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In t roductio n t o Energ y Point s of Yoga an d Ayurv ed a

Point s of an d

The use of pressur e points for massag e and acupunctur e has become a popular topic in natural healing today. In Ayurveda , the traditiona l medi cine of India, these pressur e points are called marmas, meanin g or zones . Such points can be used specificall y for the diagnosi s and treatmen t of disease or generall y for promotin g health and longevity. Marmas are integra l to all Ayurvedi c therapi es from simple self-treatment s to comple x clinical procedures . They form one of the main pillars of Ayurvedic though t and Marma s are also an importan t aspect of the science of Yoga, with whic h Ayurveda is closely connected . Yoga not only has a sophisticate d system of physical postures , it also recognize s the power of Prana or the life-force , which is reflecte d through the points on the surface of the body. An understanding of marma s can add greater efficacy to any level or type of yoga practice whethe r using the body, the breath or the mind . Just as acupunctur e points are used in both Chines e medicin e and in Chinese martial arts, marma points are also used in the martial arts of India, like the Kalari traditio n of South India. Martial arts emphasiz e how to strike these vulnerabl e points with force and precisio n in order to counter attackers . The existenc e of such vital regions demonstrate s tha t the body is not simply a physica l mass but an intricat e energy field wit h points of power through which we can control both physiologica l and psy chological processes . Marma s are part of a greater that maps out the bod y according to subtle energy current s and power points. The body has its own special sacred points just as the Earth has its sacred sites and energ y currents accordin g to sacred geography . We must learn this sacred geogra phy of our own body in order to attune ourselve s both to the Earth and to

the greater cosmos .

Introduction to

Withou t knowin g these lines of force on our own bodies we canno t really understan d ourselve s or our interactio n with our environment , no r can we create lasting balanc e and harmon y in our lives. Yet thoug h marmas are a key componen t to India's traditiona l sciences , not man y people in the West know about them, includin g many who have studie d Yoga or even Ayurveda . A study of marma s adds a new dimensio n of in sight to both systems , helping us tap into the current s of vitality and cre ativity within and aroun d As a first step to understandin g marmas , let us examin e how they fit into the greater schem e of Yoga, Ayurved a and other Vedic sciences . Ayurvedi c Medicin e an d Therapy

Ayurved a is India's traditiona l healing system , its profoun d system of mind-body medicine , natural living and yogic health. Ayurveda , whic h means science of has becom e recognize d today for its wonderfu l dietary, herbal, life-styl e and yogic therapie s that help us live longer , hap pier, wise r and more in harmon y with the greater univers e of life and con sciousness. Ayurved a was the dominan t medica l paradig m in the India n subcontinent until moder n times and is still widely practice d throughou t the region as a complet e medica l system . Its roots go back deep both in time and in Ayurved a is part of the older spiritua l heritag e of humanit y tha t contain s much secret knowledg e and profoun d wisdom . It interface s closel y with the spiritua l science of Yoga, and develope d par allel to it bot h historicall y and in terms of its prime concepts . The science of marma or Marma is anothe r extraordinar y and dynami c Ayurvedi c therapy that has tremendou s value in health, disease , everyday living and in spiritua l practic e . Marm a therapy or Marma Chikitsa is an importan t method of Ayurvedi c treatmen t for the entir e spectrum of health complaint s major and minor. Many differen t marm a regions are describe d in Ayurvedi c texts along with their specifi c effects on both body and mind. Marma s range in size from very small to very large , from special points along the hands and feet to significan t region s on the trunk of the body like the heart or the navel. When manipulated , marma s can alter both the organi c functio n and structura l conditio n of the body . Through the right use of marma s our entire physica l and mental energ y can be consciousl y increased , decrease d or redirecte d in a transformativ e manner. Marma s resembl e the acupunctur e points of Traditiona l Chines e Medicine but extend to larger areas of the body. They include vital organ s like the heart and bladde r as well as bones and joints and points along the

Marmas: Energy Points of Yoga and Ayurveda

surface of the body. Marmas are centers for the vital-force or Prana, the master power behind both physical and psychologica l processes. Marma s serve like pranic switches that can be used to turn Prana up or down, on or off at various places on the body. Through manipulation of marmas, Prana can be directed to remove blockages, improve energy flow or tap hidden energy reserves and make connections with the greater powers of life and nature. This makes therapy an important tool of or The condition of marmas is an important diagnostic tool in Ayurveda. At marma sites stress and negative emotions get lodged and are held, sometimes for years. Disease is reflected in pain, blockage or swell ing in these areas even before it may manifest outwardly in the full range of disease symptoms. Ayurvedic doctors palpate marmas as an integral part of patien t examination and gain much information from them. Relieving pain, blockag e or swelling at marma sites is an important therapeutic aid and one of the first stage s of man y Ayurvedi c Marmas are key locations for Ayurvedic bodywork and massage. The Ayurvedic massage therapist will focus on marma regions that are in need of stimulation or of release and use the appropriate methods to adjust their energy flow. Ayurveda treats marmas with pressure, heat, needles, massage oils, herbs or aromatic providing many tools for working with our interna l energies through them . Marmas are a common topic in the three great Ayurveda classics of and which provide a wealth of informatio n on their location, function and application. Marma therapy can be used along with all Ayurvedic therapies from detoxificatio n to tonification and rejuvenation, from self-care to intricate clinical procedures like Panch a Karma. M a r ma s a n d t h e S y s t e m o f Y o g a Marmas are key energy centers for the practice of yoga on all levels from yoga postures (Asanas) to deep meditation Yoga postures af fect the energ y held in the limbs, joints and spine, which all contain impor tant marmas . Asana s can be used to stimulate and balance marmas in various Similarly, certain marmas can be manipulated while a person is performing variou s asana s in order to augmen t thei r Marmas connect to the (subtle nerves) and (energy cen ters) of the subtle body and the mind. They govern the interface between the physical and subtle (pranic) bodies and the interchange of energy and information betwee n them. This means that marmas are important for

Introduction to

healing the subtle body as well as the physical body. Through using marmas we can restore the proper connection between the subtle body (our inter nal energy, moods and emotions) and the physical body (our material con dition), resulting in increased health and vitality on both levels . As the important bodily sites in which Prana is located, marmas can be used along with yogic breathing practices Through yogic breathing, we can direc t Prana through different marmas for healing pur poses, improving thei r energy flow from within. Marmas are key places where stress and attachmen t accumulate , blocking the free flow of energy and They can be treated throug h relaxation techniques and the yogic practice of (yogic internalizatio n method s and sensory therapies) to release such blockages . Marmas similarly have a place in higher Yoga practices of concentra tion, mantra and meditation. Special mantras can be used with particula r marmas in order to increase physical or psychologica l strength, adaptabil ity and immunity. Those who meditate regularly become sensitive to the condition of marmas and aware of the flow of energy through them, which they can learn to modify through thought and will power Through developing mental concentration , meditators can learn to energize or clea r points , withou t requirin g any externa l Therefore, a good Yoga teacher should possess a good knowledge of marmas and how they relate to various Yoga A serious Yoga student shoul d not overloo k the locatio n or functio n of marma s in devel oping an effectiv e M a r m a s a n d V e d i c S c i e n ce s The science of marma is an integral part of all the or sciences that emerged in India in ancient The Rig Veda, the oldest Vedic text, is a collection of mantras, which are words of power or primal sounds that mirro r the workings of the universe on all levels. These Vedic essence of which is the Divine word the the sensitive energy points that govern the greater uni verse and its processes. Just as mantras are the seed-power s that underli e speech and language, so marmas are the seed-sites that underlie the body and its movement . The Vedic vision regards the entire universe or macrocosm as the cos mic person or with the human body as a replica or miniature, a microcosm. Thi s means that the mapping of the energy fields in the hu man body reflects that of the universe as a whole. The science of marm a

Marmas: Energy Points of Yoga and Ayurveda

arose from this view that our or life energy field adheres to the same pattern as the world of nature . Originally marma was part of Vedic martial arts or Veda, which is one of the four Upavedas or secondary Vedas.

Four Upavedas or Secondary Veda s


Dhanur 2. 3. Sthapatya arts for both body and mind dance and literatur e or directional influences and architectur e

Yet the science of marma is an important part of all Vedic con nected to all Vedic disciplines from dance to astrology. It reflects the music of nature and the points at which our body can receive the influences of the four It connects us to the cosmic rhythms through which our life reaches out to the universal life. M a r ma , T a n tr a a n d S i d d h a M e d i c in e Marmas are particularly important in the Siddha system of medicine, a Tantric and South Indian form of Ayurveda. In the Siddha system, marmas are referred to under the term an old synonym for marma as a bodily site that requires protection. The Vedic rishi and sage is considered to be the founde r of the science of varma . According to the Siddha system, the entire universe originates from the union of Lord his wife or con sciousness-force (Cit-Shakti). Shiva is closely connected to Prana. Prana at rest is Shiva and in motion is Shakti. The use of marma or varma as a form of energ y treatmen t connects to both Shiva and Shakti forces . In Siddha thought, varma points are invisible but can be traced wher e body, mind and psychic energies concentrate together. As such, they are places where the vital energy in the body can become This can be due eithe r to external injuries or internal factors like fear or anger. Such blockages can be perceived as a kind of psychic energy. Therefore, marmas can be controlle d by meditation, mantra, Pranayama and other yogic methods. Marmas can also be used for enhancing mental and spiritual powers. The Siddha syste m refers to marmas relative to the effects of the Moon and the planets on the human body, bringing in an astrological link as well.

Introduction to Marmas

H i s t o r i ca l B a c k g r o un d o f M a r m a s The science of marma can be traced along with the history of civilization and healing in ancient India, which is one of the oldest and most sophisti cated civilization s in the This begins with the ancient Sarasvati cultur e (3500-170 0 B C E ) , the largest urban civilization of the world at that time, as revealed in large archaeologica l sites like Harappa, Mohenjodaro, Rakhigarh i and most of which are located on the long dried-up Sarasvati River in Nort h The science of marma grew up along with other Vedic disciplines from this period, including the science of Yoga, which is evident from the many seals of figures in Yoga and meditation postures found in such sites. Early Vedi c texts , probably dating from this time, describe major marma regions like the head, the heart and the navel, along with the various Pranas, and the tissue s and organ s of the After this long formative era came the classical period of Ayurved a B CE- 7 0 0 AD ) in which the main Ayurvedic texts were compiled like Ashtanga and Ashtanga Sangraha. These classics contain references to marmas, particularly Sushruta who was himself a surgeon. This was the same period in which yogic texts describing asana, Pranayama and nadi s mentioned the use of marmas as well. In the later part of this period, the Buddhist religion spread Ayurveda, marma therapy and related martial arts east to China and Japan . After this classical period came a long decline in Ayurveda, brough t about by foreign invasions and colonial rule, which lasted up to modern in which many texts and practices were lost, including much signifi cant information about marmas. Only during the recent period since India's independenc e in 19 4 7 has a revival of Ayurveda brought about new research on topics like marma, which is now being viewed as one of the most importan t aspects of Ayurveda requiring a new critical examinatio n and application . M a r ma s a n d M a r t ia l A r t s The knowledge of marmas was part of the path of the warrior who learned to master his Prana for both defensive and offensive The ancien t Vedic warrior code emphasized the developmen t of personal energy, cour age and which rested on the knowledge and control of Prana and its key sites within the body.

Marmas: Energy Points of Yoga and Ayurveda

Marmas were associated with the use of armor for the body, called in Sanskrit, which was devised to protect these vital points from injury. The first references to marma in the Rig-Veda speak of using varma or protectiv e coverings to protect these It refers to prayer or man tra (Brahman) as the best protection (varma) for these marmas, showing a spiritual view behind the use of marmas from the very beginning. This tradition continued as the use of mantras for protective purposes . The great epic Mahabharata, in which the of Sri Krishna occurs, contains many references to marma and It mentions pro tective coverings for the marmas of elephants and horses as well of sol diers. At that time great warriors could use their powers of Prana and mental force (mantra) as fighting tools, energizing arrows with natural forces like fire or lightning. The Mahabharata details a number of such encounters betwee n great warriors like and who could only be defeated if their marma point s were exposed . Today these Vedic martial arts are best preserved in South India, wher e traditional martial arts like at and Payirchi Tamil Nadu) are still commonly practiced. The highest form of martial arts is called Marma Adi or Varma Adi, in which the knowledge of marmas is central. From this art of self-defense originated the Varma or Varma Marma or Varma therapy . Exper t physician s in this therap y were highly regarde d and often becam e royal The spiritual traditions of India have always emphasized the principle of non-harming or non-violence as the basis of spiritual prac tices. Monk s were not allowed to use weapons for self-defense, so martial arts were taugh t to them for unarmed self-protection . The Buddhist text a dialogue betwee n King Milinda and the monk Nagasena , dating from the second century B C E , explains unarmed self-defense as one of the nineteen monastic arts. Such martial arts gained prominence when Buddhism spread beyond the boundaries of India into China, Indo nesia and Thailand, where the monks no longer had the protection of the kings that they generally had in India . It is possible that Traditional Chinese Medicine adapted aspects of marma therapy, which has much in common with acupuncture, from Ayurveda and Siddha Medicine. who traditionally brought both Zen meditatio n and martial arts to China in the sixth century, is said to have originated from the famous South Indian town of Kanchipuram , a famous center of learning for yogic disciplines and one of the seven sacred cities of the subcontinent .

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Introduction to Marmas

Yet whateve r the history may be, marma s and similar energy practice s have always been with us in one form or anothe r and are an integra l part of the new world They are experiencin g a great revival again toda y in this age of new interes t in natural healing and traditiona l spirituality .

