THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA

Campus Master Plan Transportation Study

Prepared for The Catholic University of America 620 Michigan Avenue, Northeast Washington, DC 20064

Prepared by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. 8601 Georgia Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20910

December 2011

Table of Contents
Table of Contents .................................................................................................................... i  List of Tables ........................................................................................................................ iii  List of Figures ......................................................................................................................... v  Executive Summary ............................................................................................................ vii  Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1  Project Description..................................................................................................................... 1  Background ................................................................................................................ 1  2012 Master Plan Overview ....................................................................................... 2  Study Objectives ........................................................................................................................ 4  Transportation Modes and Demand .................................................................................. 6  Existing Commuter Mode Choice .............................................................................................. 6  Trip Generation .......................................................................................................................... 8  Pedestrian Facilities............................................................................................................. 12  Existing Conditions .................................................................................................................. 12  On-campus Pedestrian Facilities ............................................................................. 12  Off-campus Pedestrian Facilities ............................................................................. 14  Existing Pedestrian Activity and Distribution ............................................................ 16  Pedestrian Safety Assessment ................................................................................ 17  Master Plan Conditions............................................................................................................ 18  Master Plan Pedestrian Facilities............................................................................. 18  Other Pedestrian Plans and Opportunities .............................................................. 22  Bicycle Facilities ................................................................................................................... 27  Existing Conditions .................................................................................................................. 27  On-campus Bicycle Facilities ................................................................................... 27  Off-campus Bicycle Facilities ................................................................................... 30  Off-campus Bicycle Operations ............................................................................... 34  Master Plan Conditions............................................................................................................ 35  Master Plan Bicycle Facilities .................................................................................. 35  Other Bicycle Plans and Opportunities .................................................................... 37  Transit Facilities ................................................................................................................... 39  Existing Conditions .................................................................................................................. 39  Public Transit Facilities ............................................................................................ 39  CUA Transit Facilities .............................................................................................. 40  Master Plan Conditions............................................................................................................ 42  Public Transit Facilities Improvements .................................................................... 42  Master Plan Transit System Enhancements ............................................................ 43  Traffic Network Evaluation ............................................................................................... 45  Existing Conditions .................................................................................................................. 45 

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

i

Table of Contents

Campus Access and Vehicle Circulation ................................................................. 45  Campus Loading and Service .................................................................................. 46  Public Roadways and Intersections ......................................................................... 46  Master Plan Conditions............................................................................................................ 53  Campus Access and Vehicular Circulation .............................................................. 53  Campus Loading and Service .................................................................................. 54  Public Roadways and Intersections ......................................................................... 55  Parking Facilities ................................................................................................................. 64  Existing Parking Facilities ........................................................................................................ 64  Campus Parking ...................................................................................................... 64  Public On-street Parking .......................................................................................... 66  Parking Demand Assessment.................................................................................. 67  Master Plan Parking Facilities ................................................................................................. 69  Proposed Parking Facilities ..................................................................................... 69  Projected Parking Demand ...................................................................................... 71  Parking Management Strategies.............................................................................. 73  Transportation Demand Management............................................................................. 75  Existing TDM Strategies .......................................................................................................... 75  Master Plan TDM Program ...................................................................................................... 77  Monitoring Program ................................................................................................................. 80 

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

ii

Table of Contents

List of Tables
Table No.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Description

Page

CUA Enrollment and Employment Data............................................................ 3 CUA Headcount Data and Growth Projections ................................................. 3 CUA Commuter Survey Respondents .............................................................. 7 CUA Commuter Mode Choice Summary .......................................................... 7 Summary of CUA Commuter Population Estimates ......................................... 9 Campus Trip Generation Summary ................................................................ 10 Public Sidewalk Constraints............................................................................ 16 Campus Pedestrian Directional Distribution ................................................... 17 Pedestrian Crash Summary (2008 - 2010) ..................................................... 18 Proposed Pathway Width Standards .............................................................. 19 Bicycle Parking Supply and Demand Summary ............................................. 28 Public Bicycle Corridors Summary.................................................................. 32 Campus Bicycling Directional Distribution ...................................................... 34 Bicyclist Crash Summary (2008 - 2010) ......................................................... 35 Proposed Bicycle Parking Summary............................................................... 37 Metrobus Route Summary .............................................................................. 40 Campus Shuttle Operations Summary ........................................................... 41 Summary of CUA Private Vehicle Trip Distribution ......................................... 49 HCM Level-of-Service Criteria ........................................................................ 50 Existing Condition Signalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary ........ 51 Existing Condition Unsignalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary .... 52 Historical Traffic Volume Summary................................................................. 55 Campus Trip Generation Summary ................................................................ 57

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

iii

List of Tables

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

Future Conditions Signalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary......... 59 Future Conditions Signalized Intersection Queuing Summary ....................... 61 Future Conditions Unsignalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary..... 62 Parking Supply Summary by Type.................................................................. 65 CUA Parking Permit Pricing Summary ........................................................... 66 On-street Parking Summary ........................................................................... 67 Parking Demand Summary by Lot .................................................................. 68 Parking Demand Summary by Campus Region ............................................. 69 Parking Supply Comparison ........................................................................... 70 User Parking Demand Summary .................................................................... 72 Projected Parking Demand Summary............................................................. 72 University Parking Price Comparison ............................................................. 77 Off-campus Resident Mode Choice Targets ................................................... 80  

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

iv

List of Tables

List of Figures
Figure No.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Description

Follows Page

Site Location Map ...................................................................................................... 1 Existing Campus Map ................................................................................................ 2 Catholic University Population Residence Locations ................................................. 2 Proposed Master Plan Campus Map ......................................................................... 3 Existing Campus Pathway Network ......................................................................... 12 Off-campus Pedestrian Facilities and Generators ................................................... 15 Existing Pedestrian Safety Features ........................................................................ 17 Proposed Master Plan Pathway Network ................................................................ 18 Existing Campus Bicycle Facilities........................................................................... 27 Off-campus Bicycle Facilities ................................................................................... 30 Proposed Master Plan Bicycle Facilities .................................................................. 35 Existing Transit Facilities ......................................................................................... 40 Planned Michigan Avenue Streetcar........................................................................ 43 Proposed Master Plan Transit Routes ..................................................................... 43 Existing Campus Vehicle Circulation and Loading/Service ..................................... 46 Intersection Lane Geometry and Traffic Control ...................................................... 47 2011 Existing Weekday Morning Peak Hour Traffic Volumes ................................. 49 2011 Existing Weekday Evening Peak Hour Traffic Volumes ................................. 49 Directional Trip Distribution ...................................................................................... 49 Proposed Master Plan Vehicle Circulation and Loading/Service ............................. 53 2027 No-Build Weekday Morning Peak Hour Traffic Volumes ................................ 57 2027 No-Build Weekday Evening Peak Hour Traffic Volumes ................................ 57 Master Plan Campus Trip Redistribution ................................................................. 58 Master Plan New Site-generated Trips .................................................................... 58 2027 Master Plan Weekday Morning Peak Hour Traffic Volumes ........................... 58

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

v

List of Figures

26 27 28 29

2027 Master Plan Weekday Evening Peak Hour Traffic Volumes ........................... 58 Proposed Harewood Road/Scale Gate Road Intersection Layout ........................... 63 Existing Campus Parking Facilities .......................................................................... 64 Proposed Master Plan Parking Facilities ................................................................. 70

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

vi

List of Figures

Executive Summary

The Catholic University of America (CUA) Master Plan provides a comprehensive plan for transportation systems upgrades and policies to sustainably support the University’s growth and minimize Master Plan impacts. The Master Plan transportation systems and policies are designed to reduce future single-occupant commuter trips and promote the use of alternative transportation modes. The Master Plan recommendations included in the transportation study include the following: Pedestrian Facilities 1. Establishes a pathway hierarchy providing appropriately sized facilities for pedestrians linking major activity centers and individual buildings on the campus. Proposes a new multi-use pathway connection between the Main Campus and the DuFour Athletic Center, including a proposed bridge over Taylor Street Establishes a minimum 6-foot width for on-campus pathways and sidewalks Proposes to convert existing roadway corridors in proximity to the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station, Pryzbyla Center, Law School, and Leahy Hall into limited-access facilities primarily serving pedestrians and bicyclists, with vehicle access only for transit and service vehicles Proposes new high-visibility crosswalk markings and pedestrian warning signage conforming to DDOT standards at campus intersections and key crossing locations Proposes widened sidewalks and improved landscape buffers along the Michigan Avenue, Harewood Road, John McCormack Road, and Taylor Street campus edges Recommends public pedestrian facility improvements by CUA or DDOT at the following locations:  Speed limit signage, Stop Here for Pedestrians signage, advance stop bars, flashing beacon arrays, DDOT Rapid Flashing Beacon crossing equipment, and/or a raised crosswalk on John McCormack Road at the CUA east driveway

2.

3. 4.

5.

6.

7.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

vii

Executive Summary

  

 

High-visibility crosswalks, countdown pedestrian signals, and Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing at the Michigan Avenue/7th Street/CUA South driveway and Michigan Avenue/Harewood Road/4th Street intersections High-visibility crosswalks and LPI signal phasing at the Michigan Avenue/Monroe Street intersection LPI signal phasing at the Monroe Street/7th Street intersection High-visibility crosswalks, wheelchair ramps, and LPI signal phasing at the Michigan Avenue/4th Street/Shrine entrance intersection A high-visibility crosswalk, wheelchair ramps, and LPI signal phasing at the Taylor Street/Hawaii Avenue intersection High-visibility crosswalks, wheelchair ramps, countdown pedestrian signals, and LPI signal phasing at the Harewood Road/Taylor Street intersection High-visibility crosswalk, pedestrian warning signage, and curb extensions at the Harewood Road/Basilica Overflow lot/Shrine west driveway intersection

Bicycle Facilities 1. Establishes a dedicated bicycle route through the core of the campus, with connections to the Metropolitan Branch Trail, and linking academic, social, residential, and athletic facilities Proposes a bridge over Taylor Street accommodating bicycles and connecting the Main Campus with DuFour Athletic Center Establishes a pathway hierarchy providing appropriately-sized facilities for bicyclists and features enhancing cyclist safety Proposes to increase overall bicycle parking on the Campus to a total of over 1,000 bike spaces Proposes bicycle parking in proximity to the entrances of academic, residential, and administrative buildings Proposes significant covered bicycle parking in residential buildings, all parking garages, and major activity nodes, such as the Pryzbyla Center and proposed student center Proposes multiple sites for DDOT Capital Bikeshare stations within the campus Recommends public off-campus bicycle facility enhancements by DDOT, including:  Multi-use pathways on Irving Street NW and Michigan Avenue NW  Bicycle lanes on Irving Street NW, Kenyon Street NW, and Upshur Street NW  Signed bicycle routes on Webster Street NW and Rock Creek Church Road NW  New Capital Bikeshare stations near Takoma Metrorail Station, Fort Totten Metrorail Station, and Washington Hospital Center

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7. 8.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

viii

Executive Summary

Transit Facilities 1. 2. Proposes to maintain free CUA Shuttle service for CUA students, faculty, employees, and visitors Proposes to reconfigure and expand the CUA Shuttle routes, providing two service routes to on-campus and off-campus destinations, including:  Both sides of the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station (to improve disabled access to the campus)  CUA residential precinct  Mullen Library  Pryzbyla Center  Academic core of campus  DuFour Athletic Center  West Campus parking lot  South Campus/Arts Walk redevelopment site  The Cloisters Apartments  Brookland Ridge Apartments  Washington Hospital Center (extended route) Proposes to implement full day shuttle service and provide 20 minute, or shorter, headways for both routes throughout the day Proposes to upgrade the shuttle bus stops on the campus to provide basic accessibility, adequate waiting areas, and covered shelters where possible for shuttle passengers

3. 4.

Roadway Network 1. 2. Proposes a new roadway connection (realigning Scale Gate Road) from North Capitol Street through the West Campus to Harewood Road Proposes to restrict vehicle access to the campus at key locations to only transit, service, and emergency response vehicles, to achieve the following:  Reduce overall vehicular circulation and minimize cut-through traffic on-campus  Improve mobility and safety for pedestrians and bicyclists oncampus  Provide direct access to parking from or near public roadways at the campus periphery Eliminates or replaces several internal intersections with alternative designs, including a proposed roundabout behind Mullen Library to replace multiple misaligned roadway connections and limit vehicle speeds Establishes a two-lane roadway cross-section standard for existing and proposed campus roads Proposes to retain the existing one-way northbound section of John McCormack Road near the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and provide a vehicular turnaround and drop-off area along John McCormack Road Proposes to maintain service and loading access from John McCormack Road and Harewood Road

3.

4. 5.

6.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

ix

Executive Summary

7.

8.

Recommends signal timing modifications at the following signalized intersections:  Michigan Avenue at 4th Street/Shrine driveway  Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street  Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/CUA south driveway  Harewood Road at Taylor Street Proposes a new unsignalized intersection at the Harewood Road/Scale Gate Road/CUA west driveway

Parking Facilities 1. Proposes to eliminate the following existing parking facilities:  274-space McMahon parking lot in the center of the campus  Several surface parking facilities, including the Mullen Front lot Pangborn lot, throughout the campus  Most on-street parking within the campus Proposes to construct the following parking facilities:  A 276-space temporary surface parking lot on the West Campus, to replace McMahon lot  A 300-space expansion of the University Garage, accessible from John McCormack Road  A 260-space below-grade parking facility at the DuFour Athletic Center to better accommodate parking demands during athletic events and minimize parking spillover into the neighboring community  A 106-space parking garage under the proposed building east of O’Connell Hall  A long-term parking structure near the Hartke Theater to replace the temporary West Campus surface lots Proposes to increase the overall parking supply on the campus by a total of 63 parking spaces, but reduces parking in several key areas:  Reduces parking on the Main Campus by 18 percent  Reduces parking in the Lower Main Campus (core academic and social center) by over 200 spaces  Reduces the overall number of parking spaces per person on the campus by 10 percent  Reduces surface parking on the campus by over 600 spaces Proposes several parking management strategies to manage projected parking demand and facilitate future parking operations on the campus:  Transition its parking permit system to assign parking by location, rather than by type (garage or surface parking)  Use parking permit pricing adjustments to incentivize parking in peripheral and garage locations  Eliminate commuter parking in surface lots within the campus core and reserve these spaces for faculty and carpool/vanpool drivers

2.

3.

4.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

x

Executive Summary

 

Provide hourly or daily fee parking for commuters and visitors in the University Garage and proposed garage near O’Connell Hall Offer reduced parking rates or designate resident student parking in underutilized peripheral parking facilities, such as the O’Boyle lot and DuFour Center Use the proposed DuFour Center garage and West Campus parking lot to manage special event parking on the campus

Transportation Demand Management 1. Increase building density near Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and Metropolitan Branch Trail to leverage major transit and non-vehicular facilities Construct additional student housing on campus (combined with new offcampus housing by private developers) to reduce travel distances for students and minimize the need for student to own automobiles Enhance pedestrian and bicycle facilities throughout the campus using vehicle access restrictions on campus roadways, widened pathways, and additional bicycle parking Implement new parking management policies to disincentivize singleoccupant vehicle usage on campus Implement shuttle system operational improvements, including expanded CUA shuttle service to off-campus destinations, increased shuttle schedule frequency, and use of GPS tracking Offer alternative commute incentives for students and employees, including Commuter Connections ridesharing services and transit pass subsidies Form a Transportation Management Association (TMA) with other entities in proximity to CUA Hire or designate staff member as the CUA Transportation Management Coordinator to expand internal marketing efforts, coordinate with DDOT and other agencies, and promote alternative transportation options

2.

3.

4. 5.

6. 7. 8.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

xi

Executive Summary

Introduction

1

Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB) on behalf of The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., has prepared a transportation study for the University’s 2012 Master Plan. This study evaluates existing and projected future conditions related to the various transportation modes serving the campus. The study identifies issues or limitations in transportation systems serving the campus and identifies measures proposed in the University’s Master Plan to improve access to the campus, minimize impacts associated with the University’s growth, and promote the use of alternative transportation modes.

Project Description
The Catholic University of America’s Master Plan, includes plans for transportation and parking systems to support new and enhanced building facilities and enrollment growth, and to strengthen the University’s relationship with the community. This section describes the campus and highlights of the proposed Master Plan.

 Background
The Catholic University of America (CUA) is located in Northeast Washington D.C., within an area generally bounded by Michigan Avenue to the south, Taylor Street to the north, Harewood Road to the west, and John McCormack Road to the east. The DuFour Athletic Center is located on John McCormack Road, north of Taylor Street and east of Hawaii Avenue. CUA also owns an undeveloped property, referred to as West Campus, which is located between North Capitol Street and Harewood Road. The Campus is bordered to the east by the WMATA/CSX Railroad Line, and the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station is located at the southeast corner of the University. A site location map of the campus is included in Figure 1. The previous Master Plan was approved in 2002 and provided the roadmap for development on the approximately 140-acre Campus over a 10-year period. The 2002 Master Plan was approved for the following levels of growth:

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

1

Introduction

W M as ar hi yla ng n to d n D. C

THE

Figure 1 Site Location Map The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Base mapping from Bing Maps

  

Growth from 4,357 full-time student equivalents to 7,500 full-time equivalents, representing 72 percent growth in enrollment. Employment growth from 1,185 to a maximum of 1,710 faculty/staff members, representing 44 percent growth in employment Maximum of 2,340 parking spaces allowed on campus

Based on the 2002 Master Plan, the University completed several important projects during the past 10 years, including:    Renovation and expansion of key academic and administrative buildings within the Main Campus Approval of the mixed-use South Campus redevelopment project, replacing underutilized CUA property south of Michigan Avenue Provision of temporary student housing and construction of the Opus Residence Hall, which were the first steps to significantly expanding oncampus housing Acquisition of the West Campus property

Figure 2 shows the existing campus map. It should be noted, the Shrine of the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception is not part of the Campus.

