Comparison of Theoretical and ANSYS FEA Lug Analysis

by Christina A. Stenman An Engineering Project Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ENGINEERING IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Approved: _________________________________________ Ernesto Gutierrez-Miravete, Thesis Adviser

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Hartford, CT April, 2008 (For Graduation June, 2008)

i

CONTENTS
Comparison of Theoretical and ANSYS FEA Lug Analysis ............................................. i LIST OF FIGURES .......................................................................................................... iv LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................................. v LIST OF SYMBOLS ........................................................................................................ vi ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................ viii ABSTRACT ..................................................................................................................... ix 1. Introduction.................................................................................................................. 1 2. Theoretical Calculation of Ultimate Loads for Uniformly Loaded Double Shear Joint ..................................................................................................................................... 5 2.1 Lug, Bushing, and Pin Strength under Uniform Axial Loading ........................ 5 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 2.1.5 2.1.6 2.1.7 2.1.8 2.1.9 2.2 Lug Bearing Stress under Uniform Axial Load ..................................... 5 Lug Net-Section under Uniform Axial Load ......................................... 7 Allowable Design Load for Lug under Uniform Axial Load ................ 8 Bushing Bearing Strength under Uniform Axial Load .......................... 8 Allowable Design Load for Lug/Bushing Combination under Uniform Axial Load.............................................................................................. 8 Pin Shear Strength for Double Shear Joints under Uniform Axial Load8 Pin Bending Strength for Double Shear Joints under Uniform Axial Load 9 Lug and Link Tang Strength for Double Shear Joints under Uniform Axial Load............................................................................................ 10 Allowable Joint Ultimate Load ............................................................ 11

Lug and Busing Strength under Transverse Load............................................ 11 2.2.1 2.2.2 Lug Strength under Transverse Load ................................................... 12 Bushing Strength under Transverse Load ............................................ 13

3. Lug Geometry and Theoretical Calculations ............................................................. 14 3.1 3.2 Lug, Link, Bushing, and Pin Geometry and Material Properties..................... 14 Critical Load Calculations for Uniform Axial Loading................................... 15 ii

........... References.................................................................... 16 4.................................. 17 iii .3 Critical Load Calculations for Uniform Transverse Loading ................3.............

............................... 13 iv ........ 9 Figure 6: Lug Geometry for Transversely Loaded Lug [1]......................................... 6 Figure 4: Net-Tension Stress Coefficient [1].................................... 12 Figure 7: Transverse Ultimate and Yield Load Coefficients [1] ................................................................................................................................ 5 Figure 3: Allowable Uniform Axial Load Coefficient [1].............................................. 2 Figure 2: Lug Geometry for Uniform Axial Loading [1] ............LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Vertical Tail to Fuselage Attachment Points and Associated Lug Geometry [8] ............................... 7 Figure 5: Double Shear Lug Joint [1] .................................................................................................................................

. 15 Table 3: Critical Loads for the Link and Link Bushing.............................................. 15 v .....................LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Joint Geometry and Material Properties [4] .................................................................................... 14 Table 2: Critical Loads for the Lug and Lug Bushing.......

B = Allowable Bushing Transverse Ultimate Load (lb) Mmax.p = Pin Ultimate Tensile Strength (psi) Pnu = Allowable Lug Net-Section Ultimate Load (lb) Pu.LIST OF SYMBOLS Fbru = Lug Ultimate Bearing Stress (psi) Fbry = Lug Yield Bearing Stress (psi) Ftu = Ultimate Tensile Strength (psi) Fty = Yield Tensile Strength (psi) Fbru = Allowable Ultimate Bearing Stress (psi) Fbry = Allowable Yield Bearing Stress (psi) Ftu = Ultimate Tensile Stress (psi) Fnu = Allowable Lug Net-Section Tensile Ultimate Stress (psi) Fny = Allowable Lug Net-Section Tensile Yield Stress (psi) Fbry = Allowable Bearing Yield Stress for Bushings (psi) Fcy.p = Pin Ultimate Bending Load (lb) Pub.p = Ultimate Shear Stress of Pin Material Ftu.max = Balanced Design Pin Ultimate Bending Load (lb) PT = Lug Tang Strength (lb) Pall = Allowable Joint Ultimate Load (lb) Ptru = Allowable Lug Transverse Ultimate Load (lb) Ptru.B = Allowable Bushing Ultimate Load (lb) Pu.p = Pin Ultimate Shear Load (lb) Pub.LB = Allowable Lug/Bushing Ultimate Load (lb) Pus.B = Bushing Compressive Yield Stress (psi) Fbru.B = Allowable Bearing Ultimate Stress for Bushings (psi) Fsu.p = Maximum Pin Bending Moment (in-lb) Mu.p = Ultimate Pin Failing Moment (in-lb) K = Allowable Load Coefficient Kn = Net-Section Stress Coefficient kbp = Plastic Bending Coefficient for the Pin kbT = Plastic Bending Coefficient for the Tang vi .p.

.Ktru = Transverse Ultimate Load Coefficient Ktry = Transverse Yield Load Coefficient a = Distance from the Edge of the Hole to the edge of the Lug (in) b = Effective bearing Width (in) D = Hole Diameter (in) Dp = Pin Diameter (in) E = Modulus of Elasticity (psi) e = Edge Distance (in) P = Load (lb) g = Gap between Lug and Link (in) h1.h4 = Edge Distances in Transversely Loaded Lug (in) hav = Effective Edge Distance in Transversely Loaded Lug (in) tlug = Lug Thickness (in) tlink = Link Thickness (in) wlug = Lug Width (in) wlink = Link Width (in) ε = Strain (in/in) vii .

for his continual guidance and teaching during the completion of this project and for providing me with the base macros from which my ANSYS models were created. my coworker at Pratt & Whitney. viii . I would also like to thank my friends and family for their never-ending support through the course of my education.ACKNOWLEDGMENT I would like to thank Alex Simpson.

ix .ABSTRACT Type the text of your abstract here.

addressed prior anticonservative assumptions. During the 1960’s.P. With the tightening of weight. such as incomplete evaluation of the effect of stress concentration and pin adequacy with respect to bending. which requires no additional analysis as shear tear-out and bearing allowables account for hoop tension failure. This work provided analysts with a defined and experimentally validated approach to analyzing axial. link. Melcon.. titanium. remains the aerospace industry standard method for designing lug. cost. Stress Analysis Manual. closely related failures based on empirical data. and pin joints. developed in the 1950’s at Lockheed Aircraft Corporation by F. and Hoblit’s work and. Prior to the 1950’s. and focused on steel and aluminum alloys. and oblique loads. [2] 1 . the later which can be resolved into axial and transverse components. and F. and other heat resistant alloys. Cozzone. which can lead to excessive pin deflection and the build up of load near the lug shear plane. that built upon Cozzone. (3) hoop tension at the tip of the lug. a more precise method of lug analysis was required.M Hoblit and summarized in Reference 2 and 3. Melcon.A. For each possible failure method. (2) shear tear-out or bearing. M. and (6) excessive yielding of the bushing if one is used. and space requirements in the aerospace industry. in considering any lug-pin combination. [1] Both the Lockheed engineers and the Air Force stated that. Introduction Lugs are connector type elements used a structural supports for pin connections. the applied load is compared to the failure load (yield or ultimate) by means of a margin of safety calculation. Early aerospace lug analysis. These include (1) tension across the net section resulting from hole Kt. all ultimate failure methods must be considered. (4) shearing of the pin. such as nickel based alloys. to this day. transverse. (5) bending of the pin. Industry has since verified this method for other materials.1. lug strength was overdesigned as weight and space were not design driving factors. the United States Air Force issued a manual.

NASTRAN. the right rear lug carried the largest load during the failure event compared to the design allowables. which focused solely on the lug failure. One team focused on the global deformation. This team provided the associated loads and deformations to the second team. Figure 1: Vertical Tail to Fuselage Attachment Points and Associated Lug Geometry [8] 2 . and ABAQUS. Two structural teams were assembled at the NASA Langley Research Center to assist the NTSB. it is necessary to determine whether the results obtained from FEA analysis concur with those historically acceptable values generated from theoretical hand calculations. load transfer.With the ever increasing prevalence and usage of finite element analysis codes such as ANSYS. Prior work in this field was completed as part of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation into the failure of the composite vertical tail of the American Airlines Flight 587 – Airbus A300-600R. killing all 260 people onboard as well as five on the ground. This team determined that. 2001 takeoff. Figure 1 shows the lug location and geometry. and failure load of the vertical tail and rudder. of the six laminate composite lugs that attached the tail to the aluminum fuselage through a pin and clevis connection. This failure caused the plane to crash shortly after the November 12.

The solid-shell model was built using 3D quadrilateral elements in the vicinity of the pin hole and shell elements in all other locations. Multi-point constraints were used to connect the solid and shell elements. This will be achieved by first completing the theoretical analysis for set 3 . Displacements were obtained from the global model and applied to the lug model. Material properties were set to degrade as the material failed under load. Both models were created in ABAQUS. [7] To assess the validity of these models. Thus. Agreement was also obtained between the model and the 2003 subcomponent test and accident conditions. As lug to pin friction data was not available. the pin was modeled as a rigid cylinder with its diameter equal to the diameter of the lug hole. The ultimate goal of this work will be to show agreement between the theoretical analysis technique presented in the Stress Analysis Manual and the ANSYS FEA analysis. It was shown that both models predicted the same magnitude and spatial distribution of displacements as the original Airbus model under set loads.The detailed lug analysis team used two modeling approaches: (1) a solid-shell model and (2) a layered shell model. and the failure mechanism. frictionless multi-point constraint equations were prescribed between the lug hole and the rigid surface to prevent rigid motion sliding of the pin. The displacement of the pin along it axis was set to the average of the lug hole displacements in that direction over a 120° arc that represented the contact region between the pin and lug. they were first compared to each other and then to experimental testing. the failure load. the previously modeled 3D region was converted to 14 layers of quadrilateral shell elements that were connected by 3D decohesion elements. In both models. meaning that no bushing existed in the assembly. In the layered shell model. The stiffness of the lug. the solid-shell model was then compared to a certification test completed by Airbus in 1985 and subcomponent tested completed in 2003 as part of the failure investigation. and the failure location predicted by the model all agreed with the experimentally determined values from the 1985 test. [7] This paper will expand upon prior work to consider an isotropic material lug system under uniform axial and transverse load modeled using solely solid and contact elements.

This augmentation will include the addition of lug and link bushings and the addition of geometric model division so to simplify the extraction of model loads. Once the model is functional a mesh density study will be completed to ensure the convergence of stresses in the contact regions of the pin. 4 . Next. This comparison will lead to the automation of model post processing as well as post processing guidelines. and lugs. bushings. The results of this fully converged model will be compared with those obtained from the theoretical analysis. a FE model of the assembly will be created by augmenting the automated lug FEA generator developed by Alex Simpson at Pratt & Whitney. For a set load.geometry and material properties. the stress margins of the FEA will be compared to the load margins of the theoretical analysis.

lug failures are likely to result from shear tearout or hoop tension while when e/D is greater than 1. failure depends on the interaction of several failure methods. When e/D is less than 1. Figure 2: Lug Geometry for Uniform Axial Loading [1] 2.1 Lug Bearing Stress under Uniform Axial Load To calculate bearing stresses in the region of the lug and/or link forward of the netsection. and Pin Strength under Uniform Axial Loading Lugs must be analyzed for bearing and net-section strength while pins are analyzed for shear and bending load. Bushing.1 Lug.5. failure due to bearing is more likely.5. In the majority of cases. however. 2. Figure 3 depicts the relationship between e/D and K. See Figure 2 below for an overview of basic lug geometry.1. The following outlines the procedure for and theory behind lug analysis as presented in the Stress Analysis Manual. 5 . Reference 1. K takes into account these interaction effects. on must first determine the allowable load coefficient (K) which is related to the ration of e/D.2. one must consider numerous failure modes when assessing a lug joint. Theoretical Calculation of Ultimate Loads for Uniformly Loaded Double Shear Joint As was stated in the introduction.

or hoop tension is Pbru = Fbru ⋅ D ⋅ t when Ftu < 1. one can calculate the lug ultimate bearing stress (Fbru) from the equations Fbru = K a Ftu D when e/D < 1. load will pile up near the lug shear 6 .5 when e/D > 1.5 [3] [4] Fbry = K ⋅ Fty The allowable lug ultimate bearing load (Pbru) for lug failure in bearing.Figure 3: Allowable Uniform Axial Load Coefficient [1] With the determination of K.5 when e/D > 1. the lug yield bearing stress (Fbry) is calculated from the equations Fbry = K a Fty D when e/D < 1. shear tear-out. If the pin is flexible and bends.5 [1] [2] Fbru = K ⋅ Fty Additionally.304*Fty [5] Pbru = 1.304*Fty [6] It should be noted that the above equations apply only if the load is uniformly distributed across the lug.304 ⋅ Fbry ⋅ D ⋅ t when Ftu > 1.

Similar to the bearing procedure above. [1] 2. [1] Figure 4: Net-Tension Stress Coefficient [1] 7 . which is a function of lug geometry. see Figure 4.planes. thereby relieving the stress concentration at the edge of the hole.2 Lug Net-Section under Uniform Axial Load The allowable net-section tensile ultimate stress (Fnu) across the net section of the hole is affected by the lug material’s ability to yield. one must first determine the net-tension stress coefficient (Kn). and strains of the lug material. ultimate and yield strength of the lug material. The procedure for ensuring this does not occur will be outlined further in this chapter.1. leading to possible premature failure.

[1] 2. allowable lug net-section tensile yield stress (Fny) is calculated as Fny = K n Fty The allowable net section ultimate load (Pnu) is [8] Pnu = Fnu ⋅ (w − D ) ⋅ t Pnu = 1. p = π 2 ⋅ D p ⋅ Fsu .1.304 ⋅ Fcy . B = 1.1.304*Fty [9] when Ftu > 1. B ⋅ D ⋅ t [12] 2.1.4 Bushing Bearing Strength under Uniform Axial Load The allowable yield stress for bushings (Fbry) is limited by the compressive yield strength of the bushing material (Fcy.B) [11] Pu . 2.5 Allowable Design Load for Lug/Bushing Combination under Uniform Axial Load The allowable lug/bushing ultimate load (Pu. Assuming that the bushing extends the thickness of the lug.Using this constant.304 ⋅ Fcy . Fnu is calculated using the equation Fnu = K n Ftu [7] Similarly.LB) is the lower of the loads obtained from section 2. p 2 [13] 8 . B The allowable bushing ultimate load (Pu.1. The lower of these values is the ultimate load value for the double shear joint.1.6 Pin Shear Strength for Double Shear Joints under Uniform Axial Load The pin ultimate shear load (Pus.B) is Fbru . this value is the ultimate load for the link and its bushing while twice this value is the ultimate load for the lug and its bushing.3 and equation 12.B).3 when Ftu < 1.304*Fty [10] Allowable Design Load for Lug under Uniform Axial Load The allowable design load for a lug or link under uniform axial loading is the smaller of loads obtained from equations 5 and 9 or 6 and 10. the allowable bearing ultimate stress for the bushing (Fbru. For a double shear joint.p) is Pus . B = 1.304 ⋅ Fny ⋅ (w − D ) ⋅ T 2.

Thus. This coefficient is 1. and therefore bending moment. excessive pin deflection causes load to peak near the lug shear planes instead of being uniformly distributed across the lug thickness. one must complete the following procedure to determine the true pin bending load. this concentration of load can decrease the bending arm.2. the pin ultimate bending load (Pub. for the doubler shear joint shown in Figure 5. 1. the maximum pin bending moment (Mmax.1.p) is M max.p) can be calculated as 9 . p = π 32 ⋅ k bp ⋅ D p ⋅ Ftu . p = P  t1 t 2   + + g 22 4  [14] The ultimate failing moment of the pin is M u. p 3 [15] where kbp is the plastic bending coefficient for the pin.7 for perfectly plastic materials.56 for reasonably ductile materials. and 1. [3] However. Finally. on the pin.0 for perfectly elastic materials. leading to possible premature failure of the joint. [1] Figure 5: Double Shear Lug Joint [1] Assuming that the load is uniformly distributed along the lug thickness.7 Pin Bending Strength for Double Shear Joints under Uniform Axial Load While pin bending failure is infrequent.

Otherwise.T .max ⋅ t lug 2 ⋅ Pu . LB . PT = 2 Ftu . Further calculations must be completed to determine a balanced design ultimate pin bending load (Pub.p or the values determined in section 2.1.p. p .T and the lug/link tang strength is the lower of the following two values.5.1. p . min = Pub.link ⋅ t link [22] 10 . LB .min = [20] 2.lug Pub . LB .Pub .max = 2C   C    t1 t 2   ⋅  + + g  + g 2 − 2Cg  2 4    [17] Where C= Pu .max) that takes into account the possibility that pin loads are not uniformly distributed across the lug and link faces.link Pu . No further pin calculations are required.lug ⋅ wT .link ⋅ wT . The allowable stress in the tangs is Ftu.lug ⋅ t link + Pu . LB .link [19] 2b2.p is greater than or equal to either Pus. LB . then the pin is relatively strong and bending of the pin is not critical.8 Lug and Link Tang Strength for Double Shear Joints under Uniform Axial Load If the balanced design approach is not used. LB .link ⋅ t lug [18] The balanced design effective bearing widths are b1.T . the load in the lugs and tangs are assumed to be uniformly distributed.lug ⋅ t lug [21] PT = Ftu . p t t  16 ⋅  1 + 2 + g  2 4  [16] If Pub. the pin is considered relatively weak and critical in bending.lug ⋅ Pu . [1] This balanced design ultimate pin bending load is calculated from the equation  Pub . p = π ⋅ k bp ⋅ D p 3 ⋅ Ftu . p Pub .max ⋅ t link 2 ⋅ Pu . p .

Since the 1950’s.p. From this data. When stresses are in the elastic range. described below in section 2. a plastic method was developed to remove the limitations and deficiencies of the prior elastic method.p and Pu.2.1. Then. the lug tangs must be checked for the combined axial and bending stresses resulting from the eccentric application of bearing loads.p and Pub. test data has been obtained for other materials.2 Lug and Busing Strength under Transverse Load Axial loading was understood and an analysis process which provided reasonably accurate results developed long before a satisfactory method for transverse loading was determined. however. 2.lug ⋅ t lug 3 1+  blug .5 for a perfectly plastic tang. Pall is the minimum of Pus. If the pin is relatively weak.T .0 for a perfectly elastic tang to 1. [3] 11 . transversely loaded lugs were treated as redundant elastic frames uniformly loaded by a pin. if the balanced design approach has been used. the lug tang strength is the lower of the following values PT = 2 Ftu . the load distribution is not uniform since the comparatively rigid pin prevents bending deformation in the lug and yielding of the lug further alters the stress distribution.link ⋅ t link [24] where kbT is the plastic bending coefficient for a lug tang of rectangular cross section.4 representing a material with reasonably ductility.min   k bT ⋅ 1 −  t lug    [23] PT = Ftu .link ⋅ wT .9 Allowable Joint Ultimate Load If the pin is relatively strong the allowable joint ultimate load (Pall) is the minimum of Pus. with 1. [1] 2. Thus. failure load was found to plot against a single parameter. an empirical method was developed by Melcon and Hoblit by testing aluminum and steel samples loaded transversely and obliquely for both yield and ultimate strength.LB.However. this method was laborious and unrealistic. It varies from 1.lug ⋅ wT .max. but the uncertainty and laborious nature of the analysis remained. Initially.T .1. Next.

1. the h1 dimension is at the root of the cantilever portion of the lug and therefore carries most of the load.1. the maximum lug bearing stresses at ultimate and yield load must not exceed the values explained below in equations 26 and 27. hav = 6 3 1 1 1 + + + h1 h2 h3 h4 [25] The averaging is on a reciprocal basis to give reasonable results when one dimension is much larger than the others. The coefficient 3 was in equation 25 was determined to give the least scatter of test data on which this method was based. it has a more complicated failure load and additional calculations must be completed than were done for the axially loaded lug. shown in Figure 6 below. [3] 12 . The strength calculations are the same as noted above.2. however.1 Lug Strength under Transverse Load Similar to K in section 2. is a more redundant structure than an axially loaded lug. the transverse ultimate load coefficient (Ktru) and the transverse yield load coefficient (Ktry) must first be determined as a function of the effective edge distance (hav) using Figure 7. Additionally. Figure 6: Lug Geometry for Transversely Loaded Lug [1] 2.As a transversely loaded lug.

The allowable bushing ultimate load (Ptru.304*Fty [29] [26] [27] 2. From these coefficients the lug ultimate bearing stress (Fbru) and lug yield bearing stress (Fbry) can be calculated Fbru = K tru ⋅ Ftu Fbry = K try ⋅ Fty The allowable lug transverse ultimate load (Ptru) is Ptru = Fbru ⋅ D ⋅ t when Ftu < 1.B) is equal to Pu.2 Bushing Strength under Transverse Load The allowable bearing stress on the bushing is the same as that for the bushing in an axially loaded lug. 13 .304 ⋅ Fbry ⋅ D ⋅ t when Ftu > 1. given by equation 11.304*Fty [28] Ptru = 1.Figure 7: Transverse Ultimate and Yield Load Coefficients [1] .2.B calculated in equation 12.

1075 0.1075 0. and Pin Geometry and Material Properties A simple double shear joint was used for this analysis.185 26. Lug Geometry and Theoretical Calculations 3.750 0.1 Lug.750 0.150 0. Its critical geometry and associated material properties are summarized in Table 1 below.500 0.400 0.200 0.1075 0.005 0. Bushing.3.060 0.4E6 1000 Bushing Pin INCO718 1000 160 134 14 . [4] Table 1: Joint Geometry and Material Properties [4] Lug Material Temperature Ftu Fty Fcy Fsu E εu D Dp e a w tlug tlink g h1 h2 h3 h4 in in in in in in in in in in in in 0.125 0.185 0. All material properties were obtained from Military Handbook 5 – Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures (MIL-HDBK-5).500 °F ksi ksi ksi ksi psi 25.125 INCO718 1000 160 134 Link Waspaloy 1000 147 101 67.135 0.200 0.4E6 0. Link.9E6 0.135 0.3 99 25.1075 0.400 0.185 0.

Next.485 lb.953 12. Table 3: Critical Loads for the Link and Link Bushing Load Type Pbru Pnu Pu.206 5. Since the balanced design approach was used. the limiting load is that of the lug bushing. As this is a double shear joint.B Critical Load (lb) 10.max) is 1.960 22. the limiting load is that of the link bushing.485 Thus. leading to additional calculations.LB for the link 5. the above information is used to determine the critical bearing and net-section loads for both the lug and the lug bushing. The results are summarized in Table 3.227 Thus.485 lb.LB for the lug 8. Therefore.2 Critical Load Calculations for Uniform Axial Loading Based on the equations presented in Chapter 2. the ultimate load value is the lesser of the limiting link load or twice the limiting lug load. critical loads were calculated for the link and link bushing.400 lb. These loads are summarized below in Table 2. the ultimate load value is 5. The balanced design ultimate pin bending load (Pub.3. The pin shear load (Pus.395 lb.420 lb and 29.p) was calculated to be 2.p and Pu. Table 2: Critical Loads for the Lug and Lug Bushing Load Type Pbru Pnu Pu. making Pu. the pin is determined to be weak and critical in bending. the lug and link tang strengths were calculated to be 32. Since this value is less than Pus.227 lb. respectively.430 lb and the ultimate bending load (Pub.LB. making Pu.p. 15 .B Critical Load (lb) 19.p) was calculated to be 190 lb.211 8.

therefore.Thus. 16 . the limiting load for the joint is 1.3 Critical Load Calculations for Uniform Transverse Loading For the lug.395 lb and the joint is limited by the pin. the effective edge distance was calculated to be 0. the allowable joint ultimate load (Pall) is 1.395 lb and the joint is limited by axial load.124”. 3. As this load is greater than the limiting load for the joint under uniform axial loading.062 lb. the allowable transverse ultimate load is 18.

[6] Seely. Krishnamurthy. n 1. New York. Belle Harbor. Fred B.O.4.S..” CMES Computer Modeling in Engineering and Sciences. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. New York: John Wiley & Sons. (2007): 1-30. 2004 17 . Vorst.A. and Terence Moritz. [3] Melcon. v 22. 1969. Smith. [4] Military Handbook 5H – Metallic Materials and Elements for Aerospace Vehicle Structures. Joseph Giessler. C. E. 1998 [5] Bruhn.. “Structural analysis of the right rear lug of American Airlines Flight 587. M. T. Airbus Industrie A300-605R. [2] Cozzone. [8] “In-Flight Separation of Vertical Stabilizer American Airlines Flight 587. November 12. [7] Raju.H. Mason." Product Engineering 24(May 1953): 160-170." Product Engineering 21(May 1950): 113-117. Columbus: Battelle Memorial Institute.G. G.E. References [1] Maddux. 2001” National Transportation Safety Board Aircraft Incident Report NTSB/AAR04/04.. I. 1952.P. Stress Analysis Manual. F. E. and J.. Leon A. Glaessgen. Hoblit. F. Dayton: Technology Incorporated. B.H. "Analysis of Lugs and Shear Pins Made of Aluminum or Steel Alloys.F. N14053. 1952. Melcon. "Developments in the Analysis of Lugs and Shear Pins. Davila. Hoblit. Cincinnati: Tri-State Offset Company. Analysis and Design of Airplane Structures. Inc.

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