These p in s are c lle d ot a R c t fin s of an a c n t c y in the Gulf of e en d n ie it (India Today, Feb. 2 002 ) may go b c k w l l b fo e a e er 5 00 0 BCE . Note b o s like Gods, Sages and Kings (F le ) and In Search of the Cradle of Civilization ok raw y and F w ra ley) . A c rd g to r c n t a h e lo y , the S ra v t i R e r d d up o in g to g o g a l c an s , cim t e c o in ee rc a o g a sa iv rie w e lo ic h ge l a c a g s and the s iftin g of its h a w te hne h e d a rs , fin h g the riv r as a p re n l s a m a u d is in e e n ia tre ro n B E. C V d c c ltu e m s t be o e r th n th t to k o w of th s g a t riv r . ei u r u ld a a n i re e Note the in th s re ct . i spe 32.6 3 and Dronaparva 15. In the T m l la g a e m n y m u rip s are ava l e on th s s ce t art like a i nug a an sc t ilab i er Peerangi, Thiravugole, Varma Ponosi, Varma Kundoci, and Varma T hes e m nu rip s d sc e in d ta l a sc t e rib e i v rio s ty e s of m rm s and th i r tre tm n . a u p a a e a et For example ,

CHAPTER

Ayurvedi c Syste m of an d Mar m a

To properly approach marma therapy, we must understand its background in Ayurvedic medicine. The following chapter is a brief account of the Ayurvedic view of the body and the energies at work behind it, particularl y relative to the use of The reader can consult additional books on Ayurved a for mor e detail s on this grea t syste m of natura l Ayurveda like Yoga rests upon the ancient system of cosmol ogy for its theoretical background. The Samkhya system sets forth the of Yoga and Ayurveda, out of which their principles and prac tices evolved and whic h explains their goals. Samkhya recognizes two ulti mate universal principles of spirit and matter, and or the principle and the principle of From the union of Purusha and Prakriti arises the entire universe on all levels from inanimate matter to living beings of all types . Purusha is the or Se l f that is the ultimate source of life, awareness and feeling. The goal of human life is to realize this higher Self in which we can go beyond all suffering and pain, gaining release from karma and the cycle of birth and Connecting with the higher Self is the ultimate goal of Ayurvedi c healing as well as that of Yoga practice . Prakriti is Nature or the principle of manifestation in time and whose laws and processes underlie the body and mind and their interac tions. Just as our consciousnes s or eternal nature is one with the higher Self, our body and mind or temporal manifestation follows the laws of Nature or Prakriti. In order to realize our higher Self and spiritual freedom we mus t first harmonize our embodiment This means that balance and well-bein g in both body and mind are integral aspects of spiritual development and the foundation for deeper We cannot ignore the body to find the spirit. Rather the body is our vehicle for realizing the spirit . Relative to marmas as energy zones on the body, we could say that, on

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Introduction to Marmas

the highest level, marmas are places in the body where Purusha and interface, where consciousnes s and Prana are reflecte d in our psycho-physica l structure and dynamic Marmas help us harmonize our Prakriti practical manifestation ) and our Purusha (our quest for

Th e Three Guna s and the Five Element s


The Purusha is a homogenous entity composed of pure consciousnes s that serves as the seer and witness behind the processes of nature, which func tion through its presence. Prakriti or Nature, however, is a heterogeneou s substance with diverse actions. It is composed of the three gunas or prime qualities sattva (balance and intelligence) rajas (action and energy) and (inerti a or materiality) and their ever-changin g permutations and interactions . The gunas are the primordial forces behind cosmic evolution, which proceeds from matter (tamas) to life (rajas) and mind Only from the level of pure sattva (the clarity of the higher mind) can we have an enduring acces s to the Purusha or higher Self, whose nature is extremely Fo r this reason , both Yoga and Ayurveda emphasize the cultivation of sattva Marmas can be used to balance our Prana or vital energy and increase sattva . From the combination of the three gunas arises the five great element s (Pancha Mahabhutas) of earth, water, fire, air and solid, liquid, radiant, gaseou s and etheric forms of are central to both yogic and Ayurvedi c thought. The elements show that the entire universe consists of differen t frequencies or vibrations of the same underlying stance (Prakriti), just as water can be found in solid, liquid and gaseous forms. From these five great elements the three biological humors or main factors of Ayurvedic thought. The doshas are the underly ing energetic force s behind the workings of both body and mind. They represent the five elements imbued with the life-force (Prana). Each dosha consists of two of the five great elements as well as a portion of the three gunas .

ELEMEN T
Ethe r Air Fire Wate r Earth

GUN A
Sattva Rajas Sattva Sattva Tamas

DOSH A
Vata Vata Pitta Kapha/Pitt a Kaph a

Rajas Tamas

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In this the subtle element s of air and ether (Vata dosha) control the gros s element s of earth, water and fire (Kapha and Pitta Most marmas are locate d near joints and orifices that contain space and hold air or energy. Marma s are importan t centers that govern the air and ether element s in the body and therefor e can be used to contro l Kapha the element s in the body as a whole.

Th e T h r e e Dosh a s The three doshas or biologica l humors are the prime factors be hind both health and To understand them more easily, we can compar e them to the thre e main forces at work in the atmo Vata as wind, Pitta as hea t (particularl y the force of the and Kapha as moistur e (both on Eart h and in the atmo Wind, hea t (tempera ture) and moistur e in their interactio n create all the weathe r pattern s on Earth. They are responsibl e for all weathe r change s and the externa l cli mate as they fluctuat e throughou t the Similarly , the three doshas rule over our interna l climate or interna l atmosphere by their ever changin g interaction s of movemen t heat (Pitta) and moistur e (Kapha ) through the rhythm s of time and the aging process. Health consist s of the timely developmen t and harmoniou s inter action of the three doshas. Disease is caused by their imbalances , excesse s and inappropriat e Vat a Dosh a The Principle of

Movement

or

Propulsion

Vata means which moves or convey s It is compose d of the ether and air elements , which are its condition s of rest (ether) and movement (air) . Vata is responsibl e for all major and minor, perceptibl e and impercep tible movement s in the body. It is the prime force that govern s the transportation of the discharg e of and the elimina

tion of waste-materials . Its main physica l disorder s are tissue depletion ,

Introduction to Marmas

debility, dehydration and disturbances to the mind and nervous system . Vata governs the mind and the senses, which function through its bioelectrical force, ensuring their quick and balanced function. It gives agility, adaptability and good communicatio n skills to the mind. Emo tionally, Vata's main disturbances are fear and anxiety. It causes and instability when imbalanced when in excess . Vata's subtle or master form is Prana or the life-force, the prime vital energy behind all that we do. Prana is responsible for our organic equi librium, hormonal secretions, growth, healing, creativity and rejuvena tion. It is the master force behind all our states and conditions of body and mind . Vata's main site in the digestive system is the large intestine where it accumulates in the form of waste From there it gets transported by the circulatory system to weak sites in the body where it causes various Vata diseases like arthritis, weight loss, insomnia, mental agitation and nervous system disorders . Marma therapy is an important way of working on Prana, which governs our entire functioning. Prana in turn is connected to Vata dosha or the biologica l air-humor, which therefore is the most important of the humors in the development and treatment of disease. This makes marmas particu larly important in dealing with Vata, which relates to deep-seated, chronic and degenerative diseases . Depending on its site and function, Vata is divided into five types or Prana, Udana, Vyana, and Apana. These are called the five Pranas, five Vatas or, more specifically, the five Vayus or airs. They are also important for the practice of Yoga and for the interface of Yoga and Ayurveda . Prana Vayu is responsible for the intake of nutrients that provide fuel for the body and mind, including food, water, air and impressions. Its main region in the body is in the region of the head and it is connected to the marmas located Prana Vata also has a special correspondenc e to the nerves . Udana Vayu is responsible for the upward movement of energy as in exhalation, speech, will and effort. Its main region in the body is the neck and it is connected to the marmas located there. Udana has a special correspondenc e with the Vyana Vayu is responsible for the outward movement of energy as in the extension of the limbs or the arterial flow of the blood. Its main region in the body is the chest, arms and hands and it is connected to the marmas located there. Vyana has a special correspondenc e with the

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ligaments . Vayu is responsibl e for the inward movemen t of energy as in the contraction of the limbs and the venous flow of the blood. It facilitate s the breakin g down and digestio n of food. Its main region in the body is the navel and digestiv e organs and it is connecte d to the marma s lo cated there. Samana has a special correspondenc e with fat tissue . Vayu is responsibl e for the downwar d movemen t as in the dis charge of the feces, urine or menstrua l fluid. Its main region of the body is the lower abdomen , legs and feet and it is connecte d to the marmas located As it govern s Vata's site of accumulatio n in the large intestine , it is the main form of Vata for the treatmen t of disease in general. Apana has a special correspondenc e with the bones .

Of the five forms of Vata Dosha, marma s are most connecte d to Vyan a Vayu, which govern s the skin, circulatio n and the movemen t of Prana or vital energy. Therapeuti c touch occurs mainly through Vyana, which dis tributes Prana throughou t the body and can direct Prana as a healing forc e outside the body as well. Vyana also distribute s the effects of herbs and oils through marma s to the rest of the body. 2 . Pitt a Dosh a The Principle of

Digestion

or

Thermogenesis

Pitta means which cooks or digests things'. It is compose d of the fire and water element s (with the oily aspect of liquids providin g for its fuel in the Pitta is responsibl e for the conversio n of food into heat, tissues and It govern s digestio n and metabolis m from the cellular level to the tissu e level, to that of the body as a whole. Its main physica l disorders are fever , infection , inflammatio n and bleeding . At the mental level, Pitta is responsibl e for perception , judgmen t and determination and gives clarity and discriminatio n to the mind. Emo tionally, Pitta creates drive and passion and its main disturbanc e is an ger, which is toxic emotiona l heat or fire . Pitta's subtle or master form is called Tejas which provide s positiv e warmth, radianc e and insight. Tejas gives sexual vitality , courage and the ability to fight disease and resist cold . Pitta's main site in the body is the small where it accumulate s in the form of acid and heat. From there it gets transporte d by the circu latory system to weak sites in the body and causes various Pitta disease s like ulcers, infection s and inflammatio n of differen t types, particularl y blood

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Introduction to Marmas

Pitta dosha is divide d into five types or Alochaka and tion. Sadhaka Pitta is responsible for the digestion of nerve impulses by the brain. Marmas on the skull and brain generally relate to Sadhaka Pitta . Alochaka Pitta is responsible for the digestion of light through the eyes (and for digestion through the other senses). Marmas on the face and near the eyes relate to Alochaka Pitta . Bhrajaka Pitta is responsible for the digestion of sunlight and warmt h through the skin. Marmas on the extremities and in the chest relate to Bhrajaka Pitta . Pachaka Pitta is responsible for the digestion of food through the diges tive tract (particularly the small Marmas in the navel area relate to Pachak a Pitta. As it governs Pitta's site of accumulation in the small it is the main form of Pitta for the treatment of disease in general . Ranjaka Pitta is responsible for the coloring of the blood, the bile, the urine and the feces and works mainly through the liver. Marmas in the region of the liver relate to Ranjaka Pitta . Marma therapy can increase or decrease heat in the body, directly impact ing Pitta dosha. Marmas have a special connection to Bhrajaka Pitta which governs the skin and joints where most marmas are located. This means that Bhrajaka Pitta is usually the most important form of Pitta rela tive to marm a therapy. The application of therapeutic touch, heat or the use of aromatic oils directly affects Bhrajaka Pitta and through it the other forms of Pitta . 3 . K a ph a D o sh a The of Cohesion govern specific forms of diges

Coherence

or

Kapha means which holds things It is composed of wa ter and earth elements, which are its states of motion (water) and rest (earth). Kapha is responsible for the formation of new tissue, for hydration, nu trition, lubrication and protection of the body against heat, wind, wear and tear. The body as a whole is composed mainly of Kapha and Kapha's main physical disorders are accumulation s of mucus, water or excess tissu e development , particularly fat or adipose tissue . Psychologically , Kapha is the basis of feeling and emotion, love and

caring . It impart s stability , calm and contentmen t to the mind .

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tionally, its main disturbance is attachment, which results from too much heaviness (earth and water) in the mind. Kapha's subtle or master form is called Ojas, which is the essence of all the bodily tissues. Ojas is responsible for resistance to endur strength, fertility and longevity. Ojas provides the foun dation for good health, emotional happiness and peace of mind. Kapha's main site in the body is the stomach, where it accumulates in the form of mucus or phlegm. From there it gets transported by the circu latory system to weak sites in the body and causes various Kapha dis eases like asthma, diabetes, edema, heart disease and obesity . Kapha' s subtype s Avalambaka, cation . or subdosha s and are Sleshaka, govern specific forms of lubri brain and nervou s heart and spine. tongue and sense of the head and

Tarpaka Kapha is responsible for lubrication of the system. It mainly relates to marmas on the head, skull, Bodhaka Kapha is responsible for lubrication of the organs in the head. It relates to marmas in the region

Sleshaka Kapha is responsible for lubrication of the joints. It relates to marma point s locate d in the joint s and Kapha is responsible for lubrication of the digestive tract. It relates to marmas in the region of the stomach . Avalambaka Kapha is responsible for lubrication of the heart and lungs. It relates to marmas in the chest region. As it governs Kapha's site of accumulation in the stomach, it is the main form of Kapha for the treat ment of disease in general . Marma therapy can be used to promote the circulation of Prana and break up accumulations of Kapha, which is increased by stagnation and lack of movement. As marmas are commonly connected to joints, they have a special association with Sleshaka Kapha . Just as the doshas work together for creating health or disease, so do the subdoshas . Prana Vayu, Sadhaka Pitta and Tarpaka Kapha relate to the brain, spine and nervous system and the region of the along with the marmas in these Udana Vayu, Alochaka Pitta and Bodhaka Kapha relate to the senses , face, mouth and neck, along with the marmas in these areas . Vayu, Pachaka Pitta and Kledaka Kapha relate to the digestiv e

1 8 Introduction Marmas

to

system, mainly the stomach and small intestine s and Agni (digestiv e along with the marmas in these areas . Vyana Vayu, Bhrajak a Pitta and Sleshak a Kapha relate to the skin , joints, extremitie s and surface of the body, along with the marmas in these areas . Apana Vayu, Ranjaka Pitta and Avalambak a Kapha relate to the interna l organs of the lower abdomen , middle abdome n and chest, along wit h the marmas in these areas . Marmas , however, do not affect only the doshic factors in their own regio n of the body, though this is an importan t They often have broader and indirect influence s as well. Marmas on the extremities , for example, can strongly impact the internal organs and tissues of the body.

Th e Three Dosha s and Individua l Constitutiona l Type s


Marm a an d Ayurvedi c Constitutio n Besides their general role within the body as a whole, the doshas imprin t each one of us in a unique manner as our particula r nature or Usually one dosha marks our individual mind-bod y or Ayurvedic constitution as a Vata, Pitta or Kapha predominan t person . VATA TYP E S are airy in their physica l characteristic s with a thin low body weight, poor resistanc e to disease, and lack of tissue develop ment. They easily overexten d themselve s and fall into condition s of ex haustio n or debility . They are sensitiv e to wind, cold and dryness as environmental factors and feel better in condition s of warmth , mois ture, rest and nurturin g support. Psychologically , Vatas are restless, ac tive, nervous and creative individuals, with many talents, who are ofte n hypersensitive and can be a bit fragile . PITTA TYP E S are fiery in their physica l characteristic s with a moderat e frame, moderat e body weight, strong appetite , ruddy complexion , good circulatio n and warm extremities . They easily overhea t them selves and quickly come down with various infectiou s diseases . The y are sensitiv e to heat and light as environmenta l factors and feel bette r in condition s of coolnes s and calm. Psychologically , Pittas are deter mined, intelligent , motivate d and aggressiv e individuals who achiev e their goals in life but often run into conflict . KAPH A TYP E S are watery in their physica l characteristic s with a stocky frame, sturdy build and good tissue development . They dislik e

movement and easily accumulat e weight, water or mucus owing to

The Ayurvedic System of Healing and Marma Therapy

their slow metabolisms. They are sensitive to cold, dampness and stagnant air as environmental factors and feel better in conditions of warmth, dryness and increased activity. Psychologically , Kaphas are emotional, caring, stable and conservative types who value their feelings but easily get attached . Mixed doshic types also occur, in which two doshas exist in relativel y equal proportions as Vata-Pitta types, Pitta-Kapha types, or VataKapha types. Occasionally, people may have all three doshas in rela tively equal proportion (a Vata-Pitta-Kaph a These doshic con stitutions are the Ayurvedic mind-body types well-defined in general books on Ayurveda, which usually contain tests to help you deter mine what your type may be. Please examine such books for more information on this important Below is a typical Ayurvedic constitutional chart to help you determine your own constitution .

VATA (AIR) H IG T : E H or v r y s o t e hr

PITTA (FIRE ) m du m ei

KAPHA (WATER ) u u ll y sa so tb t hr u can be ta l a d la e l n rg la e , rg w ll e fo e d rm ha ,h d e vy ar to lo e w ig t s eh

FRAME:

th , b n , in o y g d oo m sc s u le lo , h r d w a to h l d o w ig t eh d l l or d s y u uk s a , ne u s m ll rvo d , th n ry i cro ke , o d p orl y o fo e d rm ro g , b e uh rittl

m e od rate , de velop e d m d ra e oe t

W IG T : E H

SKIN LU STER : EYES: H IR : A TEETH:

r d y , lu u s ud stro w rm , o y a il p rc g , ie in e s y inflamed a il th , o y in il m derate , o b din g lee g ms u s ft , p k o in

w it e or p l e h a co , d m , th k ld a p ic lag , w it e re h th k , o , w v y ic ily a large , w ll-fo e d e rm

SKIN TEXTURE : d , ro gh , thin ry u

N IL : A S

s ft , o

w it e J IN S : h O T

s , ca k e s y tiff r c a il : m d ra e oe t

lo s e o p o , va b e or ria l high , e c s iv e xes

firm , go d o m d ra e oe t b t u c n ta t os n

la e C C L T N rg IR U A IO APPE TITE :

va le , n rvo s riab e u

T IR T : H S SW EATING :

lo , s a t y w cn m d ra e oe t sat y cn

h h ig p s eb t rofu u n t o ed n urin g s w to sa t lo tr b t p fu e u ro s

20

Introduction to Marmas

STOOL : U IN T N : R A IO S N ITIV S E S ITIE IM UN E M FU C N : N TIO DISEAS E TENDENCY : DISEAS E TYPE: A T IT : C IV Y sw y lo l ENDURANCE : SLEEP: DREAMS : MEMORY : SPEECH: TEM PERAM ENT POSITIV E EMOTIONS : NEGATIV E EMOTIONS : F IT : A H TOTAL 30 :

hard or dry sat y cn

s ft , lo s e o o p fu e , y llo w ro s e

n rm l o a m d ra , c a r o e te le cold ,

co , dryn ss , ld e ha ,sn h , e t u lig t d p s sw d am ne in lo , v ria l e w a b m d ra , o e te s n itiv e to h a t es e fe e , in m a vr fla m tio n b o , liv r lo d e m d ra e oe t m d ra e but oe t fo se d cu va b e ria l

good , high

pain ne u s rvo high , re tle s s s po ,es y o r a il exhausted p o , d rb d or istu e fre u n , qet

co g stio ne n , ude s a lu g s e u , n m com lo , m v s w oe h h ig ec s s xe

m de o rate , in q e t , disturbed c lo fre u n o rfu l roaa ti c a r m n, c q ic k b u ut sh rp le so w b t l u s a y a se t-m d te d b n in e d s w , m lo io s lo edu fa t , fre u n t s qe s a , c tt g h rp u in m tiv te d o a cn n , o te t

: nervous , ch e l e ang ab c ne a o s rv tiv e a a ta ilit y dp b fe r a va b , e ti c ria le rra Vata

cu g e o ra a er ng s n , tro g determined cag e hn Pitta

lo e v a c mn t tta h e s ay , te d slow to Kapha

M a r m a Therap y an d Doshi c Type s Naturall y the treatmen t of marma s must conside r such constitutiona l fac tors. Marma s as energy centers are most connecte d with Prana and wit h the correspondin g Vata dosha as already but they have their effects on the other two doshas as well . VATA TYP E S can use marma points to monito r and treat the level of Vata in their bodies and minds. They can benefit from marma therap y that aims at reducin g Vata from its variou s places of accumulatio n in the large intestine , bones, joints and nervou s system . Marma therap y can be used for pain relief, reducin g stiffness , stoppin g tremors , reliev ing constipation , calmin g down anxiety , relievin g stress, promotin g

The Ayurvedic System of Healing and Marma Therapy

sleep and other Vata-reducin g actions . PITTA TYP E S can use marma points to monito r and treat the level of Pitta in their bodies and minds. They can benefit from marma therap y that aims at cooling down high Pitta from its various places of accumu lation in the small intestine , liver and blood. Marma therapy can be used for removin g acidity, cleansin g the blood, detoxifyin g the liver , countering infection , stoppin g inflammation , calming anger and othe r Pitta-reducing actions . KAPH A TYP E S can use marma points to monito r and treat the level of Kapha in their bodies and minds. They can benefit from marm a therapy that aims at moving and eliminatin g Kapha from its places of accumulation in the stomac h and lungs, lymphati c system and fat tis sues. Marma therapy can be used for reducin g mucus, removin g con gestion, eliminatin g edema, promotin g weight reduction , increasin g physical and mental activity and other Kapha-reducin g actions .

O the r Bodil y Factor s


Th e Seve n Tissue s To understan d the body, we must understan d the seven tissues that com pose it. The tissues are called dhatus meanin g constituents' . They are the main substance s that do not get eliminate d from the body for the reproductiv e They remain within the limit of the skin from the outsid e and the interna l membrane s of the organs and joints from within the body. The tissues go on developin g throughou t life. Their proper maintenanc e is essentia l for health and longevity. They are seven in number.
Name PLASMA Rasa dhatu 2. BLOOD dhatu 3. MUSCLE dhatu FAT Meda dhatu 5. BONE Asthi dhatu 6. NERVE dhatu Character Function Anatomical Counterpart S n ki B o d ve se s lo s l M s le s and in rn l uc te a o an s rg S und g adipo e urro in s fo a n s rm tio B n s and s e to n oe k le B i n and s in l c r d ra p a o

P s a and m c u s N tritio n la m uo u m m ra e s e b n H m g b n p rtio n O yg n tio n e o lo i o x ea of the b o d lo M s l e tis u e uc s Fat or adip e os tis u e s B n e tiss e and o u c rila e at g N rv e tis u e and e s b n e m rro w o a M ve e t o mn Lb a u ric tio n & cu io in g sh n S p o t and upr p te tio n ro c T nm s ra s is io n of n rv e im u e p lse s

7. REPRODUCTIVE R p d c e ro u tiv e tis u e R p d c s e ro u tio n T s s , u ru s e te te Shukra dhatu and s cre n s e tio

22

Introduction to Marmas

Marma therapy works on the tissues of the body by increasin g or decreas ing the circulatio n through them. In this way, it primaril y promote s the flow of blood and Bu t marma therapy is also an importan t method of workin g on the deeper tissues of bone and the seats of Prana and Vata. This is because many marma points are on the head or on the joints , both of which connec t directly to Prana and Vata . The outer tissues of plasma and blood are affected mainly by nutrition , our daily intake and digestio n of food and drink. The inner tissues of nerv e and reproductio n are affected mainly by our behavior , how we develop our minds and relate to other people. The intermediat e tissues of muscle , fat and bone have a strong nutritiona l componen t but are also strongl y af fected by our behavio r in terms of exercis e and posture . Marma therap y can help us change behaviora l patterns , though unlockin g the Prana held in the deeper tissues. Even deep-seate d psychologica l problem s and ad dictions can be treated by marma therapy , which release s them from the joints, bones and nerve tissues in which they are held . II. Waste-Materials The waste-material s or are the constituent s eliminate d from the body during the normal course of metabolism . They vary from gaseous , liquid, semi-solid , to solid in form. The three main malas or gross wastematerials are urine, feces, and sweat. Proper eliminatio n through the co lon is essentia l for controllin g Vata. Proper urinatio n is importan t for con trolling Pitta. Proper sweatin g is importan t for controllin g Kapha . In additio n to these are subtle waste-material s or exudation s eliminated from the epithelia l linings of the mouth, ears and genital organs. Other minute waste-product s are also formed during tissu e formatio n and as a by-produc t of cellular metabolis m. The main tissue that relates to Kapha is the plasma (Rasa dhatu), whic h produces Kapha (mucus ) as a waste-material . The main tissue relative to Pitta is the blood (Rakta dhatu), which produce s Pitta (bile or exces s blood) as a waste-material . Fo r this reason, most Kapha disease s involv e the plasma and lymph glands and most Pitta disease s relate to the blood . The main tissue relative to Vata is bone (Asthi which holds Vata in its joint s and porous spaces. While Vata is not a waste-materia l of the bone, it is containe d withi n the bones . Henc e mos t Vat a diseases , suc h as involv e the Health is maintaine d when waste-product s are eliminate d properl y and in a timely manner . Certain marma points can be used to promot e or inhibit their discharg e from the body in order to normaliz e them .

The Ayurvedic System of Healing and Marma Therapy

23

III . Channe l Systems Ayurved a views the human body as compose d of innumerabl e like irrigatio n canals, which supply the nutrient s to and remove waste ma terials from the various tissues. These channel s are called Srotas in San skrit, from the root meanin g with as the plural of the term. Th e channel s are similar to the physiologica l system s of Wester n medicine. Three channel s connec t the interior of the body to the outside environ ment, bringin g in nourishmen t to the body in the form of breath, food , and water : 1 . R e s p i r a t or y Srotas

the channel s that carry the breath and vital It consist s primaril y of the respirator y system , though aspects of the circu latory and digestiv e system s are involved as well. It relates to the subtle or energy bod y Kosha) which envelope s and gives life to the physical body . This system has its origin in the heart and gastrointestina l tract sinc e Prana is not only absorbe d through the lungs but also is taken from foo d through the digestiv e tract and is distribute d through the blood and plasma by the action of the heart. Many marma points work on this syste m because of their direct connectio n with Prana . 2 . Digestiv e Srotas a

Annavaha the channel s that carry food mainly the digestiv e system. Its origin is in the stomac h and the left side of body where most of the digestiv e tract is located . It is called Mahasrotas or as it is the main canal in the body, the gastro-intestina l tract . It is the dominan t system that govern s the physica l body, which itself is Annamaya Kosha or the made of Many marma points work on thi s syste m because it is the main system governin g the body. 3 . W a t e r - m e t a b o l is m Srotas or

Udakavaha Srotas, the channel s that carry (convey ) water (udaka or and regulat e water-metabolism . Its origin is the soft palate and the pancreas . It does not possess a simple anatomica l equivalen t in em medicine , but is like the fluid-absorbin g aspect of the digestiv e system . It govern s the assimilatio n of water and water-containin g includ ing the digestio n of sugar. Diabete s is an importan t disease that relates to

24

Introduction to Marmas

it. Certain marmas affect it, largely by stimulating the flow of fluids throughout the body. Three additional channels connect the interior of the body to the out side environment and provide the elimination of the three main wastematerials from the body. 4 . S w e a t in g Srotas Srotas, the channels that carry sweat or perspiration Its origin is fat from which sweat and the hair follicles to which the sebaceous gland s are connected. Certain marmas can be used to increase peripheral circulatio n and promote sweating, which is an im portant treatment for many disease s starting with the common cold . 5 . E x c r e t or y Srotas Srotas or the excretory system, the channel s that carry the feces Its origin is the colon and rectum, the organ of excretion . Certain marmas can be used to regulate elimination, either to relieve con stipation or to stop diarrhea . 6 . U r i n ar y Srotas Mutravaha Srotas or the urinary system, the channels that carry (convey) the urine Its origin is the bladder and the organs of urina tion. Certain marma s can be used to regulate urination . In addition, there are seven channel systems, one for each of the seven as well as one separate channel for the mind and making a total of fourtee n 7. Plasma , Lymphati c Blood , Circulator y 9. Muscle , Muscula r 10. Fat Adipos e Syste m 11. Bone , Skeleta l 12. Nerve , Nervou s 13 . Reproductive , Reproductiv e 14 . Mind , Menta l Srotas Srotas Srotas Srotas Srotas Srotas Srotas Srotas

Ther e are two more channel s in women: th e menstrual system or Srotas and lactation system or Stanyavaha Srotas. These are a

subset of the reproductive system

Srotas) and not alway s

The Ayurvedic System of Healing and Marma Therapy

25

counted separately . Marma s functio n as trigger points for regulatin g the movemen t of en ergy through these channels . They are closely connecte d to the anatomica l structures, organs and orifices through which these channel s flow . IV . th e Powe r o f Digestio n

The key force responsibl e for the functionin g of the body is Agni or the power of digestion . There are several forms of Agni or fire in the body . Most notable is the prime digestiv e fire or in the (Jatharagni ) which digests the food and beverage s or earth and water element s taken in through the mouth. Workin g along with it are the elementa l Agnis (Bhutagnis) located in the liver, which are responsibl e for convertin g the digested foo d mass into appropriat e forms of the five element s in the physical In addition , each of the seven tissues has its own Agni or digestive powe r responsibl e for its specific metabolis m called tissue Agni s thirteen forms of bodily Agnis in total . The digestiv e however, is not simply a materia l but a pranic or electrical fire. It helps to energiz e the bioelectrica l force of Prana to circu late through the fluids and tissues of the body. To create the proper fuel for this pranic fire, food must be broken down into a homogenou s semi-liqui d mass that is oily in nature. Only then can proper digestio n occur. Agni, like a flame in the abdomen , burns using the fuel of this oily food mass, just as a ghee flame burns using ghee or a candle burns using beeswax . The digestiv e fire or Agni is the key factor in health. When it is low or weak the power of digestio n is impaired . The improperl y digeste d foo d mass become s a toxic substanc e in the digestiv e tract, called in San skrit. Such toxins or Ama set in motion the disease process and invade the tissues and organs creating various ailments , minor or severe in nature. Various marma s can be treated for strengthenin g the digestiv e fire and for reducing Ama, aiding in its remova l from the body. In additio n to the digestiv e fire, the breath itself is a gaseou s or prani c fire (Pranagni ) that promote s the proper movemen t of energy throughou t the body. Variou s marma s can be used to increas e Pranagn i and keep our vital energy at its optima l conditio n and able to counter any disease at This pranic nature of Agni makes it possibl e to work on it through pranic healing and marma therapy . Each of the five senses also has its own Agni that aids in the receptio n and recognitio n of sensory In the same way, the mind has its own Agni through which it digests emotions , ideas and Cer -

26

Introduction to Marmas

tain marma s are special Agni points and can help catalyz e these differen t forms of Agni, which are all interrelated . So wheneve r we think of marm a points, we must conside r both Prana and Agni .

Note Ayurveda, Nature's Medicine (F w y and ra le by the a th r s of th s b o . u o i ok For e a p , c m e ta x m le o m n rie s on the Hatha Yoga a c s ic l w r k on Y a , lis s the re u tio n of la s a o og t dc ra s and in re s e of ja c a as one of the m i n g a s of a n a p c e a ol sa ra tic B h a a d a c m e ta ) . ra m n n o m n ry P leas e c n u t b o s like Ayurvedic Healing (F w y ) or Ayurveda, Nature's Medicine (F w y and R osl ok ra le ra le anade ) for m r e in rm tio . o fo a n T e e are c n e te d to R n k a P a th t a o w rk s in the hs onc a ja itt a ls o liv r . T e e are c n e te d to A c a a P a w ic h g v rn s the e hs onc lo h k itt h oe ey . es T e e are c n e te d to S d a a P a w ic h g v rn s m ta o m in the b in . hs onc ahk itt h oe e b lis ra

CHAPTER

Natu r e an d Classificatio n

The human body consists of an intricate network of cir cuits and tissues on many levels from the blood to the most refined nerve tissue of the brain. These interrelated channels create various patterns, linkages and interchanges across which energy and informa tion continually travel and circulate creating the mosaic of systems that makes up who we The great ancient Ayurvedic teacher Sushruta described the constitu ents of the body in terms of 7 layers of skin, 30 0 bones (including cartilages and teeth), 21 0 joints, 90 0 ligaments, 50 0 muscles, 16 major tendons, 70 0 veins, arteries and nerves, and 107 marmas. This means that marmas are important identifiable parts of our anatomy and reflect key physiologica l and psychologica l processes that occur within it. As a surgeon, Sushruta stressed the importance of marmas in surgical practice. He stated that in any surgica l procedure knowledge of marmas is as essential as knowledge of the nerves , muscles , bone s and bloo d Charaka mentioned six major marma regions in the head, neck, heart , bladder, (endocrine system) and (reproductive sys tem). These are sometime s reduced to three main vital (lower heart and head, which hous e our most important vital organs. Marmas, therefore, have a strong foundatio n in our anatomy and physiology . All major Ayurvedic texts refer to the total number of primary marmas as while the total number of primary marma regions is The differ ence betwee n these two numbers is because several marmas exist on both sides of the body, and some marmas contain more than one marma point . However, many Ayurvedic teachers recognize more marmas than thes e classical 107 . Even Sushruta lists additional marmas beyond Clearly ther e are more significant sites on the body than these 107. A number of these marmas are mentioned at various places in this book (like the point in the cente r of the forehea d or point s by the

28

Introduction to Marmas

sites along the spine). In fact, every point on the body is potentiall y a marma point becaus e the entire skin or surface of the body is itself a marma or sensitiv e region . On e could say that the skin itself is the marma , linking all the other marma s together . As Vata and Prana are held in the each joint can also be viewed as a potentia l marma region . Our interna l organs have additiona l marm a points , either directl y connecte d to them or connecte d by reflex point s that can affect them from a distance . On top of such universall y share d marma points, each person will have his or her own unique sensitiv e points dependin g upon weight , frame, posture , diet, behavio r and age . Therefore, we should not look at marma s in a rigid way, though the clas sical 107 marma s are a good foundatio n to start with. The same prin ciples of marma therapy can be applied to the extra marma s as well . The Thre e Dosha s and Thre e Mai n Marm a Site s Th e thre e
|

mai n

head, heart and blad der o r lower abdo th e thre e main sensitiv e zone s in the body. Althoug h all organs and struc (Heart) tures in the body can be related to all thre e doshas to some de gree, the lower abdo Basti (Bladder) men with its connec tion to the urinogeni and excretor y or gans relates more to The Thre e Dosha s & Thre e Main Marm a Region s Vata, the heart wit h its connectio n to the blood relates more with and the head with its pool of nerve and brain tissue relates more to Kapha . As the doshas are the thre e main forces responsibl e for creatin g the entire body, marma s reflect thei r impact on our physiolog y in variou s ways . Letha l and Therapeuti c Marma s Marmas are broadly classified into two categories as lethal or as therapeu tic Lethal marmas are points where the life-forc e can be hit and driven ou t of the body, causin g injury, unconsciousnes s or even death . Therapeutic points are region s where the vital force can be treated for

Marmas,

Their Nature and Classification

29

healing purposes . Lethal region s are areas which if struck or injure d threaten the life of a person . Therapeuti c region s are sensitiv e points tha t can be used to direct energy and counte r diseases . Lethal areas, there fore, are more importan t for the martia l arts, while therapeuti c points are more significan t for medica l purposes . Lethal marma s are often too sensitiv e for direct touch or manipula tion. As region s like the throat, they can be inappropriat e for stronge r therapies like acupressur e or acupuncture , but can be worked on in a limited manne r if touche d in a gentle way or if approache d throug h pranic healing . Thoug h not as significan t for most healing they are importan t for diagnosti c purpose s as disease is often reflecte d in pain or dysfunctio n at their locations . Therapeuti c regions , like marma s on the arms and legs, are the mos t important for treatmen t purposes . They are easy to work on throug h procedures like massage , acupuncture , oils, aromas or ointments . How ever, these two types of marma s cross over to a great extent. Vulnerabilit y can make an area importan t for therapeuti c purposes . In addition , letha l areas often have therapeuti c points around them that can be used whil e avoiding their more central vulnerabl e areas . Physica l and Energeti c Definition s of Marma s The concep t of marma include s a whole range of anatomica l structure s like the skin, bones, joints, nerves and interna l organs . Many marma s are on the limbs of the body, like those of the elbow and knee. We can easil y work upon these external marmas throug h therapeuti c touch. Som e marmas like Shringatak a (the soft palate) or Hriday a (heart) are locate d inside the body. These internal marma region s are best treated throug h reflex points above them on the surface of the body. Marma s are defined anatomicall y accordin g to their physica l loca tion. In this regard , the therapis t should know the structure s that defin e each marma and allow for its easy identification . However , we must no t regard locatio n of the marma as a simple physica l phenomenon . Marma s are primaril y centers ' where the life-forc e accumulate s and flows. Treatin g them is more a means of treatin g Prana (the electricit y running throug h the body) rather than simply workin g on physica l tis sues and organs (the light bulbs that carry the This is particu larly true of larger marmas , like the knee (Janu marma ) which have sen sitive points in their vicinit y that vary in locatio n relativ e to the conditio n of the person . This means that the main definitio n of marma s is not anatomica l bu t energetic, in terms of Prana and the doshas . Their exact locatio n de pends upon the Pranas of both the therapis t and the client, not simply on

30

Introduction to Marmas

a fixed physical location. The patient should generally be treated where the Prana is focused in the marma region, which is not a fixed phenom enon. In addition, a good healer can direct his or her Prana to a marma region at almost any point within it. The Prana of a good therapist can easily find the weak or blocked Prana points on the client even without an extensive physical examination. Prana will always work to heal Prana, just as water will naturally flow into low lying areas. the identifi cation of marmas is an art and a matter of not simply a physi ological definition. This is one reaso n why exact marma locations may be slightly different according to differen t Ayurvedi c Size of Marma s and Individua l Finge r Uni t Marmas are located and measured in size in terms of anguli or the of the respective individual. To determine this follow these instructions : 1. Join both open palms at ulnar (little finger) side. Measure the width of both palms at metacarpo-phalangia l joint s (bas e of the 3. Divide this by 8 (as this width is average for 8 fingers) . 4. This is individual finger unit. Generally the height and breadth of a person is around 84 times the individual figure unit as shown in the illustration at left. Marmas are classified ac cording to their range in size as one-half finger unit (An guli one finger unit, two finger units, three finger unit s or four finger units (fist Note Ap pendix 3 for more informa tion on this classification . We ca n se e from this classification tha t marma s vary greatly in size. Whil e many marmas are as small as one-hal f finger unit in size, several like Hriday a (heart) marma are as large as four finger units. Whil e

Marmas,

Their Nature and Classification

31

smalle r marma s can be called rately describe d as or M arm s an d Acupunctur a

the larger marma s are more accu

e Point s

Marma s resembl e acupunctur e points in propertie s and usages . Some times they are referre d to as acupressur e However , we must be careful no t to simply equate marma s and acupunctur e Marma s can be much large r in size, are not always related to acupunc ture meridian s and are fewe r in numbe r than acupunctur e points . A pinpoin t locatio n of marma s is not always as crucial as for acupunc ture points, particularl y when marma treatmen t centers on massag e rather than the use of needle s (which Ayurved a rarely So while recognizing the importan t similarities , we shouldn' t confus e marma s with acupunctur e points. The two can be very different . Table of Marma s Below is a table of the main marmas . As you can note, most marma s are named after their anatomica l position , which in severa l instance s occur s on both sides of the body. This list will serve as an introductio n to how marmas are viewed . Note Part II of the book for a detaile d descriptio n of each marma and note Appendix 3 for a more detaile d examinatio n of the Sanskrit meanin g of the marma name .

Marma Adhipati

Location

Meaning

Size unit ui t n ui t n unit ui t n ui t n ui t n

Number 1 2, 1 on e c h s e a id 2, 1 on e c h s e a id 2, 1 on e c h arm a 2, 1 on e c h a on e c h sid e a 2, 1 by e c h eye a

Top of the he d O a verlor d S ou e r b d e h ld la S oulde r h S oulde r b d e h la S o ld er hu

Ani (arm) (leg) Apalapa Apanga Apastambha Avarta

L w r re io n of The p in t of oe g o the up e r arm p a ne l e ed L w r re io n of The p in t of oe g o leg up r leg pe a ne l e ed A p t or a ill a U g a e d rm i x n u rd O te r co e r of L o in g a a y u rn ok w the e s ye U p r side of pe Wa t s n s h ta d side the ab o e n dm M p in t a o e C la ity ; from id o bv a m the eye s its se sitive e s n ns

unit 2, 1 on e c h a to the s e id ui t n by e h eye ac

32

Introduction to Marmas

Bahvi Basti Brihati Guda Gulpha Indrabasti (arm) Indrabasti (leg) Janu Kakshadhara Katikataruna Krikatika Kshipra (hand) Kshipra fo t o Kukundara Kurcha (hand) Kurcha fot o (hand) Kurchashira fot o Kurpara Lohitaksha (arm) Lohitaksha (leg) Manibandha w t ris Manya Nabhi

In id e of s u e r arm pp B a d re io n of ro g the u p r b c k pe a Aus n A k e jo t nl in Ha t er C nte r of e fo a m re r C nte r of e lo e r leg w K e e jo t n in Top of shou e r ld jo t in H - in t ipjo

W a t re te s h la to the arm W e or larg e id Aus n A k e jo t nl in Ha t er In ra s a w d ' rro In ra s a w d ' rro K e e jo t n in

1 uit n 4 u it s n ui t n 4 u it s n 2 u it s n 4 u it s n uit n ui t n 3 uit n

2, 1 on e c h side a 1 2, 1 on e c h side a 1 2, 1 by e c h a k e a nl 1 on e c h a a rm on e h leg ac 2, 1 on e c h k e e a n on e c h a s o lde r hu on e h s e ac id of the b c k a 2, 1 on e c h a of the n c k e 2, 1 on e c h h n d a a 2, 1 on e c h a on e h s e ac id 2, 1 on e c h h n d a a 2, 1 on e c h a on e h h n d ac a 2, 1 on e c h a on e c h e o w a lb 2, 1 on e h a m ac r on e c h leg a 2, 1 on e c h a 2, 1 on e c h a 1

L w r ab o e n B d r oe dm lad e

W a t u h ld s 1 u i t h po n the fla k n W a t ris s h e ui t n from the h ip

J in t of the n c kJ in t of o e o Vz unit side the n c k e B tw e n th m b e e u and in e x fin e r d g Q ic k to give u re u s s lt uit n Vz unit Vz unit 4 u it s n 4 u it s n 1 ui t n 1 ui t n 3 u it s n Vz unit ui t n 2 u it s n 4 u it s n 4 u it s n

B t e n big toe Q ic k to give ew e u and s c n d toe re u s eo s lt h a On e h side of W a t m rk s ac lo e r ilia c s in e the lo s w p in B tto m of th m b A k o t or o u n b nd e u l B to m of big toe A k o t or ot n bu l e nd Base of th m b jo t u in B s e of big a toe jo t in E o w jo t lb in L w r fro ta l end oe n of s o ld r jo t hu e in The h a d e of k rc a u h The h a d e of k rc a u h E o w join t lb R d in d e -jo te

L w r fro ta l end R d in d oe n e -jo te of the h jo t ip in W t ris Ba ee t r cl Side of s ide upper n c k e N el av Hn r oo N ave l

Marmas, Marma Location Base of sid e the th a t ro

Their Nature and Classification Size 4 u it s n uit n uit n the w is t a ui t n uit n Number 2, 1 on e c h a 2, 1 on e c h a 2, 1 on e c h a 2, 1 by e c h a

33

Meaning D r k blue a

The u p r reg n B tto k s pe io u c sid e of the b tto k s u c The u p r hips pe s e id Phana Shankha Side of the ns l ns s o tri o tril T ml e e p The side of

A serpe s nt' h d oo A cn h s l l oc he

2, 1 on e h sid e ac 4 5 on the 8, 4 on e c h side a of the n c k e 2, 1 on ea h side c of the b a t re s 2, 1 on e c h side a of the b a t re s 1 2, 1 on eac h h d an 2, 1 on e c h a 2, 1 by e c h ear a 2, 1 on e c h a 2, 1 by e c h ear a 2, 1 on e c h side a

Shringataka S f t p la e of o at the m u th o F issure s on s u l the s u l kl kl Sira Stanamula Stanarohita Sthapani Talahridaya (hand) Talahridaya fo t o Utkshepa B s e of the n c k a e R o t of o the b a t re s U p r reg n pe io of the b a t re s P in t b tw e n o e e the e e s y C nte r of the e palm of the ha d n

P c e we e la hr 4 u it s n fo r ro d s m e t u a e Sm i t u m M th r of the o e blood ve e s ss l 4 unit s 4 u it s n

R o t of b a t 2 u it s o re s n U p r re n pe gio of the b a t re s W tg es ha iv s p o t or fix s upr e C nte r of e the s rfa e u c uit n uit n ui t n uit n uit n 1 ui t n uit n 1 uit n

C nte r of the e C nte r of e sole of the fo t the s rfa e o u c A o e the ears bv W t is ha u w rd s p a

The m g n id-re io W a t is wd e h i leg of the u p r th h pe ig Vidhura Vitapa B h d and e in below the e r s a P erineu m D s s istre W t is hot ha or p in l a fu

Definition s of Marma s There are several classica l Ayurvedi c definition s of From thes e we can see that marma s are related to the energie s of the body, mind , Prana and They are key connectin g points to all aspects of our energies from the inmost consciousnes s to the outermos t physica l or gans . 1. Charak a defines marma s as sites where muscle , veins, ligaments , bones and joints meet together , though all these structure s need not be

34

Introduction to Marmas

present at each This explains marmas as important connectio n centers or crossroads in the physical body. 2. According to Vagbhatta, marmas are sites where important nerves come together along with related structures like muscles and a similar definition to that of He says that sites which are painful, tender and show abnormal pulsation should also be considered as marma or vital point s regardless of their anatomical structure. They are the seats of or This means that any sensitive point on the body is a potential marma. Any injured area, for example, becomes a kind of marma point until it is healed . 3. According to Sushruta, marmas are places where the three dosha s (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) are present along with their subtle forms as Prana, Tejas and Ojas and the three gunas of rajas and This means tha t marmas control not only the outward form of the doshas, but thei r inward essences or master forms as well (Prana, Tejas and Ojas) and also the mind (sattva). Relating to Ojas or the power of immunity, marmas help maintain our immune system and can be treated in order to boost its powers . Connected to Ojas their treatment can be also used for rejuvenation . Connected to the mind, their treatment can relieve stress and promot e meditation . 4. According to Dalhana, can cause death if injured is a While marma s do not always result in death, their impairment causes various disease s that can be difficult to treat . Marmas mark the junction of the body with the mind, which is why we can feel pain when they are touched. They are important sites that can stimulat e unconscious bodily processes, mental/sensor y responses or emotional reactions. Treating them can release negative emotions and remove mental blockages, including those of a subconscious nature (like This means that there is an important psychologica l side to their treatment . Compositio n of Marma s Marmas are classified according to their dominant physical constituents as muscle, vessel, ligament, joint or bone-based regions. The descriptions below follow except for the last category of Note Appen dix 3 for more information on this classification . 1. Muscle-based Marmas to muscle-based structures like facia, serous membranes, sheaths and muscles .

Marmas,

Their Nature and Classification

35

2. Vessel-based Marma (Sira to various vessels or chan nels supplying energy or fluids to the body, particularly the blood and lymphati c vessels . Sushrut a explain s four types of thes e A) Vessels (Vatavaha Sira), darkish in color. Vagbhatta says that impulse s flow in this type of channels, connecting them with the but they can also refer to energy carrying channels not entirely physical in nature . B) Pitta-carrying Vessels Sira), yellowish in color, connect ing them with heat, color (pigmentatio n factors), bile and lymph. They can also refer to smaller vessels carrying heat or enzymes . C) Vessels Sira), whitish in color, con necting them to lymphatic vessels, channels that carry mucus and other fluid or plasma-conveyin g D) Blood-carryin g Vessels Sira). Vagbhatta says that they are deep-seated and carry red-colored blood, which would identif y them with arterie s and Channels carrying the doshas are more energetic than anatomical in ba and so anatomical correlations are only general. Sushruta notes that single vessel carries Vata, Pitta or Kapha alone. All vessels to some degree carry all three of the so their distinctions are only general . 3 Ligament-based (Snayu to the tissues and structures that bind the bones and muscles together. There are tour types: ligaments proper , tendons, sphincter muscles and aponeuroses . 4. Bone-based Marmas (Astbi to bony tissue, can be classified into bone s proper, cartilage, teeth and nails. 5 Joint-based Marmas (Sandhi to the joints, are impor tant sensitive on the body for both Prana and the Joint s are classified into movable, partially movable and non-movable . These can be complex or large marmas . Symptom s of Injury to Marma s Marmas are susceptible to damage from injuries, falls, wounds and other catastrophic events. Their injury results bleeding , disorientation, loss of coordination , loss of consciousnes s and long term disability. It can affect all three doshas as well as the blood, Prana and the mind. Significant injury to marmas results in severe and often very spe cial symptoms .

36

Introduction to Marmas

notes, "When marmas are injured, a person rolls in bed due to pain, feelin g as though entering into emptiness. He suffers from faint- ness and restlessness and has difficulty breathing. Due to severe weak ness, he cannot lift his legs and hands, has a burning sensation in the heart, canno t stay in any posture for long and may soon succumb to death." The effects of injuries to marmas will vary according to the composi tion of the Any injury of a penetrating or lacerating type to a marma region will naturally produce hemorrhage and blood loss. If it occurs at a vessel type marma (veins and like in the region of the neck, the blood loss can be severe. If a joint-based (Sandhi) marma is injured it will become difficult to move the joint, which may become swollen, reddish or distorted. Injury to a muscle-based marma results in pain, paralysis, atroph y or edema of the muscle . Five Type s of Marma s Relativ e to Symptom s When Injure d Marmas are also classified according to five types relative to their degree of These are Sadya (Instan t Pranahara (Long-term (Fatal If Pierced), Vaikalyakara (Disability-Causing) and Rujakara (Pain-caus This is a very important consideration that is defined in terms of the five elements. However, the elements in this context do not reflect the dosha controlled by the marma but only the effects that occur if the marma is injured. Fo r example, marmas that govern the main heat centers in the body (bladder, navel and heart) are classified as fiery and are the most vulner able, but thes e are not all primary Pitta sites. Please examine Appendix 3 for more information on this important classification . Sadya Death-Causing Sadya Pranahara means taking the Prana or life-force like the burstin g of a balloon. They are sites where Prana can be quickly harme d and driven from the body. Significant injury to these marmas can prove fatal within twenty-four and usually results in severe pain along with loss of consciousness . These marmas are key points of vitality like the heart , navel or bladder, said to be fiery or heating in their degree of vulnerability. Whe n the heating power, bodily warmth and power of circulation which they control is weakened, our lives are imme diately threatened. Injury to thes e main heat-holding marmas results in severe symptoms ranging from interna l hemorrhage, coma, and irregular heartbeat (head and heart marmas) , bloo d in urine, extravasation of

Marmas,

Their Nature and Classification

37

blood or urine in peritoneal cavity (Basti marma), shock and pain. If the injury is serious, the person may not live long. 1. Death-Causing Kalantara Pranahara means the Prana or life-force away over like causing a leak in a vessel. They are points at which Prana can be remove d from the body in the long-term. Significant injury to these marmas causes our Prana to gradually drain away and can prove fatal after a perio d of two weeks or more. Injury to such locations harms ones vitality in a significant but not immediately life-threatenin g manner. These marmas are said to be both fiery and watery, or heating and cooling in their degree of vulnerability in nature. Their fiery nature makes them vulner able but their watery nature protects them, so harm to vitality from their injury is only in the long run. Such are points like Simanta (skull points) or points on the chest (Stanamula and Stanarohita) which are sensitive but have the protection of bones or muscles . 3. If Pierced (Fatal If Pierced) marmas can prove fatal if the point is pierced. Traditionally , it is said that if a foreign body or weapon becomes lodged at these points, it is life-threatenin g to remove it. This highlights the danger of damaging these points. These marmas are key points of vitality said to be airy in their degree of These are important Prana points on the head, like Sthapani (the point between the and so can cause severe pain or injury as well as disturb the mind. They hold and protect the life-force or but if punctured allow it to quickly leave the body, causing severe harm. Vaikalyakara marmas, if injured, result in damage to the marma, harmin g the tissues, bones, nerves and vessels involved, but nothing that will threate n the life of the person. These marmas are said to be watery or cooling in their degree of which preserves and protects them. Injury to them results more in debility than in death and is so These are mainly points on the arms and legs at a distance from the main vital organs and so injury to them canno t cause so much internal damage . 5. marmas result in recurrent or constant pain, depending upon the severity of the injury, which gets aggravated when the marma region is touched, moved or otherwise affected. Thes e

38

Introduction to Marmas

marmas are said to be both airy and fiery in their degree of whic h make s them sensitiv e and unstabl e and so results in severe pain and inflammatio n if injured . They are mainly sensitiv e joints like the wrists and Injur y to Marma s and the Thre e Dosha s Vata, Pitta and Kapha increas e at differen t marma s either accordin g to external factors like injury or accordin g to interna l factors like wron g diet. When in a conditio n of excess at a marma , each dosha will manifes t its characteristi c symptoms . Understandin g we can monito r the doshic imbalance s at marma sites. Note the two sets of factors and symp toms below . Factor s tha t Increas e the Dosha s at Marm a Site s VATA D O S H A is most likely to get disturbe d by externa l injuries to marmas, particularl y marma s that relate to nerves, bones or joints, or injuries that result in significan t blood loss. Externa l factors of cold , dryness and wind also cause Vata to increas e at various marmas . Vata is disturbed at marma s owing to interna l factors of weakness , tissue defi ciency, nervou s digestio n or hyperactivity . PITTA D O S H A increase s at marma s owing to interna l factors of hy peracidity, fever, inflammatio n or toxic blood. Externa l factors like overexposur e to heat , brigh t light s or causti c chemical s also caus e it to KAPH A D O S H A increase s at marma s owing to interna l factors of accumulation of weight, water (edema) , mucus, congestio n or lack of movement in the region. Externa l factors like cold, dampnes s and stag nant air also cause it to increase . Symptom s of Exces s Dosha s at Marm a Site s IF VATA IS D I S T U R B E D AT AN Y MARM A , there will be severe pain not only at the marma site but in the entire body. Vata symptom s like fear, anxiety , tremors , constipation , nervou s indigestion , insomni a and nervou s agitatio n wil l therapie s like the applicatio n of heat, warm oil massage , or Vata-reducing herbs like ginger, calamu s or ashwagandh a will bring thes e symptoms down . IF PITTA GE T S DISTURB E D AT AN Y MARM A , there will be feel ings of heat, irritabilit y and fever often extendin g to the entire body . Pitta symptom s like inflammatio n or bleedin g at the marma point wil l

Marmas,

Their Nature and Classification

39

combine with general Pitta symptom s like burning sensations , hypera cidity, loose stool, red eyes or intoleranc e to light . Anti-Pitt a therapie s such as the applicatio n of cold cooling oils like coconut, and cooling herbs like sandalwoo d or rose will bring thes e symptoms down. WH E N KAP H A B E C O M E S I NCREAS E D A T AN Y MARM A , there will be swelling, accumulatio n of fluid (edema) and congestion . Overall Kapha symptom s will increase with possible feelings of heavi ness, lethargy, cough, tirednes s and dislike of movement . therapie s such as the applicatio n of heat, fasting, taking of hot spice s like ginger and cayenne , or using warmin g aromati c oils like eucalyptus or ginger will reduce these symptoms .

Sushruta Samhita Sharira Sushruta Samhita Sharira Sthana VI.3, Ashtanga Sangraha sh.

Ashtanga

sh.4.

Sushruta Samhita Chikitsa Sthana VII.38 and Sharira Sthana IX. 12, for exam ple , m n n s six e tio a d n l m r a s re tin g to re ro u tiv e s s m p b m s a n g wt h d itio a am la p dc y te ro le lo i and B s i m rm s . at a a eai M vah , Y n , A ta p a a sro s and utra a oi n hhl ta T e e are c lle d S v n , hs a Ashtanga Hridaya Sh. 4.37, Ashtanga Hridaya Sh. Sushruta Samhita, Sharira Sthana Sushruta Samhita, Sharira Sthana Ashtanga Sangraha sh.6.4. Ac c ordin g to G n n t h Sen, the e can be a a n su d aaa s gi b ivide d in o Aruna, n rv e (sym athe ) , t e p tic a rie , Keshika, c p rie , Gauri, ly p a c v s e s and Dhamani, n rve s (m rte s a illa s m h ti es l e otor) . ve , ins Ashtanga Sangraha S.sh7.26-27. Sushruta Samhita Sharira Sthana VI. 16. These fiv e type s of m rm s also re t e to d r n t a a m a l fa to . A c rd g to Sushruta Samhita, a a la iffee n to ic c rs c o in Sadya Pranahara (Im e t e D th au g ) m rm s are c m o d of all fiv e fa to s of veins , m dia ea -C sin a a o p se c r liga ents , m s le , b n s and jo ts . Th s e b lo g g to m uc s oe in o e n in Pranahara (L g r m D a -C u g ) on -te e th a sin m rm s are c m o e d of only four fa to . Vishalyaghna (F l If P a a o ps c rs ata ierce ) type s are c m o e d of th e d o ps re fa to . Vaikalyakara (D ility-C sing ) s s are c m o e d of two fa to s and only one fa to r is p se t c rs isab au ite o ps c r c re n in (P in a s g ) s s . The m r e fa to s in o e d in a m rm , the m r e d n e u s in r y to it a -c u in ite o c r v lv a a o a g ro ju Sushruta Samhita, Sharira Sthana.

is lik l y to b . e e

C HA PTE R

Yoga in its deeper sense is a spiritua l science of Self-realization . Its aim is to lift our awarenes s to a higher consciousnes s that transcend s pain and suffering, karma and rebirth. Toward this goal, the science of Yoga em ploys many practice s and techniques . Asanas or Yoga posture s work on our physical body to release stress, eliminat e toxins and balance our physica l energies. Asana is followe d by interna l method s of Pranayam a (breat h control) and Pratyahar a (contro l of the senses) to calm and balance our vital energy and sensory impulse s so that they do not disturb the mind . in turn, are followed by mantra and meditatio n to calm and balance the min d and make it receptiv e to higher influences . Traditiona l Yoga reflects the physiologica l view of Ayurvedi c medicin e with its doshas, tissues and channe l systems , includin g the role of marmas . Marmas are related to the chakra and nadi (subtle channel ) system s em phasized in yogic thought . They are the focus of various Yoga practices , particularly those involvin g Prana. This is because marma s are importan t pranic centers . They also hold negativ e emotion s and nervou s tension (par ticularly Throug h workin g on marma points, we can control our Prana. Throug h Prana we can control our sensory and motor organs, and eventuall y the entire mind-bod y complex , affordin g us easy access to the higher realms of yogic consciousness . M ar m as , C h a k r a s a n d N a d i s There are three levels of energy centers that link the body to the mind and higher chakras , the nadis and the marmas . Th e chakras are the energ y centers of the subtle body that are located along the spine. They are the subtles t of the three, being of the nature of pranic or centers' rather tha n mere physica l location s (which is why their actions are seldom perceptibl e at a physica l The nadis are the subtle channel s that run from the chakras to variou s points on the body and which energiz e our physiologica l They are

42

Introduction to Marmas

not physica l nerves but perceptibl e energy-flows . Marma s are sensitiv e regions that develop from the They distrib ute the Prana from the and the nadis throughou t the body as a whole. They can be felt as certain points or zones on the body. Therefore , we can understan d marma s as a developmen t on a physica l level of the energies tha t originat e from the chakras and the nadis . Three Types of Energy Center s 7 Chakra s 2. 14 Nadi s 3. 107 Marma s Marma s an d th e Seve n Chakra s There are six main chakras or energy centers distribute d along the spine as well as the seventh or main head center called the or petal that is connecte d to the brain. We should note that each of these chakras and its correspondin g region of the back is a kind of marma or sensitiv e area. We could say that the chakras are the main marma s or pranic (energy ) center s of the subtle body, which energiz e all the marma s or pranic centers of the physica l body .

Root

E arth , S e , m ll N ose , E in lim atio n

N di , a E c to y s s m x re r y te

Guda (anus )

2. Svadhishthana, W r , T ate aste , Khu N , u adi K ku a , u nd ra Sex T gu , R p du tio n on e e ro c g n l s te m e ita ys 3. F ,S ire ight , E yes , F e t V vodh r a nadi , e ish a Navel D et e s s m ig siv y te 4. Anahata, Heart 5. Vishuddha, Throat 6. Third Eye Air, T ouch , S , H d s V n a n , kin an aru adi C u to y irc la r ss m y te E e , S nd , th r ou E ,S ars peec h M , In r P rc p n ind ne e e tio S ras t i nadi , a va R sp to y e ira r ss m y te

V pa ita N b i (n ve ) ah a l H a a rid y (h eart ) Mna , ay

7. Sahasrara, Head

C onsciousne s

Ida, P g la , P in a ush a S an , thap i G andhari , P ya a svin i A pang a S ankh i h in nadis , N rv u s e o s te m ys nadi , A hip ti , d a B in ra

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

43

We will not go into great detail about the because this informa tion is covered in many However, we have presented their main factors of correlation relative to the marmas in a table below, including the elements, sens e organs, motor organs, sense qualities, nadis, and bodily systems relativ e to each . The important point to remember here is that through treating their re spective marmas, we can treat the nadis, elements, sense and motor organs, and other factors associated with the chakras. Fo r example, through treating the marmas in the region of the navel, one can work on the fire element in the body, including the digestive fire (Agni) and organs of the digestive sys tem, the sense of sight and the feet as a motor organ. Relative to the nadis referred to in the table, these will be explained shortly. M a r ma s a n d t h e F o u r t ee n N a di s Along with the seven chakras, the Yoga sys tem emphasizes fourteen nadis or channels of the subtle body. Eac h nadi is identified by a point, aperture or orifice on the sur face of the body that connects to it. All nadis begin at the root or base of spine, mov e parallel to th e Sushumna , which is the central nadi running up the re gion of the and branch out from the Sushumna at variou s places. Apart from the Sushumna, the mos t important nadis are the Pingala and the Ida which, through the breath, govern the energy flow on the right and left sides of the body. Eac h nadi is connected to certai n marmas. Through these marmas, we can treat the nadi and insure the prope r flow of Prana throug h it. Suc h very

point s are

Each chakra has a correspondin g nadi that carries its energy to variou s portions of the body.

44

Introduction to Marmas

Extent Apertur e Marma 2. Kuhu

Runs from the center of the root chakra to the tip of the rectum. Supplie s Prana to the organs of elimination . Apertur e is the anus. Relates to the root or earth chakr a and to Apana Vayu . Correspondin g marma is Gud a Chakra Runs from the base of the spine to the sex chakra and for ward to the end of the urethra. Supplie s Prana to the urinar y and reproductiv e Apertur e is the penis or chakra and to Apana Vayu . Correspondin g marm a is Bast i chakra Runs from the base of the spine to the navel chakra and from it throughou t the abdomen . Supplie s Prana to the di gestiv e system and digestiv e fire . Apertur e is the navel. Relates to the navel or fire chakr a and to Samana Vayu, Pachaka Pitta, Ranjaka Pitta and Kledaka Kapha. Support s the entire body through the digestive system and Agni . Correspondin g marma is Nabhi (navel) . chakra Relates to the sex or water

Extent

Apertur e Marm a 3. Extent

Apertur e

Marma

4 . Varun a Extent

Runs from the base of the spine to the heart chakra and from it throughou t the entire body. Supplie s Prana to the entire body, through the respirator y and circulator y systems and the skin . Apertur e is the skin. Relates to the heart or air chakra and to Vyana Vayu, Bhrajak a Pitta and Avalambak a Kapha This nadi allows for the deeper feeling and knowing of the heart to manifest . Main marma is Hridaya the chest . as well as other marmas in

Apertur e

Marma

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

45

5. Sarasvati Extent

chakra

Runs from the base of the spine to the throat chakra , branching out to the tip of the tongue. Supplie s Prana to the throat, mouth, tongue and vocal organs . Apertur e is the mouth and throat in general . Relates to the throat or ether chakra, to Udana Vayu and to Bodhak a Kapha. This nadi, as the name indicates , gives the powers of speech, song, taste, wisdom and mantra . Correspondin g marma is the tip of the tongue, which is not one of the classica l 107 marmas . A reflex point for the Sarasvati nadi is in the middle of the jaw below the lips . Marmas in the throat region like and Manya relat e to chakra

Apertur e

Marma

Sushumna Extent

Runs from the base of the spine to the top of the head, with many nadis branchin g out from it in the region of the third eye. Energize s the spine, the brain, the nerve tissue, and support s the bone tissue . Apertur e is the eyes, specificall y the point betwee n the eyes or third Collect s and distribute s the energy of all the nadis , particularl y the eight right-lef t predominan t nadis. Connecte d to Prana Vayu, Sadhak a Pitta and Tarpaka Kapha , Prana, Tejas and Ojas . Main marma s are Sthapan i (third eye) and Adhipat i (crow n

Apertur e

Marmas

Specia l N ad i s fo r t h e Thir d Ey e The third eye or Ajna Chakra is the origin of six nadis that supply the senses, two for each of the nostrils , eyes and ears . 1. Extent nad i Branche s out from the third goes to the right nostril , which is its orifice, and supplie s Prana to it. Also govern s the right nasal passage . Driving pranic channe l for fiery and Pitta activitie s of all types from digestio n to critical thinking . Also related to the root chakra which govern s the sense of smell. Supplie s en-

Effects

46

Introduction to Marmas

ergy to the right side of the body, stimulatin g all the righ t side nadis , Marm a Mai n marm a is the righ t Phan a marma .

2 . Ida nadi Extent Branche s out from the third eye, goes to the left nostril , which is its orifice, and supplie s Prana to it. Also govern s the left nasa l Main Prana channe l for watery and Kapha function s from tissue developmen t to sleep. Govern s inspired or visionar y speech. Causes the whole body to be nourishe d throug h Prana. Also related to the root which govern s the sense of smell. Supplie s energy to the left side of the body , stimulatin g all the left side nadis . Main marma is the left Phana marma . nadi

Effects

Marma

3. Pusha Extent

Branche s out from the third eye, goes to the right eye , which is its orifice, and supplie s Prana to it. Ruled mainl y by Prana as the main power of the senses . A very importan t nadi because the soul dwells in the righ t eye during the waking state. Meditatio n upon the Seer in the right eye is a major approac h to Self-realizatio n in Yoga . Relates to Alochak a Pitta (the form of Pitta gov erning the eyes) and to the navel chakra, which govern s the sense of sight . Main marma is the right Apanga marma . nadi

Effects

Marma

4. Gandhari Extent Effects

Branche s out from the third goes to the left which is its orifice, and supplie s Prana to it. Promote s dream, imaginatio n and creative vision. Also re lates to Alochak a Pitta and to the navel chakra whic h govern s the sense of sight . Main marma is the left Apanga marma .

Marma

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

47

5. Payasvini Extent Branche s out from the third eye, goes to the right ear , which is its orifice , and supplie s Prana to it. Also govern s the righ t Eustachia n At the right ear we hear the inner sounds of Yoga or the music of the soul. Connecte d to the throat chakra which govern s the sense of hearing . Main marma is the right Vidhur a marma . nadi Branche s out from the third eye, goes to the left ear, whic h is its orifice , and supplie s Prana to it. Also govern s the left Eustachia n Increas es faith and makes us receptiv e to higher devotiona l influences. Also connecte d to the throat chakra which gov erns the sense of hearing . Main marma is the left Vidhur a marma .

Effects

Marma 6. Extent

Affects

Marma

Th e T w o N a d i s fo r t h e A r m s a n d Leg s Two special nadis supply Prana to the right and left sides of the body and the arms and legs. Many differen t marma s occur in the field of these two nadis, which are very importan t for marma therapy . They relate to Vyan a Vayu or the outward-movin g vital air, though which our Prana radiate s out and interface s with the environment . They are connecte d to both the navel and heart chakras , which govern the hands and feet as motor or gans and the flow of energy throug h them .

Yashasvat i nad i Extent Runs from root chakra to the navel chakra where it branches out. Supplie s Prana to the right foot and right hand. Its energy comes to a center in the middle of the right hand and foot and from there radiate s out to the five fingers or toes , ending primaril y in the right thumb and big Aperture s are the tips of the right thumb and big toe . There is a strong healing energy potentia l throug h the palm of the right hand, which like the right eye relates to

Apertur e Effects

48

Introduction to Marmas

the soul and to fire. Relates to Vyana Vayu, Bhrajaka Pitta and Sleshaka Kapha . Marmas Main marmas are Kshipra and Talahridaya on the right side of the body on both the hands and the feet. Fo r all the marmas on the right side of the body, it is importan t to keep the energy flow in this channel clear and constant .

2 . Hastijih v a nad i Extent Runs from the root chakra to the navel chakra where it branches out. Supplies Prana to the left foot and left hand. Its energy comes to a center in the middle of the left hand and foot and from there radiates out to the five fingers or toes, ending primarily in the left thumb and big Apertures are the tip of the left thumb and big toe. The energy of the left hand is more cooling, soothing and nourishing than that of the right and is watery in nature. This nadi relates to Vyana Vayu, Bhrajaka Pitta and Sleshaka Kapha . Main marmas are Kshipra and Talahridaya on the left side of the body on both the hands and the feet. Fo r all the marmas on the left side of the body, it is important to keep the energy flow in this channel clear and constant .

Apertures Effects

Marmas

Marma s and Yog a Practices


Marmas are an important factor to consider in regard to all Yoga practice s from physical postures to Pranayama and meditation. They are an integral part of yogi c thinkin g and the yogi c understandin g of both body and M a r m a a n d A s a n a P r a c t ic e One of the main purposes of the asana practice (Yoga postures) is to insure the right flow of Prana through the various marma regions. As many marmas are located in the joints, asanas help keep the marmas clear and energized . Therefore, it is important for an effective asana practice to consider the condition of the different centers in the body, aiming at bringing better circulation to those marma regions that are stiff or Marma s that are sore indicate the need to exercise the surrounding muscles and joint s proper/y. Below are a few suggestive indications as this is an importan t topic in itself outside the main scope of this book. Please exam-

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

49

works on Yoga asanas for more detail on the poses referred Sitting poses in general, but particularly the lotus pose (padmasana) , serve to close and protect the marmas for the practice of meditation and for of our energie s of Prana and mind. The bound lotus in particular is a pose for locking and holdin g marma energy at an internal level. Twists are excellent for unlocking marma energy generally, through im proving the flow of Prana through the particularly for marmas in the back, hips and shoulders. Standing and extending poses (like trikonasana , parsvakonasana, or serve to open and expand the marma system, connectin g it with external sources of Prana and vitality . Backward bends (like ustrasana and urdhva dhanurasana ) generall y open the marmas located on the chest and the front of the body and can strongly stimulate marma energy. Forward bends (like janu sirsasana, and pascimottanasana ) are better for marmas on the back of the body and are more calming to marma energy. Poses that bring the chest forward like upward facing dog and th e cobr a pose (urdhv a and bhujangasana ) are good for stimulating marmas in the chest . Practices like bandha and which aim at opening up the solar plexus , are excellent for marmas in the stomach region and for regulating Pitta in that area of the body. Practices like whic h seal the energy in the root chakra, are excellent for marmas at the base of the spine and for regulating Vata in that area of the body. Practices like bandha and the more basic practice of Ujjayi are excellent for marmas in the throa t region and for regulating Kapha in that area of the body . Inverted poses aid in the stimulation of marmas in the head and uppe r region of the body, depending upon the nature of the The headstand is very powerful for marmas in the head. The shoulder stand is excel lent for marma s in the neck. Naturally, one must prepare for these poses properly, particularl y for the headstand . M a r m as , P r a t y a h ar a a n d P r a n a y am a Marmas as pranic centers can be easily affected through Pranayama . Through Pranayama or yogic breathing we increase the flow of Pran a through the chakras, nadis and marmas. Mos t notable in this regard is the practice of We can use the right nostril breathing (breathing in throug h the right nostril and out through the which is heating in nature, to energiz e the marmas on the right side of the

50

Introduction to Marmas

body. We can use left nostril breathing (breathing in through the nos out the right), which is cooling in nature, to energize the marmas on the left side of the body. Anothe r metho d is to use to open the marmas in the region of the head . Yet perhaps the main aspect of Yoga practice that actively considers the use of marmas is Pratyahara, th e fifth of the eight limbs of Yoga . Pratyahara mediates between the outer factors of Asana that works upon the physical the inner factors of specifically Dhyana or meditation that works upon the mind. Pratyahara is the door between the oute r and inner aspects of Yoga that allows us to turn our energy inward. Its role is crucial in taking Yoga practice from a mere physical exercise to a true spiritua l discipline. Pratyahara is placed be tween Pranayama or prani c energization , the fourth limb of Yoga, and to or mental concentration , the sixth limb of Yoga. It serves to take the Prana inward, which frees it for both spiritual and healing purposes . Pratyahara literally means like a turtle withdrawin g into its shell. It refers to various internalizatio n exercises designed to control the senses and motor organs and introvert the mind. Such Pratyahara practices includ e closing the eyes and ears to look and listen to the inner lights and sound s withi n and the practice of silence or not speaking in order to control the vocal organ. Common physical forms of Pratyahara consist of relaxation and releasing the energy in vari ous muscles and joints, whic h affects related marmas. This clears the en ergy in the organs and system that the marmas control . We can understand the relevance of marmas and Pratyahara when we consider the marmas as control points', through which Prana and the variou s organs of the body can be influenced. Each marma has corre sponding organs , systems, senses, nadis and chakras that it rules over. Through working on the particular marma, we can control or affect these factors in various therapeuti c The great yogic text, Vasishta contains an important sectio n explaining the use of specific marmas for the practice of Pratyahara. It states, "Great yogis ever praise Pratyahara as concentratio n (Dharana) on the eighteen marma places that hold Drawing the Prana from each of these place s is said to be the best form of Pratyahara. " We have included a translation and summar y of the materia l as it is not availabl e in T h e E i g h t ee n Y o gi c M a r m a R e g i on s a n d C o r r e s p o n d in g M a r m a s Toes Ankles Kshipra marm a Gulpha (ankle) marm a

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

51

3. Middle of the cal f Root of the kne e 5. Center of the kne e 6. Middle of the thig h 7. Anu s 8. Middle of the hip 9. Root of the urethr a 10. Navel Center of the hear t 12. Base of the throa t 13. Root of the tongu e 14. Root of the nos e 15. Center of the eye s 16. Middle of the brow s 17. Center of the forehea d 18. Top of the head

Indrabast i marm a No t a classica l marma , but can also be use d Janu marm a marma Guda marm a Kukundar a and Nitamb a marma s Vitapa marm a Nabhi (navel) marm a Hridaya (heart) marm a marma Shringatak a marm a Not a classica l marma , relates to Phana marma by the nostril s Apanga marm a Sthapan i marm a No t a classica l marma , but is still ver y useful. Adhipat i marm a

These eightee n marma regions include points for seven root of the anus (Muladhara) , the root of the urethra the navel (Manipura), the heart the root of the throat (Vishuddha) , the middle of the brows (Ajna) and the top of the head The re gions of the the root of the the root of the and the middle of the brows relate to the third eye or Ajna chakra as well. Th e point on the forehea d also relates to the crown chakra . These marma regions also relate to the fourtee n nadis. The root of the anus relates to Alambush a nadi. The root of the urethra relates to Kuh u nadi. The navel relates to Vishvodhar a nadi. The heart relates to Varun a nadi. The root of the tongue relates to the Sarasvat i nadi. The top of the head relates to the Sushumn a nadi. The root of the nose relates to Ida and Pingala nadis. The point betwee n the eyes relates to the Pusha and Gandhari nadis. The marma s along the legs relate to the Hastijihv a (lef t side) and Yashasvat i (right side) nadis . Marm a Meditatio n

Below is a marma meditatio n using marma points accordin g to this yogi c

teaching.

Samhita states, "One should practice concentratio n by

Introduction to Marmas

drawin g one's Prana by the power of attentio n from each of these marm a To do this practice the following method carefully , using inhala tion and exhalatio n at eac h marm a region , muc h like flexing and relaxin g of the Direct your attentio n to your toes. On inhalation , gather your energ y there. On exhalation , release it. Feel your toes energized , healed and relaxed. 2. Move your attentio n to your ankles. On inhalation , gather your energ y there. On exhalation , release it. your ankles energized , healed and relaxed. Move your attentio n to the middle of your On inhalation , gather your energ y there. On exhalation , release it. Fee l your calves ener gized, healed and relaxed . 4. Move your attentio n to the base of your knees. On inhalation , gathe r your energy there. On exhalation , release it. Feel the base of you r knees energized , healed and relaxed . 5. Move your attentio n to the middle of your knees. On inhalation , gathe r your energy there. On exhalation , release it. Feel the middle of you r knees energized , healed and relaxed . 6. Move your energy to the middle of your thighs. On inhalation , gathe r your energy there. On exhalation , release it. Feel your thighs ener gized, healed and relaxed . Move your energy to the root of your anus. On inhalation , gather you r energy there. On exhalation , release it. Fee l your anus energized , healed and relaxed . Move your energy to the middle of your hips. On inhalation , gathe r your energy there. On exhalation , release it. your hips energized , heale d and Move your energy to the root of your urethra . On inhalation , gathe r your energy there. On exhalation , release it. Feel your urethra ener gized, healed and relaxed .

7.

8.

9.

10. Move your energy to your navel. On inhalation , gather your energ y there. On exhalation , release it. your navel energized , healed and relaxed. Move your energy to your heart. On inhalation , gather your energy On exhalation , release it. your heart healed and relaxed . 12. Move your energy to the root of your throat. On inhalation , gathe r your energy there. On exhalation , release it. Feel your throat ener -

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

53

healed and relaxed . 13. Move your attention to the root of your On inhalation, gather your energ y there. On exhalation, release it. Feel your tongue ener gized, heale d and relaxed . 14. Move your attention to the root of your nose. On inhalation, gather your energy there. On exhalation, release it. your nose energized, healed and relaxed . 15. Move your attention to your On inhalation, gather your energ y there. On exhalation, release it. Feel your eyes energized, healed and relaxed . 16. Move your attention to the point between your brows. On inhalation , gather your energy there. On exhalation, release it. Feel your brows energized, healed and relaxed . 17. Move your attention to the middle of your forehead. On inhalation , gather your energy there. On exhalation, release it. your forehea d energized , healed and relaxed . 18. Move your attention to the top of the head. On inhalation, gather your energy there. On exhalation, release it. Feel the top of your head ener gized, healed and relaxed . In this you should concentrate both your mind and Prana in each of thes e eighteen regions starting with the feet. Gather your attention from one marma region to another like climbing a series of steps from the bottom to the top of the body. Finally, hold your awareness at the top of the head in the space of the Supreme Self beyond birth and death and all suffering. In addition , you can also direct your attention to any of these marma sites individually in order to heal the area or for specific therapeu tic purposes . M a r m a a n d t h e U s e o f M a n tr a Besides their usage for spiritual and yogic purposes, mantras have a wide application for healing purposes. Mantra therapy or Mantra Chikitsa is commonly used in all branches of Ayurveda and considered one of the most important Ayurvedic therapies for all types of diseases. Mantras fa cilitate the flow of Prana through the marma points and are another im portant tool of marma therapy . Mantras have a special application to protect marma points. They can create a protective covering or armor, called in Sanskrit, at a psy chic or pranic level to shield various Many meditationa l kavacha s have been designed for this purpose, using certain mantras or names of God to protect the vulnerable parts of the body. Kavachas are common in

54

Introduction to Marmas

Tantric texts where they occur in a great variety. Another practice is that of or consecration , where various parts of the body like the heart and forehead are touched with the hands along with the recitation of mantras in order to dedicat e those areas to the deity. This is another important tool both of ritual and psychic healing . Fo r the sake of brevity and simplicity we will discuss only a few simpl e mantras. These are among the most energetically powerful as well as the easiest mantras to The Mantra Purusha, which correlates the fifty root th e th e parts th e also be used for this if one wants to be more I m p o r t an t B i j a ( S e e d ) M a n t ra s a n d U s a g e w i t h M a r ma s The mantra H U M (pronounced rhyming with room) is Varma the seed sound of protection, possessing a fiery and wrathful na It is used specifically to protect marma points and is the most important mantra in this regard. The mantra H U M can be repeated relative to any marm a that one wants to protect from injury or from energy loss. It can be used along with the marma meditation practice outlined above to create a protective field of mantra around the physical body and the Visualize this mantra as creat ing a deep blue protective force that can ward away all negativity, dis ease or debility. Chanted with a shorter u-sound, as in the word H U M has a more fiery energy for purposes of warming the marma s and increasing Agni or fire at their locations . The mantra OM is Prana or the seed sound of energy and vitality. It can be repeated relative to any marma one wants opened, cleared and released. It carries the immortal force of the higher Self and is expansive and ascendin g in its Usually it is visualized as golden in color and as carrying a solar force of life and intelligence . The mantra AI M (pronounced is Guru bija, the seed sound of speech, guidance and concentration . It can be used for directing men tal energ y and healing intentions to any marma point. It holds the Sarasvati energy, the energy of knowledge, wisdom and creativity, and is white in color . The mantra (pronounced is the seed sound of shakti, the power of action and represents electrical or lightning force. It can be used to stimulat e and energize any marma with pranic power. It holds the Kali energy, the energy of transformation , internalizatio n and spiritua l awakening, which is also the power of Yoga, and is dark blue in

color .

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

55

The mantra (pronounce d is the seed sound of har mony and well-bein g and project s a nutritiv e lunar energy. It can be used to hea l or soothe any marma region, particularl y from condition s of weaknes s or tissue depletion . It holds the energy or the positive force of health , creativity , happines s and prosperity . The mantra (pronounce d is the seed sound of the heart, space and Pran a and project s a solar force and golden color. It can be used to open , energiz e and heal any marma , particularl y interna l marmas like thos e of the heart. It holds the Goddes s energy in general as a force of health , vitality and enlightenment . The mantra (pronounce d is the seed sound of desire, attraction or magneti c energy, and project s the power of It can be used to increas e Kapha or Ojas energy at any marma , includin g strengthening reproductiv e functions . Ho w t o U s e T h e s e M a n t r a s Choose any one of these mantra s that you find suitable to work with . Chant it for a minimu m of 10 8 times (or multiple s thereof ) for one mont h (preferably the period betwee n two new Meditat e upon the marma you are focusin g on and repeat the mantra along with the breath, energizing the marma on inhalatio n and releasin g or expandin g it on exha lation. Fo r example , mentall y repeat the mantra H U M on inhalatio n while visualizing the marma filling with a protectiv e while on exhala tion sprea d that protectiv e force from the marma to around the body as a whole . One can also use these mantra s relative to the eightee n marma region s mentioned above. A good method is to use the mantra OM on inhalatio n in order to gather energy in the marma region, and the mantra H U M on exhalation to protect and fortify the On e can visualiz e OM as creating a golden light to energiz e the marma and H U M creating a dar k blue light to protect it. Mantra s fo r t h e Fi v e E l e m e n t s The body can be divided into five regions relative to the five elements . We can treat the element s in the body accordin g to the marma s in the portio n that relate s to 1 . MARMAS I N T H E R E G I O N F R O M T H E T O TH E KNEES B E L O N G T O T H E EART H ELEM EN T . Key marma : Talahriday a on the feet . Key mantra : LA M (pronounce d as in

56

Introduction to Marmas

2 . MARM A S I N T H E R E G I O N F R O M T H E KNE E S T O T H E AN U S B E L O N G T O T H E WATER E L E M E N T Key marma : marma on the middle of the thighs. Key mantra : VA M (pronounce d as in 3 . MARM A S I N T H E R E G I O N F R O M T H E AN U S T O T H E HEA R T B E L O N G T O T H E FI R E ELEM EN T . Key marma : Nabhi (navel) marma on the navel . Ke y mantra : RA M (pronounce d rum as in MARM A S I N T H E R E G I O N F R O M T H E HEA R T T O T H E M I D D L E O F T H E EY EBR O W S B E L O N G T O T H E AI R EL EM EN T . Key marma : Phana marma on the nostrils . Ke y mantra : YA M (pronounce d yum as in 5 . MARM A S I N T H E R E G I O N F R O M T H E M I D D L E O F T H E BRO W S T O T H E TO P O F T H E H E A D B E L O N G T O T H E ET H E R EL EM EN T . Key marma : Adhipat i marma on the head . Ke y mantra : H A M (pronounce d hu m as in The seed mantra s of the five element s can be used to treat the marma s in their respectiv e region s of the body. On e can use the seed sound of Eart h LA M to strengthe n marma s on the feet like Talahriday a marma . One can use the seed sound of Water VAM to strengthe n marma s on the thighs like Urvi marma . On e can use the seed sound of Fire RA M to strengthe n marmas in the middle of the body like Nabhi marma One can use the see d sound of Air YAM to strengthe n marma s in the chest and throat like Hriday a marma On e can use the seed sound of Ether HA M to strengthe n marma s in the head like Adhipat i marma . Anothe r method is to use the seed sounds of the element s in order to increase the elemen t require d to heal any marma . Fo r example , if one wants to increas e the fire elemen t in the navel to stimulat e the power of digestion, use the mantra RAM . If you want to increas e the water elemen t in the nave l for counterin g acidity , use the mantr a You can also use these mantra s along with alternat e nostril breathing . Fo r the mantra RA M can be repeate d upon inhalatio n throug h the righ t nostril to increas e the fire elemen t on the right side of the body. Similarly, the mantra VAM can be used along with exhalatio n throug h the left nostri l to increas e the water elemen t on the left side of the body. Or one can use the mantra H A M with alternat e nostril breathin g to increas e

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga

57

ether element in the entire body. In this way one can direct the ener gies of the five elements to either or both sides of the body and their corre sponding sensory and motor organs . M a r m as , C o lo r a n d G e m T h e r ap y The use OTA Ayurvedic healing , particularly relative to Tantra and its energetic prac tices that work to harnes s the secret forces of Gem s are specificall y referred to as Mani and provide one of the three main factors of Ayurvedi c healing along with herbs and mantras. While some Ayurvedic doctors to day who are trained in modern medicine may not use it, many traditiona l Ayurvedi c practitioners as well as followers of energetic healing in the West find great value in these subtle therapies. Color and gem therapy can be used on marmas. Light is able to stimulate marmas in various ways depending upon its source and its color .

M a s and Colo r Therap y arm


Colors can be applied with colored preferably projecting a focused ray on the general extent of the marma to be treated. Color can be used internally through visualization as well, meditating on the color as pervad ing the marm a region. This can be combined with breath work (breathing the color into the Special machines also exist for transmitting light throug h gemstones. These give a particularly high quality healing power to color therapy. Generally the marma should be bathed in the ap propriate colore d light for at least fifteen minutes for it to have an effect . NOTE: in the chart below; P Pitta, K Kapha, V Vata

Energetics:

increases Pran a

Good for removing inflammation , infection and fever, and for stopping bleeding, also affords protection . Energetics: increases Agni warming, improving blood flow.

Good for stimulation,

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Introduction to Marmas

GOL D Energetics : increase s Tejas and Oja s Good for energization , pain relief, stimulation , and spiritualization , also promotes growth the tissue development . Transmit s a solar force . YELLOW Energetics : Goo d for balancing , clearing , nourishin g and groundin g energy . GREE N Energetics : PK-V+ , increase s Pran a Goo d for giving vitality , promotin g Prana, cleansin g the blood, calmin g the nerves, balancin g the mind and stoppin g pain . WHIT E Energetics : PV-K+ , increase s Oja s Good for balancing , nurturin g and increasin g tissues and bodily fluid s (Kapha) .

Marmas and Gem Therapy Ge m Therap y is called Mani Chikitsa in Sanskri t and is commonl y use d along with both herbal and mantra Gemstone s provide a strong form of color therapy , workin g on a subtle level to help balance the flow of Prana and connec t us with cosmic light sources that emanat e from the stars and Th e Use of Crystals Crystal s are easy to use for marma therapy . They are not expensiv e and can be found in sufficien t size (ten or more carats) to have a good effect. Pol ished stones are not necessary , though they can be more A crys tal can be placed on one marma , while the practitione r is workin g on an other. A simple method is to tape the crystal on the respectiv e marma, using a soft tape that doesn't damage the skin. Placing larger crystals on large marma regions like the heart or navel is another method . One can use the point of a crystal to stimulat e a marma point, and the flat face of the crysta l to calm it.

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C L E AR C R Y S T A L Useful in clearing , energizin g and opening marmas , making them re ceptiv e to healin g M I L KY C R Y S T A L Has a nourishing , moistenin g and calming lunar energy. Builds tissue s and increase s bodily fluids. R O SE C R Y S T A L Warms , energize s and stimulate s the circulatio n at marmas . Strength ens the blood . C I T R I NE Strengthens , tonifies and builds energy in marmas . Improve s vitalit y and immun e A M E T H Y ST cleanses , purifies and detoxifie s marmas . Goo d for acute pain or infection .

Primar y G e m s For these stones, cut gems are preferable , which can be expensive . Uncu t or unset stones can be used but may not be as strong in their affects. Cu t gems can be used in small sizes, but should generall y be at least one carat in size. Uncut stones should be used in larger sizes, preferabl y over five Lik e crystals they can be temporaril y taped over marma Or the therapis t can hold the gem on the marma point using his thumb or middle finger for a minute or two . However , it is more effectiv e to keep such primary gems on marm a points for a period of a month or longer for stronge r action. Some marma s like those on the hands, arm, neck or heart can be treated by wearing rings , bracelets, bangles or pendant s which touch them. For this it is best to have an open setting for the gem in which the gem can directly touch the skin. Such a gem is an importan t consideratio n when ever prescribin g the use of gems . Substitut e stones to these primary expensiv e gems can be used muc h like the crystals mentione d above. The usage of primary gemstone s is de fined astrologicall y accordin g to the rules of Vedic astrolog y which can be examine d for more informatio n on the Such gem s

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Introduction to Marmas

usually require an examination of the birth chart and should not be pre scribed according to Ayurvedic indications alone. in the chart below; P R U BY Substitutes: red garnet, sunston e Energetics: Increases and Tejas Transmits a powerful solar force to warm and stimulate pro moting circulation, energy flow and relieving pain, strengthening the heart. P E A RL Substitutes: moonstone, milky crystal, cultured pearl s Energetics: increases Ojas Transmits a gentle lunar force to cool, lubricate and nurture marmas , counterin g drynes s and debility, strengthenin g the lungs and soothin g the R ED C O R A L Substitutes: carnelia n Energetics: P+(slightly) VK-, increases Ojas and Tejas Transmits a Mars force to warm, strengthen and energize marmas . Helps build the blood, muscles and bone and improves male energy. E M E R A LD Substitutes: peridot, jade, green tourmalin e Energetics: generally balancing, increases Prana Transmits a Mercury or pranic energy to relieve pain and tremors, and counter mental or nervous agitation at marmas, calming for children . Helps heal injured marmas . Y E L L OW S A P P H IR E Substitutes: topaz, citrin e Energetics: generally balancing, increases Ojas Transmits a Jupiter energy to fortify, tonify and build good quality tis sue at marmas, promoting vitality and longevity. Goo d for Ojas. PerPitta, K Kapha, V Vata

Marmas and the Practice of Yoga


S A P H I R E Co n t i n u e d

haps the best strengthening stone for general usage, particularly good for the elderly . DI A MO ND Substitutes: white sapphire, zircon, clear quartz crysta l Energetics: PV-K+, Increases Ojas Transmits a Venus energy to clear, energize, and strengthen marmas , bringing the energy of Ojas (higher Kapha force) to them. Also im proves female energy and strengthens the bones . B L UE S A P P H IR E Substitutes: amethyst, turquoise, lapis lazuli Energetics: PK-V+ Transmits a Saturn energy to cool, cleanse, detoxify and calm the energy at marmas. Helps heal injured marmas, inhibiting bleeding and stop ping infection .

S a c re d S t o ne s a n d Y a n t ra s Other special stones can be used to heal marmas as well. One can use (Shiva stones) or (Vishnu stones), special small egg shaped rocks from rivers and mountains in India . These also help stabilize and heal marma points. Fo r this purpose, small stones can be used of one to three inches in size. Or you can use any sa cred stones tha t you ma y have. The important thing is you are connected to the healing power of the The Earth energy of such stones is very good for bring ing calm and stabilit y to pranic energy through th e marmas. They are particu larly good for counterin g

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Vata dosha. They help conduct the healing energy from the Earth which in turn is connected to that of the stars and planets . Another method is to place small yantras on Yantras are meta l made with copper but also with silver, gold or various al contain geometrical designs, mainly triangular in nature, along with inscribed mantras. Yantras serve as conductors for spiritual and cos mic energies. Yantra, dedicated to the Sun, which represents Prana, is importan t in this respect. It consists of a six-pointed star with a in the middle along with various inscribed mantras for the Sun. Another im portant healing yantra for marma therapy is the Sri Yantra sacred to the which consists of five upward facing and four downward facing triangles. It can be used with the mantras or Such yantras are often available where Ayurvedic, Vedic astrology or Puja supplies are sold. Generally one should use small yantras of one or two inche s in size for treatment energizing them with the appro priate These are most commonly found made out of coppe r which is a good metal for conducting pranic energy .

