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MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Free tax assistance
AARP offers help in filing
taxes. PAGE 7
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Special to The Sun
The Jacobs Creek Bridge, seen here, could possibly be moved in
its entirety to Howell Living History Farm. Officials have been
debating over what to do with the span for many months.
Fate of historical Jacobs Creek Bridge still unknown
By MELISSA DIPENTO
The Hopewell Sun
As history may have it, George
Washington once traversed the
road leading to Trenton from
Washingtons Crossing on the
other side of the Delaware River,
taking his army across the Jacobs
Creek Bridge in Hopewell.
Many historians and local resi-
dents believe the site at Jacobs
Creek Road near Bear Tavern
Road is one of the crossroads of
the American Revolution.
But the fate of the bridge still
remains in the balance, nearly
three years after New Jersey De-
partment of Transportation-con-
tracted engineers deemed it un-
safe for motorists.
Since the bridge was closed,
residents and supporters of the
bridge have banded together to
save it.
The Save the Victory Trail &
Jacobs Creek Bridge advocacy
group has worked to preserve
Washingtons Victory Trail and is
fighting to keep the bridge in
Hopewell where it currently sits.
Even though some residents
want to see the bridge remain in-
tact, Mercer County officials
want to replace it, said Hopewell
Township Administrator/Engi-
neer Paul Pogorzelski.
The states Historic Sites Coun-
cil also wants the bridge to be re-
located, possibly to the Howell
Living History Farm up the road
in Lambertville.
The bridge would maintain its
current structure and be restored
to its original condition.
Locals feel the old bridge
should remain in place. The State
Historic Sites Council recom-
mended the bridge be moved to a
new location and preserved and
that the road be retained in its
present T configuration,
Pogorzelski said. The council
said it should be moved to anoth-
er site and the county proposed
the site move to the Howell Living
History Farm.
Ultimately, the New Jersey De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection would have the final say
on what happens to the bridge,
with funding for the project com-
ing from the county, Pogorzelski
said.
Recently, residents had ex-
pressed interest to have a letter
written from the township to the
NJDEP to reiterate that the town-
Spanning
history
please see MAYOR, page 4
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
CuDI11nq 5rhooI
Presents
PhiIip SchuItz
Pulitzer Prize-winning Poet & Author of:
"My DysIexia
ApriI 10, 2012
7:00 pm - Presentation
100 Straube Center Blvd. Pennington, NJ
About MY DYSLEXIA
Despite winning the Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for his poetry collection Failure, Philip Schultz could never shake the feeling of being exiled to the Dummy
Class in school, where he was largely ignored by his teachers and peers and not expected to succeed. Not until many years later, when his oldest son was
diagnosed with the same condition, did Schultz realize that he was dyslexic. In this moving memoir, Schultz traces his difficult childhood and his new un-
derstanding of his early years following his realization. In doing so, he shows how a boy who did not learn how to read until he was eleven went on to
become a prize winning poet by force of sheer determination. His balancing actlife as member of a family with not one, but two dyslexics, countered by
his intellectual and creative successes as a writerreveals an inspiring story of the strengths of the human mind
For more information go to www.thecambridgeschooI.org or our Facebook page
Admission free - RSVP required
(609) 730-9553 or ematakas@thecambridgeschooI.org
.
86 East Broad Street
Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100
www.1stconstitution.com
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The First Presbyterian Church
of Titusville will host Princeton
Universitys chamber choir for a
concert on Sunday, April 1 at 4
p.m. The choir will present a pro-
gram of music set to the English
poet, satirist and cleric John
Donnes writings. Included on the
program will be two great works
for double choir by William Har-
ris, the final two movements of
Hubert Parry's Songs of
Farewell, and a pair of move-
ments from a cycle composed by
Richard Rodney Bennett upon
Donnes Sermons and Devo-
tions.
We are extremely grateful for
the opportunity to host the
Princeton University chamber
choir in Titusville, said the Rev.