 2012 Master Plan Overview
The 2012 Master Plan intends to enable additional campus growth and modernization over a period of 15 years (2027 planning horizon), adhering to the requirements of the District of Columbia. The proposed Master Plan includes new and expanded building facilities to support academic, cultural, recreational, and student housing needs. The plan also includes open space improvements, architectural enhancements, expanded gathering spaces, and places of spiritual repose to enhance the campus experience for students, employees, and visitors. The Master Plan is depicted in Figure 3. The University anticipates modest enrollment growth over the 15-year planning horizon, particularly compared to the growth rates approved under the 2002 Master Plan. Tables 1 and 2 summarize the existing University student and employee populations and provide the 2027 enrollment and employment projections.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

2

Introduction

B

oa sR ate

dN

E

ii wa Ha u en Av eN
Taylor Street NE

E
John F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

North Capitol Street

d Road Harewoo

NE

Brookland-CUA

Mic

a hig

ue ven nA

NE
Monroe Street NE 8th Street NE 7th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

Figure 2 Existing Campus Map
*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

te Ba

oa sR

dN

E

ii wa Ha
Taylor Street NE

u en Av eN E
John F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

North Capitol Street

E d Road N Harewooewood Road NE Har

Mic

an hig

nu Ave

eN

E

Brookland-CUA

Monroe Street NE 7th Street NE 8th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

Figure 3 Proposed Master Plan Campus Map The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

Table 1 CUA Enrollment and Employment Headcount Data
Category Existing 2011-2012 Headcount Full-time Undergraduate Graduate and Law Total Faculty Staff Total 3,347 students 1,484 students 4,831 students 385 employees 952 employees 1,337 employees Part-time 226 students 1,910 students 2,136 students 361 employees 211 employees 572 employees Projected 2027 Headcount Full-time 4,100 students 1,560 students 5,660 students 445 employees 1,045 employees 1,490 employees Part-time 275 students 2,100 students 2,375 students 410 employees 230 employees 640 employees

Table 2 CUA Headcount Data and Growth Projections
Category Student Population Full-time Students Part-time Students Total Students Employee Population Full-time Employees Part-time Employees Total Employees Total Headcount 1,337 employees 572 employees 1,909 employees 8,876 individuals 1,490 employees 640 employees 2,130 employees 10,165 individuals 11.4% 11.9% 11.6% 14.5% 0.73% 0.91% 44.3% 66.2% 3.7% 5.2% 4,831 students 2,136 students 6,967 students 5,660 students 2,375 students 8,035 students 17.2% 11.2% 15.3% 0.96% 72.1% 5.6% Existing 2011-2012 Headcount Projected 2027 Headcount Projected 15-year Growth Annual Growth Rate Previously Approved 10year Growth Approved Annual Growth Rate

Projected growth rates calculated for the 2002 Master Plan were never realized at the University. The 2012 Master Plan population projections indicate significantly slower growth than that proposed with the 2002 Master Plan. The Master Plan 15year growth projections indicate the campus population will grow less than one percent annually, as compared to the previously approved 10-year CUA growth rate of over five percent annually. A significant proportion of the CUA student and employee population (approximately 38 percent) lives within one mile of the campus. The vast majority of the entire campus population lives in Washington D.C., suburban Maryland, and Northern Virginia within an approximately 6-mile radius of the campus. Figure 4 shows the residence locations of the CUA population.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

3

Introduction

Figure 4 Catholic Univeristy Population Residence Locations The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

The proposed Master Plan includes numerous elements designed to improve transportation access, bolster the University’s transportation facilities, and support alternatives to single-occupant commuting at the campus. The transportation study describes and evaluates the Master Plan transportation systems in detail, but below is a brief summary of the critical attributes of the Master Plan transportation systems:  A new roadway connection from North Capitol Street through the West Campus is intended to establish a University presence on North Capitol Street, provide direct access to temporary parking facilities on the West Campus, and reduce CUA-related traffic on other public roadways. A multi-use bridge over Taylor Street, proposed as part of an improved pedestrian/bicycle corridor running on a north-south alignment through the center of the campus, will formalizes a connection between the Main Campus and the DuFour Athletic Center. Modest enrollment growth coupled with significant on-campus studenthousing construction will move most undergraduate students to the campus, within reach of academic, cultural, social, and recreational facilities without the need for an automobile Higher building density programmed within 1,500 feet of the BrooklandCUA Metrorail Station will shift more campus activity toward the Metrorail Station and eliminate surface parking close to the Metrorail Station Several campus roadways will be converted to pedestrian, bicycle, transit, and service facilities Parking facilities in the core of the campus will be relocated or consolidated in peripheral or controlled access locations to reduce on campus conflicts and promote alternative modes

 

Study Objectives
The transportation study fulfills several objectives for evaluation of the transportation components of the Master Plan, including the following:        Assess pedestrian facilities within the Campus and along significant walking corridors in proximity to the campus Evaluate bicycle facility access within the Campus and public bicycle facilities connecting to the Campus. Identify existing transit facilities and planned transit enhancements serving the Campus Identify planned campus vehicular circulation and evaluate existing and future traffic operational conditions on public roadways serving the campus Evaluate campus mode choice and measures to promote use of alternatives to single-occupant vehicles Evaluate existing and proposed CUA parking supply and demand Define a Transportation Demand Management plan and monitoring strategies to evaluate mode choice shifts

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

4

Introduction

Identify potential transportation access and safety improvements for all modes.

Sources of data for this study include:            The Catholic University of America Campus commuter survey Master Planning information and data from Ayers Saint Gross Traffic counts, parking counts, and other data collected by VHB District Department of Transportation (DDOT) standards, data, and planning resources DDOT Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plans District of Columbia Public Realm Design Manual Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority maps, schedules, and ridership data Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) The 2002 Master Plan Traffic Impact Assessment Traffic impact studies conducted for background development projects by others

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

5

Introduction

Transportation Modes and Demand

2

The Master Plan addresses facilities and operations for a variety of modes serving The Catholic University of America. The campus community uses several transportation modes to commute to the campus and travel between buildings or regions of the campus. These modes include walking, bicycling, transit (both public and University-operated), and automobiles. The transportation study includes an evaluation of the various mode choices and trip generation associated with each mode for existing and future conditions.

Existing Commuter Mode Choice
The University conducted a commuter mode choice survey of students and employees in October 2011. The campus survey received 1,304 responses from students, faculty, and staff, including both full-time and part-time students and employees. Table 3 summarizes the range of campus community members responding to the commuter survey and compares the sample size to the campus population distribution.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

6

Transportation Modes and Demand

Table 3 CUA Commuter Survey Respondents
Respondents Undergraduate Students Graduate Students Faculty Staff Total Full-time Part-time Total CUA Residents Off-campus Residents Total Responses 267 525 218 294 1,304 1,052 243 1,295 165 1,139 1,304 Percentage 20.5% 40.3% 16.7% 22.5% 100.0% 81.2% 18.8% 100.0% 12.7% 87.3% 100.0% Campus Headcount 3,573 3,394 746 1,163 8,876 6,168 2,708 8,876 2,227 6,649 8,876 Population Distribution 40.3% 38.2% 8.4% 13.1% 100.0% 69.5% 30.5% 100.0% 25.1% 74.9% 100.0%

Source: Catholic University campus community

The campus commuter survey included questions related to CUA community’s transportation choices and preferences. The primary intent of the survey was to establish the existing commuter mode split used by both on-campus and off-campus residents. Table 4 summarizes the responses obtained in the 2011 CUA commuter survey regarding the primary mode of transportation used to travel to and from the campus during a typical week.

Table 4 CUA Commuter Mode Choice Summary
Mode Single Occupant Vehicle Carpool Public Transportation Bus/Streetcar/Trolley Subway/Rail Bike Walk Other CUA Resident Mode Choice 3.1% 1.8% 35.6% 0.0% 35.6% 0.0% 57.7% 1.8% Non-resident Mode Choice 48.3% 6.8% 34.5% 2.9% 31.6% 2.6% 6.8% 1.0% Overall CUA Mode Choice a 42.6% 6.2% 34.6% 2.5% 32.1% 2.3% 13.2% 1.1% Overall District of Columbia Resident Mode Choice 36.9% 6.9% 37.1% 16.4% 20.7% 1.9% 11.3% 5.9% b

Source: Catholic University campus commuter survey data and U.S. Census data for District of Columbia a Weighted average based on resident and non-resident population b Includes Other and Work at Home

The campus commuter survey data suggest a similar campus mode split to the overall District of Columbia resident mode split and indicates that a majority of the campus community uses modes other than personal automobiles to travel to the

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

7

Transportation Modes and Demand

campus. Use of personal automobiles is particularly minimal by the on-campus resident population, which has little need to use automobiles to travel between residential halls and class or other facilities on the campus. Reponses from oncampus residents regarding the use of transit likely reflects the transportation mode most often used to travel from the campus to typical off-campus destinations, including work places, internships, training programs, social activities, parents’ homes, airports, and intercity rail and bus stations. The campus population residence locations and campus survey results suggest opportunities for growth in the use of some transportation modes by the campus community. Specifically, the availability of robust public transit facilities, including the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and other Metrorail Stations, in proximity to the campus and CUA residence locations represents an opportunity to leverage greater use of transit systems by commuters. Approximately 50 percent of the CUA population lives on or within three miles of the campus, which suggests both walking and bicycling are viable transportation options for a large segment of the campus community. The survey results suggest low bicycle use by on-campus residents, but the relatively high walking rates of on-campus residents (possibly suggesting on-campus bicyclists still consider walking to class as their primary mode choice). However, off-campus residents use bikes slightly more often than residents of the District of Columbia overall. Bicycles are an effective mode of transportation on most college campuses and increasing the use of bicycles on-campus and to offcampus destinations is an area of potential opportunity for the Master Plan. The campus mode choice data summarized in this section provides the basis for evaluation of the various transportation systems defined in the Master Plan. The mode choice data are also an effective benchmark for CUA to monitor progress in supporting alternative modes to single-occupant vehicles for commuting to the campus and for comparison to future plans for the campus.

Trip Generation
Trip generation estimates for commuters to the Campus were developed based on a variety of available data sources. To calculate trip generation for the Campus, the student and employee populations were converted into commuter populations based on several factors affecting trip generation for the campus. Relevant factors include mode choice, the proportion of on and off-campus residents, estimated daily attendance on the campus, and K factors for peak hour trip generation. These factors were applied to the campus population data to develop the trip generation estimates. Updated mode choice data obtained from the campus commuter survey indicated very low usage of single-occupant vehicles by on-campus residents and lower trip generation projections than estimates previously provided to DDOT during initial transportation study coordination. Table 5 summarizes the adjustment factors applied to the Campus population data.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

8

Transportation Modes and Demand

Table 5 Summary of CUA Commuter Population Estimates
Category Full-time Students Part-time Students Full-time Employees Part-time Employees On-campus Residents Existing: 2,227 undergrads Master Plan: 2,870 undergrads n/a n/a n/a Daily Attendance Estimate 95% 30% 99% 28% K Factor 14% AM, 13% PM 14% AM, 13% PM 14% AM, 13% PM 14% AM, 13% PM

Source: Catholic University 2010 on-campus student housing data, academic credit hour data, full-time and part-time staff equivalence data, and ITE temporal distribution data

The campus population adjustment factors are based on The Catholic University of America and Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) data. The University’s oncampus student housing currently houses 2,227 full-time students, which is equivalent to 62% of undergraduate enrollment. The Master Plan proposes that CUA will construct student housing for 70% of undergraduate enrollment, which will provide a total of 2,870 student beds. Daily attendance was estimated based on credit hour data for full-time vs. part-time on-campus students. Faculty and staff presence on the campus was derived from full-time equivalence data for all CUA employees. The peak hour K factors were derived from a comparison of daily vs. peak hour ITE trip generation data for colleges and universities. The adjusted population data provide an estimate of peak hour trip generation for the CUA student and employee population. A factor of 20 percent was applied to the total student and employee trip generation results to estimate visitor, service, delivery, and other trips on the Campus. Future conditions trip generation estimates are based on the existing conditions trip generation results, projected campus enrollment/employment levels, and proposed increases in student housing on the campus. The Master Plan projects the University will construct additional student housing with the goal of accommodating 70 percent of undergraduate students, which represents an increase of 643 student beds on the Campus over the master planning horizon. The Master Plan conditions trip rates were adjusted using the CUA residential mode share for single-occupant and carpool vehicles from the CUA commuter survey to reflect significantly lower use of automobiles by on-campus residents associated with increased levels of students living on the campus. Table 6 summarizes Master Plan peak hour trip generation estimates for the Master Plan.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

9

Transportation Modes and Demand

Table 6 Campus Trip Generation Summary
2011 Existing Conditions Time Period Movement Trip Rates b 62% undergrads housed oncampus Pedestrian Trips Weekday Moring Peak Hour
d

2027 Master Plan Conditions Trip Rates c 70% undergrads housed oncampus Gross Trip Generation 10,165 headcount Net New Trips

Gross Trip Generation 8,876 headcount a

Enter Exit Total Enter Exit Total

0.023 0.008 0.031 0.014 0.022 0.036

207 69 276 128 193 321

0.025 0.008 0.033 0.016 0.024 0.040

254 81 335 163 244 407

+47 +12 +59 +35 +51 +86

Weekday Evening Peak Hour d

Bicyclist Trips Weekday Moring Peak Hour
d

Enter Exit Total Enter Exit Total

0.002 0.001 0.003 0.001 0.002 0.003

17 6 23 11 16 27

0.002 0.001 0.003 0.001 0.002 0.003

20 10 30 11 20 31

+3 +4 +7 0 +4 +4

Weekday Evening Peak Hour
d

Transit Passenger Trips Weekday Moring Peak Hour
d

Enter Exit Total Enter Exit Total

0.037 0.012 0.049 0.023 0.034 0.057

327 109 436 203 304 507

0.037 0.012 0.049 0.023 0.034 0.057

376 122 498 234 346 580

+49 +13 +62 +31 +42 +73

Weekday Evening Peak Hour d

Vehicle Trips Weekday Moring Peak Hour
d

Enter Exit Total Enter Exit Total

0.048 0.016 0.064 0.030 0.044 0.074

422 140 562 262 392 654

0.045 0.015 0.060 0.028 0.042 0.070

457 152 609 285 427 712

+35 +12 +47 +23 +35 +58

Weekday Evening Peak Hour
Source: a b c d
d

Estimates based on CUA enrollment, mode choice, and parking utilization data. headcount includes students, faculty, and staff trips per person (based on CUA headcount) trips per person (based on existing trip rates adjusted to reflect increase of on-campus student housing) pedestrians, bicyclists, passengers, or vehicles per hour

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

10

Transportation Modes and Demand

As shown in Table 6, the Campus is projected to generate new peak hour pedestrian, bicycle, transit and automobile trips during the weekday morning and weekday evening peak hours. The trip generation analysis indicates that construction of significant additional on-campus student housing will result in the most significant trip increases among pedestrian and transit trips. CUA-related automobile trip generation is projected to increase by 47 and 58 trips during the weekday morning and evening peak hours, respectively. To maintain a conservative basis for traffic impact analysis, it should be noted that the trip generation estimates do not account for additional vehicular trip reductions associated with other transportation demand management (TDM) strategies included in the Master Plan, including pedestrian/bicycle facility upgrades, transit system improvements, and parking management strategies. Further discussion of the mode choice effects associated with various TDM measures on the Campus is included in a subsequent chapter of the transportation study.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

11

Transportation Modes and Demand

Pedestrian Facilities

3

As outlined in the commuter survey results, walking is the most convenient and prevalent method of transportation for the campus community within the confines of the Campus. The 2012 Master Plan seeks to support superior pedestrian facilities and connectivity within the campus and nearby areas.

Existing Conditions
The following sections discuss the existing pedestrian facilities on and in proximity to the Campus.

 On-campus Pedestrian Facilities
The Campus is served by an extensive network of sidewalks and pathways connecting the various buildings, quads, and parking facilities with one another and the public sidewalk network surrounding the campus. Sidewalks are provided along most campus roadways. The campus pathway network and the locations of building entrances throughout the campus are depicted in Figure 5. In general, the existing CUA pedestrian walkways and circulation paths create a confusing system lacking hierarchy and organization. The existing pathway and sidewalk network is characterized by a variety of paving materials and pathway widths. Pathway widths vary based on the age and anticipated level of usage at the time of construction. Many pathways between campus activity centers have not been upgraded as regions of the campus were redeveloped. Several primary pathways on the campus provide very comfortable accommodations for pedestrians, including near the Pryzbyla Center, Regan Hall, and Opus Hall, but consistently comfortable pedestrian connections between these facilities and other regions of the campus are lacking. Figure 5 also identifies areas with significant observed pedestrian activity and conflicts with vehicular traffic.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

12

Pedestrian Facilities

es Bat

d Roa

NE

Taylor Street NE

ii wa Ha u en Av eN E
John F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

North Capitol Street

d Road Harewoo

NE

Brookland-CUA

Mic

a hig

u ven nA

eN

E

Monroe Street NE on 7th Street NE 8th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

Campus Pathways High Activity/Conflict Areas
*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

Building Entrances

Figure 5 Existing Campus Pathway Network The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

Primary campus pathways near Regan Hall and the Pryzbyla Center Crosswalk treatments are provided at numerous intersections throughout the campus. Some intersections are characterized by very lengthy and overly complicated crossing treatments. Most crosswalks on the campus do not meet the recommended DDOT standards for width and design. Typical crosswalk markings on the campus are six feet wide consist of parallel transverse bars with or without diagonal striping. Wheelchair ramps are provided at most on-campus intersection crossings.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

13

Pedestrian Facilities

Complicated intersection and crosswalks at the high-activity CUA driveway connection from John McCormack Road to the Mullen Library

Typical Campus crosswalk markings The topographic character of the Campus presents challenges for some pedestrians, particularly over long distances. While the elevation of the academic core and residential precincts in the southern and eastern part of the Main Campus is relatively level, the campus gains approximately 60 feet of elevation across a distance of ½ mile between the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and the northwest corner of the Main Campus. The highest elevations on the campus are near O’Boyle and Marist Halls on the Upper Main Campus.

 Off-campus Pedestrian Facilities
A significant number of students and employees live in the Brookland neighborhood to the east of the Campus and other neighborhoods near campus. Additionally, there

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

14

Pedestrian Facilities

are a variety of other destinations that generate pedestrian activity from the campus community. The most significant potential pedestrian generators in proximity to the Campus include the following:             Private residences in the Brookland neighborhood The Cloisters Apartments (100 Michigan Ave) Brookland Ridge Apartments (400 Taylor Street) Commercial properties on the 12th Street corridor (including CVS, U.S. Post Office, Brookland Hardware, and several restaurants) Colonel Brooks’ Tavern (901 Monroe Street) Trinity Square Shopping Center Washington Hospital Center Dominican House of Studies (487 Michigan Avenue) Theological College (401 Michigan Avenue) Trinity Washington University (125 Michigan Avenue) St. Anthony of Padua Church (1029 Monroe Street) Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land (1400 Quincy Street)

Sidewalks and multi-use pathways are provided along the edges of the campus bordering the public roadway system. Figure 6 summarizes the presence and typical width of sidewalks and planting strips along primary roadways supporting pedestrian access to the campus. Figure 6 also identifies the location of significant off-campus pedestrian generators and destinations. The DDOT Pedestrian Master Plan includes goals and standards for sidewalk improvements throughout the District of Columbia. DDOT’s long-term goal is to fill gaps in the existing sidewalk system and provide sidewalks on both sides of all streets in the city. Since the publication of the Pedestrian Master Plan in 2009, DDOT has constructed new sidewalks or trails along Harewood Avenue and John McCormack Road. The DDOT standard for sidewalks is a minimum 6-foot wide sidewalk and a minimum 4-foot wide planting strip (6 feet preferred) in residential areas. The standard requires a minimum 8-foot wide sidewalk on Principal and Secondary Arterials and a 10-foot sidewalk in commercial areas. Sidewalks in the pedestrian facilities study area were evaluated for conformance with DDOT standards. Table 7 summarizes specific sidewalk limitations on roadways surrounding or providing direct access to the campus.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

15

Pedestrian Facilities

\\mdssdata\projects\38067 CUA Master Plan\graphics\figures\CUA-MP-Campus.dwg

Legend:
Sidewalk Presence and Width
So ut h Da

nA ve

.

M

ich

iga

North Capitol Street
Haw aii A ve n

No Sidewalk
ko ta Av en

Less than 6 feet
ue

6-8 feet 8-10 feet Greater than10 feet

12th Street

ue

2
Taylor Street

Planting Strip Presence and Width 4 feet or greater Less than 4 feet

10th Stre et

John

reet ol St apit th C Nor

McC orma ck Ro

10

Pedestrian Generators 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 The Cloisters Brookland Ridge Colonel Brooks’ Tavern Trinity Square Washington Hospital Center Dominican House of Studies Theological College Trinity Washington University St. Anthony of Padua Church Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land Brookland Neighborhood

Road Harewood

ad
10th Street

Monroe Street

Irving Street

Mi

c

an hig

e. Av

14th Street

3 6
7th Street

9

13th Street

12th Street

4
4th Street

7

5
Mi

1 8

11

ch

iga

n

Avenue

Franklin Street

Figure 6 Off-campus Pedestrian Facilities and Generators The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

Table 7 Public Sidewalk Constraints
Roadway Road Class Michigan Avenue, east of Monroe Street Michigan Avenue, west of Monroe Street John McCormack Road Harewood Road Taylor Street Hawaii Avenue Monroe Street 7th Street 4th Street
Note:

Side of Road North South North South East West East West North South East West North South East West East West

Typical Planting Strip Width Existing No strip No strip 2.5 3 No strip 3 3 No strip 4 No strip No strip 3 3.5 3.5 5 3 5 4 DC Standard 6 6 6 6 4 4 6 6 4 4 6 6 4 4 6 6 4 4

Typical Sidewalk Width Existing 5 5.5 6 6 10 6 6 6 6 5.5 No sidewalk 6 5.5 5.5 6 5 6 6 DC Standard 8 8 8 8 6 6 8 8 8 8 6 6 8 8 6 6 8 8

Secondary Arterial Secondary Arterial Collector Secondary Arterial Secondary Arterial Collector Secondary Arterial Collector Secondary Arterial

All measurement values are approximate, in feet.

 Existing Pedestrian Activity and Distribution
Pedestrian volume data were collected at several intersections surrounding the Campus during the weekday morning (7:00-9:00 AM) and weekday evening (4:006:00 PM) periods. The pedestrian volume counts indicate that the most active crossing bordering the Campus is at the driveway on John McCormack Road opposite the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station. The number of crossings on streets bordering the campus provides an approximate indication of the distribution of pedestrians walking to and from the campus. Based on the pedestrian volume data, Table 8 summarizes the general distribution for pedestrians traveling to and from the Campus.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

16

Pedestrian Facilities

Table 8 Campus Pedestrian Directional Distribution
Direction (to/from) South of Michigan Avenue North of Taylor Street East of John McCormack Road East to Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station West of Harewood Road Total Peak Hour Pedestrian Crossings 149 139 33 678 86 Distribution 13.7% 12.8% 3.0% 62.5% 7.9%

 Pedestrian Safety Assessment
No pedestrian crashes on the Campus have been reported to the CUA Department of Public Safety officials in recent years. However, a combination of prominent pedestrian desire lines and vehicle traffic on internal roadways in the core of the campus creates conflicts between people and vehicles. Pedestrian-vehicle conflicts were observed in several areas on the campus and identified in interviews with member of the campus community. Figure 7 summarizes the location of existing pedestrian safety features at intersections bordering the Campus. Pedestrian crash data were provided by DDOT for roadways surrounding the campus, including Michigan Avenue, Monroe Street, John McCormack Road , Harewood Road, Taylor Street, and Hawaii Avenue, for the three-year time period from 2008-2010. During the study period, pedestrian crashes were reported at one intersection in the study area. Table 9 summarizes the pedestrian crash data at the Monroe Street/7th Street intersection.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

17

Pedestrian Facilities

\\mdssdata\projects\38067 CUA Master Plan\graphics\figures\CUA-MP-Campus.dwg

B

John

ii wa Ha en Av ue

Legend:
S

orm McC Road ack

Signalized Intersection Handicap Ramp Pedestrian Directional Countdown Signal

A

S

Taylor Street

S

Taylor Street

High Visibility Crosswalk Standard Crosswalk

D
d Road Harewoo

John

A

B

orm McC Road ack

C
C
d Road Harewoo

E
D

Cormack John Mc Road

E F

F
Cormack John Mc Road

G

od Harewo Road

Mic

u ven nA iga h

e

S S

G

S
nu Ave e
7th Street

Mic

an hig

S
Monroe Street

S

Figure 7 Existing Pedestrian Safety Features The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

Table 9 Pedestrian Crash Summary (2008 - 2010)
Monroe Street at 7th Street Year 2008 2009 2010 Total Crash Type Left Turn Hit Pedestrian Total Severity Fatal Crash Injury Crash Total Time of day Weekday, 6:00 AM to 9:00 AM Weekday, 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM Weekday, 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM Weekday, any other time Weekend Total
Source: District Department of Transportation

3 1 0 4 4 4 0 4 4 0 2 2 0 0 4

The pedestrian crash data indicate that four pedestrian crashes involving left-turning vehicles occurred at the Monroe Street/7th Street intersection during the study period. All four crashes resulted in injury, which is typical for reported pedestrian crashes. It should be noted that pedestrian facility improvements at the Monroe Street/7th Street intersection are proposed as part of the South Campus redevelopment project.

Master Plan Conditions
 Master Plan Pedestrian Facilities
The Master Plan proposes to establish a hierarchy for pathways connecting various parts of the campus and implement standards for pathway construction and rehabilitation. The University intends for primary pathways to be located in areas where the most significant pedestrian and bicycle activity is expected, while secondary and tertiary pathways will connect lower activity destinations and provide local access, respectively. The Master Plan pathway network, including proposed hierarchy and building entrance locations, is depicted in Figure 8. The pathway network plan depicts the proposed campus pathway network connecting the different regions of the campus and connections to the public

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

18

Pedestrian Facilities

es Bat

d Roa

NE

Taylor Street NE

ii wa Ha u en Av eN E
John F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

North Capitol St.

Harewoo

E d Road N

Brookland-CUA

Mic

a hig

u ven nA

eN

E

Monroe Street NE 7th Street NE 8th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

Primary

Secodary and Tertiary

High Visibility Crosswalk

Existing Building Entrances

New Building Entrances

Figure 8 Proposed Master Plan Pathway Network The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

sidewalk network surrounding the campus. The pathway network is intended to provide convenient and logical access between buildings and lead to building entrances. A new multi-use pathway connection between the Main Campus and the DuFour Athletic Center will be provided via a proposed bridge over Taylor Street. The bridge will take advantage of the topographical features of the campus to connect from a high point on the Main Campus to an expansion of the athletics building. The Master Plan establishes a minimum 6-foot width for on-campus pathways and sidewalks. Pathway widths will be set based on the facility type within the Master Plan’s pathway hierarchy. Table 10 summarizes the minimum pathway widths. The Master Plan recommends that clearance along pathway adhere to the guidelines provided in the American Association and State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Guide for the Planning, Design, and Operation of Pedestrian facilities, and that multi-use paths follow the AASHTO Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities.

Table 10 Proposed Pathway Width Standards
Pathway Type Multi-use Corridor Primary Pathway Secondary Pathway Tertiary Pathway Pathway Width Range 16-20 feet 14-16 feet 8-12 feet 6 feet minimum

The Master Plan addresses pedestrian-vehicle conflicts in several locations on the campus by limiting vehicular access to some internal campus roadways that travel through areas with high pedestrian activity. These roadways will limit vehicle access to transit and service vehicles and will function as pedestrian and bicycle corridors. The vehicle restrictions will significantly reduce pedestrian-vehicle conflicts at the following high pedestrian activity corridors:    Along the east-West Campus roadway connecting the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station with the Architecture School and Mullen Library Along the mostly north-south internal roadways connecting the academic core and Pryzbyla Center with the residential precinct to the north Along the north-south campus roadway in front of Hartke Theater, Leahy Hall, and Caldwell Hall.

The University will also install new high-visibility crosswalk markings, raised crosswalks, and pedestrian warning signage conforming to DDOT standards at campus intersections and key crossing locations. Figure 8 summarizes the locations for proposed crosswalk treatments.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

19

Pedestrian Facilities

High visibility crosswalk marking standard The proposed pathway network includes widened sidewalks and improved landscape buffers along the Michigan Avenue, Harewood Road, John McCormack Road, and Taylor Street campus edges. The existing Michigan Avenue sidewalk in particular offers an uncomfortable pedestrian experience in areas where the sidewalk is significantly constrained by retaining walls. The sidewalk along the campus edge on Michigan Avenue will be widened to 8 feet with a 4-foot minimum planting strip. The sidewalks along the campus edges on Harewood Road, John McCormack Road, and Taylor Street will be upgraded to 6-feet wide with a 6-foot minimum planting strip. John McCormack Road at CUA East driveway This unsignalized intersection is the site of the most significant pedestrian crossing activity surrounding the campus. The intersection includes a marked crosswalk and on-street pedestrian warning signage on John McCormack Road at the Campus driveway and the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station. John McCormack Road is restricted to one-way northbound travel for vehicles just south of the intersection, which reduces the potential for conflicts between pedestrians and southbound traffic at the intersection. CUA security personnel cited vehicle speeding and the absence of speed limit signage on northbound John McCormack Road as issues at the crossing.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

20

Pedestrian Facilities

John McCormack Road at the CUA driveway/Metrorail Station entrance, including a highvisibility crosswalk, curbside and in-street pedestrian warning signage, and one-way travel restrictions south of the crosswalk. The Master Plan proposes to eliminate automobile access to the CUA driveway, except for transit and service vehicles, thereby converting the driveway into a primarily pedestrian and bicycle corridor. Additional pedestrian safety signage and pavement markings on John McCormack Road approaching the intersection may help to reduce the potential for pedestrian crashes in this pedestrian-vehicle conflict area. The Master Plan proposes that the University will implement additional pedestrian safety measures at this intersection, subject to DDOT review. Potential treatments recommended in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and DDOT Pedestrian Master Plan include:      Speed limit signage on northbound John McCormack Road, just north of Michigan Avenue Stop Here for Pedestrians signage and advance stop bars on the pavement Flashing beacon arrays to supplement pedestrian warning signage DDOT Rapid Flashing Beacon crossing equipment Raised crosswalk on John McCormack Road to improve crosswalk visibility and reduce vehicle speeds at the crossing

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

21

Pedestrian Facilities

MUTCD R1-5 pedestrian signage, flashing beacon array, and DDOT Rapid Flashing Beacon

 Other Pedestrian Plans and Opportunities
The approved South Campus redevelopment project by Abdo Development, LLC will change the character of the land use and pedestrian activity along Michigan Avenue, Monroe Street and 7th Street. The mixed-use housing and commercial development project will improve the streetscape and involve the construction of wider sidewalks along these roadways as well as an arts walk between Monroe Street and the Brookland CUA Metrorail Station. Crossings at several intersections, including Michigan Avenue /Monroe Street, Monroe Street /7th Street, Monroe Street/8th Street will be redesigned with 20-foot wide stamped-concrete crosswalks. The South Campus redevelopment project is currently under construction. The 2008 Brookland Small Area Plan includes pedestrian facility improvement recommendations in proximity to the University. Pedestrian facility recommendations in the Brookland Small Area plan include the following:     Pedestrian countdown signals should be provided at all signalized pedestrian crossings in the study area Accessible wheelchair ramps should be provided at all curbs facing crosswalks in the study area Sidewalks along both sides of Michigan Avenue, Monroe Street, and 12th Street should be widened Crosswalk enhancements, such as high-visibility markings, should be installed at several intersections in the study area, including Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street, Michigan Avenue at 7th Street, and Michigan Avenue at 10th Street, Monroe Street at 9th Street, and Monroe Street at 10th Street A raised crossing (speed table) should be constructed at the Monroe Street/9th Street intersection Medians should be constructed on both Michigan Avenue and Monroe Street

 

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

22

Pedestrian Facilities

 

Curb extensions should be constructed at several intersections in the study area, including Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street and Monroe Street at 10th Street Advanced stop bars should be installed at several intersections in the study area, including Monroe Street at 7th Street and Monroe Street at 10th Street Roadway lighting should be improved along both Michigan Avenue and Monroe Street

CUA supports DDOT’s plans and efforts to upgrade pedestrian facilities and improve pedestrian safety features on public roadways in proximity to the campus. Vehicle collisions with pedestrians typically result in severe consequences for pedestrians. Treatments to improve visibility or awareness of pedestrian activity and reduce vehicle speeds are recommended to minimize pedestrian-vehicle conflicts and improve crash outcomes. Several locations in proximity to the Campus offer opportunities for pedestrian facility improvements. Michigan Avenue at 7th Street /CUA South Driveway The South Campus redevelopment project will modify this intersection to align 7th Street and the CUA driveway approaches, which are currently askew. The intersection realignment will shorten the crossing distance across Michigan Avenue, which will reduce pedestrian exposure in the roadway. The South Campus project will also significantly widen sidewalks on the south side of Michigan Avenue. The proposed development includes two crosswalks on Michigan Avenue and one crosswalk on the south leg of 7th Street, all with pedestrian countdown signals and ADA-compliant wheelchair ramps. Pedestrian countdown signals are also planned for the CUA driveway without a crosswalk or an ADA-compliant ramp on the eastern side. DDOT should consider installing or implementing the following additional pedestrian safety enhancements at this location:    A crosswalk and countdown pedestrian signals on the CUA driveway approach High-visibility crosswalks at all pedestrian crossings Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

23

Pedestrian Facilities

Vehicles traverse the skewed alignment of 7th Street (right) and the CUA South driveway (left), where pedestrian signals and a crosswalk is absent Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street The South Campus redevelopment project will modify this intersection to realign the Monroe Street approach, which will normalize the currently channelized intersection into a standard T-intersection. The Monroe Street realignment will allow for the installation of a crosswalk across Monroe Street at a logical location for pedestrian desires lines on Michigan Avenue. The intersection improvements, which include crosswalks, ADA-compliant wheelchair ramps and pedestrian countdown signals on Monroe Street and the east leg of Michigan Avenue, will reduce turning vehicle speeds and minimize pedestrian crossing distances. DDOT should consider installing or implementing the following additional pedestrian safety enhancements at this location:   High-visibility crosswalks at all pedestrian crossings Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing

Monroe Street at 7th Street This intersection was the site of four pedestrian crashes related to left-turning vehicles over a three-year study period. The intersection currently provides countdown signals and crosswalks on all approaches. The South Campus redevelopment project will install widened stamped-concrete crosswalks on all legs of this intersection. DDOT should also consider implementing Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing at this location to improve pedestrian visibility and safety.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

24

Pedestrian Facilities

Michigan Avenue at 4th Street /Shrine entrance This intersection currently provides standard crosswalk markings on both approaches of Michigan Avenue and on 4th Street. Countdown pedestrian signals are provided on all approaches, including the Shrine entrance. Wheelchair ramps are not provided on the north side of Michigan Avenue. DDOT should consider installing or implementing the following pedestrian safety enhancements at this location:    High-visibility crosswalks at all pedestrian crossings ADA-compliant wheelchair ramps at the northern end of the crosswalks on Michigan Avenue Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing

Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road /4th Street This intersection currently provides crosswalks and wheelchair ramps on all approaches. Countdown signals are present at all crosswalks, except at the crossing on the southbound channelized right-turn lane on Harewood Road. DDOT should consider installing or implementing the following pedestrian safety enhancements at this location:     A crosswalk on the Harewood Road right-turn lanes High-visibility crosswalks at all pedestrian crossings Countdown signals for the north leg crossing Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing

Taylor Street at Hawaii Avenue This T-intersection currently provides high-visibility crosswalks on the west leg of Taylor Street and on Hawaii Avenue, but no crosswalk on the east leg of Taylor Street. Countdown signals are provided on all approaches, including the east leg, despite the absence of a crosswalk or wheelchair ramps. DDOT should consider implementing the following pedestrian safety enhancements at this location:   High-visibility crosswalk and ADA-compliant wheelchair ramps on the east leg Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing

Harewood Road at Taylor Street This intersection currently provides high-visibility crosswalks (longitudinal bars) and countdown signals on Harewood Road and the east leg of Taylor Street. Countdown signals are provided at all crosswalks. DDOT should consider implementing the following pedestrian safety enhancements at this location:  High-visibility crosswalk, ADA-compliant wheelchair ramps, and countdown signals on the west leg

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

25

Pedestrian Facilities

Lead Pedestrian Interval (LPI) signal phasing

Harewood Road at Basilica Overflow Lot/Shrine West Driveway The driveway providing access to the front of Shrine of the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception is a well used route for pedestrians walking to and from the Basilica Overflow lot, west of Harewood Road. There are no pedestrian crossing accommodations or safety features provided at this location.

