570-239-8356 DINING ROOM SET Antique 8 piece matching, mahogany, good condition, 75 years old. $350 OBO. 570-474-6947 KITCHEN TABLE with 5 chairs. Wood with leaf, medium brown $65. 570-468-3052

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT: Walker, seated, great condition, $200. Cane: $30; Foot Spa $20. Call 570-735-2867

APPLE I-POD NANO very little used. Ear buds complete with radio for use without the ear buds. $50. REMOTE CAR STARTER Bulldog, Model RS502 $50. 570-826-0830

786 Toys & Games
BICYCLE Girl’s 16” Barbie bike by Dynacraft with training wheels. $45. firm. 570-696-4020 DOLLS 18” American Girl look alikes with 2 outfits $20. 570-693-2329

770

Photo Equipment

548 Medical/Health

PART11-7 shift TIME RN for PART3-11 shift TIME CNA for
Call Bonham Nursing & Rehab Center 864-3174 Ask for Linda or Lynette

To place your ad call...829-7130
OVEN Rotisserie, Set it and forget it. Used only once. $20. 826-0830

Recliner / Lift Chair. Excellent condition. $400 firm. Call 570-696-2208 between 9am-8pm

Pride Mobility

NIKON D3100 Excellent condition. 18-55 mm lens, 50 mm manual lens, plus filters, grip, battery/charger, & more. Asking $600 obo. 570-362-2568.

786 Toys & Games
AT M K I D S B A N K pink, $20. Like new. Sells for $35 at Toys-R-Us. LEAPFROG Leapzone turbo twist spelling wand. Needs 4 AA batteries. $10. SPONGEBOB BUNDLE Alarm clock & electronic book of 5 games, selling both for $20. TWILIGHT DELUXE Scene it dvd game, like new, $20. On Toys-R-Us website for $44. 22 KIDS VHS movies lot & VHS stand $2. each or all for $35. Stand is $5. LITTLE TYKES Snacks & Snow cones cart. beverage dispenser, snack vending tubes, cash register, scale, cutting boards, retails for $80. Used twice. $40. OBO. 735-2661

712

Baby Items

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

$800. Neg. HOSPITAL BED: Electric. Like new. $400. Negotiable. Call 570-735-2867

SCOOTER: Outdoor. LIKE NEW. Indoor -

776 Sporting Goods
BIKE girls 20” pink with white tires & pink rims. 1 front hand brake & pedal brakes. Used only a few times. $45. Includes Schwinn water bottle holder 735-2661

700 MERCHANDISE

SEAT Pink Bumbo seat with tray $20. 2 Fisherprice Jumperoo’s, $50. each. 570-814-0980

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

758 Miscellaneous
BACK MASSAGER brown. Folds up. Homedics, newer. $5. 570-693-2329 COMPOST BIN Wood, painted red. Free. 675-3890 DRAPES lined, white pinch pleat 120x84” 1 pair, new. $35. 570-693-2329 GRILL Gas, Charbroil $50. FISH TANK 29 gallon $40. 570-474-5164

duty case in the Dallas area for 3-11 and 11-7 shifts. Call Jessica at 451-3050 for immediate interview.

RNS AND LPNS needed for private

708

Antiques & Collectibles

716

Building Materials

STREETLIGHT R-A-G 1960’s, very good condition. $75. 570-468-3052

BRICKS solid paver ready for Spring, for sidewalks, red color with variations. Approximately 936 available. $0.30 each. 696-1267.

ROCKER, wood/tapestry, $75. RECLINER, Burgundy velour cloth, $125. SOFA, chair, ottoman, 3 tables, great for den. Wood and cloth, all in excellent condition. $450. Call after 6 PM 570-675-5046

BIKE Murray, 20” 18 speed, Herculite micro-Alloy, $50. CAMPING TENT sleeps 6, $50. HAMMOCK FRAME metal, $15. CAMPING COTS 2 metal framed, $15 each. 570-824-0591 SCOOTER 2002 Golden Tech, 3 wheels, runs good. $100. Call 655-1070

PAGE 44 796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise 815 Dogs 906 Homes for Sale 912 Lots & Acreage 941

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

For your gold and silver, gold and silver coins, rings, bracelets, scrap jewelry Guaranteed highest prices paid. Also Makes Housecalls 570-855-7197 TWIN JOGGER Infant stroller in good condition at fair price. 675-0528 call after 5:30pm.