Will Shurley, pastor of the
church. We look forward to wel-
coming the greater community
into our building on Palm Sunday
for the chance to hear such great
works of British choral litera-
ture.
As the greatest metaphysical
poet of his age, Donne was the
originator of countless proverbs
and aphorisms, which have en-
dured the four centuries since his
death and the wit and penetrating
wisdom of his writing resonates
as much in modern times as it did
when he lived.
A surprisingly small number
of composers have risen to the
challenge of setting Donne to
choral music, but the British
composers who will be spotlight-
ed in the choir's concert have cre-
ated works of immense beauty
and rich complexity that are very
much in keeping with the texts
that inspired them.
The concert is free and open to
the public. A reception will follow
the performance.
Princeton University
choir performs on April 1
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR CALLING
US IN THE LAST FEW WEEKS.
Your support has been overwhelming, so much so, that we've
been able to negotiate an extension to our lease. This means
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ship and its residents wish to
keep the piece of living history in
their backyard.
In a March 15 letter to NJDEP
Commissioner Robert Martin
and Assistant Commissioner
Amy Cradic, Mayor Michael
Markulec asked to have the
bridge preserved.
The resolution of the Jacobs
Creek Bridge in Hopewell Town-
ship remains a critical issue for
the residents of Hopewell Town-
ship. The loss of that bridge for
the last several years has been
detrimental to both our corporate
residents and homeowners,
Markulec wrote.
In his letter, Markulec thanked
the DEP Historic Sites Council
for its in-depth analysis.
We were extremely pleased
with the Historic Site Councils
recommendation to retain the
current alignment for historic
preservation reasons, Markulec
said. While the Historic Site
Councils recommendation calls
for the replacement of the cur-
rent bridge, the Hopewell Town-
ship Committee fully supports
their recommendations as it re-
lates to retention of the current
alignment, namely the retention
of the T-intersection.
The letter called for a compro-
mise with the DEP in an effort to
maintain the bridges historical
character.
It is the Hopewell Township
Committees belief that a compro-
mise bridge solution based upon
Historic Sites Councils recom-
mendation best preserves the na-
tionally registered historic dis-
trict, accommodates emergency
vehicles and school bus traffic
and addresses local and corporate
resident traffic concerns.
A definitive timeline for action
has not yet been agreed upon, offi-
cials said.
MAYOR
Continued from page 1
Mayor asked NJDEP
to preserve bridge
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
KATHLEEN DUFFY
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
W
hen New Jersey abandoned
its plans for a standalone
February presidential pri-
mary, people thought the state might
lose political clout.
And that line of thinking made
sense: The earlier the primary, the
more impact a state might have and
the more money presidential candi-
dates might spend in the state trying
to win voters.
But the move made sense for other
reasons. The political parties werent
happy with the February date. And the
election would have cost millions of
tax dollars about $12 million to be
more precise. Holding a single pri-
mary election in June for multiple
contests was the wise move.
Now, it looks like the June date still
might pay dividends since the GOP
primary shows no signs of getting less
intense.
Now, our guess is that there might
not be a huge economic windfall, but,
these days, snaring a few extra dollars
doesnt hurt.
New Jerseys impact on the race
isnt as great as Californias. That
state also holds its primary on June 5.
And California has more than three
times the number of delegates up for
grabs than does New Jersey: 172 to 50.
Also, were not too sure how compet-
itive the GOP race will be in the state.
Our guess is Mitt Romney will carry
the day here and that the other can-
didates know this. How much time
and money will they spend in the Gar-
den State? Who knows? It all depends
on what happens in the coming
weeks.
Still, having the primary matter at
least a little bit is somewhat exciting.
Its kind of the icing on the cake the
cake being the other benefits the state
realized by moving the date.
We certainly wouldnt mind a few
visits from the political campaigns.
Their presence will help to boost local
economies and theres a little bit of
prestige on the line if the race stays
close.
Will N.J. primary matter?