Pedestrians regularly cross Harewood Road at the Shrine west driveway DDOT should consider implementing the following pedestrian safety enhancements at this location:    High-visibility crosswalk on Harewood Road Pedestrian warning signage on Harewood Road approaching the crosswalk Curb-extensions on Harewood Road at the Shrine and Basilica Overflow lot driveways

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

26

Pedestrian Facilities

Bicycle Facilities

4

Bicycling is an important component of The Catholic University of America’s overall transportation system. On-campus residents regularly use bicycles to travel to class or other destinations on the campus. Commuter survey data indicate approximately three percent of the off-campus population use bicycles to commute to the campus. Overall results from the campus survey indicate that the bicycling mode offers the opportunity for future growth amongst the campus community.

Existing Conditions
The following sections discuss the existing bicycle facilities on and in proximity to the Campus.

 On-campus Bicycle Facilities
Access to the campus from surrounding bicycle facilities is available at the campus gateways on Michigan Avenue, John McCormack Road, and Harewood Road. Oncampus bicycle facilities generally consist of the campus pathway and roadway networks. Some on-campus pathways are designed to comfortably accommodate pedestrian and bicycle activity simultaneously, primarily in proximity to the Pryzbyla Center; however, bicyclists share narrow pathways with pedestrians throughout the campus. The Campus currently provides 393 bicycle parking spaces throughout the campus in a variety of bicycle rack types. Covered bicycle parking for 20 bicycles is provided in the University Garage, within convenient access to the Law School and Pryzbyla Center. A number of campus buildings, particularly residential halls, provide convenient bike racks that are easily accessible to building entrances. Bicycle parking on the campus was assessed in October 2011. Figure 9 summarizes public bicycle facilities surrounding the campus and bicycle access locations and

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

27

Bicycle Facilities

B

oa sR ate

dN

E

12

ii wa Ha u en Av eN
Taylor Street NE

E

50 24 7
John

9 10

12 12 12 14 12 12 12 12
North Capitol Street

F Mc Corm

12 12

ack R d., N E

11

20

12

15
E d Road N Harewoo

15

15

13 20
Mic

16
u ven nA iga h eN E

34
Brookland-CUA

12

Monroe Street NE 8th Street NE 7th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross Existing Bike Racks Existing Bike Racks Covered Bike Racks Proposed Bike Racks Metroplitan Branch Trail MetropolitanBranch Trail Signed Bike Route Signed Bike Route Principal CUA Bike Proposed Campus Bike Lane Proposed Campus Bike Lane Gateway Future Trails Future Trails Fair Condition Biking Fair Condition Biking Dedicated Bike Lane Dedicated Bike Lane Capital Bikeshare Existing Station Station Potential Station Potential Station

Figure 9 Existing Station Proposed Campus Bike Lane Existing Campus Bicycle Facilities
Future Trails

Potential Station

Metropolitan Branch Trail Signed Bike Route

Bicycle Parking Biking Fair Condition Spaces

Dedicated Bike Lane

The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

bicycle parking spaces on the campus. Table 11 provides a summary of the bicycle parking demand in several areas of the campus.

Table 11 Bicycle Parking Supply and Demand Summary
Bicycle Rack Location Upper Main Campus Residential Quads (Opus, Millennium, Kane) Centennial Village Lower Main Campus Pryzbyla, Hannan, and Law School Architecture, Nursing, O’Connell, and Gibbons Leahy Hall and Ward Hall University Garage (covered) North Campus (DuFour Center ) Total 53 83 29 20 12 393 13 17 7 8 2 63 100 96 8 8 Bike Parking Supply Bike Parking Demand

Bike rack designs on the campus range from individual racks that support bicycles well and allow users to lock the wheel and frame (typically provided at newer buildings) to outmoded front-loading racks that often allow bicycles to fall over and limit the ability to lock a bicycle’s frame. The following photos depict the range of bicycle rack types provided on the Campus.

Individual triangle bicycle racks outside of the residential Opus Hall

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

28

Bicycle Facilities

Front-loading bicycle racks near the residential Millennium North Hall

U-type bike racks near the Pryzbyla Center On-campus roadways provide for bicycle access and circulation, but the circuitous roadway network limits connectivity between critical destinations. Intersections and on-street parking contribute to bicycle-vehicle conflict potential throughout the campus. Conflicts on relatively active roadway corridors, such as the campus driveway connecting John McCormack Road at the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station to the Mullen Library, induce some bicyclists to share narrow sidewalks with pedestrians. Additionally, some campus roadways and pathways are outfitted with features that are not conducive to bicycle travel and pose bicycle safety issues, including slotted drainage grates that are not compatible with bicycle tires.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

29

Bicycle Facilities

Drainage grate near Pryzbyla Center is incompatible with bicycle tires

 Off-campus Bicycle Facilities
The roadways and trail system surrounding the Campus provide local and regional access to the campus and offer a range of bicycle facilities, including multi-use paths and bicycle lanes. Several roadway corridors are signed bicycle routes while others provide no designated bicycle facilities. Bicycles are legally required to ride in the roadway and share space with traffic on these corridors. Figure 10 shows primary bicycle access corridors and existing bicycle facilities in proximity to the campus, from the DDOT Bicycle Map. Dedicated bicycle facilities that provide separation from traffic, such as multi-use trails and bicycle lanes, provide adequate space for bicycle mobility and reduce potential conflicts with vehicles. Several dedicated bicycle facilities are provided on or along public streets in proximity to the Campus. The north-south oriented Metropolitan Branch Trail, which generally follows the WMATA/CSX rail corridor, runs along John McCormack Road and Bates Road on the east and north edges of the campus. The Metropolitan Branch Trail is a 10-foot wide multi-use pathway that runs between Union Station in downtown Washington D.C. and Silver Spring, Maryland and provides access to several Metrorail Stations and communities. Bicycle lanes are provided on the following streets:    Monroe Street , between Michigan Avenue and 12th Street 12th Street between Michigan Avenue and Rhode Island Avenue 4th Street , between Lincoln Road and T Street

Table 12 provides a summary of the bicycle level-of-service listed in the DDOT Bicycle Master Plan and characteristics affecting bicycle operations and on several roadway corridors without bicycle lanes. Several of the roadways in proximity to the

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

30

Bicycle Facilities

NORTH not to scale

Vanasse Hangen Brustlin

Primary CUA Access Corridor Captial Bikeshare Locations Off-street Trails Off-street Trails (proposed) Bike Lanes and Sharrows

On-street Signed Routes Trail Access Points Limited Access Highways No Bike Riding on Sidewalk Zone

Figure 10 Off-Campus Bicycle Facilities The Catholic University of America Washington, D.C.

Campus have been designated by DDOT as signed bicycle routes, including Harewood Road, 4th Street, Irving Street, and Michigan Avenue (west of Monroe Street). The 2005 DDOT Bicycle Master Plan refers to Irving Street NW and Michigan Avenue NW as existing multi-use trails, but the 2011 DDOT Bicycle Map only refers to Irving Street NW as a signed bicycle route and shows no bicycle facilities on Michigan Avenue NW. Sidewalks provided on both roadways are too narrow to be considered multi-use trails.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

31

Bicycle Facilities

Table 12 Public Bicycle Corridors Summary
Roadway Michigan Avenue Extents Irving Street to John McCormack Road John McCormack Road to Varnum Street Varnum Street Irving Street /NW Michigan Avenue to Eastern Avenue Michigan Avenue to Hobart Place NW Hobart Place NW to 11th Street NW Kenyon Street NW Monroe Street Newton Street 4th Street 8th Street Harewood Road /NW Irving Street to 11th Street NW 12th Street to Eastern Avenue 12th Street to 28th Street Michigan Avenue to Franklin Street Monroe Street to Franklin Street Michigan Avenue to Taylor Street Taylor Street to North Capitol Street North Capitol Street to Rock Creek Church Road NW Rock Creek Church Road NW Webster Street NW Upshur Street NW Taylor Street Hawaii Avenue Fort Totten Drive Gallatin Street NW 3rd Street NW North Capitol Street to Upshur Street NW Rock Creek Church Road to 8th Street NW Rock Creek Church Road to 8th Street NW Harewood Road to Michigan Avenue Taylor Street to 2nd Street Hawaii Avenue to Gallatin Street Fort Totten Drive to 3rd Street NW Gallatin Street to Rittenhouse Street NW Travel Direction East-West East-West East-West East-West One-way east One-way west East-West East-West North-South North-South North-South East-West One-way east North-South Varies East-West East-West North-South North-South Varies North-South Signed Bike Route Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes No. of Lanes 5-6 4 2 6 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 4 2 2 1-2 2 2-4 2 2 1 2 Approx. Roadway Width 56’ 38’-46’ 28’ 78’ 28’ 30’-36’ 28’-32’ 28’ 48’ 36’ 40’ 44’ 22’ 32’-36’ 28’ 44’ 30’-38’ 38’ 28’-32’ 28’-30’ 30’-40’ On-street Parking None None Both sides None Both sides Both sides One side Both sides None Both sides Both sides None None Varies Both sides Both sides Varies Both sides One side Both sides Both sides 2005 Bicycle Level of Service D D-E n/a D E E D n/a D C C D E C-D A D D C D n/a C

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

32

Bicycle Facilities

A Capital Bikeshare station serving the Campus is located on John McCormack Road at the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station. Other Capital Bikeshare stations are located at the Monroe Street/10th Street and Newton Street/12th Street intersections. Campus survey data indicate that almost five percent of the campus community has used Capital Bikeshare and over two percent of the campus community use it at least once a month.

Capital Bikeshare station along Metropolitan Branch Trail at Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station

Bicycle lanes and Capital Bikeshare station on Monroe Street

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

33

Bicycle Facilities

 Off-campus Bicycle Operations
The trip generation evaluation indicates that the campus generates approximately 23 and 27 bicycle commuter trips during the weekday morning and evening peak hours, respectively. Bicycle trip distribution data for the campus were obtained from residence location data for cyclists included the Campus commuter survey. Table 13 summarizes the existing trip distribution for CUA bicycle commuters.

Table 13 Campus Bicycling Directional Distribution
Direction (to/from) North (Takoma, 16th Street NW corridor, Silver Spring, MD) South (Capitol Hill, Southeast D.C., Southwest D.C.) East (Brookland, Northeast D.C., Prince George’s County, MD) West (Columbia Heights, Northwest D.C) Distribution 20.7% 17.3% 31.0% 31.0%

The bicycle trip distribution suggests the greatest bicycle commuting activity is oriented to the east and west of the campus, toward areas such as Brookland and Columbia Heights. Locations to the north and south of campus are less active for bicycle commuting, but these areas are better connected to the Campus by dedicated bicycle facilities, including the Metropolitan Branch Trail. Michigan Avenue along the southern edge of the campus represents a barrier to bicycle activity because of the relatively high traffic volumes, limited sidewalk widths, and absence of dedicated bicycle facilities on the roadway. Bicyclists often ride on the sidewalk to avoid conflicts with traffic on Michigan Avenue.

Cyclist on Michigan Avenue riding on the sidewalk

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

34

Bicycle Facilities

Crash data provided by the District Department of Transportation for 2008-2010 indicates that bicycle-related crashes were recorded at two intersections in proximity to the campus. Table 14 summarizes the bicycle crash data.

Table 14 Bicyclist Crash Summary (2008 - 2010)
Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road Year 2008 2009 2010 Total Crash Type Left Turn Hit Bicyclist Right Angle with Bicyclist Other Bicyclist Total Severity Fatal Crash Injury Crash Total Time of day Weekday, 6:00 AM to 9:00 AM Weekday, 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM Weekday, any other time Weekend Total
Source: District Department of Transportation 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1

Taylor Street at Hawaii Avenue
0 1 1 2 1 1 0 2 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 2

Master Plan Conditions
 Master Plan Bicycle Facilities
The Master Plan includes physical measures designed to improve bicycle mobility and safety throughout the campus. The proposed campus bicycle facilities plan is included in Figure 11. The proposed pathway system hierarchy provides for widened pathways throughout the campus. The proposed minimum widths of multi-use, primary, and secondary pathways are 16 feet, 14 feet, and 8 feet respectively. The improved pathway system will enhance bicycle mobility between various regions of the campus and reduce conflicts between pedestrians and bicycles on pathways.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

35

Bicycle Facilities

B

s ate

a Ro

dN

E

ii wa Ha u en Av eN
Taylor Street NE

E
John F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

North Capitol St.

Harewoo

E d Road N

Mic

a hig

u ven nA

eN

E
Monroe Street NE 8th Street NE 7th Street NE

Brookland-CUA

Irving Stre

et NE

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

Existing Bike Racks Proposed Bike Racks Metropolitan Branch Trail Signed Bike Route

Fair Condition Biking Dedicated Bike Lane Future Trails Capital Bikeshare Capital Bikeshare St Station Potential Capital Bikeshare

Proposed Campus Bike Route Primary Campus Bike Facility Secondary Capital Bikeshare St Campus Bike Potential Capital Bikeshare Potential Capital Bikeshare

Figure 11 Proposed Master Plan Bicycle Facilities The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

A new bicycle route will be provided on a combination of roadways and multi-use paths constructed through a relatively level corridor in the center of campus. The bicycle route will connect the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station, Metropolitan Branch Trail, and Michigan Avenue entrance with key destinations on the Main Campus such as the Pryzbyla Center, new recreation facilities, the residential region of the campus, and the North Campus (DuFour Athletic Center). The proposed bicycle route will connect to the Metropolitan Branch Trail at both the south and north ends of the campus, near the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and the DuFour Athletic Center. The Master Plan significantly increases the number of bicycle parking locations on the campus. Bicycle racks will be provided in proximity to the entrances of academic, residential, and administrative buildings on the campus. Covered bicycle parking will be provided in new residential buildings and all parking garages, including the University Garage expansion, the garage in the proposed building next to O’Connell Hall, and at the DuFour Athletic Center. The campus bicycle rack standard is a freestanding triangular design, currently used at the residential Opus Hall. The triangle bicycle rack fulfills the DDOT standards for individual bicycle parking with that ability to lock the bicycle frame and support bicycle frames at multiple points.

Triangle bicycle racks The Master Plan calls for an increase in the overall amount of bicycle parking on the campus to significantly upgrade the availability and visibility of bicycle parking accommodations. The campus currently provides 393 bicycle parking spaces throughout the campus. The Master Plan’s standards include provision of at least one bike space for every five campus residents and an additional bike space for every 15 full-time students and employees. Table 15 summarizes the bicycle parking levels proposed in the Master Plan.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

36

Bicycle Facilities

Table 15 Proposed Bicycle Parking Summary
Standard One bicycle space per 5 residential beds One bicycle space per 15 full-time students One bicycle space per 15 full-time employees Total 2027 Master Plan Conditions 2,870 beds 5,660 students 1,490 employees Proposed Bicycle Spaces 574 spaces 377 spaces 99 spaces 1,050 spaces

Based on projected resident and employee levels, this policy will provide over 1,000 bicycle rack parking spaces, including 657 additional spaces, on the Campus by 2027. New residence halls will provide covered bicycle parking for a minimum of 10 percent of the students residing in the building. Similarly, parking garages will provide covered bicycle parking equal to a minimum of 10 percent of the vehicle parking spaces. Additional covered parking will be provided in major activity nodes, such as the Pryzbyla Center and proposed student center. The University will evaluate bicycle rack utilization to identify areas with the highest demand and install bicycle racks over time as part of other capital projects included in the Master Plan. The University proposes to provide sites for DDOT to install Capital Bikeshare stations within the campus. Figure 11 identifies the proposed Capital Bikeshare station locations within the campus. The proposed Capital Bikeshare station sites include the heart of the Campus (near the Pryzbyla Center) and the DuFour Athletic Center. The University will also review existing on-campus pathways and roadways to identify and remove or replace features of the campus infrastructure that are not conducive to bicycle activity. Existing features, such as drainage grates with longitudinal bars, present potential safety issues for bicyclists.

 Other Bicycle Plans and Opportunities
DDOT has constructed numerous bicycle facilities meeting or exceeding the recommendations of the DDOT 2005 Bicycle Master Plan. The DDOT Bicycle Master Plan recommends several bicycle facility improvements that remain incomplete:  Incomplete segments of the Metropolitan Branch Trail, along the CSX/WMATA rail corridor from near Fort Totten to Takoma, will be constructed by DDOT The approved South Campus redevelopment project by Abdo Development, LLC will complete a new segment of the Metropolitan Branch Trail between Monroe Street and the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station, including a connection under the Michigan Avenue bridge that will provide a more direct crossing alternative for bicyclists

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

37

Bicycle Facilities

Bicycle lanes are proposed on 4th Street , between Michigan Avenue and Lincoln Road

The 2008 Brookland Small Area Plan includes bicycle facility improvement recommendations in proximity to the University. Bicycle facility recommendations in the Brookland Small Area plan include the following:  On-street bicycle lanes should be installed on Monroe Street , between Michigan Avenue and 12th Street (this recommendations has been completed) The Metropolitan Branch Trail adjacent to the CSX/WMATA railroad should be completed and bicycle trails should be constructed along Michigan Avenue and Irving Street On-street bicycle parking should be provided at several locations in the study area, including Monroe Street at Michigan Avenue , Monroe Street at 10th Street , McCormack Road adjacent to the Metro portal

The University supports DDOT’s plans to complete new and improved bicycle facilities providing access to the Campus. The bicycle trip distribution suggests the highest levels of bicycle activity are oriented to the east and west of the campus. Based on the assessment of various roadway corridors providing bicycle access to the Campus, the following bicycle facility opportunities should be considered:   Widen sidewalks to construct a multi-use pathway on Irving Street NW and Michigan Avenue NW Install bicycle lanes on: o Irving Street NW, from 11th Street and Hobart Place NW o Kenyon Street, from Irving Street to 11th Street NW o Upshur Street NW, from 8th Street to Rock Creek Church Road NW Provide signed bicycle routes on Webster Street NW and Rock Creek Church Road NW Install new Capital Bikeshare stations near the Takoma and Fort Totten Metrorail Stations, and Washington Hospital Center

 

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

38

Bicycle Facilities

Transit Facilities

5

The Catholic University of America’s proximity to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station is a major asset for the University. As indicated by the commuter survey, over a third of the campus community regularly uses Metrorail and other transit modes to commute to the campus. New and expanded transit options will help the University to shift additional commuters onto transit systems.

Existing Conditions
The following sections discuss the existing transit facilities on and in proximity to the Campus.

 Public Transit Facilities
The Catholic University of America is served by WMATA Metrorail service and several Metrobus routes. The Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station is located at the southeast corner of the campus and is accessible by foot from John McCormack Road or by vehicle from Monroe Street. The Bookland-CUA Station is on the WMATA Red Line, which connects suburban Maryland with downtown D.C. and Union Station. A significant number of the students, faculty, and staff live in areas served by the Red Line, including Silver Spring and Wheaton in Maryland and areas such as Takoma, the Connecticut Avenue corridor, and upper Northwest in the District of Columbia. WMATA ridership records indicate average daily boardings of 6,576 passengers on Metrorail at the Brookland-CUA Station. The CUA side of the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station is equipped with an escalator, but does not have elevator service to and from the station. Disabled passengers requiring elevator access to the station must travel to the east side of the Metrorail Station, via Monroe Street.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

39

Transit Facilities

WMATA also operates several Metrobus routes in proximity to the Campus, with stops on Michigan Avenue, Taylor Street, and Monroe Street. All of the Metrobus routes serving the Campus also connect to the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station. Figure 12 identifies the location of the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and various Metrobus routes and stops located in proximity to the Campus. Table 16 summarizes the transit route extents, schedules, frequency, and average ridership from 2011 WMATA records.

Table 16 Metrobus Route Summary
Route Number 80 Service Area North Capitol Line (Kennedy Center to Fort Totten Metro) Rhode Island Ave Line (Farragut West to Avondale) Brookland to Potomac Park/State Dept Crosstown Line (Brookland to Tenleytown) Park Road-Brookland Line (Mt Pleasant to Rhode Island Ave Metro via Brookland) Queen Chapel Road Line (Brookland to PG Plaza) Schedule 4:30 AM - 2:10 AM Weekday Headways AM/PM Peak: 10 minutes Midday: 15 minutes AM/PM Peak: 10 minutes Midday: 30 minutes 20 minutes (runs peak hours only) AM/PM Peak: 8 minutes Midday: 15 minutes AM/PM Peak: 15 minutes Midday: 20 minutes Average Weekday Ridership 7,419

G8

4:55 AM - 1:40 AM

3,571

H1 H2, H3, H4

6:20 AM - 7:00 PM 4:30 AM - 2:00 AM

656 6,113

H8

5:05 AM - 3:25 AM

3,386

R4

5:25 AM - 11:05 PM

AM/PM Peak: 20 minutes Midday: 30 minutes

1,391

 CUA Transit Facilities
The Catholic University of America operates a campus shuttle for CUA students, faculty, staff, and visitors on weekdays. The CUA shuttle is divided into two routes, with separate functions. The Green CUA shuttle operates during the day and evening, with service between major campus destinations and off-campus apartment complexes. The Blue CUA shuttle only operates during the evening, running a route within the campus and mainly providing an alternative option for students or employees who desire transportation to dorms or parking at night. Figure 12 shows the Campus shuttle routes and stop locations. Table 17 summarizes the CUA shuttle route operations.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

40

Transit Facilities

Figure 12 Existing Transit Facilities The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Base mapping from Bing Maps

CUA Shuttle vehicle

Table 17 Campus Shuttle Operations Summary
Route Number Green Route General Service Area Mullen Library, Brookland Ridge Apartments, DuFour Athletic Center, BrooklandCUA Metrorail Station, the Cloisters Apartments Mullen Library, O’Boyle Hall, Law School, Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station Schedule 8:00 AM – 12:33 AM Service Headways 20-38 minutes

Blue Route

5:00 PM – 12:19 AM

21 minutes

CUA shuttle stops are located throughout the campus. Stops are identified by “CUA Bus Stop” signs with additional signage identify shuttle routes and schedules at each stop. Conditions at the shuttle stops vary widely from standard concrete passenger landings to ungraded curbside locations.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

41

Transit Facilities

CUA Shuttle stop without passenger landing CUA Shuttle ridership data collected by the University for October 2010 through March 2011 indicates an average monthly ridership of 2,112 passengers. This is equivalent to average daily ridership of approximately 100 passengers. Results from the campus commuter survey indicate that approximately four percent of the campus population uses the CUA shuttle on a weekly basis and an additional four percent use the system at least once a month.

Master Plan Conditions
The following section discusses future conditions for transit systems, including public facilities and plans associated with the Master Plan.

 Public Transit Facilities Improvements
The District Department of Transportation has released plans for future streetcar routes on a number of roadways in the District of Columbia. Streetcars were a major component of the District’s transportation system in the early 1900s, but the system was shut down by 1962 and most of the rails and stations were removed or repurposed. Planning and financing for the return of the first streetcar routes (Phase 1) in Washington D.C. are currently under development.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

42

Transit Facilities

DC Streetcar carriage on public display DDOT’s plans for Phase 3 of the D.C. Streetcar system include a streetcar route on Michigan Avenue, providing service between the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and other streetcar segments on Columbia Road NW and Georgia Avenue NW. The Michigan Avenue streetcar will serve as a new fixed rail link between the WMATA Red Line and Green/Yellow Lines. DDOT projects average 2030 weekday ridership of 1,336 passengers for the segment. Figure 13 shows the planned Phase 3 Michigan Avenue streetcar route.

 Master Plan Transit System Enhancements
The Master Plan proposes to maintain free CUA Shuttle service on the campus and to key off-campus destinations. The Master Plan proposes to reconfigure the CUA shuttle route to include additional off-campus destinations, and reduce headways to increase ridership on the system. To improve overall shuttle operations, both the Green and Blue routes will be reconfigured to efficiently serve both on-campus and off-campus destinations. Some on-campus stops will be eliminated or consolidated to improve the efficiency of the shuttle circulating through the campus. Figure 14 shows the proposed campus shuttle routes. Both the Green and Blue routes will be modified and extended to serve new oncampus and off-campus destinations. The Master Plan proposes to eliminate the existing loop route system for the CUA shuttle and replace it with two shuttle routes operating on routes with fixed destinations. The two routes will serve different parts of the campus, but both routes will serve the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station. The two proposed routes will intersect near the Mullen Library in the southeast corner of the campus, providing riders with the ability to transfer if desired. The proposed routes cover the Campus and key off-campus destinations, including:

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

43

Transit Facilities

Characteristics
Length: 2030 Ridership: Capital Cost:
(in millio 2009$) ns

2.73 Miles 3,600 $109.2

Source: District Department of Transportation Streetcar Program

Vanasse Hangen Brustlin

Figure 13 Planned Michigan Avenue Streetcar The Catholic University of America Washington, D.C.

Irving Street

Mi

chi

ga

ve. nA
13th Street 12th Street

Franklin Street

CUA Green Shuttle Route CUA Green Shuttle Route Extension CUA Blue Shuttle Route CUA Bus Stop

Figure 14 Proposed Master Plan Transit Routes

The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

M

ich

Monroe Street

iga

nA ve

.
10th Stre et

North Capitol Street
Haw aii A ve n

So

ut

h

Da

ko ta Av en

ue

12th Street

ue

Taylor Street

reet ol St apit th C Nor

John McC

Road Harewood
4th Street

orma ck Ro ad
7th Street

          

Both sides of the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station (to improve disabled access to the campus) CUA residential precinct Mullen Library Pryzbyla Center Academic core of campus DuFour Athletic Center West Campus parking lot South Campus/Arts Walk redevelopment site The Cloisters Apartments Brookland Ridge Apartments Washington Hospital Center (WHC) (extended route)

Service to the WHC may be provided by extended service on the Green route based on demand from the CUA Nursing Department, which partners with WHC for clinical instruction. Based on CUA’s assessment of passenger demand and the clinical scheduling, the Green route may only operate during certain times of day, or a dedicated alternative shuttle may be used for direct service to the WHC. Campus commuter survey data indicated that almost 50 percent of the respondents believe that increased transit service would be effective or very effective in supporting transportation mode shift from single occupant vehicles to alternative modes. The University proposes to increase the overall frequency of the shuttle operations, including full day service and 20 minute, or shorter, headways for both routes throughout the day. The University will also upgrade shuttle bus stops on the campus, to provide basic accessibility and adequate waiting areas for shuttle passengers. Stops will be reviewed and upgraded as part of other capital projects identified in the Master Plan. To better accommodate transit passengers, the University will upgrade substandard stops to meet the following minimum standards:    CUA shuttle stops will be accessible from a sidewalk, pathway, or wheelchair ramp CUA shuttle stops will provide a minimum 5x8 foot level pedestrian landing area with a maximum 2% cross-slope Covered shelters will be installed at CUA shuttle stops with sufficient open space

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

44

Transit Facilities

Traffic Network Evaluation

6

Measuring existing traffic volumes and projecting future traffic volumes quantifies traffic within the study area. To assess quality of flow, roadway capacity analyses were conducted with respect to existing conditions and projected No-Build and Build traffic volume conditions. Capacity analyses provide an indication of the adequacy of the roadway facilities to serve the anticipated traffic demands. Roadway operating conditions are classified by calculated levels of service.

Existing Conditions
The following section describes the existing conditions traffic operations on and near the Campus.

 Campus Access and Vehicle Circulation
Primary access to the Campus is provided at two entrances on Michigan Avenue, opposite 4th Street and 7th Street. The entrance at the Michigan Avenue/4th Street intersections also serves as the entrance to the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Secondary entrances to the Campus are provided on Harewood Road and John McCormack Road. John McCormack Road provides access to seven entries onto the campus, including entry to the University Garage; entrances to the Pangborn Hall, DuFour Center, and Opus Hall parking lots; a service entrance to the Power Plant and maintenance shops; and two entries to campus roads. Harewood Road provides access to three entries, including campus roadways to the north of the Shrine, north of Hartke Theater, and north of O’Boyle Hall. The campus is served by a network of internal roadways crossing the campus between public roadways. The campus roadway network provides direct access to parking facilities, most buildings, and service areas. The primary service and loading facility on the campus is located at the Pryzbyla Center, which is accessible from John

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

45

Traffic Network Evaluation

McCormack Road via a campus roadway. Figure 15 shows the existing campus roadway network and loading areas. The roadway network includes numerous redundant connections, some of which encompass buildings and allow vehicle access to areas dominated by pedestrian activity. The presence of multiple proximate entrances, connected by internal roadways, creates redundant entries and cut-through opportunities. The campus roadways on the southeastern region of the campus in particular have become a cutthrough for campus and local traffic between John McCormack Road and Michigan Avenue. Cut-through traffic on the campus increases vehicular-pedestrian conflicts in high-activity areas near the Mullen Library, Architecture School, and north of the Law School.

 Campus Loading and Service
Figure 15 also depicts the location of loading areas for service vehicles at buildings on the Campus. The most significant loading activity on the campus is centralized at the Pryzbyla Center, which is the only building with food service, in the center of the campus. The Pryzbyla Center loading area is accessible via a campus roadway connection to John McCormack Road. Information provided by CUA indicates the following delivery schedule for the Pryzbyla loading area during the August-May academic year:     Sysco: One semi-tractor trailer truck five days a week (Monday – Friday) Produce: One single-unit box truck six days a week (Monday – Saturday) Beverage: One single-unit beverage truck five days a week (Monday – Friday) Bakery: One single-unit box truck six days a week (Monday – Saturday)

The Post Office in McMahon Hall, which is most accessible via campus roadway connections to Michigan Avenue and John McCormack Road, receives at least one USPS box truck per day. A loading area serving Leahy Hall, which is directly accessible via Harewood Avenue, receives a few box trucks per day. Specific loading information for other loading areas on the campus is unavailable, but loading is characterized as sporadic and infrequent at most of the other loading areas on the campus.

 Public Roadways and Intersections
Regional vehicular access to the University campus occurs along North Capitol Street, Michigan Avenue, Monroe Street, Irving Street, and 4th Street. Direct vehicular access points to the campus are provided along Michigan Avenue to the south, Harewood Road to the west, and John McCormack Road to the east. The

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

46

Traffic Network Evaluation

B

s ate

a Ro

dN

E

DuFour Center

Taylor Street NE

ii wa Ha u en Av eN E
Aquinas Hall

John F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

Hartke Theatre Hannan Hall Leahy Hall Przybyla University Center

Colombus School of Law

Maintenance Shed McMahon Hall

North Capitol Street

Pangborn Hall Mullen Library

d Road Harewoo

NE

McCort-Ward Building

Brookland-CUA

Mic

u ven nA iga h

eN

E

Monroe Street NE 7th Street NE 8th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

Campus Roadways

Existing Loading/Building Service

Figure 15 Existing Campus Vehicle Circulation and Loading/Service The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

major roadways in proximity to the campus and intersections within the study area are described below. Figure 16 shows the observed intersection lane geometry and traffic control within the study area.

Roadways Michigan Avenue
Michigan Avenue is a four to six-lane undivided urban minor arterial roadway running in a generally east-west direction through Washington D.C. Michigan Avenue provides access to the campus from North Capitol Street, Washington D.C., and other regional highways connecting to Prince George’s County in suburban Maryland. Within the study area, the roadway is posted at a speed limit of 25 miles per hour (mph). According to the most recent DDOT daily traffic volume estimates, Michigan Avenue carries an average daily traffic volume of 36,700 vehicles per day (vpd) in proximity to the campus.

Harewood Road
Harewood Road is an undivided urban minor arterial roadway that borders the campus to the west and provides access to the campus via multiple driveways. Between Michigan Avenue and Taylor Street, directly adjacent to the campus, Harewood Road is a two-lane roadway running in a north-south direction. According to the most recent DDOT daily traffic volume estimates, this section of Harewood Road carries an average daily traffic volume of 6,400 vehicles per day (vpd).

John McCormack Road
John McCormack Road is a two-lane collector roadway running in a north-south direction between Michigan Avenue and Bates Road. John McCormack Road borders the campus to the east and provides access to the campus via multiple driveways. The roadway serves as the primary access roadway to the DuFour Athletic Center and surrounding athletics complex on the north side of campus. The section of John McCormack Road north of Taylor Road carries substantial volumes of heavy truck traffic, as it serves as the primary access to the Fort Totten Transfer Station.

Taylor Street
Taylor Street is a four-lane undivided urban minor arterial roadway running in an east-west direction. Taylor Street connects Harewood Road on the west side of the campus with Michigan Avenue to the east. According to the most recent DDOT daily traffic volume estimates, Taylor Street carries an average daily traffic volume of 9,900 vehicles per day (vpd) in proximity to the campus.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

47

Traffic Network Evaluation

Hawaii Avenue
Hawaii Avenue is a two-lane collector road that runs in a generally northwestsoutheast direction between Taylor Street and North Capitol Street. The roadway borders the west side of the CUA athletics complex, and provides access to the residential neighborhood to the northwest of campus. According to the most recent DDOT daily traffic volume estimates, Hawaii Avenue carries an average daily traffic volume of 8,600 vehicles per day (vpd) in proximity to the campus.

Monroe Street
Monroe Street is a two-lane urban minor arterial roadway running in an east-west direction. Monroe Street connects Michigan Avenue with the Brookland neighborhood and other Northeast Washington neighborhoods and suburban Prince George’s County, Maryland, to the east. According to the most recent DDOT daily traffic volume estimates, Monroe Street carries an average daily traffic volume of 14,900 vehicles per day (vpd) in proximity to the campus.

4th Street
4th Street is a four-lane undivided urban minor arterial that runs in a north-south direction. The roadway connects Rhode Island Avenue and Franklin Street to the south with Michigan Avenue and Harewood Road in the vicinity of the Campus. According to the most recent DDOT daily traffic volume estimates, 4th Street carries an average daily traffic volume of 12,300 vehicles per day (vpd) in proximity to the campus.

Traffic Volumes
Traffic volume data in the study area were collected in October and November 2011. As part of this effort, manual turning movement and classification (TMC) counts were conducted at the following intersections during peak traffic periods: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road/4th Street Michigan Avenue at 4th Street/Shrine entrance Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/CUA south driveway Michigan Avenue at John McCormack Road Harewood Road at Taylor Street Taylor Street at Hawaii Avenue Taylor Street at John McCormack Road (interchange) John McCormack Road at CUA east driveway

Based on a review of the count data, the weekday morning and evening peak hours of vehicular activity were determined to be from 7:45 AM to 8:45 AM and 5:00 PM to

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

48

Traffic Network Evaluation

6:00 PM, respectively; however, peak volume conditions for individual intersections were used for analysis purposes. Figures 17 and 18 summarize the existing conditions turning movement traffic volumes for the weekday morning and evening peak hours.

Trip Distribution
The vehicular trip distribution pattern for the Campus was developed based on student and employee zip code data provided by the University. The zip code data identifies the residence locations for all students enrolled and faculty/staff employed by the University. The residence data was evaluated using GIS software to pair origin and destination zones with major roadway corridor routes serving the Campus. Based on the analysis, the percentage distribution of traffic approaching and departing the campus was calculated. The Campus trip distribution is summarized in Figure 19 and Table 18.

Table 18 Summary of CUA Private Vehicle Trip Distribution
Origin/Destination North Capitol Street, to/from north North Capitol Street, to/from south Monroe Street, to/from east Taylor Street, to/from east Michigan Avenue, to/from east Michigan Avenue/Irving Street, to/from west 4th 7th Street, to/from south Street, to/from south Private Vehicle Trip Distribution 28.9% 29.1% 10.4% 2.3% 9.8% 13.4% 5.1% 1.0% 100.0%

Total

Existing Conditions Traffic Operations Analysis
The evaluation criteria used to analyze area intersections and roadways in this traffic evaluation are based on the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM).1 Level-of-service (LOS) is the term used to denote the different operating conditions that occur on a given roadway segment under various traffic volume loads. Level-of-service is a qualitative measure that considers a number of factors including roadway geometry, speed, travel delay and freedom to maneuver. Level-of-service provides an index to the operational qualities of a roadway segment or an intersection. Level-of-service designations range from A to F, with LOS A representing the best operating conditions and LOS F representing the worst operating conditions.

1 Transportation Research Board, Highway Capacity Manual, Washington, D.C., 2000

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

49

Traffic Network Evaluation

Figure 19 Directional Trip Distribution The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Base mapping from Bing Maps

The LOS designation is based on the delay for individual movements or approaches and is calculated and reported differently for signalized intersections and unsignalized intersections. For signalized intersections, the analysis considers the operation of all traffic entering the intersection and the LOS designation is for overall conditions at the intersection. For unsignalized intersections, the analysis assumes that traffic on the main road is not affected by traffic on the side streets. The LOS designation is for the critical movement exiting the side street, which is generally the left-turn out of the side street. Table 19 summarizes the LOS criteria for both intersection types.

Table 19 HCM Level-of-Service Criteria
Level of Service A B C D E F Average Control Delay for Signalized Intersections < 10.0 > 10.0 and < 20.0 > 20.0 and < 35.0 > 35.0 and < 55.0 > 55.0 and < 80.0 > 80.0 Average Control Delay for Unsignalized Intersections < 10.0 > 10.0 and < 15.0 > 15.0 and < 25.0 > 25.0 and < 35.0 > 35.0 and < 50.0 > 50.0

It should be noted that the analytical methodologies typically used for the analysis of unsignalized intersections entail conservative analysis parameters, such as long critical gaps. Drivers on minor streets generally accept shorter gaps in traffic than those used in the analysis procedures and therefore experience less delay than reported by the analysis software. The analysis methodologies also do not fully take into account the beneficial grouping effects provided by nearby signalized intersections. The net effect of these analysis procedures is the over-estimation of calculated delays at unsignalized intersections in the study area. Table 20 presents a summary of the existing conditions vehicle operations analysis at the signalized intersections. Table 21 summarizes the existing conditions vehicle operations at the unsignalized intersections.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

50

Traffic Network Evaluation

Table 20 Existing Condition Signalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary
Location/Period Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road/4th Street Weekday Morning Approach a NB SB EB WB Overall NB SB EB WB Overall NB SB EB WB Overall NB SB EB WB Overall NB EB WB Overall NB EB WB Overall EB WB Overall EB WB Overall NB SB EB WB Overall NB SB EB WB Overall 2011 Existing Condition Delay b LOS c 36.6 37.2 29.8 7.9 20.4 30.7 28.4 23.3 1.5 18.7 27.9 30.0 6.3 38.5 29.5 48.2 30.5 4.3 30.9 19.3 20.3 0.7 6.0 8.9 26.5 1.7 3.4 6.0 17.2 0.3 5.2 43.5 0.1 28.7 22.8 22.3 3.4 23.4 18.3 26.2 32.9 16.3 10.2 16.6 D D C A C C C C A B C C A D C D C A C B C A A A C A A A B A A A A C C C A C B C C B B B

Weekday Evening

Michigan Avenue at 4th Street/Shrine driveway Weekday Morning

Weekday Evening

Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street (east) Weekday Morning

Weekday Evening

Michigan Ave. at Monroe Street (channelized right) Weekday Morning Weekday Evening Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/CUA South driveway Weekday Morning

Weekday Evening

a b c

EB = eastbound, WB = westbound, NB = northbound, SB = southbound average delay in seconds per vehicle level of service

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

51

Traffic Network Evaluation

Table 20 (cont.) Existing Condition Signalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary
Location/Period Harewood Road at Taylor Street Weekday Morning Approach a NB SB EB WB Overall NB SB EB WB Overall SB EB WB Overall SB EB WB Overall 2011 Existing Condition Delay b LOS c 29.6 18.5 26.2 16.8 22.5 31.5 55.1 21.4 13.3 24.3 37.0 7.8 9.1 14.1 37.2 8.4 7.7 13.4 C B C B C C E C B C D A A B D A A B

Weekday Evening

Taylor Street at Hawaii Avenue Weekday Morning

Weekday Evening

a b c

EB = eastbound, WB = westbound, NB = northbound, SB = southbound average delay in seconds per vehicle level of service

Table 21 Existing Condition Unsignalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary
Location Michigan Avenue at John McCormack Road Taylor Street at John McCormack Road Period Weekday AM Weekday PM Weekday AM Weekday PM Lane a EB LT EB LT NB LTR SB LTR NB LTR SB LTR EB LR EB LR EB LR EB LR EB LR EB LR Delay b 10.5 17.5 16.7 15.2 11.6 9.6 11.6 9.6 9.5 12.2 3.4 2011 Existing LOS c Queue d B 29 C C C B A B A A B A 6 17 16 14 6 5 11 5 8 12

John McCormack Road at Taylor Street north ramp John McCormack Road at Taylor Street south ramp John McCormack Road at CUA east driveway
a b c d

Weekday AM Weekday PM Weekday AM Weekday PM Weekday AM Weekday PM

EB = eastbound, WB = westbound, NB = northbound, SB = southbound; L = left-turn, T = through, R = right-turn average delay, in seconds per vehicle level of service 95th percentile vehicle queue, in feet

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

52

Traffic Network Evaluation

Master Plan Conditions
The following sections describe the future conditions traffic operations evaluation, including the campus access, vehicle circulation, and impacts of vehicle trips associated with the Master Plan.

 Campus Access and Vehicular Circulation
The Master Plan proposes several improvements to the campus roadway network to enhance access for all transportation modes and simplify vehicle circulation. The Master Plan roadway plan will support the following priorities:    Establish a main entrance providing an identity for the campus Provide better balance between vehicular circulation and pedestrian/bicycle mobility and safety Minimize cut-through opportunities and redundant roadway connections that contribute to pedestrian-vehicle conflicts on campus roadways and along the campus edges Provide direct access to parking from public roadways at the campus periphery to reduce internal vehicle circulation Enhance pedestrian and bicycle mobility in campus core

 

Figure 20 shows the Master Plan vehicle access and circulation plan. The Master Plan proposes a new roadway connection (realigning Scale Gate Road) from North Capitol Street through the West Campus and intersecting with Harewood Road opposite the campus driveway north of the Basilica. The new roadway connection on West Campus will provide the University with a presence on North Capitol Street and access to temporary parking facilities proposed on the West Campus. The proposed roadway connection will provide direct access to the West Campus from North Capitol Street and reduce vehicle trips on local streets in proximity to the campus. The proposed intersection at Harewood Road will provide appropriate traffic control and high-visibility crossing treatments for pedestrians walking between the Main Campus and West Campus. The proposed campus roadway network will reduce overall vehicular circulation within the campus by eliminating several existing roadways and restricting access at key locations to only transit, service, and emergency response vehicles. By limiting access to these roadways using gates or barriers, CUA will improve mobility and safety for pedestrians and bicyclists and eliminate access for unauthorized vehicles. In particular, the campus roadway connection from John McCormack Road to the Library building is a high volume pedestrian corridor for passengers to and from the CUA-Brookland Metrorail Station. Access to this roadway segment for general traffic will be restricted and the intersection of the Michigan Avenue entrance (from 7th Street) with campus roadways behind the Library will be redesigned as a

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

53

Traffic Network Evaluation

B

oa sR ate

dN

E

DuFour Center

ii wa Ha u en Av
Taylor Street NE

eN E
Aquinas Hall

John F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

Hartke Theatre Hannan Hall Przybyla University Center

Colombus School of Law

North Capitol Street

Pangborn Hall McMahon Hall Mullen Library Building McCort-Ward

d Road Harewoo

NE

Brookland-CUA

Mic

a hig

u ven nA

eN

E

Monroe Street NE 7th Street NE 8th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

Existing Loading/Building Service Proposed Loading/Building Service

Public Access Roads Limited-Access Roads Pedestrian Only

Figure 20 Proposed Vehicle Circulation and Loading/Service The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

roundabout. Access restrictions will also reduce vehicular circulation and pedestrian-vehicle conflicts on roadways north of the Law School, through the residential precinct, and along the roadway between Nugent Hall and Ward Hall. The vehicular entrances generally do not provide a clear sense of arrival on campus, except the entrance at the Michigan Avenue/4th Street intersection which is dominated by the Shrine. The campus gateways should be consolidated and enhanced with streetscape improvements, University signage, and wayfinding devices for both motorists and pedestrians to simplify access and improve the sense of arrival at the campus. Several internal intersections in the campus core will be eliminated or redesigned, including a proposed roundabout behind Mullen Library that replaces multiple misaligned roadway connections. Intersection improvements will allow the University to convert road surface to open space or pathways, reduce pedestrianvehicular conflicts, and simplify wayfinding. The Master Plan establishes roadway cross-section standards for existing and proposed campus roads. Campus roads will be constructed or modified to provide two travel lanes without on-street parking. Space will be allocated for streetscape and sidewalk accommodations, conforming to DDOT standards for sidewalk and planting strip widths, along campus roadways. The Master Plan proposes to retain the existing one-way northbound section of John McCormack Road near the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station. A vehicular turnaround and drop-off area will be constructed along John McCormack Road, south of the campus Power Plant, in proximity to the Metrorail Station. Plans for the South Campus redevelopment project show 7th Street will be realigned with the existing CUA driveway intersection on Michigan Avenue, which will improve vehicular access to the campus and accommodations for pedestrians.

 Campus Loading and Service
The campus roadway network will preserve access for transit and services vehicles on all campus roadway connections. Figure 20 also shows the location of loading areas at existing and proposed facilities. Loading and service needs for the proposed student center building north of the Pryzbyla Center are anticipated to be very similar to the existing service activity at the Pryzbyla Center. The Pryzbyla Center currently receives approximately one tractor-trailer truck and three single-unit trucks per day. Service vehicles will continue to access the Pryzbyla Center and other service and loading areas via existing campus roadway connections from John McCormack Road and Harewood Road. To minimize loading vehicle activity on residential streets, all

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

54

Traffic Network Evaluation

service vehicles will be instructed to approach and depart the campus using only Michigan Avenue , John McCormack Road , Harewood Road , and the segment of Taylor Street connecting Harewood Road and John McCormack Road .

 Public Roadways and Intersections
The following sections describe future conditions traffic operations on the public street network near the Campus. Future conditions analysis scenarios consist of NoBuild and Master Plan conditions. The No-Build condition evaluates future traffic operations with historical growth and trips associated with planned background development projects, but without the implementation of any Master Plan development or growth. The Master Plan conditions analyses include both the NoBuild assumptions and Master Plan trip activity.

Historical Traffic Growth
Historical count data for the primary roadways in proximity to the Campus were reviewed to determine the average annual traffic growth on study area roadways resulting from regional background growth. Table 22 summarizes the historical traffic volume data reviewed on public arterial roadways near CUA.

Table 22 Historical Traffic Volume Summary
Location North Capitol Street Michigan Avenue, east of North Capitol Street 2006 Daily Volume 32,400 vpd 15,600 vpd 2009 Daily Volume 32,000 vpd 15,400 vpd

Source: District Department of Transportation Average Annual Daily Traffic count data a Average Daily Traffic volume, expressed in vehicles per day

Rather than reducing future conditions traffic volumes in the study area, an annual growth rate of 0.5 percent was applied to future conditions forecasts to represent a low-growth condition on public roadways in proximity to the site. Historical growth was applied specifically to public street movements unassociated with access to the Campus or other private driveways.

Background Development Trips
In addition to an annual background growth rate, specific development projects likely to generate new trips in proximity to the Campus were considered. Based on coordination with DDOT and the District Office of Planning, three background projects were identified for consideration the analysis of future conditions traffic operations. The following is a description of the background development projects.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

55

Traffic Network Evaluation

South Campus Redevelopment
Abdo Development, LLC has received approval to rezone and redevelop a parcel previously owned by The Catholic University of America south of Michigan Avenue, known as the South Campus. The six blocks that comprise the South Campus encompass 8.9 acres of land and generally are bounded by Michigan Avenue on the north, Kearney Street on the south, the WMATA/CSX tracks on the east, and the Dominican House of Studies and Theological College on the west in the Northeast quadrant of Washington, D.C. The mixed-use development will consist of residential, retail, and arts components and would be interwoven into the existing Brookland Community. The project consists of 976,942 square feet (sf) of development, including 848 residential units (totaling 875,962 sf); 83,073 sf of retail development; and 17,907 sf of arts space. Access to the site will be provided via 7th, 8th, Monroe, Lawrence, and Kearney Streets. The proposed project will realign short segments of both Monroe and 7th Streets where they intersect Michigan Avenue.

Brookland Artspace Lofts
The Brookland Artspace Lofts is a recently completed residential development located at the Northeast corner of the intersection of 8th and Kearney Streets in the Brookland neighborhood of Washington, DC. The development consists of 41 affordable artist studios and apartments that provide affordable live-work spaces for artists in the Brookland community.

McMillan Reservoir Redevelopment
The former McMillan Reservoir occupied a 25 acre site located at North Capitol Street and Michigan Avenue that is planned to be redeveloped into a mixed-use project. The Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development (DMPED) selected a Master Developer to lead the master planning and community outreach efforts for the site. The project’s goal is to create an architecturally distinct, vibrant, mixed-income community that provides housing, jobs, retail, educational, and recreational opportunities for District residents. The mixed-use project also proposes to create a pedestrian-oriented environment with multi-modal transportation options to reduce automobile dependency and foster a sense of community. The proposed McMillan site redevelopment master plan includes twelve vehicle access points to the site along North Capitol Street, First Street, and Michigan Avenue. The project is currently programmed to include approximately two million square feet of residential, retail and medical office space. The preliminary concept master plan for the McMillan project includes the following development program:  756 residential units

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

56

Traffic Network Evaluation

 

995,000 sf general and medical office space 54,000 sf of retail including a 45,000 sf grocery store

No-Build Traffic Volumes
The No-Build traffic volumes include all existing traffic, new traffic associated with historic traffic growth, and traffic related to background development projects identified by DDOT. The 0.5 percent annual background growth and the traffic volume projections for the three background development projects were added to the 2011 Existing conditions traffic volumes to develop the 2011 No-Build condition. Figures 21 and 22 summarize the 2027 No-Build weekday morning and evening peak hour traffic volume networks, respectively.

Master Plan Trip Generation
To evaluate the impact of the proposed Master Plan on the study area intersections, site-generated traffic for the future Master Plan conditions was estimated and distributed through the roadway network. The Master Plan trip generation projections are based on the overall CUA population growth estimates and the effects of proposed new on-campus housing. Table 23 summarizes the vehicle trip generation used to evaluate the plan’s impact on study intersections.

Table 23 Campus Trip Generation Summary
Time Period Weekday Moring Peak Hour
d

Movement Enter Exit Total Enter Exit Total

2011 Existing Condition 422 140 562 262 392 654

2027 Master Plan 457 152 609 285 427 712

Net New Trips +35 +12 +47 +23 +35 +58

Weekday Evening Peak Hour d
a vehicles per hour

As shown in Table 23, the Master Plan is anticipated to generate 47 new trips during the weekday morning peak hour and 58 new trips during the weekday evening peak period. To provide a conservative estimate of future vehicle tips, the trip generation projections do not account for additional vehicular trip reductions associated with other transportation demand management (TDM) strategies.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

57

Traffic Network Evaluation

Trip Distribution
The existing campus directional trip distribution informs trip assignments for new vehicular traffic. Master Plan conditions trip assignment patterns are based on two primary factors:   Existing trips redistributed based on access modifications and proposed parking facility locations New trips to and from the campus

Figure 23 summarizes the trip assignments associated with redistributing existing traffic based on the proposed access and parking system modifications. Trip assignments for new trips to the campus are summarized in Figure 24. The Master Plan site-generated traffic volumes were calculated based on the vehicle trip generation projections and trip assignments. The site-generated trips were added to the 2027 No-Build peak hour traffic volumes to develop the 2027 Master Plan weekday morning and evening peak hour traffic volumes. Figures 25 and 26 summarize the 2027 Master Plan weekday morning and evening peak hour traffic volumes, respectively.

Future Conditions Traffic Operations Analysis
Traffic operations analyses were conducted for the 2027 No-Build, 2027 Master Plan, and 2027 Master Plan with Improvements conditions for the signalized and unsignalized study-area intersections. In order to demonstrate the impacts of sitegenerated traffic on the surrounding roadway network, the 2027 Master Plan condition analysis presented in this section does not include any proposed improvement measures. Description of the proposed improvements related to the 2027 Master Plan with Improvements section is included in the next section. Capacity analyses were conducted for the signalized and unsignalized intersections in the study area under the various conditions studied. Tables 24 and 25 present the signalized analysis results. Table 26 presents the results of the unsignalized intersection operations analyses.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

58

Traffic Network Evaluation

Table 24 Future Conditions Signalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary
2027 No-Build Location/Period Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road/4th Street Weekday Morning Approach a NB SB EB WB Delay b 39.6 39.1 34.8 9.3 23.0 31.9 29.1 27.4 0.9 20.9 30.0 28.0 6.2 61.2 44.6 69.2 30.5 13.6 38.8 29.1 23.3 0.9 7.8 10.9 28.3 5.0 2.5 8.1 LOS c D C D A C C C C A C C C A A C E C B D C C A A B C A A A 2027 Master Plan Delay b 40.0 40.0 32.2 9.2 22.4 32.2 29.8 25.7 0.6 20.3 27.9 29.2 6.5 59.6 43.6 79.2 29.5 9.0 38.9 28.0 23.3 1.0 8.0 10.9 28.3 5.7 1.5 8.2 LOS c D D C A C C C C A C C C A E D E C A D C C A A B C A A A 2027 Master Plan w/ Improvements Delay b LOS c 40.0 40.0 32.2 9.2 22.4 32.2 29.8 25.7 0.6 20.3 25.2 34.1 6.2 29.1 22.9 54.8 35.8 9.8 18.4 18.5 23.3 1.0 8.0 10.9 28.3 5.7 1.5 8.2 D D C A C C C C A C C C A A C D D A D B C A A B C A A A

Overall

Weekday Evening

Overall

NB SB EB WB

Michigan Avenue at 4th Street/Shrine driveway Weekday Morning

Overall

NB SB EB WB

Weekday Evening

NB SB EB WB
Overall

Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street (east) Weekday Morning

Weekday Evening

NB EB WB Overall NB EB WB Overall

a b c

EB = eastbound, WB = westbound, NB = northbound, SB = southbound average delay in seconds per vehicle level of service

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

59

Traffic Network Evaluation

Table 24 (cont.) Future Conditions Signalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary
2027 No-Build Location/Period Michigan Ave. at Monroe St. (channelized right) Weekday Morning Weekday Evening Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/CUA South driveway Weekday Morning Approach a EB WB Overall EB WB Overall NB SB EB WB Delay b 20.1 0.2 6.9 94.8 0.1 61.3 23.3 22.4 12.8 108.9 77.6 28.2 34.4 22.1 17.5 22.0 29.9 18.5 26.5 17.4 22.9 32.2 55.1 21.9 13.6 24.7 38.7 8.1 9.6 14.8 39.0 8.8 7.9 14.0 LOS c C A A F A E C C B F F C C C B C C B C B C C E C B C D A A B D A A B 2027 Master Plan Delay b 20.1 0.4 6.2 105.5 0.1 68.7 23.4 21.5 14.1 118.5 84.0 28.3 26.7 22.5 18.4 21.7 29.9 18.5 26.7 17.8 23.2 31.4 55.1 22.0 15.3 24.2 38.7 8.3 9.7 14.7 39.0 9.1 8.2 13.9 LOS c C A A F A E C C B F F C C C B C C B C B C C E C B C D A A B D A A B 2027 Master Plan w/ Improvements Delay b LOS c 20.0 0.4 6.2 51.7 0.1 33.7 35.6 31.8 2.1 22.0 17.7 28.3 26.7 22.5 18.4 21.7 29.9 18.5 26.7 17.8 23.2 40.3 45.9 22.0 12.1 25.3 38.7 8.3 9.7 14.7 39.0 9.1 8.2 13.9 B A A D A C D C B C B C C C B C C B C B C D D C B C D A A B D A A B

Overall

Weekday Evening

Overall

NB SB EB WB

Harewood Road at Taylor Street Weekday Morning

Overall

NB SB EB WB

Weekday Evening

Overall

NB SB EB WB

Taylor Street at Hawaii Avenue Weekday Morning

Overall

SB EB WB

Weekday Evening

Overall
a b c EB = eastbound, WB = westbound, NB = northbound, SB = southbound average delay in seconds per vehicle level of service

SB EB WB

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

60

Traffic Network Evaluation

Table 25 Future Conditions Signalized Intersection Queuing Summary
2027 No-Build Location/Period Michigan Avenue at Harewood Road/4th Street Weekday Morning (Weekday Evening) Movement a NB LTR SB LT SB R EB LTR NB LTR NB R SB LTR WB L WB TR NB LR EB T EB R WB T NB LTR SB LTR EB LTR WB LTR NB L NB LT NB R SB LTR EB LTR WB LTR SB L SB R EB LT WB TR Average c 129 (120) 138 (80) 0 (0) 231 (382) 18 (13) 0 (97) 14 (36) 204 (184) 824 (248) 276 (138) 263 (737) 0 (98) 115 (15) 23 (78) 25 (128) 77 (298) 836 (222) 54 (89) 55 (87) 0 (0) 23 (37) 112 (129) 113 (57) 165 (163) 0 (0) 64 (106) 87 (31) 95% c 214 (168) 198 (123) 118 (40) 284 (462) 43 (26) 50 (296) 34 (64) 403 (345) 965 (341) 338 (177) 318 (814) 46 (106) 115 (19) 65 (129) 38 (168) 105 (342) 977 (298) 104 (152) 103 (149) 35 (44) 61 (37) 156 (175) 153 (72) 257 (253) 39 (24) 91 (141) 119 (54) 2027 Master Plan Average 129 (120) 144 (90) 0 (0) 220 (369) 11 (7) 0 (157) 5 (24) 207 (129) 822 (219) 277 (138) 276 (655) 0 (63) 115 (7) 22 (79) 7 (48) 81 (312) 850 (230) 55 (84) 55 (84) 0 (0) 23 (35) 117 (132) 118 (69) 165 (164) 0 (0) 70 (113) 95 (41) 95% 214 (168) 206 (135) 119 (41) 269 (445) 31 (16) 51 (349) 17 (49) 402 (238) 963 (256) 339 (177) 333 (798) 48 (116) 115 (9) 65 (131) 16 (77) 119 (340) 991 (311) 104 (148) 103 (148) 37 (52) 61 (33) 164 (178) 159 (82) 257 (254) 39 (25) 97 (150) 128 (67) 2027 Master Plan w/ Improvements Average 95% 129 (120) 144 (90) 0 (0) 220 (369) 12 (7) 0 (157) 5 (24) 202 (129) 684 (219) 277 (138) 276 (655) 0 (63) 226 (7) 38 (79) 9 (48) 30 (312) 510 (230) 55 (84) 55 (84) 0 (0) 23 (35) 117 (132) 118 (69) 165 (164) 0 (0) 70 (113) 95 (41) 214 (168) 206 (135) 119 (41) 269 (445) 34 (16) 47 (349) 19 (49) 309 (238) 899 (256) 339 (177) 327 (798) 48 (116) 285 (9) 96 (131) 20 (77) 23 (340) 820 (311) 104 (148) 103 (148) 37 (52) 61 (33) 164 (178) 159 (82) 257 (254) 39 (25) 97 (150) 128 (67)

Michigan Avenue at 4th Street/Shrine driveway Weekday Morning (Weekday Evening)

Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street Weekday Morning (Weekday Evening)

Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/CUA South driveway Weekday Morning (Weekday Evening)

Harewood Road at Taylor Street Weekday Morning (Weekday Evening)

Taylor Street at Hawaii Avenue Weekday Morning (Weekday Evening)

a b c

EB = eastbound, WB = westbound, NB = northbound, SB = southbound; L = left-turn, T = through, R = right-turn Turn lane storage capacity, in feet Average and maximum (95th Percentile) queue, in feet

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

61

Traffic Network Evaluation

Table 26 Future Conditions Unsignalized Intersection Capacity Analysis Summary
Location Michigan Avenue at John McCormack Road Taylor Street at John McCormack Road Period Weekday AM Weekday PM Weekday AM Weekday PM John McCormack Road at Taylor Street north ramp John McCormack Road at Taylor Street south ramp John McCormack Road at CUA east driveway Harewood Road at Scale Gate Road /CUA west dwy Weekday PM Weekday AM Weekday PM Weekday AM Weekday PM Weekday AM Weekday PM Weekday AM Lane a EB LT EB LT NB LTR SB LTR NB LTR SB LTR EB LR EB LR EB LR EB LR EB LR EB LR EB LTR WB LTR EB LTR WB LTR
a b c d

2027 No-Build Delay b LOS c Queue d 18.4 C 47 4.3 A 15 19.0 18.1 16.4 12.0 9.6 11.6 9.6 9.5 12.2 14.1 n/a n/a n/a n/a C C C B A B A A B B n/a n/a n/a n/a 7 19 18 15 6 5 11 5 8 22 n/a n/a n/a n/a

2027 Master Plan Delay LOS Queue 33.2 D 92 6.6 A 26 16.7 19.1 20.9 13.1 10.0 14.3 9.8 9.7 C C C B A B A A Access restricted Access restricted 23.8 16.8 22.0 20.9 C C C C 19 11 28 31 17 28 54 32 8 8 15 8

EB = eastbound, WB = westbound, NB = northbound, SB = southbound; L = left-turn, T = through, R = right-turn average delay, in seconds per vehicle level of service 95th percentile vehicle queue, in feet

Proposed Operations Enhancements
The results of the capacity analysis indicate that individual approaches at a few of the signalized intersections operate under failing levels-of-service during No-Build conditions, without the proposed Master Plan development. To address existing operations deficiencies at the study intersections, improvement measures are recommended at several intersections. Traffic operations with recommended enhancements are reflected in the Master Plan with Improvements analysis results included in Tables 24, 25, and 26 in the previous section. Specifically, based on the results of the intersection operations analysis, signal timing modifications are recommended at the following signalized intersections:     Michigan Avenue at 4th Street/Shrine driveway Michigan Avenue at Monroe Street Michigan Avenue at 7th Street/CUA south driveway Harewood Road at Taylor Street

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

62

Traffic Network Evaluation

It should be noted that the projected Master Plan impacts, and the recommended operations enhancements, are based on a conservative projection of future trip generation for both the Campus and long-range background development. The conservative trip generation projections do not account for potential trip reductions associated with planned public bicycle and transit projects or transportation demand management measures by CUA and others. It is possible that projected trip increases may be largely reduced by mode choice shifts to alternative transportation modes. Harewood Road/Scale Gate Road/CUA West Driveway Intersection The proposed Master Plan includes plans for the realigned Scale Gate Road to intersection with Harewood Road opposite the CUA west driveway, just north of the Basilica. This intersection will provide access to the Main Campus for vehicles entering from North Capitol Street and to West Campus from Harewood Road. Based on the traffic operations analysis, a conceptual design plan for the intersection was developed. Figure 27 shows the proposed intersection layout. Intersection design features include the following:    Two-lane approaches Stop sign control for the side street approaches of Scale Gate Road and the CUA west driveway Curb extensions on Harewood Road to define on-street parking, provide adequate intersection sight distance, and reduce crossing distance for pedestrians High visibility crosswalks and accessible wheelchair ramps on all intersection legs Advance pedestrian warning signage on the Harewood Road approaches to improve pedestrian safety.

 

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

63

Traffic Network Evaluation

Parking Facilities

7

The Catholic University of America intends to provide adequate parking for students, faculty/staff, and visitors to the campus, while encouraging alternative modes of transportation. It is important for the University to maintain a balance between providing parking necessary to meet the needs of the campus community and effectively promoting alternatives to automobiles for commute trips to the campus. The parking evaluation includes projections for future parking demand on the campus, which provides the basis for the proposed parking supply.

Existing Parking Facilities
The following sections discuss the parking supply and observed parking demand on the Campus and streets surrounding the campus.

 Campus Parking
The CUA provides permitted parking in numerous locations throughout the campus. Currently, the CUA operates one parking structure (the University Garage) with gated access for faculty/staff, commuting students, and resident student parking. All other parking facilities on the campus are surface parking lots or on-street spaces along campus roadways. A significant amount of surface parking is provided in the academic core of the campus, specifically in the McMahon and Pangborn parking lots. The CUA operates and maintains a total of 1,927 parking spaces on the campus. Figure 28 identifies the location and number of spaces at each parking lot and the University Garage.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

64

Parking Facilities

B

oa sR ate

dN

E

Parking Zone South Campus North Campus DuFour West Campus

Spaces 1,323 447 157 -1,927

North Campus DuFour Center
ii wa Ha u en Av eN
Taylor Street NE

E
159

5 162

34

48

z
32
John

Upper Main Campus
18 54 6 23 88 5

F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

5

z
274

7 558 2

North Capitol Street

d Road Harewoo

NE

West Campus

Lower Main Campus
18 61 46 44 74 13

172

21

Mic

a hig

ue ven nA

NE
Monroe Street NE 8th Street NE 7th Street NE

Brookland-CUA

10th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

Surface Parking Parking Garage Number of Spaces

On-Street Parking 3 Hour On-Street Parking

4 Hour Metered Parking On-Street Parking Prohibited

Figure 28 Existing Campus Parking Facilities The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

z

Zipcar Locations

McMahon lot, situated between Caldwell Hall and the Pryzbyla Center (not pictured) Parking in the various campus parking lots is regulated according to a permit system. Separate parking permits for general parking, resident students, and evening students are sold on an annual or semester basis. A limited number of reserved parking permits are issued to faculty and administrators, allowing these users to park in specially designated spaces in various parking areas. CUA provides no designated visitor parking, but some metered spaces are provided and visitors to the campus may obtain a temporary daily permit from the Facilities Department. Table 27 summarizes the parking supply on the Campus according to permit types:

Table 27 Parking Supply Summary by Type
Parking Type General Spaces Resident Spaces Faculty/Staff Spaces Reserved Spaces Metered Spaces Handicap Spaces Other/Motorcycle Total Number of Spaces 1,237 203 232 63 61 105 26 1,927

Parking permits are sold throughout the year and pricing for annual and semester permits is adjusted monthly to reflect the remaining duration of the permit. CUA records indicate a total of 2,330 parking permits for the campus were sold during the 2009-2010 academic year. Overselling permits is a standard practice for institutions of higher education and does not contribute to critical parking capacity issues at

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

65

Parking Facilities

CUA. A summary of the initial 2011-2012 parking permit pricing is provided in Table 28.

Table 28 CUA Parking Permit Pricing Summary
Permit Type General Annual General Semester Resident Annual Resident Semester Evening Annual Evening Semester Surface Permit Price $425 $240 $485 $268 $245 $135 Garage Permit Price $515 $300 $565 $310 $275 $151

Parking enforcement on the campus is conducted by the Department of Public Safety. Parking violations are enforced through fines for parking without a permit, parking with an expired/altered permit, or illegal parking. A vehicle receiving at least three unpaid parking violations may be immobilized (i.e. booted) to prohibit the vehicle’s owner from continuing to operate the vehicle without paying their fines. Vehicles immobilized for at least 72 hours may be towed off the Campus.

 Public On-street Parking
Public on-street parking is available on several streets surrounding the campus. Figure 28 also summarizes the curbside parking restrictions on the streets in proximity to the Campus. Table 29 summarizes the on-street parking designations and approximate capacity on streets allowing on-street parking.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

66

Parking Facilities

Table 29 On-street Parking Summary
Locations Harewood Road John McCormack Road 7thStreet Monroe Street Hawaii Avenue Michigan Avenue 4th Street Taylor Street Parking Restrictions 3-hour Parking 4-hour Meters Unrestricted Unrestricted No Parking one side No Parking both sides No Parking both sides No Parking both sides Approximate Capacity 200 spaces 132 spaces 25 spaces 18 spaces 90 spaces n/a n/a n/a

 Parking Demand Assessment
Observations of parking demand on the Campus were conducted in April 2011. Peak period parking observations were conducted on a typical weekday when school was in session. Table 30 summarizes the peak period parking demands by each individual parking area and Table 30 summarizes the parking demand by regions of the Campus.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

67

Parking Facilities

Table 30 Parking Demand Summary by Lot
Peak Parking Demand Parking Location 7th Street Entrance Aquinas North Aquinas Rear Entrance Caldwell South O'Connell Hall Curley Court Curley Front Curley Road CV Rear DuFour Lot/Front Flather Front Gibbons Gibbons East/Road Gowan Rear Grounds Complex Hartke North Hartke South Health & Fitness Center Law School North/Ryan Leahy Front Leahy Rear Leahy Road Marist Annex/Rear Marist Road McGivney Road McMahon Lot McMahon Mullen Front Mullen North Mullen Rear Nugent South O'Boyle Lots Opus Lot Pangborn Lots Pryzbyla Rear Shahan North Shrine Mall University Garage Road University Garage Ward Total 10 AM-12 PM 17 30 4 0 45 8 4 34 5 40 2 9 16 18 4 12 6 4 2 9 6 14 28 64 17 250 14 43 5 10 6 74 48 155 9 9 48 0 279 15 1,373 2-4 PM 18 26 8 0 41 11 6 29 5 47 1 7 10 19 4 10 6 6 1 12 7 14 27 61 17 218 15 39 7 12 6 89 45 177 10 7 48 2 350 13 1,431 Absolute Maximum 18 30 8 0 45 11 6 34 5 47 2 9 16 19 4 12 6 6 1 12 7 14 28 64 17 250 15 43 7 12 6 89 48 177 10 9 48 2 350 15 1,502 Parking Supply 13 32 10 2 44 11 8 35 7 157 5 10 15 21 5 13 6 7 5 10 5 11 34 64 21 263 11 48 5 12 5 162 43 172 7 9 61 2 558 18 1,927 PM Peak Utilization Rate 138% 81% 80% 0% 93% 100% 75% 83% 71% 30% 20% 70% 67% 90% 80% 77% 100% 86% 20% 120% 140% 127% 79% 95% 81% 83% 136% 81% 140% 100% 120% 55% 105% 103% 143% 78% 79% 100% 63% 72% 74%

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

68

Parking Facilities

Table 31 Parking Demand Summary by Campus Region
Peak Parking Demand Parking Location University Garage Lower Main Campus (w/o garage) Upper Main Campus North Campus (DuFour Center) Total Weekday Morning 279 721 333 40 1,373 Weekday Afternoon 350 694 340 47 1,431 Parking Supply 558 765 447 157 1,927 PM Peak Utilization Rate 63% 91% 76% 30% 74%

The parking demand data indicates that parking supplies on the Campus are currently adequate for vehicle parking on the campus. However, some areas of the campus are underutilized while other parking facilities are full. Parking facilities on the northern extents of the campus, including the DuFour Center and O’Boyle lots are only 30-55 percent utilized during peak conditions and the University Garage’s peak parking utilization is approximately 63 percent. Meanwhile, surface lots located in proximity to academic buildings and activity centers throughout the Lower Main Campus are over 90 percent utilized during peak conditions.

Master Plan Parking Facilities
The Master Plan proposes to provide adequate parking for typical daily operations and special events. On-campus parking will be limited to necessary levels to increase overall parking utilization and promote use of alternative transportation modes.

 Proposed Parking Facilities
The Master Plan seeks to maintain adequate on-campus parking for the campus community’s needs, but will de-emphasize parking within the core of the campus by shifting parking areas to more peripheral locations and decreasing the number of spaces within the academic core on the south region of campus. The following is a summary of the most significant modifications proposed to the on-campus parking system:  Eliminate several surface parking facilities on the south portion of the campus and construct a 300-space expansion of the University Garage, accessible from John McCormack Road Eliminate the 274-space McMahon parking lot in the center of the campus Construct temporary surface parking on the West Campus (276 spaces) to provide necessary flexibility to the University for surface parking modifications on the Main Campus

 

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

69

Parking Facilities

  

Eliminate most on-street parking within the campus Eliminate several small parking areas on the Upper Main Campus Replace surface parking at the DuFour Athletic Center with a 260-space below-grade parking facility, intended to better accommodate parking demand during athletic events and minimize parking spillover into the residential neighborhood bordering Hawaii Avenue. A long-term parking structure is proposed near the Hartke Theater to replace the temporary West Campus surface lots

Figure 29 summarizes the Master Plan parking locations and compares proposed parking supply with existing parking supply. Table 32 summarizes parking supply changes by regions of the campus and the total number of parking spaces relative to the campus population.

Table 32 Parking Supply Comparison
Parking Location Main Campus West Campus North Campus (DuFour Center) Total CUA Population Spaces per Person Existing Parking Supply 1,770 0 157 1,927 8,876 people 0.217 Proposed Parking Supply 1,454 276 260 1,990 10,165 people 0.196 Difference -18% n/a +66% +3% +15% -10%

The Master Plan proposes to increase the overall parking supply on the campus by a total of 63 parking spaces. However, as shown in Table 32, the University will actually reduce parking in the core academic and residential precincts of the campus (Lower Main Campus) by 16 percent. Additionally, the Master Plan reduces the overall number of parking spaces per person on the campus by 10 percent. The key features of the University’s parking plan will support sustainable transportation principles of the Master Plan and benefit the surrounding community, in the following ways:  By decreasing the parking supply in the Lower Main Campus, which is the core academic and social center of the University, by over 200 spaces and shifting to peripheral areas, the University will reduce vehicular circulation in areas intended predominantly for pedestrian and bicycle circulation The combined parking supply in the South, North, and West Campus areas will decrease by 40 spaces under the plan, which will help to minimize the attractiveness of driving to campus. New or replacement parking provided on the West Campus and North Campus (DuFour Center) is located on the periphery of the campus, which

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

70

Parking Facilities

B

oa sR ate

dN

E

Parking Zone South Campus North Campus DuFour West Campus

Existing Proposed 1,323 447 157 -1,927 1,115 339 260 276 1,990

North Campus DuFour Center
ii wa Ha
321 300

u en Av eN
Taylor Street NE
John

157 260

E

F Mc Corm ack R d., N E

48 15

54 24 24

0

Upper Main Campus

12 19

26 276

560 560

d Road Harewoo

0 North Capitol Street

276

NE

Lower Main Campus
18 18

172 300

276

0

West Campus

61 61

M

NE ue ven nA iga 44 106 ich
7th Street NE

34 21

Brookland-CUA

Monroe Street NE 8th Street NE

10th Street NE

Irving Stre

et NE

120 30

Surface Parking Parking Garage Long-term Garage Temporary Surface Parking

Existing Parking Count Proposed Parking Count Long -Term Parking Count

Figure 29 Proposed Master Plan Parking Facilities The Catholic University of America Washington D.C.

*Source: Graphical base from Ayers Saint Gross

diminishes the convenience of single-occupant driving and minimizes driving between different regions of campus. The parking plan reduces surface parking on the campus by over 600 spaces, particularly improving the core of the campus by converting impervious parking lots and on-street parking into open space and non-automotive circulation. Access to new and remaining parking facilities will be provided on or in proximity to the public street network, which will significantly reduce the need for vehicles to circulate within the core of the campus and minimize vehicle-pedestrian conflicts in a number of areas within the core campus. Consolidation of parking from numerous small lots to larger structured parking facilities will reduce travel between parking lots associated with searching for available spaces and hunting for the most desirable space Parking garages will provide a significant amount of covered bicycle parking, which encourages use of bicycles as an alternative mode.

The overall parking supply increase for the campus is most attributable to the parking structure proposed for the DuFour Athletic Center. The DuFour Athletic Center is currently unable to adequately accommodate parking during many athletic events and the proposed parking expansion at this location will allow the University to park the majority of vehicles, including team and visitor buses, at the athletic center. This parking will minimize off-campus impacts from vehicles circulating and parking in surrounding neighborhoods.

 Projected Parking Demand
Peak parking demand projections for the Campus are based on existing parking demand data for individual user groups collected on the campus and the University’s projected population growth. Parking permit counts on the Campus provide an estimate of the peak parking demands for residents, commuter students, employees, and visitors. Population growth estimates for each group were used to calculate future parking demand. Table 33 summarizes the peak parking demand projections for the Campus.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

71

Parking Facilities

Table 33 User Parking Demand Summary
Parking Location Resident Students Commuter Students Faculty/Staff Metered/Visitor Other Total Existing Peak Parking Demand 184 471 553 167 56 1,431 Population Basis 2,227 4,740 1,909 8,876 8,876 Parking Rate 0.083 0.099 0.290 0.019 0.006 2027 Projected Population Basis 2,870 5,165 2,130 10,165 10,165 2027 Peak Parking Demand 238 511 618 193 61 1,621

Overall parking demand is anticipated to grow on the campus, but proposed student housing expansion is anticipated to reduce overall parking demand growth rate below the campus population growth rate. To provide a conservative estimate of future parking demand, the parking evaluation does not account for other factors that may reduce parking demand over time, including transportation demand management strategies and economic influences. Based on the overall peak parking demand projections for the Campus, Table 34 estimates the Master Plan peak parking demand for the campus. Based on the results of the parking demand evaluation, the overall Master Plan parking supply is adequate to accommodate future parking demands on the campus.

Table 34 Projected Parking Demand Summary
Parking Location Future Master Plan University Garage Lower Main Campus Upper Main Campus West Campus North Campus (DuFour Center) Total 754 235 312 242 78 1,621 860 255 339 276 260 1,990 88% 92% 92% 88% 30% 81% Peak Parking Demand Parking Supply Peak Utilization Rate

The Master Plan will result in overall parking utilization of approximately 81 percent on the campus, and peak parking demand for the Main Campus and West Campus parking areas will average approximately 90 percent. Parking occupancy ratios in the 80-90 percent range are typical in a campus setting.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

72

Parking Facilities

The peak parking demand evaluation suggests that the University Garage and proposed West Campus parking lot will be required to accommodate parking demands previously served by the Main Campus surface lots. To accommodate anticipated parking demand at the campus, the University will implement new strategies to manage parking system operations.

 Parking Management Strategies
Accommodating increased parking demand, while reducing parking supply in the core campus, will require new strategies to manage parking operations on the Campus. In addition to the parking policy recommendations, a variety of recommendations for management of the existing and future parking supply have been developed to optimize the use of underutilized parking facilities, increase parking revenue, and support a sustainable parking system. Currently, the University controls parking through a permit system with pricing based on garage vs. surface parking, with higher costs to park in the garage. The price difference between surface and garage parking permits likely contributes to the lower utilization rates in the garage than surface lots on the Lower Main Campus, which is a principle that can be applied to encourage drivers to park in other locations. The University also controls access to the parking garage through gate systems with electronic access devices, but surface lots are open to all vehicles. The Master Plan recommends the University should transition its parking permit system to assign parking by location, rather than garage vs. surface parking. Parking permit pricing adjustments should be used to incentivize use of peripheral and garage parking locations by placing a premium cost on convenient parking. The proposed West Campus parking lot should be priced at discounted rates to incentivize campus drivers to use this lot, which will be served by campus transit. The limited surface parking facilities in the campus core should be reserved for faculty parking and preferential parking spaces for carpool/vanpool drivers. Currently, CUA commuter students park in virtually all lots on the campus and no designated parking for visitors is provided. The Master Plan recommends the University should maintain commuter student parking in peripheral lots, such as the West Campus lot, but eliminate commuter parking in surface lots within the campus core. The University should transition the garage control systems to provide hourly or daily fee parking for commuters and visitors in the University Garage and proposed garage next to O’Connell Hall. Hourly and daily parking fee structures allow for fine-tuned pricing adjustments and electronic enforcement. The Master Plan recommends that the University manage resident parking more actively to minimize resident parking in the campus core. The University should offer reduced parking rates or designate resident student parking in underutilized peripheral parking facilities, such as the O’Boyle lot and DuFour Center.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

73

Parking Facilities

The Master Plan recommends that the University use the proposed DuFour Center garage and West Campus parking lot to manage special event parking on the campus. Both facilities will be served by campus transit systems, allowing these peripheral parking facilities to provide ample parking for major campus events, including conventions, commencement, and athletics contests.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

74

Parking Facilities

Transportation Demand Management

8

The Master Plan includes a variety of transportation systems designed to support a sustainable future for the campus. To secure a sustainable future for the Campus, the transportation systems must shift commuters into modes other than single-occupant vehicles. A host of factors influence transportation mode choice for commuters to college campuses (and other destinations). Among these factors are the proximity to the destination; presence and comfort of pedestrian and bicycle facilities; availability of transit options, price and availability of parking. The Catholic University of America uses transportation demand management (TDM) measures to minimize vehicle commuter trips to the campus and offer support for other transportation options. The Master Plan includes new TDM programs designed to reduce the use of singleoccupant vehicles and increase use of alternative transportation modes by the campus community.

Existing TDM Strategies
The Catholic University of America is located in an urban setting, which access to a wide variety of transportation facilities and options, including the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station. Many students and employees live within one mile of the campus or within relative proximity to major alternative transportation facilities including the Metropolitan Branch Trail, Metrorail Stations, and Metrobus routes. The University leverages its advantageous location to encourage students, employees, and visitors to use Metrorail to commute to the campus. The University has implemented the following TDM measures to promote use of alternative transportation:   Parking fees are charged to students, faculty, and staff for on-campus parking on a semester or annual basis Freshmen and sophomore residents are not allowed to keep cars on-campus

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

75

Transportation Demand Management

  

CUA operates a free shuttle providing transportation within the campus, to the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station, and to off-campus apartment complexes CUA has constructed additional on-campus student housing, which minimizes the need for students to drive on a regular basis CUA partners with Zipcar to provide five carsharing vehicles on the campus (two in the McMahon lot and three in the O’Boyle lot) CUA provides employees with pre-tax payroll deduction of monthly public transit costs through the SmartBenefits program

Specifically, the SmartBenefits provides CUA employees who regularly use public transportation to commute to work with the option to purchase up to $230.00 worth of SmartBenefits vouchers per month through payroll deduction on a pre-tax basis. The SmartBenefits vouchers can be used as Metrorail fare cards or can be exchanged for the fares of any of the other types of regional public transportation including Metrobus, commercial vanpools, county and commuter buses, MARC Rail, Virginia Railway Express, Montgomery County RideOn, Prince George’s County The Bus, etc. The University’s proximity and access to alternative modes of transportation is reflected in the commuter mode split data showing that over 1/3 of the campus community uses transit to commute to the campus. Approximately half of the campus population uses a primary mode other than automobile to commute to the University. The campus commuter survey provided other indicators of the campus community’s familiarity with and use of alternative transportation modes, including options provided by the University or others on-campus:      Approximately 83 percent of the Campus population owns a Metro SmarTrip card Approximately eight percent of the campus population uses the CUA shuttle on at least a monthly basis Approximately five percent of the campus community uses the Capital Bikeshare system Almost four percent of the campus population has used Zipcar on the Campus Less than 12 percent of on-campus residents report keeping a car on-campus.

Typically, the most important factors influencing commuter choice of singleoccupant driving are the price and convenience of parking. Increasing parking prices is one of the most effective strategies available to the University to reduce reliance on single-occupant vehicles. Table 35 summarizes the parking price ranges for full-time commuters, residents, and employees as several schools in Washington D.C. or other universities in urban settings.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

76

Transportation Demand Management

Table 35 University Parking Price Comparison
Institution The Catholic University of America George Washington University Georgetown University American University Howard University Loyola University Johns Hopkins University Boston College Georgia Institute of Technology Location Washington D.C. Washington D.C. Washington D.C. Washington D.C. Washington D.C. Baltimore, MD Baltimore, MD Chestnut Hill, MA Atlanta, GA Parking Supply 1,927 spaces 3,467 spaces 1,380 spaces 2,724 spaces 3,000 spaces 1,573 spaces 2,250 spaces 3,877 spaces 12,954 spaces Daily n/a $12 n/a $16 n/a $29-$36 $8-$15 n/a n/a Monthly n/a $230-$255 $137-$150 $123 n/a n/a $57-$120 $39-$52 n/a Semester $240-$310 $760-$860 $686 (satellite) $494 n/a n/a $400 n/a n/a Annual $425-$565 n/a n/a $988-$1,476 $240-$400 $300-$350 n/a $259-$714 $657

The parking price data indicates that CUA currently offers parking to students and employees at lower prices than most of the other local or urban peer universities. Most of the local universities included in this comparison tend to charge significantly higher rates for parking.

Master Plan TDM Program
Transportation Demand Management programs are most effective when implemented in a coordinated system. An evaluation of TDM program implementation data collected from a broad group of institutions of higher education provides some indication of the effectiveness of individual measures. However, it should be noted that evaluation of individual measures was often influenced by the simultaneous implementation of multiple TDM strategies. The following is a summary of finding regarding TDM strategy effectiveness on other campuses:     Parking permit price increases were up to 10 percent effective in reducing vehicle trips. Bicycle facility improvements were up to 8 percent effective in reducing vehicle trips. Carpool preferential parking and financial incentives were up to 4 percent effective in reducing vehicle trips Various program marketing, ride-matching, car-sharing, and flexible work strategies were up to 4 percent effective in reducing vehicle trips.

Responses from the campus commuter survey also provide some indications of the types of TDM strategies that are most likely to reduce use of single-occupant vehicles on the Campus. Some steps favored by the campus community included the following:

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

77

Transportation Demand Management

  

Over 52 percent of respondents indicate subsidized transit passes would be effective in reducing use of single-occupant vehicles Nearly 50 percent of respondents indicate that transit system improvements would be effective in reducing use of single-occupant vehicles. Over 40 percent of respondents favor reduced parking costs for carpools

The Master Plan defines a range of potential TDM strategies and programs that the University will implement to expand the use of alternative transportation modes. The University commits to implementing the following TDM strategies to support the Master Plan’s goals for sustainable transportation systems and reduce the use of single-occupant vehicles on the campus:  Increase building density near the Brookland-CUA Metrorail Station and the Metropolitan Branch Trail to leverage major transit and non-vehicular facilities Construct additional student housing on campus (combined with new offcampus housing by private developers) to reduce travel distances for students and minimize the need for student to own automobiles Enhance pedestrian and bicycle facilities through various measures including: o Vehicle access restrictions on campus roadways to enhance pedestrian, bicycle, and transit access while minimizing pedestrianvehicle conflicts o Modify roadway cross-sections to expand pedestrian and bicycle accommodations and minimize vehicle speeds o Widen pathways throughout the campus to accommodate both pedestrians and bicyclists o Install additional bicycle parking, including covered and indoor bicycle parking in new buildings and garages. o Construct shower facilities in new academic and administrative buildings. Implement new parking management policies to disincentivize singleoccupant vehicle usage on campus: o Increase fees for all parking permits to more closely match other local and peer institutions o Introduce tiered pricing by parking location to charge higher rates for the most conveniently located parking, including surface parking on Lower Main Campus and in the University Garage o Reduce parking permit fees for carpooling and designate carpool parking spaces in the University Garage and on surface lots on Lower Main Campus o Maintain restrictions on freshmen and sophomores parking cars on campus Implement shuttle system operational improvements, including: o Expand CUA shuttle service to new off-campus destinations, including disabled passenger access to the Brookland-CUA Metrorail

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

78

Transportation Demand Management

Station, West Campus parking facilities, South Campus redevelopment, and the Washington Hospital Center campus o Increase shuttle schedule frequency to a minimum of every 20 minutes during daytime operations o Improve visibility and access accommodations for all passengers at on-campus shuttle stops. o Incorporate GPS tracking systems in shuttle vehicles to report shuttle schedules, locations, and delays via the CUA website, digital information technology, and digital displays in key buildings on the campus (i.e. Pryzbyla Center, Library, and Leahy Hall). Offer alternative commute incentives for students and employees, including: o Offer pre-tax payroll deduction to employees for both transit and bicycle expenses o Partner with the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments’ (MWCOG) Commuter Connections ridesharing services, including formation of carpools and guaranteed ride home o Introduce campus-focused social networking rideshare programs, such as Zimride, to conveniently form carpools in a format familiar to and preferred by many students o Purchase Metro SmarTrip cards for new students and employees each semester o Subsidize approximately $20-$50 in transit expenses on a monthly basis, structured for compliance with federal tax guidelines, for employees who forgo a parking pass Form a Transportation Management Association (TMA) with other entities in proximity to CUA (i.e. South Campus/Arts Walk) to achieve the following: o Manage transportation initiatives for the most significant employers and residential properties within shuttle distance of the Brookland/CUA Metrorail Station o Coordinate ridesharing and shuttle operations among area employers and organizations o Collaborate with DDOT on transportation management practices in the area Hire or designate staff member as the CUA Transportation Management Coordinator to address the following: o Expand internal marketing efforts for alternative transportation options o Maintain a Parking and Transportation website o Conduct on-campus events promoting alternative transportation options (i.e. at freshmen orientation and beginning of each semester) o Coordinate event or other special transportation conditions with DDOT o Coordinate with MWCOG, DDOT, and others regarding Commuter Connections or other ridesharing resources o Disseminate information regarding CUA shuttle services and GPS tracking

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

79

Transportation Demand Management

o o

Coordinate with Zipcar and Capital Bikeshare staff and publicize location and availability information Coordinate the potential Transportation Management Association

Monitoring Program
As CUA constructs new facilities and student enrollment grows, it will be important for the University to monitor progress in achieving greater use of alternative transportation modes to the campus. The Master Plan defines multiple monitoring steps that the University will conduct to evaluate progress in reducing the use of single-occupant vehicles. The University’s goal is to efficiently maintain or reduce the level of single-occupant vehicle activity on the campus over the life of the Master Plan. Because on-campus residents account for a very small fraction of the single-occupant vehicle trips to the campus, and CUA will continue to maintain policies limiting the number of oncampus resident vehicles on the campus, the University will evaluate progress in reducing single-occupant vehicle mode choice by off-campus residents. The University also intends to significantly improve the use of transit, bicycle, and walking modes amongst off-campus residents. To prevent increasing automobile commute trips to the campus, CUA will reduce off-campus single-occupant vehicle mode choice to approximately 44 percent by the 2027 Master Plan horizon. However, to promote a more sustainable campus transportation system, the Master Plan seeks to reduce single-occupant mode choice below existing levels. Table 36 defines the maintenance level mode split and an aspirational mode split projection, based on mode shift results from TDM programs at other campuses, for the 2027 Master Plan horizon.

Table 36 Off-campus Resident Mode Choice Targets
Mode Single Occupant Vehicle Carpool Transit Systems Bike Walk Other Existing Non-resident Mode Split 48.3% 6.8% 34.5% 2.6% 6.8% 1.0% Target to Maintain Current Automobile Trip Levels 44% 7% 38% 3% 7% 1% Aspirational Master Plan Mode Split 41% 8% 38% 4% 8% 1%

The aspirational mode split projection reflects the University’s emphasis on improving pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facilities and incentives for the campus community. The University will implement an annual monitoring program to

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-final.docx

80

Transportation Demand Management

measure progress in transportation mode choice over the life of the Master Plan. The following is a description of the proposed annual monitoring plan elements:  Conduct a campus commuter survey to document the off-campus resident commuter mode choice patterns relative to existing off-campus resident mode choice Conduct parking occupancy counts in CUA-controlled parking facilities on a typical weekday to document peak parking demand. Conduct bicycle parking demand counts on a typical weekday day Document CUA Shuttle ridership Document the number of parking permits sold during the previous academic year Document the number of employees participating in the SmartBenefits program

    

The findings of the annual monitoring program will be summarized in a report and submitted to the DDOT Policy, Planning, and Sustainability Administration once per year. In the event that the University is unable to show reasonable progress in the evaluation measures relative to existing metrics, the University will consult with DDOT staff to improve the effectiveness of the proposed TDM measures or develop new strategies to achieve the Master Plan’s sustainability goals.

\\mdssdata\projects\38067.00 CUA Master Plan\reports\38067_CUA_TS-v4.doc

81

Transportation Demand Management

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful