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MISSION BLUE BUTTERFLY
z by: flicker user: JPilipson
THE KINGDOM IS ANIMALIA, THE PHYLUM IS ARTHROPODA, THE CLASS IS INSECTA, THE ORDER IS LEPIDOPTERA, THE FAMILY IS LYCAENIDAE, THE GENUS IS ICARICIA, AND THE SPECIES IS ICARIOIDES MISSIONENSIS.

CLASSIFICATION

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CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PHYLA AND CLASS

A close relative of the mission blue is the Pardalis blue. butterflies that are commonly found in the same areas are the Acmon blue, the silvery blue, the eastern-tailed blue, and the echo blue.

Relatives of the mission blue

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Organisms in the phyla of arthropoda have a body plan that consists of repeated segments, each by: flicker with a pair of user: appendages. Anne Toal Arthropod’s internal organs are generally built of repeated segments. They also have open circulatory systems. These areas include the Twin Peaks area of San Francisco, Fort Baker in Marin County, and San Bruno Mountain in San Mateo County.

Organisms in the class insecta have bodies supported by exoskeletons. They also have sensory antennae, a pair of, compound eyes, one-three simple eyes, and appendages that form mouth parts. They also have six segmented legs.

The mission blue butterfly is restricted to three locations in the San Francisco Bay area.

Locations of the mission blue

by:flicker user: Anne Toal

by: flicker user: Anne Toal

by: flicker user: Anne Toal

Mission Blue Butterfly
Habitat of the mission blue
The mission blue is commonly found at elevations of about 700 feet. The butterfly requires a coastal scrub and grassland habitat found only near the Golden Gate of San Francisco. The mission blue uses the lupine flower to reproduce. Three types of lupine grow in this habitat. They are the lindley varied lupine, the silver lupine, and the summer lupine.

Routines of the mission blue

Yearly the adults appearance is between early March and early June. Lupines also appear at this time. The daily routines of the mission blue butterfly usually go like this. They spend the day getting nectar, perching on flowers and branches, flying to collect food, mating, and ,for the females, laying eggs.

Females lay eggs onto leaves, stems, flowers, and seed pods, of one the three types of lupines. The larvae hatch after four to seven days and then they feed off the host lupine’s mesophyll for about three weeks. The caterpillars then go dormant at the lupines base in the leaves till spring. The caterpillars then feed off the lupine till pupations when they again go dormant. When this is over, they reenter the world as a mission blue butterfly.

Reproduction of the mission blue

by: flicker user: lauradahl

by: flicker user: JPilipson

by: flicker user: Anne Toal

by: flicker user: JPilipson

by: flicker user: Anne Toal

Endangerment of the mission blue
Reasons for the mission blue’s endangerment
LAWS
The reasons for endangerment are mostly residential and industrial development. This development is reducing coastal scrub habitat. Other habitat destruction comes from cultivation, grazing, and aggressive, exotic plants. These include the European gorse and pompous grass taking over the lupine’s habitat. This is also causing mission blue butterflies to become endangered.

PROTECTING

THE

MISSION

BLUE

In 1984, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service(USFWS) drew up a recovery plan to protect mission blue habitat. Habitats damaged by urbanization, off highway vehicle traffic, and exotic plant invasions, are also being repaired.

Some enemies of the butterfly are birds and cats. Rodents are also a predator. A type of Encryrtid wasp, that makes it’s home in the mission blue’s eggs, is also a predator.

Mission blues in the food chain

by: flicker user: ZeroOne

mission blue depends on the perennial lupine to reproduce. Lupines provide nourishment the larvae need to survive.

by: flicker user: Anne Toal

Mission blues appear annually at the same time as the lupine. This is important because the

Adaptions of the mission blue

by: flicker user: urtica

by: flicker user: urtica

by: flicker user: urtica

Other interesting information about the mission blue is that the larvae secrete honeydew. Caterpillars get protection from predators and

MORE INFORMATION

Mission Blue Butterfly
RESOURCES

parasites by creating a trade with aunts. The aunts protect them and in return the caterpillars secrete honeydew for the aunts to feed on.

THE MISSION BLUE
ENDANGERED

<ref>http://bss.sfsu.edu/holzman/courses/Fall00projects/MissionBlue.htm</ref>| <ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthropod</ref>| <ref>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insect</ref>|

ENDANGERED

by: flicker user: lauradahl

by: flicker user: Anne Toal

ENDANGERED
by: flicker user: Anne Toal

ENDANGERED

by: flicker user: ZeroOne