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Teaching Unit Template Title: The Road To Revolution An investigation of the political and sociocultural causes of the American

Revolution Overview: Students will explore the various political and sociocultural conditions that existed in the prerevolutionary colonies that led up to the initial conflict between the British and the colonists at Lexington and Concord and spurred the American Revolution. Political aspects like the Intolerable Acts and the Boston Massacre, will be among some of the topics examined to help students gain an understanding of the political climate that existed in the American colonies. Students will also read the novel, Johnny Tremain, by Esther Forbes to gain a better understanding of the sociocultural climate in the New England colonies and the role that culture played in the conflict between the colonists and the British. Students will develop a greater understanding of how time and place can influence culture and at times lead to conflict. Grade Level: Grade 5 Social Studies Time Allotment: Subject Matter: Interdisciplinary: History, Social Science and Literature Learning Objectives: Students will understand the political causes of the American Revolution By examining the political events of the prerevolutionary time period, students will understand how specific events served as a catalyst to conflict between the colonies and the crown. Students will understand the sociocultural climate in the American colonies and its relationship to Britain Students will read, Johnny Tremain, by Esther Forbes to exam the road to the Revolution through the eyes of its main character Johnny. Students will understand how time and place can influence culture Students will construct a timeline of events and characters in the colonies to better understand how time and place and influence culture and events

Students learn to use Timetoast timelining software or multimedia programs of Animoto or Voicethread Students will choose between using Timetoast.com to create an interactive timeline with embedded multimedia evidence and making a slide-based multimedia timeline using Voicethread or Animoto.

Standards: Framework : 2003 History and Social Science

Strand: Grade 5: United States History, Geography, Economics, and Government: Early Exploration to Westward Movement 5.CS.2 Interpret timelines of events studied. 5.CS.3 Observe and identify details in cartoons, photographs, charts, and graphs relating to a historical narrative. 5.CS.14 Give examples of how changes in supply and demand affected prices in colonial history (e.g., fur, lumber, fish, and meat). (E, H) 5.10 Explain the importance of maritime commerce in the development of the economy of colonial Massachusetts, using the services of historical societies and museums as needed. 5.15 Explain the reasons for the French and Indian War, how it led to an overhaul of British imperial policy, and the colonial response to these policies. (H, C, E) Sugar Act (1764) Stamp Act (1765) Townsend Duties (1767) Tea Act (1773) and the Intolerable Acts (1774) the slogan, "no taxation without representation" the roles of the Stamp Act Congress, the Sons of Liberty, and the Boston Tea Party (1773) 5.17 Describe the major battles of the Revolution and explain the factors leading to American victory and British defeat. (H) Lexington and Concord (1775) Bunker Hill (1775) Saratoga (1777) Valley Forge (1777-1778)

Yorktown (1781)

5.18 Describe the life and achievements of important leaders during the Revolution and the early years of the United States. (H, C) John Adams Benjamin Franklin King George III Alexander Hamilton Thomas Jefferson James Madison George Washington Framework: Grade 5 English Language Arts, 2004 Supplemental Standard 4: Vocabulary and Concept Development o Determine the meanings of unfamiliar words using context clues (for example, definitions, examples, explanations in the text). Standard 8: Understanding a Text Identify and draw conclusions from the authors use of description of setting, characters, and events. Standard 9: Making Connections Relate a literary work to information about its setting. Standard 10: Genre Identify the characteristics of various genres (for example, poetry, informational and expository nonfiction, dramatic literature, fiction, subgenres of fiction such as mystery, adventure, historical, or contemporary realistic novels and short stories). Standard 12: Fiction Identify the elements of setting, characterization, conflict, and plot structure. Identify personality traits of characters, and how their thoughts, words, and actions reveal their personalities. Describe how main characters change over time. Standard 13: Nonfiction Identify and use knowledge of common graphic features (for example, charts, graphs, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations). Identify common organizational structures (for example, chronological order, cause and effect). Standard 24: Research Apply steps for obtaining information from a variety of sources, organizing information, documenting sources, and presenting research in individual and group projects:

Standard 27: Media Production Create a media production using effective images, text, music, sound effects, or graphics. Framework: Massachusetts Technology Literacy Standards and Expectations, Grades 3-5, April 2008 Standard 1 Demonstrate proficiency in the use of computers and applications, as well as an understanding of the concepts underlying hardware, software, and connectivity. o 1.1 Demonstrate basic steps in using available hardware and applications. o 1.14 Explain and use age-appropriate online tools and resources o 1.15 Save, retrieve, and delete electronic files on a hard drive or school network. o 1.18 Use age-appropriate Internet-based search engines to locate and extract information, selecting appropriate key words. o 1.19 Create, edit, and format text on a slide. o 1.20 Create a series of slides and organize them to present research or convey and idea. o 1.21 Copy and paste or import graphics; change their size and position on a slide. Standard 2 Demonstrate the responsible use of technology and an understanding of ethics and safety issues in using electronic media at home, in school, and in society. 2.1 Explain and demonstrate compliance with school rules (Acceptable Use Policy) regarding responsible use of computers and networks. 2.5 Work collaboratively online with other students under teacher supervision. Standard 3 Demonstrate the ability to use technology for research, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, communication, collaboration, creativity, and innovation. o 3.1 Locate, download, and organize content from digital media collections for specific purposes, citing sources. 3.3 Evaluate Internet resources in terms of their usefulness for research. 3.5 Use online tools (e.g., e-mail, online discussion forums, blogs, and wikis) to gather and share information collaboratively with other students. 3.8 Create projects that use text and various forms of graphics, audio, and video (with proper citations) to communicate ideas. 3.9 Use teacher-developed guidelines to evaluate multimedia presentations for organization, content, design, presentation, and appropriate use of citations. 3.10 Communicate with other students and other classes using appropriate technology.

ISTE NETS for Students 2011 Standard 1: Creativity and Innovation Demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression Standard 2: Communication and Collaboration Use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats d. Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems Standard 3: Research and Information Fluency Apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. b. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media c. Evaluate and select information sources an digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks Standard 4: Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. b. Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project. Standard 5: Digital Citizenship Understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity Standard 6: Technology Operations and Concepts Demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies Resources: Hardware: Desktop computers (enough for class size of 25), laptops, ipads equipped with internet access and microphones and cameras Software: Multimedia programs and timelining software Relevant materials: Access to the internet 25 Copies of Johnny Tremain, by Esther Forbes 25 copies of social studies textbooks Printer paper Literature circle supplies.

Bookmarked Sites: www.timetoast.com voicethread.com/ animoto.com/ www.mywebspiration.com/

Activities: Performance of Understanding How does the sense of time and place influence culture? a) Messing about: Students will complete a KWL for the American Revolution by sharing their knowledge in terms of the who, what, when, where and why of the period. They will then be placed into their literature groups to discuss their current understanding and generate wonderments. The teams will post their collective understanding and questions to their wiki project page to be updated as they learn.

b) Guided inquiries with differentiating instruction: Students participate in literature circles as they read Johnny Tremain, a historical fiction novel by Esther Forbes. Students take turns assuming the roles of character creator, setting sleuth, conflict catcher, vocabulary visionary, and discussion director as they learn about the causes of the American Revolution through Johnnys eyes. Students will collaboratively build knowledge of the important events through their teams wiki project, which will serve as an electronic gateway, discussion forum and information repository. Students will also keep journals where they will answer ongoing teacher prompts and reflect on their literature discussions. c) Culminating performance: Students will work in groups to create a digital timeline. Students may choose between using timetoast.com to create an interactive timeline with embedded multimedia evidence and making a slidebased multimedia timeline using Voicethread or Animoto. At minimum, all projects must accurately depict at least 10 events in order that led up to the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord. Each event must be supported with evidence demonstrating multiple viewpoints. Evidence may include pictures, voice clips, videos, and links to credible sources. Students may also choose to include additional causes, work backwards on their timeline covering events beginning with European contact in the Americas, or work forward on the timeline. (See attached rubric.) Students will understand the impacts of opposing points of view. a) Messing about: Students will debate different viewpoints on issue that is relevant to their lives where the overall goals of both sides are similar but differ because of individual beliefs. Topic must be chosen based on student population. (In the case of my class, I might square off vegetarians and meat eaters.) Students discuss possibilities of compromise and why it may not always be possible for both sides to walk away with what they want. Students reflect on how they would feel if they were forced to adopt the beliefs of the opposing side. b) Guided inquiries with differentiating instruction: Students will be divided into two groups: Patriots and Loyalists. Students may choose to take on the role of specific historical figures during a series of staged debates, which will demonstrate the escalation of conflict between the two factions. Students will also reflect on each debate through online discussions. c) Culminating performance: Students will work in groups to create a digital timeline. Students may choose between using timetoast.com to create an interactive timeline with embedded multimedia evidence and making a slidebased multimedia timeline using Voicethread or Animoto. At minimum, all projects must accurately depict at least 10 events in order that led up to the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord. Each event must be supported with evidence demonstrating multiple viewpoints. Evidence may include pictures, voice clips, videos, and links to credible sources. Students may also choose to include additional causes, work backwards on their timeline covering events beginning with European contact in the Americas, or work forward on the timeline. (See attached rubric.) Students will understand how cause and effect relationships traverse through a historical continuum.

a) Messing about: Students develop a timeline of their own lives using a concept map (Webspiration) to brainstorm events. They will then place events, including pictures and other media, on an interactive timeline using (Timetoast.com). Students will choose their favorite event and present interactively through Voicethread or Animoto. b) Guided inquiries with differentiating instruction: Students will work in teams to create a concept map demonstrating understanding of the causes of the American Revolution. Students will research the people, places, and events behind each cause using information gathered through their literature study, the Internet, and a variety of nonfiction text including primary source documents. Students will attach their multi-media evidence to the concept web for use on their culminating performance. c) Culminating performance: Students will work in groups to create a digital timeline. Students may choose between using timetoast.com to create an interactive timeline with embedded multimedia evidence and making a slidebased multimedia timeline using Voicethread or Animoto. At minimum, all projects must accurately depict at least 10 events in order that led up to the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord. Each event must be supported with evidence demonstrating multiple viewpoints. Evidence may include pictures, voice clips, videos, and links to credible sources. Students may also choose to include additional causes, work backwards on covering events beginning with European contact, or work forward on the timeline. (See attached rubric.) Assessment:
CATEGORY Events 4 Exceeds Expectations Timeline depicts events before the French and Indian War or extends beyond skirmishes at Lexington and Concord. An accurate, complete date has been included for each event. Facts were accurate for all events reported on the timeline and evidence shows cause/effect relationship. All events are recorded from multiple points of view when appropriate. The student can accurately describe 75% (or more) of the events on the timeline without referring to it and can quickly determine which of two events occurred first. 3 Meets Expectations Timeline depicts at least 10 events that led up to the American Revolution. 2 Approaching Expectations Timeline depicts at least 6 events that led up to the American Revolution. 1 Unacceptable Timeline depicts 5 or fewer events that led up to the American Revolution.

Dates

An accurate, complete date has been included for almost every event. Facts were accurate for all events reported on the timeline and almost all evidence shows cause/effect relationship. Most events are recorded from multiple points of view when appropriate. The student can accurately describe 50% of the events on the timeline without referring to it and can quickly determine which of two events occurred first.

An accurate date has been included for almost every event. Facts were accurate for most (~75%) of the events reported on the timeline.

Dates are inaccurate and/or missing for several events. Facts were often inaccurate for events reported on the timeline or it was unclear how event contributed to the conflict. Events are recorded from one point of view. The student cannot use the timeline effectively to describe events or to compare events.

Content/Facts

Point of View

Some events are recorded from multiple points of view when appropriate. The student can describe any event on the timeline if allowed to refer to it and can determine which of two events occurred first.

Learning of Content

Preparation

The student had notes about all the events and dates s/he wished to include on the timeline before beginning to design the timeline. The digital timeline engaged the viewer with a variety of media that flowed smoothly from one event to the next. The student knows how to use the application and can accurately and clearly answer almost any question related to how to perform certain functions.

The student had notes about almost all the events and dates s/he wished to include on the timeline before beginning to design the timeline. The digital timeline engaged the viewer with a variety of media that mostly flowed smoothly from one event to the next. The student knows how to use the application and can accurately and clearly answer many questions related to how to perform certain functions.

The student had notes about most (~75%) of the events and dates s/he wished to include on the timeline before beginning to design the timeline. The digital timeline attempted to engage the viewer with a variety of media flowing from one event to the next. The student knows how to use some parts of the application and can accurately and clearly answer a few questions related to how to perform certain functions.

The student had not prepared adequate notes before beginning to design the timeline.

Presentation

The digital timeline did not engage the viewer and/or seemed pieced together.

Technology Use

The student does not appear to know how to use the application without assistance.

Student Choice: Student chooses and defines own criteria for grading.

Interdisciplinary Connections: How does the literary character of Johnny in Esther Forbes novel, Johnny Tremain, inspired and inform modern day American readers as to the need for patriotic service or duty? How are the actions, beliefs and values of historical character Johnny in Esther Forbes novel, Johnny Tremain, true to the time period in which he was portrayed? Helpful Notes: