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Managing editor Johan van Wyk Editorial support Louise van Niekerk Editorial panel Sandile Keswa Phetole Rapetswa Dineo Poo Layout Rachel-Mari Ackermann Philatelic artist Thea Clemons Agents for Philatelic Services Local The Stamp Shop, Port Elizabeth, Tel (041) 365-2548 Cape to Kenya, Pretoria, Tel (012) 667-2833 Sandton Stamps & Coins, Sandton, Tel (011) 783-8309 2 Penny Blue, Aeroport, Tel (011) 947-2830 Glen Carpendale, Pretoria, Tel (012) 333-4741 Mr. Thematic, Johannesburg, Tel (011) 390-1321 Overseas Harry Allen, England, Tel (0944) 1923 475-555 Herrick Stamps Company, USA, Tel (091) 516 569-3811 Trullis Hansen Distributors, Norway, Tel (0947) 612-55601 Japan Philatelic Agency, Tel (09813) 5951-3433 Address correspondence to: The Editor, Setempe, Private Bag X505, Pretoria, 0001, SOUTH AFRICA Tel (national) (012) 845 2814/15 (international) +27 12 845 2814/15 Fax (national) (012) 804 6745 (international) +27 12 804 6745 E-mail sa.stamps@postofce.co.za Website www.postofce.co.za Buy our stamps on: www.epostal.co.za Opinions expressed in Setempe are not necessarily those of the South African Post Ofce or of Philatelic Services. Information published in Setempe may be reproduced, provided its source is acknowledged and copies are sent to the editor. Setempe is published by the Philatelic Services of the South African Post Ofce, Cnr James Drive and Moreleta Street, Silverton, Pretoria, SOUTH AFRICA. Please note: Stamp images published in Setempe are from the original artwork and are subject to change. ISSN 1560-9626

SETEMPE
South African Stamp News May - August 2011

Dear Reader Interview: Muano Mainganye Honouring a Constitution Celebrating rare instruments of African rhythm The beauty of South Africas forest birds Green Earth, healthy garden Setempe advert dates and rates Phils Corner Evolution of a legendary emblem Interview: Will Lourens Bellville Post Ofce Youth: Telling a story with stamps Youth development news Museums: Conserving heritage objects Letters and Titbits Order forms

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This Setempe is printed on


Triple Green products are produced from waste sugar cane bre. The bleaching process is elemental chlorine free and the wood bres are sourced from sustainable and well managed forests.

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New issues
With the year well on its way, we look forward to introducing you to our diverse and interesting stamps, which will be available soon. First up is the nal issue in the series about Constitution Hill in Johannesburg. This issue features the rst few lines of South Africas Constitution. We would like to use the opportunity to pay tribute to the late Dr Ivan May, former Chief Executive Ofcer of the Constitution Hill Trust, who passed away at the end of 2010 for his continuous support and enthusiasm for this series of stamps. Our set of 10 stamps featuring rare musical instruments will be launched on 10 June at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown. The latest stamps in our series on South African birds will be issued on 15 July. This set of ve stamps designed by Andr Olwage depicts forest birds. At Philatelic Services we like to remind our clients that there is a story behind every stamp. The story behind our Green Earth stamps is arguably about one of the most important issues facing the world today, namely hunger and food security. The World Food Summit of 1996 dened food security as existing when all people at all times have access to sufcient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life. According to the Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations, there are 926 million hungry people in the world, 239 million of which live in sub-Saharan Africa. And lastly, Goal 1 of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals calls for a reduction by half of the number of people suffering from hunger between 1990 and 2015. In a small effort to assist in addressing this major global issue, our Green Earth stamps, which will be issued on 12 August, promote vegetables that are rich in nutritional value and easy to grow. If you buy one sheet of these stamps at the Philatelic Services ofces in Pretoria, you will receive a gift packet of seeds of each of these vegetables. Instructions on how to plant the seeds appear on each packet. You will also receive a recipe booklet featuring recipes with each of the vegetables as the main ingredient. We have already tried and tested them! (The ne print reads: As long as stocks of seeds last.) In anticipation of the Rugby World Cup, which kicks off in September, a set of 10 stamps, which tell the story of the development of the Springbok rugby logo since 1906, will be

issued on 20 August. Read more about these stamps on page 22 and 23. Thank you, Andy, for all the assistance!

Fifth most important stamp in the world for 2010!


The philatelic website StampNews.com annually rates the stamps that were issued around the world according to different categories. According to the website the award in the category for the top 10 most important stamps of the year goes to stamps dedicated to socially-signicant events during the year. We are proud to announce that South Africas stamps featuring taxi hand signs were rated as the fth most important in the world in 2010. Stamps from about 150 countries were considered and rated by the StampNews editorial team, as well as stamp experts and the StampNews focus group. In 2009, South Africas 3D dinosaur stamps were fourth in the category Top 10 extraordinary stamps.

Best stamp for 2010?


Entries to select the best South African stamp for 2010 are trickling in at a snails pace and we have postponed the entry date to 30 June 2011. Please tell us which stamp(s) you have liked the most, or the least.

Meet Phil
On page 29 we introduce Phil. Phil is a young chap who will share his knowledge about stamps and stamp collecting with his friends and family in future issues of Setempe.

A full FIP international stamp show in 2016?


After the very successful Joburg 2010 International Stamp Show last year, we have been asked to consider and investigate the possibility of hosting a full FIP international stamp show in 2016. We would like to hear our readers views about this. Please let us know whether you think we should do it or not, and give reasons for your view. Until next time, enjoy your stamps!

Johan van Wyk

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interview ...

Muano Mainganye
honouring those who shaped our country

1. Did you know anything about stamps before receiving this assignment and which aspect of stamps did you nd surprising or particularly interesting?
I had heard about certain collectible stamps, which investors often collect in contrast to those that we use to send mail daily, but thats about it. I was also surprised to hear that the rst stamp in South Africa was created in 1853; I thought that was really interesting.

2. There were a few different themes from which you could choose. Why did you choose to design the Constitution stamps?
I found all the themes quite interesting, but the Constitution Hill stamp was centred on typography and I thought that it would make for a good challenge. At the same time I saw this as an opportunity to learn about South African history, and some of the things that our leaders endured.

7. What do you consider to be good design or of which elements does good design consist?
All design elements should be considered but you can focus on certain ones, and in this case I chose to focus on texture and type.

3. Where did you get your inspiration for this design?


I was inspired by all the research material that I had gathered; I tried to sum it up in one picture.

8. Which artist from history is your favourite and why?


I look up to a lot of artists from the past, but if I have to choose one it would have to be Rene Magritte. I enjoy the visual puns he often employed in his work.

4. What research did you do before starting the design process?


I looked at all the previous stamp designs in Setempe magazine, as well as some stamps on the Internet, from websites like usps.com. I also looked at a lot of typographical designs on the web and did some research on Constitution Hill, as well as some of the prisoners that were held there.

9. What is your opinion about stamps after everything you have learnt during this assignment?
I appreciate them more, because now I understand the amount of work that goes into making a stamp.

5. What did you wish to express in your design?


I wanted to design something that would really honour those who made this country what it is today, and the portrait behind the words is to show that they are not forgotten.

10. What is your biggest ideal in life?


We all know what it takes; we can either make excuses or just do it. Keeping this in mind, I constantly push myself towards greater things.

6. What did you enjoy most about designing this stamp?


I would have to say that it was the experimentation with the texture and type, as well as learning about South Africas heritage.

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new issues...

Honouring a

CONSTITUTION
for the people by the people
We, the people of South Africa, recognise the injustices of our past, honour those who suffered for justice and freedom in our land, respect those who have worked to build and develop our country, believe that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity. These introductory words of the preamble to the South African Constitution are featured on the last stamp issue in the Constitution Hill series.
South Africas Constitution is widely regarded as the most progressive constitution in the world, with a Bill of Rights second to none. Coming late to democracy, South Africa was able to draw on the collective wisdom of the democratic countries of the world in creating its Constitution. South Africas Constitution was the result of detailed and inclusive negotiations that took into consideration the injustices of the countrys non-democratic past. The result is that it represents the collective wisdom of the South African people and has been arrived at by general agreement. Human rights are given prominence in the Constitution. They feature in the Preamble with its stated intention of establishing a society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights. Among the rights stipulated are those of equality, freedom of expression and association, political and property rights, housing, healthcare, education, access to information, and access to courts.

Supreme law
The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, was approved by the Constitutional Court on 4 December 1996. On 10 December 1996, which is international Human Rights Day, Nelson Mandela signed the Constitution into law in Sharpeville, in Vereeniging and it took effect on 4 February 1997. The Constitution is the supreme law of the land. No other law or government action can supersede the provisions of the Constitution.

The adoption of the Constitution in 1996 was a major turning point in this countrys history. It has been called the birth certicate of a new South Africa - a country that is profoundly different to the one that existed before. This Constitution was drafted in terms of Chapter 5 of the interim Constitution (Act 200 of 1993) and was rst adopted by the Constitutional Assembly on 8 May 1996. In terms of a judgement of the Constitutional Court, delivered on 6 September 1996, the text was referred back to the Constitutional Assembly for reconsideration. The text was accordingly amended to comply with the Constitutional

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Principles contained in Schedule 4 of the interim Constitution. It was signed into law on 10 December 1996. The objective in this process was to ensure that the nal Constitution is legitimate, credible and accepted by all South Africans.

References: http://www.info.gov.za/documents/ constitution/1996/96explan.htm http://www.southafrica.info/about/democracy/ constitution.htm http://www.constitutionalcourt.org.za/site/ theconstitution/history.htm

Public participation
To this extent, the process of drafting the Constitution involved many South Africans in the largest public participation programme ever carried out in South Africa. After nearly two years of intensive consultations, political parties represented in the Constitutional Assembly negotiated the formulations contained in this text, which are an integration of ideas from ordinary citizens, civil society and political parties represented in and outside of the Constitutional Assembly. The artwork for this stamp was created by Muane Mainganye, a student at the Open Window School of Visual Communication. The Constitutional Hill stamp series started in 2008 with the architecture of the Constitutional Court. In 2009, the artworks in the Constitutional court were featured and in 2010, the history of Constitution Hill.

Technical information:
Stamp issue date: 23 May 2011 Layout and design: Muano Mainganye Stamp size: 40 x 52 mm Stamp sheet size: 105 x 75 mm Paper: Yellow Green Phosphor 102g/m2 Gum: PVA gum Quantity printed: 50 000 Souvenir sheets of 1 stamp Colour: CMYK Printing process: Offset Lithography Printed by: Cartor Security Printing, France

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Celebrating rare instruments of

African rhythm
Rhythm, music, song and dance are inherent in African culture and form an integral part of most traditional African ceremonies and rituals. Many of the musical instruments used by various ethnic groups in Africa are rare and almost unknown to the Western world. To raise awareness of this important cultural legacy, the South African Post Ofce will issue a set of ten stamps featuring a selection of rare musical instruments from various cultural groups on 30 June 2011. Two commemorative covers will also be available. The stamps, featuring artwork by Hein Botha, depict the following musical instruments: dipela. Outside Africa it is called a thumb piano, because the keys are plucked with the thumbs. It is believed to have originated in the Zambezi valley and is so widespread in Zimbabwe that it is accepted as the national instrument of the Shona. In South Africa, it is mainly found in the northern parts where it has been adopted by the Venda, Tsonga and Pedi and is used largely for recreation.

Drums
The drum, seen by many as the most representative African instrument, is still widely used today. According to some sources, every race that has inhabited South Africa has played drums at some stage, from the early Khoi playing on wooden milk jugs or clay pots, to the Venda playing on elaborately decorated wooden drums. The drums vary in shape, size and materials. Certain South African drums are difcult to nd today and some have disappeared from the musical scene altogether.

//Gwashi
The //gwashi is a pluriarc, a type of stringed instrument that the !Kung San borrowed from the Ambo people of Ovamboland. There are two variations of this instrument, namely the ve-stringed //gwashi, which is played by men and the four-stringed version played by women. The instrument is played by plucking the strings with the thumb and forenger. //Gwashi music is usually accompanied by singing.

Bull-roarer
Bull-roarers are widely used in Africa and the instrument has many different names. The San bull-roarer is known as !goin!goin, while the Khoi call their instrument burubush, the Venda call it tshivhilivhi and the Bapedi call it kgabududu. It is also sometimes referred to as a spinning disc, because the instrument is swung around in circles, producing a roaring sound. It has been used to attract insects for honey production and people have likened its sound to the buzzing of bees.

Ramkie
The San ramkie, a plucked lute, was inuenced by the Portuguese. The lower half of the body consists of a calabash over which a piece of skin is stretched to serve as a resonator. A plank of wood with strings attached from the top to the bottom of the instrument serves as the neck. The number of strings varies from three to six. It is likely that the Khoi were the rst of South Africas inhabitants to play the instrument and to pass it on to the San. The ramkie is regarded as the equivalent of the Western guitar.

Horns
Animal horns have been adapted for use as musical instruments in many African cultures. Horns, which are played mostly by men, are usually blown through an opening in the side. In the past, horns were blown as battle signals and were generally used to summon people to the chiefs kraal. The Khoi used kelp horns as instruments.

Sansa
The sansa is also known as sanza or mbira. The Bapedi version is called

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Flute
In South Africa, traditional utes are made from natural materials like small animal horns, wood, hollow bones and river reeds. Some end-blown utes are open at both ends and the player produces a variety of notes by closing and opening the bottom end with one nger and selecting high or low pitches depending on how hard it is blown. Flutes serve a number of purposes, for example herd boys use them to signal to their cattle or to each other from a distance

Bows
Bows enjoyed widespread popularity in pre-colonial days, but many are no longer made or played. South African bows were traditionally made from natural materials. The stave is made from wood and the string from twisted bre, sinew, hair or wire. Bows can be plucked with the ngers, struck with a light stick or grass stem or rubbed with a dry stick. Some bows are also activated by blowing.

Xylophone
Xylophones, also known as marimbas, are most highly developed in Mozambique, where they play an important cultural and social role. The mbila mutondo of the Venda is the only traditional marimba in South Africa. Although the instrument has been adapted by many South African cultures and has become popular over the years, the original Venda mbila is now quite rare.

Reference:
The Drumcafs Traditional Music of South Africa, Laurie Levine, Jacana Media (Pty) Ltd, 2005

Technical information: Rattles


Rattles and shakers are used to create percussion in dancing. Rattles are either handheld or worn on the ankles as part of a dance costume. In South Africa, rattles were traditionally made from cocoons, fruit shells, goat skin or palm leaves tied up and lled with stones or seeds. Ankle rattles emphasise a dancers leg movements and add some rhythm to a dance. Stamp issue date: 30 June 2011 Layout and design: Hein Botha Stamp size: 38 x 29.07 mm Stamp sheet size: 210 x 78.14 mm Paper: Yellow Green Phosphor 102g/m2 Gum: PVA gum Quantity printed: 40 000 sheets of 10 stamps Colour: CMYK Printing process: Offset Lithography Printed by: Cartor Security Printing, France

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new issues...

The beauty of South Africas

forest birds
Forests are a vital part of global sustainable development. According to World Bank estimates, more than 1,6 billion people depend on forests for their livelihoods. To raise awareness and strengthen sustainable forest management, as well as development and conservation of all types of forests for the bene t of current and future generations, the United Nations declared 2011 the International Year of Forests. To coincide with this, the South African Post Of ce chose forest birds as its theme for a new set of stamps in the South African bird series.
Forests are integral to the quality of human life and the environment. They provide people with food, fuel, shelter, medicine and employment. Forests are also home to 70% of the worlds terrestrial animals and plants. Forests clean the air we breathe, reduce concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, keep sediments from entering rivers and lakes and provide protection against ooding, mudslides and erosion. Forests also provide shelter to some of South Africas most spectacular birds. escarpment slopes. With a few exceptions, such as the forests of the Knysna area and the KwaZulu-Natal coastal dune systems, forests are small, usually occupying less than 1 000 ha. Despite the small land surface area they occupy, South African forests have relatively high species richness. Only fynbos exceeds the species richness found in our forests. Because of their importance many of South Africas forests are conserved either as State forests or they are protected in formal conservation areas. However, some also occur on private land. Indigenous woodlands cover almost one third of the surface area of South Africa. This includes proper woodlands of tall trees, as well as bushveld.

Birds
Indigenous forests and woodlands are home to some of South Africas most beautiful birds. The birds depicted on the set of ve stamps are the green twinspot, olive bush-shrike, Cape parrot, Knysa turaco (lourie) and the African crowned eagle. The artwork is by Andr Olwage.

Green twinspot

(Mandingoa nitidula)

Global warming
According to the World Bank, deforestation accounts for up to 20% of the global greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) estimates that the worlds forests and forest soil store more than one trillion tonnes of carbon twice the amount found in the atmosphere. The World Bank estimates that forests provide habitats to about two-thirds of all species on earth, and that deforestation of closed tropical rainforests could account for biodiversity loss of as many as 100 species a day.

The green twinspot is mainly green with white-spotted underparts and a red patch around the eyes. Immature birds are mainly green. The twinspot is an elusive, shy bird that frequents the edges of forests and coastal bush. It is usually seen either singly or in pairs and feeds in areas of open ground, but dart into thick cover if disturbed. Nests are built high up in tree canopies where they are protected from predators by branches and the dense green foliage.

Olive bush- shrike

(Telophorus olivaceus)

South African forests


Indigenous forests cover only about 0,25% of South Africas land surface. They are mainly patches scattered through areas of high rainfall and high humidity and on sheltered mountainsides. They include the indigenous evergreen and semi-deciduous closed forests of the coastal lowlands and

The olive bush-shrike is near endemic to the southern African region, which means it is found mainly in this region, but also occurs in other parts of the world. Locally, the olive bushshrike is common in most of southern Africas forests and is also is found in the African bushveld. Olive bush-shrikes vary in colour and the physical features of the male differ slightly from that of the female bird. The head is mainly olive with a grey bill, chestnut eyes, a white throat, yellow legs and an olive back.

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(Poicephalus robustus) The Cape parrot is listed in the Red Data Book of Birds of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland as endangered. The estimated population of the species in Southern Africa is only about 1 322 individuals, which means there is a high probability of extinction in years to come. The Cape Parrot is the largest parrot of the African genus Poicephalus. It is a short-tailed, medium-sized bird with a large powerful beak. The Cape parrot is found in South Africa, including the Eastern Cape region, as well as in West and East Africa. Its habitat range includes forest, riverine woodlands, savanna woodland, montane forests, and lowland forests.

Cape parrot

spotted with maturity. Crowned eagles are usually seen in pairs in evergreen forests, forested kloofs, dense riparian forests with large trees and well-wooded hillsides, often near water. References:
Newmans Birds of Southern Africa, Kenneth Newman, Southern Book Publishers http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Year_of_Forests http://www.environment.gov.za/enviro-info/nat/biome.htm#Forests http://www.birdsinsa.com/birds/telophorusolivaceus.htm http://www.birdlife.org.za/adoptaparrot/

Knysa turaco

(lourie) (Tauraco corythaix)

The Knysna turaco or lourie, is arguably one of South Africas most spectacular forest birds. It has a short crest and bright green upper parts. Its crimson wings are revealed when in ight. The Knysna turaco occurs from the Knysna region, northwards through the coastal parts of KwaZulu-Natal to the Drakensberg escarpment. Knysna turacos are usually seen in pairs or family groups in montane, mist belt and coastal evergreen forests. They are sometimes also seen in nearby plantations.

Technical information:
Stamp issue date: 15 July 2011 Layout and design: Andr Olwage Stamp size: 28.88 x 38 mm portrait Stamp sheet size: 164.4 x 129 mm landscape Paper: 102 grams Yellow Green Phosphor Litho gummed Stamp paper Quantity printed: 150,000 stamp sheets of 10 stamps (1,500,000 stamps) Colour: CMYK Printing process: Offset Lithography Printed by: Joh. Ensched Stamps B.V., The Netherlands

African crowned eagle


(Stephanoaetus coronatus) The African crowned eagle is a large and powerful bird with relatively short wings, which are adapted to move with speed through forest trees. Adults are dark brown with crested heads and blotched underparts and legs. Younger birds have white heads and underparts, but become progressively

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Setempe adverts dates & rates...

SETEMPE ISSUES Sep - Dec 2011 Jan - Apr 2012 May - Aug 2011 Sep - Dec 2011 ADVERT RATES FULL PAGE HALF PAGE

BOOKING/PAYMENT SETEMPE ISSUES 2011 10-Jun-11 SETEMPE ISSUES 2012 10-Oct-11 10-Feb-12 11-Jun-12 STD RATE PER ISSUE* R2,500 R1,250

ARTWORK IN

NOTES:
20-Jun-11 25-Oct-11 23-Feb-12 20-Jun-12

* Discount is available if you book 3 issues in advance. * Extra if print artwork is not print-ready. * Extra if an advert has to be designed from scratch.

Artwork and page specications will be supplied to interested parties.


NB. The South African Post Ofce: Philatelic Services reserves the right to choose which adverts will be allowed to be placed. All adverts are subject to available space in each issue.

REPRO CHANGES* R350.00 R250.00

DESIGN* R850.00 R500.00

Setem

Write to Phil: Phil, Setempe, Private Bag X505, Pretoria, 0001, SOUTH AFRICA E-mail: phil@postofce.co.za

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Evolution of a

LEGENDARY EMBLEM
Anyone who has seen a springbok leap across the African veld, will agree that it is truly a beautiful sight to behold. Apart from its grace and beauty, the springbok has become synonymous with South African rugby. It graced the national rugby teams jerseys for the rst time in 1906 when the team toured Great Britain with Paul Roos as its captain. The team excelled and on their return received a heroes welcome - a new legend was born.

It is now more than 100 years since the rst South African national rugby team was called the Springboks. For a long time the Springbok emblem represented exclusion to the vast majority of the people of South Africa. For many it was a hated symbol that epitomised the racial policies of injustice and oppression that characterised the system of apartheid. These words by Archbishop Emeritus, Desmond Tutu, echo the views of many other people about the Springbok emblem during the apartheid years. During this dark time in our history when most of the international community boycotted our sports teams, the Springbok rugby team was the domain of white South Africans only. Those who were excluded on the basis of their skin colour were justiably bitter and resentful.

Democratic South Africa


But thanks to transformation and the reconciliatory role played by former President Nelson Mandela, South African rugby has

undergone radical changes. Its emblem has similarly transformed and changed; the Springbok emblem is now worn with pride by players of all races, while supporters from equally diverse backgrounds wave the ag and sing the anthem of a democratic South Africa when the Boks take on other international teams

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R T E LI Z

This year sees the Rugby World Cup taking place in New Zealand from 9 September to 23 October with South Africa as the defending champion. A total of 20 teams will compete for the coveted Web Ellis trophy. They are South Africa, New Zealand, Australia, Argentina, France, England, Ireland, Wales, Tonga, Scotland, Italy, Fiji, Canada, Russia, Samoa, Japan, Romania, Georgia, the USA and Namibia. The rst match will be played in Auckland with New Zealand versus Tonga on 9 September 2011. The semi nals on 15 and 16 October and the nal match on 23 October will also be played in Auckland. To mark this important event on the rugby calendar, the South African Post Ofce will issue a set of ten stamps on 20 August featuring the evolution of the Springbok emblem over the years. Tri-Nations The date of issue coincides with the last Tri-Nations match to be played in South Africa. This will be the rst time ever that a Tri-Nations match will be played at the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in Port Elizabeth. From a philatelic point of view, this will also be a special occasion as the emblem stamps will be launched at the stadium.

The stamps were designed by Thea Clemons, using Springbok emblems supplied by the South African Rugby Union. The rst stamp shows the emblem used from 1906 to 1933, followed by stamps showing the emblem used from 1937 to 1962 and the South African Rugby Board badge used from 1935 to 1972. Other stamps feature the rugby emblems used from 1963 tot 1964 and 1965 to 1989; the South African Rugby Union badge used from 1966 to 1991, the emblem used from 1992 to 1995; 1996 to 2003; 2004 to 2008 and lastly, from 2009 to the present time. Two commemorative envelopes will also be available.

References:
The Badge a centenary of the Springbok emblem, published by the SA Rugby Union, Sports Science Institute of South Africa, 2006 www.rugbyworldcup.com/ www.newzealandrugbyinfo.co.nz/rugbyworldcup.php

Technical information:
Will be supplied in the next Setempe.

* Special thanks to Andy Colquhoun, Strategic Communications Manager, SA Rugby for his valueble inputs and assistance. Front cover pic: Paul Roos, rst captain of the Springboks. Ofcial website: www.sarugby.co.za

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interview...

Will Lourens
promoting the benefits of going green
1. Did you know anything about stamps before receiving this assignment and which aspect of stamps did you nd surprising or particularly interesting?
No, I had no idea how much work went into producing stamps before this assignment. What I found most surprising was how much research goes into designing the stamp itself. You must have a very solid idea of what the theme is all about before you can even think about putting paint to canvas.

2. There were a few different themes from which you could choose. Why did you choose to design the Green Earth, Healthy Garden stamps?
It was the topic that I found most interesting and the one in which I thought I could make a difference by trying to educate people through my design.

7. What do you consider to be good design or of which elements does good design consist?
I think a good design is one that has a good backing, if you dont do your research you cant have a good design, because you wont be able to get your message across effectively if you dont even know what your message is.

3. Where did you get your inspiration for this design?


I looked at the types of plants that could actually help people, so I thought why not teach people how to grow their own vegetables. That way I could make people aware of the environment and help them at the same time.

8. Which artist from history is your favourite and why?


That is a tough one. I will have to choose both Vincent van Gogh and Marko Djurdjevic. I really like the way that Van Gogh expressed his emotions in his work and brushstrokes. I also really admire Djurdjevic, because he never had any formal training, but trough hard work and determination he managed to become a very successful artist.

4. What research did you do before starting the design process?


I had to research which vegetables actually had seeds, which of them were indigenous and which were the most common in South Africa. I also looked at all the properties of these vegetables, like how they could be prepared, the best time and conditions to plant them in, as well as the actual process of planting the seeds and what health benets they held for the people who ate them.

9. What is your opinion about stamps after everything you have learnt during this assignment?
That they are far more fascinating and useful than people give them credit for. A lot of work goes into designing a stamp.

5. What did you wish to express in your design?


I wanted to show people that they could grow their own food and to make them aware of the benets of being green.

10. What is your biggest ideal in life?


I want to be a designer who creates more than just pretty pictures; I want my designs to actually have an effect on people, to help people.

6. What did you enjoy most about designing this stamp?


The actual learning process that I went through while designing the stamp and knowing that my design could actually make a difference.

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Bellville post office...

chalk Van S ia erina s. Valenc ). s. Sh nd M er left: M anag r) a From hief Telle Branch M g (C wyk ya (Actin i Mash

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Well done

e team

to a philately-friendly post ofce


At the Bellville post ofce in Cape Town, a special effort is made to make philatelists feel at home. Not only has a special room been set aside where they can browse through stamp sheets, but there is also a dedicated philately counter, which means stamp collectors dont have to stand in long queues. In addition, the post ofce also actively promotes new philatelic products by displaying them prominently in the client area, placing posters on the notice board and informing clients when new issues are available. They also make an effort to obtain material for collectors who have special requests and post printouts of all available stock to clients who are on their database. The Bellville post ofce will furthermore also gladly help philatelic clubs and organisations to obtain any philatelic material on request. The material is sourced from other centres and sent to Bellville where clubs and organisations can buy it. As a token of appreciation for their dedicated efforts to promote philately, staff members of the Bellville post ofce were invited to the Bellville Philatelic Societys 50th anniversary in 2010. A special word of thanks went to the chief teller, Ms. Sherina van Schalkwyk, for excellent service to her clients. Well done, Sherina and the rest of the team at Bellville, you have done us proud!

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youth...

story with stamps


Telling a
Are you aware that you can learn a great deal from stamps and that you can also make up your own stories from stamps? South Africas 8th Denitive set of stamps for example, can teach you a lot about the traditional beadwork of South Africa!

Many topics for collectors


The 8th Denitive set of stamps offer a wide variety of topics for thematic collectors. For example, the beadwork stamps feature photographs of the beadwork. Photography is an art form, while the beadwork itself is also of a form of art. So if you are a collector of art on stamps, they are ideal for your collection. If you collect animals on stamps, there is also a selection to choose from. You can collect the stamps featuring a llama, an Nguni cow, a zebra and lion claws. There are also stamps featuring a ladybird, a dove and a hammerhead bird. If you have an afnity for machines and technology, the stamps featuring a cell phone and aeroplane made with beads are for you.

Xhosa earrings on that day. They fell in love and Sipho proposed to her. To show Sipho that she loved him, Thandi gave him a beaded love-token necklace and Thembu earrings. Negotiations about ilobola started almost immediately thereafter with Siphos family visiting Thandis parents. Thandis father asked for 20 Nguni Cattle as ilobola and

The story of Sipho and Thandi


Traditionally, beaded objects have played an important role in everyday life. For example, Mr Sipho and Mrs Thandi Thwala have been married for many years. When they rst met Sipho was working as a miner in Johannesburg and Thandi was a young woman who worked hard making beaded objects. She met Sipho when he was home for a weekend in June. He wore a striking beaded neckpiece and carried a tobacco bag. Thandi wore a light blanket tied with a South Sotho beaded blanket pin and large

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Siphos father, who was a wealthy medicine man, was able to pay within a very short time. Thandis family presented Siphos father with a beaded Sangomas medicine gourd and gave their daughter a married womans beaded apron that had once belonged to her grandmother. The wedding feast was attended by a variety of people including chiefs with the main chief wearing a neckpiece made of lions claws. The bride and the groom lived happily ever after.

Youth Development News


Several youth competitions were run last year in Setempe, Minimag and JUNASS.
The major competition was the naming of the mascot for Youth Development. Entries were received from a number of youngsters, even from overseas. A panel from Philatelic Services compiled a shortlist from all the entries received and Philatelic Services staff was given a chance to select three names from the shortlist. The winning name chosen for the mascot from the shortlist was Phil entered by Isabelle Middleton. Thomas Tumiel won the consolation prize of one 2010 stamps year pack and a bag. Over 90 entries were received from Bergville Primary School in KwaZuluNatal. Turn to page 29 for an introduction to Phil and his stamp-collecting gang. Another important competition was run by Minimag on behalf of Philatelic Services. It was a design competition where stamps had to be used extensively in the artwork. Learners from Totius Academy in Potchefstroom stood head and shoulders above the rest with eight entries received from them. The artwork was featured in the January

Back fr o Keyser, m left: Vusi C J Esterh ohan van W aku-caku, Sa uiz n y Gelden en (Noordb k, Dineo Poo dile Keswa, N ru , h ic Celste uys, Rachel- g post ofce Rina Jacobs o Horn, Lua . Centr Mari A n manag Ras (M e le ck school) e in , Andr i-Mag), Fro ermann, Nata r), Liana Ho ft: Willie rn, Ter nt left: and He li Wibli tia nlo Bo Bamberger, A Mia Co rina Lemm n (MiniMag tes. er (Hea ), nradie d of , Thom as Hitg e (win ner)

April 2011 issue of Setempe. The winner, Thomas Witge, received a Nintendo DS Lite plus two games. The other learners received consolation prizes of bags and stationery. We were fortunate enough to get David Sinclair, a youth leader from the Penny Black Philatelic Club in Cape Town, to design a short quiz for children at JUNASS 2010. The winner, Aaron Smith, received a prize consisting of a 2010 stamps year pack.

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conserving heritage objects...

University of Pretoria Museums

are taking action


The University of Pretoria (UP): Department of Arts manages a one-of-a-kind objects conservation facility; a unique heritage conservation resource rivalling any university and even some museums.
The UP Arts Objects Conservation Facility was launched in August 2008. It fulls a need for conservation services, not only to inhouse university collections, but also to serve the public and offer consultative and conservation services to museums and the heritage sector. The Conservation Facility manages all museum conservation aspects. Firstly by preventive conservation care, which identies causes of deterioration followed by measures taken to prevent decay or damage. This takes the form of good housekeeping, climate control, physical protection, integrated pest management and care of the museum display and storage environment. Secondly, there is interventive conservation where a conservator intervenes in saving an object from decay and loss through repair, stabilisation, and reconstruction and only as a last resort to protect an object, restoration.

Forefather spirits sculpture in painted earthenware by Henriette Ngako, 1990. Dimensions: 440mm x 390mm UP Art Collection Interior of the newly established UP Arts Objects Conservation Facility at the University of Pretoria.

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The Old Arts Building, which is a National Heritage Monument in its own right, is home to the UP Arts Objects Conservation Facility. Although it covers only 56,20m2, the facility is well equipped for its purpose. It includes ofce space and a conservation reference section, as well as storage space for conservation materials, sorting tables and workbenches where airbrushing, hand painting and decorating tasks are carried out. It also has a separate wet room for cleaning and treatments and a storage area with restricted access where museum objects and private commissions are safely kept while they await treatment. An in-house objects conservator and staff with specialist knowledge and technical skills, take care of museum objects

ranging from ceramics, stone, bone, glass, ivory and metal, to archaeological objects and artworks of plaster, synthetic materials and bronze. The facility offers conservation advice, and serves as a contractor to museums and heritage organisations for most conservation concerns. Contact the UP Arts Objects Conservation Facility at: 012 420-5181; or send an email to conservation@up.ac.za. You can also visit them at the Old Arts Building, Room 1-13 on the Hateld campus of the University of Pretoria in Lynnwood Road, or view their website at: www.up.ac.za/uparts.

Available from 15 July 2011

letters and titbits ...

Stamp issue rates


Dear sirs, I was a stamp collector for many years, stopped it about 10 years ago, then decided to re-start collecting. What a mistake I made stopping! I have just received the January - April 2010 edition of Setempe and really enjoyed paging through it. However, I noticed now, as I have also noticed in the past, that the issues for Overseas Small Letters and International Post Card rates are constantly changing. I query why this should be. Foreign visitors are interested only in posting their letters and postcards home. I do not believe that the stamps used have any effect on the recipients to that mail. If the recipient happens to be a collector, then surely he would want the full set which he would have difculty to obtain, not knowing to whom he should write. Your publication quite correctly mentions the educational value of stamps, yet the best stamps are sent out of the country! What interest will overseas people possibly have in The life of sher folk? Surely these kind of stamps are to be used for standard postage so that they can nd their way into the average household and be seen by youngsters? I ask management in your organisation to consider all aspects of an issue of stamps before they decide for which branch of the postal service it will be used. Mr. AH Woolf

The editors reply to Stamp issue rates


Dear Mr. Woolf, We are indeed happy to have you back in the fascinating world of stamps! The postage rates on stamps are mainly determined by two criteria, i.e. the theme and the actual postage rate. Stamps bearing postage to international destinations are predominantly the smallest ambassadors of the country that sell the countrys achievements abroad, including promoting tourism to the country by showing images of shing images. The postage rates also provide a selection of rates and themes such as the stamps for the Soccer World Cup in 2010 bore the international postcard rate. The reasoning behind this was that visitors to the country using the stamps may wish to send postcards (which are quick to send) versus writing a letter. These decisions are, however, not cast in stone and depend heavily on the theme and the customers which the message is aimed at.

Titbits ...
During the rugby tournament in 1995 a commemorative stamp appeared for the 50th Anniversary of the CSIR on 15 June 1995. When the Springboks won the nal game Saturday 24 June 1995 a stamp had to be created to commemorate the champions. By Wednesday 28 June 1995 the commemorative stamps for South Africa as winners of the Webb Ellis Trophy for World Cup Rugby were available in post ofces. It was the fastest stamp ever produced in South Africa! Supplied by: The RSA Stamp Study Group

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CASH ORDER FORM


Account number: ______________________________________________________ First name: ___________________________________________ Initials: ________ Surname: ____________________________________________ Title: __________ Address: ______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________ Code: _________________________ Tel no: (H) ___________________________ (W) ___________________________ Cell/Mobile no: ________________________________________________________ E-mail: _______________________________________________________________ Would you like to receive news about new stamp issues and relevant information? If yes: Email: SMS:

Philatelic Services Private Bag X505 PRETORIA 0001 South Africa

THE CONSTITUTION 1 X STANDARD RATE - 23 MAY 2011


CODE PHL113418 PHL113419 PHL113420 DESCRIPTION Miniature Sheet Mint Miniature Sheet Cancelled Envelope No 8.15 TOTAL A PRICE 2.50 2.50 5.50 QUANTITY SUB-TOTAL PHL113442 PHL113443 PHL113444

GREEN AWARENESS 6 X B4 VALUE - 12 AUGUST 2011


Miniature Sheet Mint Miniature Sheet Cancelled Envelope No 8.19 TOTAL D 37.50 37.50 40.50

SA RUGBY LOGO RARE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 10 X INTERNATIONAL SMALL LETTER RATE - 30 JUNE 2011
PHL113422 PHL113423 PHL113424 PHL113425 PHL113426 PHL113427 PHL113428 PHL113429 Stamp Set Mint Stamp Set Cancelled Control Block Mint Control Block Cancelled Full Sheet Mint Full Sheet Cancelled Envelope No 8.16 Envelope No 8.17 TOTAL B 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 33.00 33.00

10 X INTERNATIONAL SMALL LETTER RATE - 19 AUGUST 2011


PHL113447 PHL113448 PHL113449 PHL113450 PHL113451 PHL113452 PHL113453 PHL113454 Stamp Set Mint Stamp Set Cancelled Control Block Mint Control Block Cancelled Full Sheet Mint Full Sheet Cancelled Envelope No 8.20 Envelope No 8.21 TOTAL E 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 33.00 33.00

8TH DEFINITIVE COFFEE TABLE BOOK - DISCOUNT STRUCTURE SA FOREST BIRDS 5 X INTERNATIONAL SMALL LETTER RATE - 15 JULY 2011
PHL113433 PHL113434 PHL113435 PHL113436 PHL113437 PHL113438 PHL113439 Stamp Set Mint Stamp Set Cancelled Control Block Mint Control Block Cancelled Full Sheet Mint Full Sheet Cancelled Envelope No 8.18 TOTAL C 30.00 30.00 30.00 30.00 60.00 60.00 33.00 Order Handling Fee GRAND TOTAL A-F PHL103289 PHL103289 PHL103289 PHL103289 PHL103289 1 to 50 Books - No Discount 51 to 100 Books (per unit) 101- 150 Books (per unit) 151 200 Books (per unit) Above 201 Books (per unit) TOTAL F 400.00 350.00 325.00 300.00 280.00

TOTAL ORDER
10.00

I hereby authorise the South African Post Office to deduct the amount of R ____________________________ from my credit card. ________________________________________________ Signature PLEASE NOTE: PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PRODUCTS AVAILABLE WHILE STOCKS LAST. POST ORDER FORM TO: PHILATELIC SERVICES, PRIVATE BAG X505, PRETORIA, 0001 TEL: (012) 845 2814/15 FAX: (012) 804 6745
SETEMPE 02/2011

Should you wish to receive South African stamps and other philatelic products on a standing order basis, please complete the form below. If you have any queries whatsoever, do not hesitate to contact our Client Services at tel (012) 845-2814/2515; or send a fax to 804-6745; e-mail sa.stamps@postoffice.co.za Indien u Suid-Afrikaanse sels en ander filatelieprodukte op 'n vaste bestelling wil ontvang, kan u die onderstaande vorm invul. U kan enige navrae rig aan ons Klintediensafdeling by tel (012) 845-2814/2815; of stuur 'n faks na (012) 804-6745; e-pos sa.stamps@postoffice.co.za
CODE / KODE 12* PRODUCT / PRODUK Yearpacks / Jaarpakke Single stamps / Miniature sheet Enkelsels / Miniatuurvel Definitive Issues Vaste Reeks Product / Produk 01 02 03 04 06 08 10 20 21 33 38 Single stamp - set / Enkelsels - stel Control blocks - set / Kontroleblokke - stel Stamp booklets / Selboekies Full sheets - set / Volvelle - stel Miniature sheet / Miniatuurvelle Aerogramme - postage paid / Aerogram - posgeld betaal Postcards / Poskaarte Commemorative envelope with stamps Gedenkkoevert met sels Commemorative envelope & m/sheet Gedenkkoevert & m/vel Corporate products - mint only Korporatiewe produkte - slegs posvars Prestige stamp booklet / Prestige selboekie Mint Posvars Cancelled Gerojeer Commemorative issues Gedenkreeks Mint Posvars Cancelled Gerojeer Reprints Herdrukke Mint Posvars Cancelled Gerojeer DEFINITIVE ISSUES VASTE REEKS Mint / Posvars Cancelled / Gerojeer COMMEMORATIVE ISSUES GEDENKREEKS Mint / Posvars Cancelled / Gerojeer

Want the convenience of a standing order account? Wil u die gerief van 'n vaste rekening geniet?

Please note that only the above-mentioned items are available on standing order. Neem asb kennis dat slegs die bogenoemde items op vaste bestelling beskikbaar is.

PLEASE NOTE: 1. Clients are advised against forwarding bank notes through the mail as Philatelic Services cannot be held responsible for any losses incurred in this manner. 2. Please allow seven days for local South African bank clearance. 3. Owing to standing currency regulations appertaining to this country, delays of up to six months can be experienced in the processing of overseas bank drafts. A cheque or postal order is therefore preferable. 4. Payment may be made directly into our bank account. Please fax payment slip to (012) 804 6745 after making a deposit. Banking details for Philatelic Services are as follows: Standard Bank Account No. 010547088 Branch Code: 010045 Branch: Pretoria * Those items marked with an asterisk are the full years issues as per that item, e.g. code 12 includes a full set of single stamps/miniature sheets for that year. It is available in the format options listed above and will be available by the end of the year 2011. LET WEL: 1. Klinte word afgeraai om banknote per pos te stuur. Aangesien Filateliedienste nie verantwoordelik gehou kan word vir enige verliese wat op die manier gely word nie. 2. Laat asseblief sewe dae vir plaaslike RSA-bankverrekening toe. 3. Vanwe staande valutaregulasies wat op die land van toepassing is, kan vertragings van tot en met ses maande in die verwerking van oorsese bankwissels ervaar word. n Tjek of posorder is dus verkieslik. 4. Betaling kan direk in ons bankrekening gemaak word. Faks depositostrokie na (012) 804 6745 nadat 'n betaling gemaak is. * Die items wat met n sterretjie gemerk is sluit die hele jaar se uitgifte van daardie item in, bv kode 12 sluit n volle stel enkele sels/miniatuurvelle in vir daardie jaar en is beskikbaar in die formaatopsies soos bo aangedui en sal teen die einde van die jaar 2011 beskikbaar wees.

Method of Payment
Postal Order VISA Credit card no: Cheque MASTERCARD Bankdraft

Y Expiry date of credit card: CVC no.

(Last 3 numbers given on back of credit card)

Signature: Y Date: ID No:


Regretfully, only credit cards mentioned above are acceptable at this stage. Please call our Customer Service Centre to explore other methods of payment

SETEMPE 02/2011