This year, it just might, if all of the GOP candidates stay in the race
A contested primary?
When the state moved its presidential
primary to June, it made economic
sense, but some wondered about the
potential downside of making the pri-
mary irrelevant. However, this years
GOP contest could liven things up.
The following items are taken from re-
ports on file with the Hopewell Police De-
partment:
Officer Lincoln Karnoff responded to a
Baker Way address for the report of illegal
dumping on March 5. Sometime overnight,
someone placed two computer monitors
and an end table in a residents driveway. A
tiki torch was also left near the residents
mailbox, police said.
Officer Vincent Amabile responded to
Maddock Road for the report of an aggres-
sive driver on March 5. Sgt. Michael
Cseremsak spotted a car a short time later
on Jacobs Creek Road and stopped it. Ama-
bile says he spoke with the driver, a Prince-
ton man, who was found to have an out-
standing traffic warrant out of the West
Windsor Municipal Court. The driver was
placed under arrest and transported to po-
lice headquarters for processing. He was
also issued a motor vehicle summons for
failing to change his address on his dri-
vers license. This charge will be heard in
municipal court. He was later released
after posting bail on the outstanding war-
rant, police said.
Officer James Rosso responded to
Denow Road for the report of a motor vehi-
cle crash involving a pedestrian on March
5. An investigation found a Hopewell
Township woman attempted to cross
Denow Road from the Hopewell Crossing
Shopping Center while in her motorized
wheelchair. A Honda mini-van driven east-
bound by a Hopewell Township man
struck the woman in the wheelchair, caus-
ing injury to her legs and pelvis.
The woman was transported to an area
hospital by the Pennington First Aid
Squad, where she was admitted for treat-
ment. Capital Health Systems paramedics
assisted. The driver of the min-van was un-
injured, police said.
Officer Kevin Koveloski stopped a car
along Route 518 on March 7 after a comput-
er check revealed that the cars registra-
tion was not on file. Koveloski spoke with
the driver, who was found to have an active
traffic warrant for his arrest out of Ewing
Township. The man was placed under ar-
rest and transported to police headquar-
ters for processing. The man was charged
with driving while suspended, unregis-
tered vehicle, uninsured motorist, unclear
plates and failure to inspect, which will be
heard in municipal court.
He was then turned over to the Ewing
Township Police Department on their out-
standing warrant, police said.
Officer Louis Vastola stopped a car after
observing it traveling at 43 mph in a 25
mph zone along Princeton Avenue on
March 9. Vastola says he spoke with the
driver, a Carversville, Pa., man, who was
found to have a suspended drivers license
and two traffic warrants out of Clinton
Township. The man was placed under ar-
rest and transported to police headquar-
ters for processing. He was charged with
speeding and driving on a suspended dri-
vers license which will be heard in munic-
ipal court. The man was later released
after posting bail on the outstanding war-
rants, police said.
Officer Louis Vastola stopped a car after
observing it traveling at 59 mph in a 45
mph zone along Pennington Road on
March 10. Vastola says he spoke with the
driver, who was found to have a suspended
drivers license and traffic warrants out of
Woodbridge, Union Township, Rahway,
Newark and Gloucester Township. He was
placed under arrest and transported to po-
lice headquarters for processing, and was
charged with speeding and driving on a
suspended drivers license, which will be
heard in municipal court. He was then
turned over to the Woodbridge Police De-
partment on that outstanding warrant.
Later that day, police say a friend of the
police report
please see POLICE, page 9
MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Its that time of year again
tax season.
For many people, filing tax re-
turns is a stressful and complicat-
ed process. It can also be an ex-
pensive one for those seeking pro-
fessional assistance.
If you are a New Jersey resi-
dent and fall into one of these cat-
egories, fret no longer.
AARP New Jersey offers a tax
aide program that will assist you
with filing your taxes free of
charge.
The AARP tax aide program
has been around for more than 40
years. What started as a few vol-
unteers working to help senior
citizens file their yearly taxes at
local libraries has blossomed into
a program with 33,000 volunteers
nationwide, and more than 900 in
New Jersey alone.
These volunteers provide serv-
ices at 150 locations throughout
the state.
Another wonderful aspect of
this program is that any New Jer-
sey resident, regardless of age, or
AARP membership status, is eli-
gible to participate. As long as
you are a full-time New Jersey
resident, AARPs program is
ready to help on any standard tax
return, even if you live in NJ but
work in New York of Pennsylva-
nia.
All volunteers are highly-
trained and are certified by the
Internal Revenue Service. Volun-
teers, in some instances, may
even be able to make house calls,
for people who are homebound,
provided that Internet access is
available.
And taxes prepared by AARP
tax aides are filed electronically,
using the exact same, completely
secure systems used by those
more expensive, for-profit compa-
nies.
Assistance is most effective
when participants bring to their
appointment all necessary paper-
work, such as pension papers,
broker transactions any source of
income or deduction.
It is also recommended partici-
pants bring a copy of their previ-
ous years tax return, so volun-
teers can check them to make
sure nothing has been missed.
The program, already under-
way, continues until April 17, but
dont wait until the last minute.
The last two weeks of tax sea-
son are extremely busy and often
overbooked. You can find the tax
aide location nearest you by visit-
ing the AARP website at
www.aarp.org.
Once there, click money at
the left, then taxes, and at the
bottom of the page will be the tax
aide locator.
AARP New Jersey offering tax
aide program free of charge
WEDNESDAY
March 28
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Deer Manage-
ment Advisory Committee meet-
ing: 7 p.m. For more information vis-
it www.hopewelltwp.org.
Movies for Adults: 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
and 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Come watch Ideas
of March, rated R. An idealistic
staffer for a newbie presidential
candidate gets a crash course on
dirty politics during his stint on the
campaign trail.
FOR CHILDREN
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and pre-
schoolers. Stories, songs and finger-
plays. Registration is not required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities. Age-
appropriate craft follows story time.
Parental supervision required.
THURSDAY
March 29
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities. Age-
appropriate craft follows story time.
Parental supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Singing, dancing ad rhymes.
Play with musical instruments, pup-
pets, parachutes and more.
FRIDAY
March 23
FOR CHILDREN
Open Play: All ages welcome; adult
supervision required. 11 a.m. to noon
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Come to the
childrens activity room for open
play time. Toys and coloring supplies
will be available.
SUNDAY
April 1
FOR ALL
Hopewell Fire Department's annu-
al Pancake Breakfast: 8 a.m. to
noon at the Hopewell Firehouse,
Columbia Ave. Menu includes pan-
cakes, eggs, sausage, bacon, home
fries and toast, as well as coffee, tea,
juice and milk. Cost is $8 for adults,
seniors and children ages 6 to 12 are
$6, and children 5 and under are
free.
FOR TEENS
Hunger Games Party: For grades
six and up. 2 to 4 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Library will be
closed for an afternoon of games,
snacks, challenges and Hunger
Games trivia. Release your inner
Katniss, Peeta or Gale in friendly
competitions based on the wildly
popular trilogy. Register online.
MONDAY
April 2
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Committee
meeting: 7 p.m. at the Municipal
Building. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Getting Comfortable with Comput-
ers: 1 p.m. at the Hopewell Public
Library. Get comfortable with com-
puters, the Internet, the World Wide
Web and the digital world. The
librarys technologist will answer
questions, provide demonstrations
and guide participants.
Book Club: 7 p.m. at Hopewell Pub-
lic Library. Come discuss Cutting
for Stone by Abraham Verghese.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat or
large towel. Registration required;
call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn this
ancient art to promote good health
and relaxation. No registration
required.
FOR CHILDREN
Kids Open Craft: All ages. 4 to 5:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Staff
member will assist kids with the
craft of the week. Parent supervi-
sion required.
TUESDAY
April 3
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Agricultural
Advisory Committee meeting: 7:30
p.m. at the Township Building first
Tuesday of the month. Public is
invited. For more information con-
tact: Lucia Huebner at 466-0277 or
lucia@doorposter.com; or John
Hart at 737-2008 or ihart89@aol.
com.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat or
large towel. Registration required;
call (609) 737-2610.
FOR CHILDREN
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. A
great way to introduce your child to
library story times and reading. Age-
appropriate books shared. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience. Adult
supervision required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities.
Age-appropriate craft follows
story time. Parental supervision
required.
calendar PAGE 8 MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
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man was also arrested on an out-
standing traffic warrant out of
Bloomfield after he came to pick
up the impounded car. That man
was processed at police headquar-
ters and was later released
after posting bail, according to po-
lice.
Officer Alexis Mirra responded
to a Dunleigh Court address for
the report of a person smoking
marijuana on March 7. A Pen-
nington man was found in posses-
sion of a metal grinder contain-
ing marijuana and was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing.
He was charged with the pos-
session of marijuana (under 50
grams) and possession of drug
paraphernalia, which will be
heard in municipal court. He was
then turned over to the custody of
the Hamilton Township Police
Department on an outstanding
traffic warrant.
POLICE
Continued from page 6
police report
BRIEFS
Hop to the Easter egg
hunt on April 7
Pennington Parks and Recre-
ation will host an annual Easter
Egg hunt on Saturday, April 7 at
10 a.m. in Kunkel Park located on
King George Road. Children ages
2 to 12 are welcome to join in the
fun. Please bring your own bas-
ket. The Easter Bunny will make
a special appearance at the event.
Fundraising dinner
set for April 28
Hopewell United Methodist
Church will host a fundraising
dinner to benefit the Joanne Davi-
son Memorial Scholarship Fund
on Saturday, April 28 from 4:30 to
7 p.m. Purchase tickets at the
door. Adults pay $10 and children
6 to 12 are $5. Children 5 and
younger eat free.
Join us for a fine Italian meal:
three kinds of pasta, regular and
whole grain spaghetti, fettuccine,
baked ziti; three kinds of sauce,
meat, plain and Alfredo. Meat-
balls are also included. Tossed
salad, Italian bread and home-
made desserts. Dinner is served
buffet style. For more informa-
tion, visit www.hopewellmethodist.
org/events or call (609) 466-0471.
Introduction to
Duplicate Bridge starting
The Hopewell Township Parks
and Recreation Department will
be sponsoring An Introduction to
Duplicate Bridge program.
The six-week series will cover
the basics of duplicate bridge, in-
cluding tools, systems and courte-
sies, bidding and scoring, how to
value your cards, bid and play a
hand.
It will be a learn by doing se-
ries that will actively engage par-
ticipants who will bid and play a
large number of interesting hands.
The program will take place at
the Hopewell Township Municipal
Auditorium on Friday afternoons
from 1 to 3 p.m. beginning April 20
and concluding on May 25.
David Hagen, an accredited
ACBL bridge teacher and active
tournament player, will instruct.
The cost for the six sessions is
$110 per player and will include
instruction, materials and
Bridge Basics textbook.
For more information or to reg-
ister, call 737-3753 by April 9.
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
Holy Week & Easter Services
Palm Sunday - 8 & 10 am (4/1)
Maundy Thursday - 8 pm (4/5)
Good Friday - Noon & 3pm (4/6)
Easter Vigil & Feast - 8:30pm (4/7)
Easter Sunday - 8 & 10 am (4/8)
300 S. Main St, Pennington, NJ
(Across from Toll Gate Grammar School)
stmatthewspennington.org
ST. MATTHEWS
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Everyone Welcome! Come Join Us!
609-924-9700
www.fearawaydrivingschooI.com
Same rates as Lawrence HS for HS students!
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Special to The Sun
Jim Hyman, president and CEO of Hopewell Valley Community Bank, along with his wife, Lynn, congratu-
late scholar-leader-athletes Matt Pagano, of Hopewell Valley Central High School, and Phil Pecora, of The
Pennington School, during the 50th anniversary of the Delaware Valley Chapter/National Football Foun-
dation Awards Dinner at the Hyatt Regency-Princeton on March 11. In addition to being named members
of the National Honor Society, Pagano and Pecora both excelled on the playing field. Pagano is Hopewells
first-ever 1,000-yard rusher and holds the single-game, single-season and career rushing record for the
Bulldogs. Pecora represented the Red Raiders as a first-team All-Prep selection. As a Friend of the
50th, HVC Bank was a major supporter of the scholarship fund that awarded both Pagano and Pecora
$1,000 each.
MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
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With this ad.
Late in 2011, the township com-
mittee passed a bond ordinance
authorizing $4.1 million to pur-
chase 267,000 gallons of extra
sewage treatment capacity from
the Ewing-Lawrence Sewerage
Authority (ELSA).
Part of the reason for this pur-
chase was to solve the ongoing
septic problems for the business-
es around Pennington Circle, and
to have ready sewer capacity to
meet the townships future afford-
able-housing requirement. Citi-
zens For Tax Choice (CFTC), the
citizens group responsible for get-
ting enough signatures to ensure
the new bond would soon be put
to a vote in a township-wide refer-
endum, has now formally come
out against the new tax, and
urges Hopewell Township citi-
zens to vote no on the ELSA
Bond Referendum on May 8, ac-
cording to a press release from
the CFTC.
Unfortunately, the state has
yet to define the townships af-
fordable-housing requirement,
and the businesses around Pen-
nington Circle have not yet
agreed to purchase the extra
sewer capacity from the town-
ship, said Robert Kecskes, chair-
man of the CFTC citizens group.
Since the current bond ordinance
allows for the purchase of far
more capacity than is required at
this time, or that has yet to be sold
to commercial entities around
Pennington Circle, all of the
Townships residents will be on
the hook to pay for this ordi-
nance.
This leaves it wide open for
developers to purchase the excess
capacity, and to build, build,
build, Kecskes said, which will
negatively impact everyones
taxes, schools and quality of life
in the township. Those proposing
this ill-conceived ordinance
would have the voters believe that
developers will come into
Hopewell Township in swarms if
the ordinance is defeated. This is
a scare tactic on their part.
Our affordable housing plan
stays intact if the ordinance is de-
feated, and a new ordinance that
properly addresses providing the
wastewater needs for affordable
housing can be dealt with shortly
after the poorly developed ordi-
nance is voted down.
Citizens for Tax Choice was
formed when the ELSA ordi-
nance went from being a paid-for-
by-users proposal to a general ob-
ligation ordinance where every
citizen in Hopewell Township is
obligated to finance the bond
through a local tax hike.
The citizens group was able to
generate 1,700 signatures from
registered voters, although by
law, only 667 were required
to get the issue on the spring bal-
lot.
That tells you something
about how strongly people feel
about this new tax, said Harvey
Lester, another CFTC member.
While some have tried to portray
this as an affordable-housing
issue, the citizens of the township
are too savvy to be fooled by such
an obvious political smokescreen.
This isnt about affordable hous-
ing. Its about giving people a
choice on how the township
spends their hard-earned tax dol-
lars.
And when we went around
and collected those 1,700 signa-
tures, township voters told us one
thing, over and over, loud and
clear: We dont like this new tax,
which a few of the folks on the
township committee sprang on us
at the end of last year.
We believe we should only pay
for whats needed, no more, and
only those who need it should
pay.
Citizens For Tax Choice urges residents
to vote down ELSA bond referendum
12 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
Who are the Elks and what
does the group do?
The Elks are a hometown patri-
otic, service and social organiza-
tion run by members of the com-
munity who are dedicated to help-
ing others and building commu-
nity relationships.
The Benevolent and Protective
Order of Elks (BPOE) Princeton
Lodge was founded in 1959 and
serves Montgomery Township as
well as Princeton, Rocky Hill,
Hopewell and the communities of
West Windsor-Plainsboro North
and South.
The lodge is a place for the
community to gather for wide
array of events and activities,
ranging from youth-oriented ac-
tivities to the support of military
veterans.
Membership spans the socioe-
conomic spectrum of the commu-
nity from laborers to CEOs to aca-
demics. All share in a commit-
ment to the lodges programs.
The Elks are among to the old-
est, community-based fraternal
and charity organizations in the
country.
The foundation of the Elks is
based on community service, em-
phasizing the principles of chari-
ty, justice, brotherly love and fi-
delity. The extensions of these
principles are found in programs
for children with special needs,
youth activities, scholarship
grants and assistance to military
veterans.
VETERANS SERVICES
Many Elks programs are in
support of the nations military
veterans. These activities gave
rise to programs such as the GI
Bill, veterans hospitals, troop
Wish Lists, the leather program
(gloves for wheelchair-confined
veterans) as well as annual Flag
Day celebrations.
Elks throughout the country
work in support of our nations
service men and women, offering
financial support, opportunities
for socializing, special care, goods
and services, family support and
recognition.
In New Jersey, the Elks have
championed programs that pro-
vide specially outfitted transport
for injured soldiers, support to
families that lost a parent in com-
bat and provide schooling
and supplies and other necessi-
ties to struggling military fami-
lies.
The Princeton Elks are active
in each of these programs and re-
cently made a financial donation
to a state fund to aid homeless vet-
erans.
YOUTH SERVICES
Elks work to support children
with disabilities and aid to their
families.
Throughout the nation, Elks
raise hundreds of thousands of
dollars for this cause.
Many individual lodges and
state associations operate facili-
ties for specialized medical and
rehabilitation care for children,
young adults and families at little
or no cost. A wide array of treat-
ments are available, ranging from
speech and occupational therapy,
autism, physical disabilities, so-
cial interaction and self-confi-
dence building.
In New Jersey, Elks operate
Camp Moore, which is located in
Haskell. The camp provides one-
to-one care the severely disabled.
The Passaic Cerebral Palsy
Center and Somerset Childrens
Treatment Centers offer therapy
and other treatments at reduced
costs.
The Princeton Lodge is part-
nering with Global Communities
of Service (GCOS) in a pilot pro-
gram, offering vocational and ed-
ucational opportunities for young
adults with disabilities who are
longer in school.
YOUTH PROGRAMS
Promoting wholesome activi-
ties that build a sense of confi-
dence, fair play and sportsman-
ship is the goal of the Elks year-
round programs.
These programs include sports
tournaments, a hoop shoot, Bat-
ter Up and Soccer Shoots, as well
as social functions.
The Antlers Youth Service and
Social program is designed to
give youths from 12 to 20 the op-
portunity lead and work together
on service projects of their
choice, as well as to provide an op-
portunity for youth to plan and
run their own social activities in
a positive environment.
The Elks annual Americanism
Essay competition also serves to
build a sense of pride and
understanding of being an Amer-
ican.
The competition is for students
in grades five to eight, and their
essay is to focus on their under-
standing and interpretation of
American citizenship.
Awards are given at the lodge,
state and national level.
SCHOLARSHIP
The Elks national foundation
is the second largest donor of ed-
ucational scholarships in the
country.
Each year, more than $3.6 mil-
lion are donated.
Scholarships are awarded
based upon academic abilities, fi-
nancial need, community service
and leadership qualities.
In addition to the national
scholarships, lodges also have
scholarships to award to students
in local communities.
MEMBERSHIP
The Princeton Lodge in located
on route 518 in Blawenburg. For
more information, visit www.prin
cetonelks2129.com.
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CLEANING
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012 PAGE 15
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
Roofing
Home Improvement
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