TOP DOLLAR

Carol is paying

BACK MOUNTAIN Centermorland

PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website. 529 SR 292 E For sale by owner Move-in ready. Well maintained. 3 - 4 bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath. Appliances included. 2.87 acres with mountain view. For more info & photos go to: ForSaleByOwner.com Search homes in Tunkhannock. $275,000. For appointment, call: 570-310-1552

March 31st! 7 acres – 400 ft Riverfront $69,900 Cooperstown, NY! Nice woods, gorgeous setting! $5,000 off for cash! Free kayak! Call now! (888) 793-7762 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.com

WATERFRONT LAND LIQUIDATION!

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

1st floor. 1 bedroom, electric water and heat included. Off street parking. Freshly painted, w/d hookup. $575/mo., lease and security required. NO PETS 570-477-6018 leave message

NANTICOKE

2 bedrooms. All appliances included. All utilities paid; electricity by tenant. Everything brand new. Off street parking. $700 + security & references. Call 570-969-9268

PITTSTON

2nd floor, 5 rooms, wall-to-wall carpeting, window dressings, stove, refrigerator, & garbage disposal. Washer/ dryer hookup, offstreet parking. No pets, no smoking. $650/month + security. Heat, water & sewer included. Call 570-574-1143

WEST PITTSTON

Coming Attractions America Realty
Available 30, 60 +/- days. Redone efficiency, 1 bedrooms, some with gas fireplaces, with appliances, laundry. Managed Services! $500 + utilities and up! MUST PROVIDE: EMPLOYMENT/ APPLICATION VERIFICATION/ NO PETS OR SMOKING. 2 YEAR LEASES.

FORTY FORT
Rentals

915 Manufactured Homes
(Formerly Pocono Park) and San Souci Park. Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE

VITO’S & GINO’S
Wanted:
WANTED ALL JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & HEAVY EQUIPMENT DUMPTRUCKS BULLDOZERS BACKHOES

Highest Prices Paid!!
FREE PICKUP

Pure Bred & Mixes $400 and up 570-250-9690

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES

288-8995

3 bedroom home, 2 full baths, living & dining rooms and extra large kitchen. Basement has a new 16’ x 26’ room with recently installed waterproofing system. House has it’s own well and septic system. Gas heat, replacement windows throughout. New roof, siding & gutters installed in ‘08. Large storage shed on property. New stone patio, all on a 165’ x 420’ lot. Twenty minutes from Tunkhannock or Wilkes-Barre. House located at 319 Overbrook Rd. $199,000 Call 570-675-1982

DALLAS

Very nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath double wide in quiet country setting. $20,000. Financing available Call 717-439-7716

HUNLOCK CREEK

Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly. ***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT (12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week) ***75 cent night shift pay differential offered. ***Pay increase based on skill development. Take charge...LEARN AND EARN!
XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced Forklift Operators - MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL TIME EXPERIENCE - with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are necessary for these positions. • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-Employment Drug Screen & Physical
All full-time positions come with the following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increases based on skill development.

288-1422

To place your ad call...829-7130

Trailer Park Double wide 24’ x 40’,3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, off-street parking, $26,000 Call 570-655-6740

JENKINS TWP. Ouiet Cove

To place your ad call...829-7130

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!
900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com. Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
560 Quality Assurance/Safety 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 560 Quality Assurance/Safety 560 Quality Assurance/Safety

EVERY THURSDAY IN MARCH from Noon-4pm at the Tunkhannock Public Library

2 bedroom. Newly renovated. Oak floors. Gas stove. Refrigerator. Washer/dryer hookup. Bath with shower. 3 paddle fans. $575 plus gas, electric & water. No Pets. References required. Call 570-406-9395 or 570-779-4609

KINGSTON

To place your ad call...829-7130
533 Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

800 PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
KITTENS free to a good home. 2 sisters, Trixie & Pixie. Short haired. 570-472-1646

815

Dogs

DOG Free, Very good with kids and other dogs. 6 1/2 years. needs loving home preferably fenced yard. Call 570-355-5198.

Easily converts to single home. New roof, electric, windows & 2 car garage. Remodeled. 66 x 100 feet, fenced lot, $140,000. 570-693-2408

DOUBLE BLOCK

WYOMING

Available April 1 New 3 room apartment. All utilities included except electric. No smoking & no pets. $650 + security and references. Furnished or unfurnished. Call 570-954-1200

BEAR CREEK

THE PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION is seeking qualified applicants for

909

raised. 3 males left. First shots/ dewormed. Ready to Go! $400. 570-417-1192

JACK RUSSELL and PUPPIES Vet bred

To place your ad call...829-7130
EXETER For sale by owner 3 bedroom, 1 bath home in great neighborhood. $105,000 570-332-3122

Income & Commercial Properties

Renovated 1st floor, 2 bedroom apartment. New carpeting and paint. Fridge & stove. Water Included. $600 + security & utilities. Call 570-240-6620 or 570-388-6503

HARDING

Multiple limited-term Transportation Construction Inspector (TCI) positions are available from April through December (with the possibility of overtime) in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne & Wyoming counties. TCI’s perform technical duties in testing and inspecting materials and inspecting work on roads, bridges, or other transportation projects to assure compliance with established standards and contract specifications. Minimum Experience & Training Requirements: One year of experience as an Engineering Technician; or two years of construction inspection work which required reading and interpreting plans and specifications, and graduation from high school; or one year of construction inspection work which required reading and interpreting plans and specifications and an associate degree in an appropriate engineering technology; or any equivalent combination of experience and/or training which provides the required knowledges, skills, and abilities. Starting Hourly Rate: $17.38 To schedule the civil service test for this job title, apply online with the State Civil Service Commission at www.scsc.state.pa.us or call 717-783-3058 to request a paper application. Interested individuals may also contact PennDOT, District 4-0 at (570) 963-4034 for more information or visit a local CareerLink Office for assistance.
Pennsylvania is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer Promoting Workforce Diversity

TRANSPORTATION CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR

Fixed Operations Manager/Service Director
Expanding automotive dealership is seeking an experienced

Fixed Operations/ Service Director. Applicants must

4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 unit apartment buildings. Fully occupied. City license and occupancy permits issued. Very well maintained. Some have new windows, roofs, coinop washer/dryer. 570-736-3125

NANTICOKE

2nd Floor. 2 bedrooms, renovated bathroom, balcony off newly renovated kitchen with refrigerator & stove, Pergo floors, central air, newly painted, offstreet parking, no pets. $600 per month plus utilities, & 1 month security deposit. 570-239-1010

KINGSTON

be experienced with all/any related programs & processes. Must be a team player.

Salary, 401k Plan and Benefits.
Submit your resume in confidence to:

Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

Box 3040 c/o Times Leader 15 North Main Street

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 941 Apartments/ Unfurnished 950 Half Doubles 950 Half Doubles

PAGE 45

NORTH WILKES-BARRE FIRST FLOOR EFFICIENCY / 1 BEDROOM, BRAND NEW FLOORING, CARPETING, MODERN/APPLIANCES, ELECTRIC/GAS FIREPLACE. APPLICATION/EMPLO YMENT VERIFICATION “being considered” NO PETS/SMOKING 2 YEARS @ $500+ UTILITIES. MANAGED!

BEING REMODELED

30+ DAY

floor, 1 bedroom apartment. Basement washer / dryer hookup. Kitchen includes fridge, range and microwave. Offstreet parking, back yard. No pets. $500 + security & utilities. 570-474-0388 570-417-8751

MOUNTAIN TOP Centrally located 1st

25 1/2 Penn St. 1/2 Double, 2 bedroom. Newly remodeled. Gas Heat. Washer & dryer hookup, yard, parking. Section 8 Not Approved. No pets. $550 + utilities. 570-714-1530

KINGSTON

America Realty
288-1422

Rentals

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
425 West 8th Street New 1st floor 2 bedroom with off street parking, washer/ dryer hook up, stove included. No pets. $550/mo + security. Sewer & garbage included, other utilities by tenant. 570-760-0458

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
on quiet street; kitchen with range, refrigerator; 1st floor laundry; storage space; off street parking; credit check, lease, and security; $660 month; call 570-575-9936 KINGSTON

Clean and freshly painted. 3 bedrooms, spacious kitchen, hardwood floors, near amenities. Full basement, stove & refrigerator, washer/dryer hookup, no pets. $625/month, + utilities & security. Call 570-328-3516 570-825-0046

WILKES-BARRE EAST END

974 Wanted to Rent Real Estate

Kingston, Forty Fort or Bear Creek Area Responsible couple.
Non-smokers. Seeking to rent a single home or half double. Call 570-822-8361

theGuide
It’s Your Entertainment News Source.

953 Houses for Rent

KINGSTON 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath

Located in quiet neighborhood. Kitchen, living room, dining room, sun room, bathroom. 2 large and 1 small bedroom, lots of closets, built in linen, built in hutch, hardwood floors, fireplace, storage room, yard. New washer/ dryer, stove & fridge. Heat and hot water included. 1 year lease + security. $950 570-406-1411

KINGSTON E. W alnut St.

WEST WYOMING

WILKES-BARRE

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
Available Now Beautiful 1 bedroom apartment in nice neighborhood. Wall to wall carpeting. Plenty of closet space. All kitchen appliances, including dishwasher & garbage disposal. Nice pantry area off kitchen. Washer / dryer hookup. No pets. No smoking. $450 + utilities & security. Call 570-406-9243 Leave Message All Calls Returned Same Day

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
- Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, brand new w/w carpeting thruout, full eat-in kitchen, Private yard with rear deck, attic & basement storage. Close to Jr. High. $700 mo + utilities, security, lease. No pets. 570-793-6294

PRISTINE & SPACIOUS

7 room house with 3 bedrooms, 1 full tile bath. Large kitchen with beautiful oak cabinets. Brand new stove, carpeting, flooring, draperies & windows. Washer/dryer hook up on 1st floor. Single car detached garage. Large yard. Gas heat. Pets OK, no smoking. $900/ month, + utilities & security. Close to airport, I81 & casino. 570-762-8265

DUPONT

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section.
*2008 Pulse Research

91

%

What Do You Have To Sell Today?
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
ONL NLY N LE D NL LE ONLY ONE LEADER. LEADER.
timesleader.com

2 small bedrooms, all appliances, security & 1st. Available 4/1. NO PETS. 570-762-6792

HARVEYS LAKE
NANTICOKE Desirable

Read it every Friday in The Times Leader.

KINGSTON

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*

Sprague Ave. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1st floor duplex, New w/w carpeting & hardwood floors. Convenient to Wyoming Ave. Washer/dryer hookup, basement storage. Reduced! $540/month + utilities, security, lease & NO PETS. 570-793-6294

KINGSTON

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms $936 + electric only

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

944

KINGSTON

Commercial Properties

floor, 2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted, security system. Garage. Extra storage & cable TV included. Laundry facilities. Air Conditioned. Fine neighborhood. Convenient to bus & stores. No pets. References. Security. Lease. No smokers please. $765 + utilities. Call. 570-287-0900

E. WALNUT 1st ST. Light, bright,

Rte. 315 1,000 & 3,800 Sq. Ft. WILL DIVIDE OFFICE / RETAIL Call 570-829-1206

DOLPHIN PLAZA

315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. & 3,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

NEW LUXURY DUPLEX This beautiful, completely renovated 2 bedroom luxury apartment could be yours! All new high end amenities include: hardwood floors, gorgeous maple kitchen cabinets with granite countertops & stainless steel appliances. Spacious great room with gas fireplace. Stacked washer/dryer. All new tile bath. Large screened-in porch. Many large, convenient closets. Central A/C. New gas heating system. Huge attic for storage. “Must See!” $850 + utilities, lease & security. NO PETS. Call for appointment. 570-793-6294

PLAINS

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!
959 Mobile Homes
DOUBLE WIDE IN PARK 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, washer/dryer hookup, pets negotiable. $650 + $260 lot rent/month, plus utilities & security. Credit & background check. 570-406-7318

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY
1135 Hauling & Trucking

LUZERN IN LUZERNE COUNTY

NEWS NEWSPAPER
Apartments/ Unfurnished 941

ONE AUDITED
Apartments/ Unfurnished

N NUMBER

MOUNTAINTOP

ALWAYS READY HAULING Moving, Deliveries, Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! Free Metal Removal Free Estimates 570-301-3754

Find the perfect friend.
The Classified section at timesleader.com

941

1165

Lawn Care

SPIKE & GORILLA’S
570-702-2497
Silly Name, Serious Results! Residential & Commercial Services Available.

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

LAWNCARE

962

Rooms

Rooms for rent in large, furnished Victorian Home. Hardwood floors. Modern kitchen, bath & laundry. Off street parking. $500 + security. All utilities, cable & internet included. Month to month lease. Call 570-430-3100

WEST PITTSTON

1183

Masonry

JAMES ATHERTON MASONRY Free Estimates All phases of masonry, foundations, brick, concrete, chimneys & roofs 570-417-7688

ONLY N LE D NL LE ONLY ONE LEADER. LEADER.
timesleader.com

PAGE 46

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

PAGE 47

V AL L EY’S GO T’EM A L EY’S GOT’EM
2010 H ON D A CR V EX -L SP OR T 4W D 2010 JEEP W R AN GL ER SP OR T 4W D 2006 CH EV R OL ET EX P R ESS 2500 D I ESEL CAR GO V AN
1- w ner O Sunr oof

V i i u s 24/ 7 w w w . leych evr l . m st va l o et co

2005 CH EV R OL ET SI V ER AD O 3500 L STAK E BOD Y 4X 4 W I L I TH FTGATE
ONL Y 34K M I ES L

ONL Y 38K M I ES L

ONL Y 35K M I ES L
1- w ner O

#12541A , 4 C yl, A ut at A /C , PW , PD L, Tint . om ic, ed W indow s, Leat FrontC apt C hairs, 31K M il her, ain es

$

22 900*
,

#12221A ,V6 6 Speed M anualTransm ission,A /C , Prem ium W heel ardtop,PW ,PD L,C ruise,23K M il s,H es $ *

21 500
,

#Z 2665, V8 6. Turb o D i 6L esel 4 Sp eed A ut at c , om i Transm i on, A i C ondi i ng , Ful oor ssi r t oni lFl C overi , D el ng uxe C onsol FrontBucketSeat e, s

$

19 900*
,

#Z 2650, Vort 6000 V8 H D 4 Sp eed A ut at c ec om i Transm i on, 40/ 20/ 40 Seat ng , Snow Pl ssi i ow Prep Packag e, A M / FM , W heelFl ares

$

24 995*
,

2007 GM C ACAD I AW D A
1- w ner O

2004 CH EV R OL ET EX P R ESS 3500 15” CU BE V AN
ONL Y 33K M I ES L
1- w ner O

2004 CH EV Y SI V ER AD O L 1500 R EGU L AR CAB 2W D
1- w ner O

2007 CH EV R OL ET EX P R ESS “ R EGEN CY CON V ER SI ” V AN ON

ONL Y 22K M I ES L
#12572A , 3. A ut at c, A i , PW , PD L H eat 6L om i r , ed M i rrors, Rear Parki A ssi , D VD w / Bose ng st Sp eakers, 18” A l i um num W heel Rem ot St s, e art

$

29 999*
,

#Z 2666, 6. V8 4 Sp eed H D A ut at c 0L om i Transm i on w / O verdri ssi ve, A i C ondi i r t oni , ng H i h Back BucketSeat TitSt g s, l eeri ng W heel

$

15 900*
,

#111008A , V6 4. 3L5 Speed M anualTransm i on, D ual ssi Ai rbags, A /C , Bedlner TitSt ng W heel O nl 46K M ies i , l eeri , y l

$

9 999*
,

#Z2661, 4. V6 A ut atc, A i , Ful oor C overi 3L om i r lFl ng, PW , PD L C l h Seat O nSt , C rui O nl 49K M ies , ot s, ar se, y l

$

17 900*
,

2004 CH EV Y SI V ER AD O L 2500H D EX TEN D ED CAB 4W D
1- w ner O L eat her

2008 GM C SI R A 3500 4W D ER EX TEND ED CAB D U R AM AX D I ESEL
L eat her

LTZ

2007 GM C SI R A SL E ER EX TEN D ED CAB 4W D
1- w ner O

2009 CH EV Y AV AL AN CH E L T 4W D

ONL Y 39K M I ES L
1- w ner O

#12177A , V8 A ut atc, A i , PW , PD L Runni Boards, om i r , ng Tonneau C over Bedlner A loy W heel C D , O nl 48K M ies , i , l s, y l

$

18 999*
,

#12238A , D uram ax D i eselV8 Turb o A li lson, A ut at c, om i A i , Sunroof Rem ot St , Pow er O p t ons, Rear Parki r , e art i ng A ssi ance, O nSt , X M Sat lt & M ore. st ar eli e

#Z 2517, 5. V8, A ut at c, 3L om i Rear Park A ssi , A ut rac Transf C ase, st ot er PD L PW , Rem ot St , 1-O w ner L , e art , ow M ies l

$

33 989*
,

$

22 875*
,
1- w ner O Sunr oof

#12467A , 5. V8 A ut , A i , PW , PD L 3L o. r , Runni ng Boards, Keyl ess St , O nSt , art ar X M Sat lt Tit C rui eli e, l, se

$

24 950*
,
1- w ner O

2011 D OD GE D AK OTA BI H OR N G CR EW CAB 4W D
ONL Y 14K M I ES L

2002 CH EV Y ASTR O CAR GO V AN

ONL Y 30K M I ES L

2012 CH EV R OL ET SI V ER AD O L 2500 H D R EGU L AR CAB 4X 4
ONL Y 90K M I ES L
6” Chr e om St eps

2008 H U M M ER H 3 4W D

ONL Y 28K M I ES L

2007 CH EV R OL ET COL OR AD O EX TEN D ED CAB 4W D Z71

1- w ner O

#11908B, 3. 7LV6 A ut atc, A /C , PW , PD L, Front om i BucketSeat A M /FM C D , Fog Lam ps, A loy W heel s, l s

$

21 999*
,

#Z 2658, Vort 4300 V6 A ut at c w / ec om i O verdri ve, D eep Ti ed G l nt ass, FrontA uxii lary Seat H i Back A uxii , ch lary BucketSeat s

#12211A , 6. 0LV8, A ut at A ir, Suspension Pkg. om ic, , PW , PD L, C ruise, Tow ing Pkg. St , eelW heel s

$

12 995*
,

$

28 999*
,

#Z2390, 3. 5 A ut at A ir, PW , PD L, Leat 7LI om ic, her, 6 D isc C D , M onsoon St ereo, Tint W indow s, H eat ed ed Seat C hrom e Package, Keyl Ent 1 O w ner s, ess ry,

$

25 999*
,

#Z 2505A , 3. I A ut at c, D eep Ti ed 7L 5, om i nt G l ass, O f fRoad Pkg . I a-Trac 4x4, PW , , nst PD L A i , C astA l i , r um num W heel 46K M ies s, l

$

17 999*
,

2005 CH EV Y EX P R ESS 3500 CAR GO

2007 CH EV R OL ET 5500 4X 4 D U R AM AX D IESEL CR EW CAB D U M P TR U CK
ONL Y 19K M I ES L

2009 CH EV R OL ET SI V ER AD O L 1500 EX TEND ED CAB Z71
1- w ner O

2003 CH EV Y C4500 STAK E BOD Y D U R AM AX D I ESEL

2004 CH EV R OL ET C4500 D U R AM AX DI ESEL R EGU L AR CAB D U M P TR U CK

ONL Y 31K M I ES L

ONL Y 35K M I ES L
#Z 2637, D uram ax 6600 D i esel 6 Sp eed , M anualTrans. Rear L , ocki D i f ng ferent al i , C rui C ont , H i se rol -Back BucketSeat s

#Z2646, 6. V8 4 Speed H D A ut at c, 0L om i Ful oor C overi lFl ng, A i , A M /FM /St r ereo, FrontReclni BucketSeat L M ies i ng s, ow l

$

15 950*
,

#Z2635, 6. 6LD uram ax D i eselA li lson, A ut atc, om i 12’D um p Body, A i , C rui A M /FM St r se, ereo

$

51 877*
,

#12398A , V8, A ut at c, A i , om i r C rui PW , PD L C hrom e G ril se, , l

$

25 590*
,

#Z 2647, D uram ax D i esel6600 A li lson 1000 A ut at c Transm i on, A i om i ssi r C ondi i ng , Tit H i t oni l, -Back BucketSeat s

$

27 887*
,

$

28 999*
,

*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. XM Satellite & OnStar fees applicable. Not responsible for typographical errors.

V A L L E Y 601 K id d e rS tre e t, W ilke s -Ba rre , P A CH E V RO L E T

K E N W A L L A CE ’ S

821-2772 •1-800-444-7172

Scan From M obil e Device For M ore Special s

Mon.-Thurs.8:30-8:00pm; Friday 8:30-7:00pm; Saturday 8:30-5:00pm

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.

PAGE 48

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
M A S S I V E • M A R K D O W N • M A R C H
2012 N IS S A N JU K E S V
*
S TK #N 21664 M O D EL# 20362 M S R P $22, 490

TH E NU M BER 1 NISSAN D EAL ER I N TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGI N* O *
T u r o 4 Cyl, 6 S p eed , A/ C, All Po w er b , S elect b le D r a ive M o d es , A Bla s tT o D r ive!!

FW D

6S P E E D

SA VE O N A L L J U KES IN STO C K 10 A VA IL A B L E!! NO W !!
W / $5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H

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2012 N IS S A N 2.5S S E DA N
S TK #N 21107 M O D EL# 13112 M S R P $23, 960

IN STO C K O NLY

SA VE $5500 O N A NY IN STO C K 2012 A LTIM A NO W !

A L TIM A

0 0SO K O 3CLES INCHTOOCSETFRO M ! R O VE VEH I
S TK #N 21519 M O D EL# 22112 M S R P $23, 050

2012 N IS S A N ROGUE 50 R O G U ES IN STO C K S FW D M O R E A R R IV IN G D A ILY !
30 IN STO C K

IN STO C K O NLY

50 IN STO C K

4 Cyl, CVT , PW , PDL , Cr is e, T ilt I- ey F lo o rM a t & S p la s h Gu a r s u , K , s d

4 Cyl, CVT , AC, AM / F M / CD , PW , PD L , Cr is e, T ilt u , F lo o rM a t & s S p la s h Gu a r s d

$

18 ,9 6 0
W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 75 0 N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

B U Y FO R

*

OR

$

* $189 PerM o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $12,459.20; M u s tb e h a h ; a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h D o w n o rT r d e E q u it (+ ) p lu s r o hr a y egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l d u e a @ d eliver $2,202.50. $1330 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in clu d ed . y e

18 9 P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

L EAS E FO R

*

$

19 ,9 9 9
W / $ 75 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

B U Y FO R

*

OR

$

* $199 Perm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $12,216.50; M u s tb e h a h ; a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h D o w n o rT r d e E q u it (+ ) p lu s r o hr a y egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l d u e a @ d eliver y= $2,202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in clu d ed . e

19 9

L EAS E FO R *

P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

S E DA N
STK#N 21280 M O D EL# 16112 M SR P $33, 125

2012 N IS S A N
V- CVT , M o o n r o f 6, o , Pw rS ea t Allo ys , A/ C, , PW , PD L , Cr is e, u T ilt& F lo o rM a t s

M A XIM A 3.5S

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IN STO C K O NLY

$

2 7,9 9 5

B U Y FO R

*

OR

$

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

* $269 Perm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $18,881.25; h a h ; M u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h D o w n o rT r d e E q u it (+ ) p lu s o hr a y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l d u e @ d eliver a y= $2,202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in clu d ed . e

269

L EA S E FO R

*

P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

You r A W D Pen n sylva n ia M ASSIV E $ IN V EN TO RY! 2 7,9 9 0
STK#N 21472 M O D EL# 23212 M SR P $32, 525

2012 N IS S A N
A W ESO M E L EA SE!!

M URA N O S

M A SSIVE SA VING S O N A LL IN STO C K 2012 M U R A NO S!

V- CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , 6, Cr is e, T ilt S p la s h u , Gu a r s & F lo o rM a t ! d s

B U Y FO R

*

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

OR

$

* $299 Perm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $16,913; M u s tb e h a h ; a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT r d e E q u it (+ ) p lu s r o hr a y egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l d u e a @ d eliver $2,202.50. In clu d es $725 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t y= e.

2 9 9 P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

L EAS E FO R

*

STK#N 21418 M O D EL# 26212 M SR P $45, 595

2012 N IS S A N A RM A DA S V SA VE $7000 O R M O R E O N A L L 2012 4X4 A R M A DA ’S IN STO C K O NLY !! 10 A VA IL A B L E
W H AT A L EA SE!!
V8, Au t m a t o ic, 8 Pa s s en ger Rea rAir , , Ba cku p Ca m er , a F o ld in g S ea t , All s Po w er M u s tS ee!! ,

S TK #N 21048 M O D EL# 25211 M S R P $35, 160

2011 N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R O NLY 4 2011’S L EFT!! SA VE $7000 S V 4X4 O R M O R E O N A NY IN STO C K 2011!
W H AT A L EA SE!!
V6, Au t , A/ C, o PW , PD L , P S ea t . , AM / F M / CD , Cr is e, T ilt u , F lo o rM a t , s M u ch M o r e

2012 N IS S A N TITA N K C SA VE O VER $6000 O FF M SR P S V 4X4 IN STO C K O NLY !!
S TK #N 21429 M O D EL# 34412 M S R P $35, 180

$

3 8 ,9 9 5
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*

OR

$

W / $ 2 0 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

* $499 Perm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $20973.70; M u s t h a h ; b e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT r d e E q u it (+ ) p lu s r o hr a y egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l d u e @ d eliver $2202.50. In clu d es $500 S t Pa t icks D a y Bo n u s Ca s h. a y= . r

499

L EAS E FOR

*

P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.

$

2 8 ,16 0

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$

* $299 Perm o n t p lu s t x, 39 m o n t lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r Res id u a l= $14415.60; h a h ; M u s tb e a p p r ved t u N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT r d e E q u it (+ ) p lu s o hr a y r egis t a t n f r io ees ; T o t l d u e @ d eliver $2202.50. $3950 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t in clu d ed . a y= e

W / $ 2 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

2 9 9 P ER M O.
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L EAS E FO R

*

V8, Au t , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cr is e, T ilt Va lu e T r ck. Pkg., o u , u F lo o rM a t & S p la s h Gu a r s s d

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M A S S I V E • M A R K D O W N • M A R C H

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