Note Yoga and Ayurveda (F w y ) c a te r ra le hp for m r e in rm tio n on the o fo a c a s . Note Yoga and Ayurveda (F w y ) c a te r h kra ra le hp for m r e in rm tio n on o fo a the n d . a is Note Y g a for Your Type: An Ayurvedic Approach to Your Asana Practice (F w y and o ra le Vasishta Samhita for d s rip e c tio n of P tya a a on e h e n m rm a re s . ra h r ig te a gion Vasishta Samhita IV.61 Note Yoga and Ayurveda (F w y ) c a te r 17 for in rm tio n on the M n a P ru a and the use of ra le hp fo a a tr u sh

m n s . Note Astrology of the Seers (F w y ) c a te r a tra ra le hp a lo y . stro g

for in rm tio n on use of g m s in V d c fo a e ei

C H A P T E R

Ayurvedi c therapy combine s all factors of right living, outwardl y and in wardly, as well as every type of healing modalit y for body, mind and Prana. It is perhap s the world's most comprehensiv e and integra l healing system , going to the roots of our being on physical , psychologica l and spiritua l levels, and our connection s with the greater univers e of consciousnes s in all these areas . Broadl y speaking , Ayurvedi c therapie s can be divided either into ods for treatin g applied mainly in a clinica l setting , or maintenance methods ' that we can do on our own as part of a harmoniou s While marma therap y is part of Ayurvedi c clinica l aspects of it can be safely used as part of for treatin g our friend s or ou r famil y Ayurvedi c method s for treatin g disease are classifie d into two groups : those for removin g toxins and reducin g excess tissues , which are calle d methods' and those for restorin g vitality and re building deficien t tissues , which are called method s ' (Brimhana). Reductio n therapie s include method s for increasin g Agni, reducing and decreasin g the dosha s of Vata, Pitta and Kapha . Tonification method s aim mainly at increasin g the tissues but also aid in revitalization and rejuvenatio n strengthe n immunit y and pro mote longevity . Followin g this therapeuti c model, many types of marma therapy hav e arisen that cover the entire range of natural treatmen t modalitie s includin g the use of massage , oils, herbs and variou s instrument s like needle s to stimulate marma points. Marma therapy can be employe d as part of daily and seasona l life-style practice s or part of com plex clinica l procedure s to eradicat e the doshas Beside s treating the body, marma therapy can be used for pranic healing or energ y

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medicine in various forms. It can also be used for calming the mind, calm ing the emotions and stress reduction. Marma therapy is a great aid for Yoga and meditation, facilitating the opening up of consciousnes s on an inner level. Marma therapy is usually supplementar y to other Ayurvedic whethe r constitutiona l or disease focused, applied along with them for added enhancement . We have already examined in the previous chapter the yogi c methods of marma therapy. Here we will examine the medical methods. We can identify ten main medical methods of treating marmas, which can be divided into three groups .

Method s of Marm a Therap y


M a s s ag e a n d E n e rg y M e t h od s Abhyanga or various forms of pressure and movemen t with the hands or other parts of the body like the feet and elbows. This is aided by applying heavy oils like sesame or special Ayurvedic medicate d herbal oils so it includes not only massage but also oil therapy. Some forms of Ayurvedic massage may use dry powders, so many tech niques fall unde r it. 2. Aroma aromatic oils like sandalwood or camphor on Thi s may be combine d with massag e or

3. Mardana or application of pressure on particular which may be combine d with the use of special massage oils or aromatic oils done as part of massage . 4. Pranic or Energy Prana either at a distance or through therapeutic touch, not requiring but often enhanced by the use of massage techniques and oils. I I . H e r ba l M e t h od s 5. Lepa or Applying Herbal of herbal pastes like sandalwood, turmeric and ginger or various herbal ointments on different marmas . 6. Herbal herbs internally in the form of pills and decoc tions as well as applying them externally to marmas in the form of poul tices (whic h overlap s with the use of herba l III . Us e s of I n s t r u m e nt (vedha) of veins

7. Sira Vedha (Vessel Piercing) and

or vessels

particularl y blood-lettin g or bleeding of marm a

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65

8.

or with needles (suchi) or includin g puncturin g of small vessel s at marm a

9. or Heat of heat application (karma ) to marma regions, including the use of heated rods and moxibustion. 10. Ksharakarma or (karma) of herbal alkali s (ksharas) or caustic substances near marma points like chemical cautery . The first group of four aroma therapy, acupressure and pranic usually used together. They generally require a therapist but can be done on a limite d scope as a form of self-treatment . The second group of herbal methods can be used along with massage methods or by They require a workin g knowledge of herbs to utilize. The third group of four methods employ s variou s instruments like magnets, rods, needles or caustic substances. Thes e are generally strong in nature and require a good clinical knowledge for thei r application . We will discuss the first two groups of massage and herbal methods in the current chapter. The third group, which is more technical in nature, is described briefly in the Appendix for reference pur poses (Part III, 1. Us e of Instruments to Treat Marmas: Blood-letting , Acupuncture, Agni-karm a and Kshara-karm a , Par t II I , 2 . Ayurvedi c

M assag e and Energ y Method s of M arm a Therap y


Therapeutic touch is the main method for treating marmas, just as it is the main method for treating the surface of the body where most marmas are located. In yogic philosophy, touch is the sensory power that corresponds to the cosmi c air element. The air element in turn relates to Prana or the cosmic life-force . Touch conveys Prana, which is the main healing power of life. The Prana from the practitioner affects the marma, which itself is a pranic center wher e our vital energy easily gets impaired. Prana at a deeper level carries the energy of love and so therapeutic touch can help heal the mind and heart as well as the body. Good Ayurvedic doctors develop a strong power of Prana, both from their medical practic e and from the i r yogic practice s (particularly which is an integral part of an Ayurvedic life-style. A highly evolved Ayurvedi c doctor can heal marma points by his pranic power alone. We must not overlook this healing power of the therapist. A practi tioner with good Prana can achieve good results even without a great deal of technical skill or much time spent in treating a marma point. On the

other

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hand, a practitioner with little development of Prana may not be very ef fective, even if technically correct in their treatment . M a rm a O i l M a s s ag e Abhyanga or massage is the main Ayurvedic method of treating marmas. It employs not only massage techniques but also the use of special massage oils, to which special herbs and aromas may be added to extend the heal ing energy to all regions of the body. Abhyanga combines the power of therapeutic touch along with the medicinal properties of herbs and aromas. Fo r the strongest treatment level, massage of specific marmas is con ducted along with whole body massage as an added enhancement . Whol e body massage opens marma energy in general and makes individua l marmas more accessible for treatment. Another method consists of giona l massaging the area of the body where the marma is located. This means that a facial or head massage can be given before treating marmas on the head . Similarly, massages of the arms and hands, legs and feet, or back or front of the body can be given before treating the marmas located in those areas. Such regional massage helps open the en ergy in that part of the body and make s specific marma massage more effective. It is also not as time-consumin g as whole body massage. How ever, individual marmas can be massaged by themselves without any addi tional massage as a limited or quick form of treatment . The different methods of Ayurvedic massage are prescribed according to season, environmenta l conditions, disease condition and individua l constitution. We will define them here mainly according to doshic consti tution. M a r m a M a s s ag e Marmas are sensitive areas, so massage should be done carefully, using mainly the thumb, which projects the main pranic power of the hand. However, the knuckle, wrist, palm of the hand or heel of the foot can be used in certain conditions, particularly to cover larger regions. The dura tion of massage for marma points should be at least three to five minutes twice a day. Fo r massage two important rules should be remembered . 1. Perform th e massage motion in a clockwise motio n when tonification or strengthening th e internal organs and tissues is th e aim . Imagine putting a clock on the body of the patient and then follow the movement of the clock's hand forward from right to left as it progresses from 12 to 1, 2, 3 and so on. 2. Perform th e massage in a counterclockwise manne r when th e goal is to

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reduce exces s dosha s or exces s tissue s growt h or for detoxificatio n pur poses. Imagine putting clock on the body of the patient and then follow the movement of the clock's hand backwar d from left to right to left from 12 10, 9 and so on. Oil s f o r M a r m a M a s s a g e Massag e often requires the use of heavy or fatty oils like sesame or al mond. Their oily or emollien t quality softens the skin and reduces friction , making the massage more pleasant . Such oils can penetrat e into marmas , loosen tension, relieve pain and bring nourishmen t to the skin and muscles in the region . Ayurvedi c oil therapy or employs differen t oils in various con texts to either strengthe n the patient or remove toxins, dependin g upon the nature of the oil and the amount used . Most heavy oils like sesame or almond are heating in nature and are generally used for Vata, which benefits from using them in larg e amounts. Some oils are light and spicy and good for like mustard or safflower. Heavier oils that are heating in nature, even sesame, can also be used for Kapha but the amount applied should be small . Only a few oils are cooling in nature and are better for coconut, ghee (clarifie d butter) and sunflowe r oil . Such are

However , we should note that such heavy oils are not used, or used onl y sparingly, in cases of (toxins in the digestiv e tract evidence d by thick tongue coating) , when there is a cold, flu or fever, or in other acute conditions . Heavy oils can suppres s Agni (the digestiv e and help hol d toxins and pathogen s in the body. M a s s ag e O i l s a n d D o s h i c I n d i c a t i o n s

Dosha
Vata Pitta Kapha

Main Massage Oils


Sesame , almond, olive, ghe e Coconut , sunflower , safflower , ghe e Mustard , safflower , apricot, sesame (small amounts )

Spe ci a l A y u r v e d i c M e d i c a t e d O i l s ( T a i l a s ) Ayurved a uses various medicate d oils called from meaning sesame oil, which is the main oil base these are made with. Tailas consist of fatty oils like sesame or coconut in which various herbs are cooked, some of which like sandalwoo d or campho r may be aromatic . This allows the

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properties of herbs to enter into the oil and add their effects. Herbs used include tonics like ashwagandha , and shatavari and nervines like and gotu kola. Tailas are usually named after the main herbs in them like Ashwagandh a a sesame oil preparation dominated by the herb They offer a greater herbal effect to the use of massage oils. Tailas are often the best way to treat marmas because they combine massage oils and herbs for a more powerful synergistic action. No t all of them have pleasant aromatic properties , however. A number of Ayurvedic massage oils are mentioned relative to the treatment of marmas. These Tailas are listed in the Appendix Many of these are now available from Ayurvedic stores and companies in the Unite d 2 . A r o m a T h e r ap y Aromatic oils have powerful effects upon marmas, serving to radiate their influence to the different channels, organs and systems of the body and mind . Aromas can penetrate deep into marmas and adjust their energy level and frequency. They can reduce excess doshas or bring in subtle heal ing energies of Prana Tejas (primary and Ojas Aroma therapy for marma points is both one of the most powerful forms of aroma therapy as well as one of the best forms of marma therapy. Aroma therapy is a quick and easy method of working on marmas that can be applied either by itself or as part of massage. Generally, it is stron ger if it is combined with massage of the point. On e can apply an aromatic oil befor e massage in order to open the energy of the point. Or one can anoint the marma with an aromatic oil once a massage is over in order to help complet e and seal the treatment . Applying an aromatic oil as a treatment in itself, one can anoint a marma point as a kind of quick or instant treatment. This is particularly good for acute conditions or if one does not have the time for a fuller treatment. Us e cooling and sedating oils like sandalwood to relieve pain, inflammation or irritation at the Us e warming and stimulating oils like cinnamon or eucalyptus to remove cold and stiffness or to promote j circulation in the region. Various pain balms like Tiger balm, which con tain mainly camphor , menthol or can be used this way as well. Generally, it is best to work an aromatic oil into a marma region one's fingers or even if little other massage will be done. Just as the case of marm a massage , use a clockwis e motio n of massag e strengthen the energy at a marma and a counterclockwis e motion to duce it. Som e aromati c oils like sandalwoo d can be used instea d of heavy

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like sesame for general massag e purpose s as well. Hot-nature d aromati c oils like eucalyptu s can be used like rubbing alcohol or prepare d in rub bing alcohol as penetratin g massag e agents . You may wish to wash off any excess aromati c oils if you don't want a lingering fragranc e (though this is often helpful Or, you can apply aromati c oils to marma s before sleep and then shower the oil off in the morning . Type s o f A r o m a t i c s Oil

Aromati c oils are of several major types. Most commo n are or pun gent aromati c These are usually heating in nature and good for reduc ing Kapha and Vata. Typica l spicy oils include basil, bay, eucalyptus , ginger , heena, nutmeg , pepper, sage and thyme. Mos t oils that derive from coniferou s trees are of this type as well, such as cedar, Hima layan cedar , fir, juniper , pine and spruce . Some spicy oils are more aromati c than heating and can be used to some degree for all three doshic types, with fewer restriction s on Pitta tha n other spicy oils. Such oils include camphor , cardamom , cinnamon , cloves , coriander, cumin, fennel, mint, motherwort , rosemary , saffron , spearmint , turmeri c and Anothe r importan t type of aromati c oils is oils', which are gener ally derived from flowers. These are good for reducin g Pitta and Vata but can increas e Kapha. They are effectiv e for gynecologica l complaint s and are tonics to the heart and the reproductiv e system . Such fragrance s are evening primrose , frangipani , gardenia , honeysuckle , iris, jas mine, lily, rose and saffron. Certain oils derived from tree resins have special healing propertie s for treating injuries , pain, stiffnes s and arthritis . These are often good for all three doshas and are particularl y useful for Vata and Kapha. Such are frankincense , guggul, myrrh and shallaki , as well as the resins of variou s conifer s (particularl y pines) . A few oils are earthy and slightly in smell. These are particularl y good for Vata and for stabilizin g of consciousnes s in condition s of shock or hysteria. Suc h are garlic , onion , valerian , jatamams i and asafoetid a Aromati c Oi l s a n d D o s h i c I n d i c a t i o n s The followin g are generall y good aromati c oils for the differen t doshas . Note that many fragrance s can help reduce all three doshas. The doshi c applicatio n of aroma s is no t as stric t as tha t of food s or Just as Ayurvedi c herbalis m employ s many diverse herbal formula s and compounds, formula s combinin g several aromati c oils can also be devised .

Ayurvedic practitioner s often devise their own aromati c blends, just as

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they do various herbal The general rule is that several herbs or oils in a formul a will have a stronger therapeutic effect than the same amount of any single herb or oil. This is owing to the synergistic effect that occurs from combining related healing substances. Special Ayurvedic aroma combinations have been developed for treating various marmas .

C o m b i n a t io n o f H e a v y O i l s a n d A r o m a ti c O i l s Differen t oils and aromas have specific therapeutic effects that can greatl y enhance the efficacy of massage. Fo r balancing the doshas, the following oils can be used on differen t TYP E INDIVIDUAL S OR CONDITIO N S OF HIGH VATA (deficient tissues, tremors, pain or insomnia) : This requires the use of heavy or fatty oils like sesame, almond or castor oil. Warm aromatic oils like ginger and cinnamon or calming oils like sandalwood or rose are also but generally Vatas require a liberal application of heavier oils like sesame to really ground them. Some high Vata types may be sensitive or disturbed by any strong even which are usually good for thei r type.

Marmas, Massage, Aroma Therapy and Pranic Healing

PITTA TYPE

OR CONDITION S OF HIGH

PITTA (exces s heat , fever, bleedin g or This requires cooling massage oils like coconut, sunflower or ghee along with sweet and cooling fragrances like rose or khus or along with aromatic oils that reduce Pitta but improve di gestion like cloves or coriander. Often the use of sweet aromatic oils is enough to bring down high Pitta conditions like fever or irritability, particu larly the use of sandalwood. However, many Pitta men who could benefit from the use of swee t fragrances may be unwilling to use them because of the feminine con notations of the fragrance. If this is the case, one can use sandalwood, khus, cloves or mint, which reduce Pitta without leaving a strong flow ery aroma like rose or

FOR KAPHA TYPE

OR CONDITION S OF

HIGH KAPH A (exces s tissues , fluids or This requires lighter application of warming massage oils like mus tard along with hot and penetrating aromas like eucalyptus, cinnamon or mint. Often the use of hot aromatic oils or pastes of spicy herbs like euca lyptus, camphor, ginger or calamus is enough to reduce Kapha conditions of congestion or dullness. Kapha types like sweet and flowery fragrances but these are not good for them . How O i l M a s s ag e a n d A r o m a T h e r ap y C o m p ar e Ayurvedi c massage is part of oleation (Snehana) therapy. Oleation is part of detoxificatio n or reduction therapy (Shodhana) used for loosening tox ins in the bones, joints, muscles and skin. The use of hot aromatic oils or herbs is part of sweating or sudation (Swedana) therapy, which is also part of this same type of therapy. It aims at drawing toxins out through the blood and skin. In Ayurveda, oleation and sweating therapies (Snehana and Swedana) are used together to help draw the doshas out of the deeper tissues and bring them through the circulatory system and into the diges tive tract for their elimination from the body by other therapeutic method s the theory of Pancha Karma as explained in various books on | This means that oil massage and aroma therapy on marma points can be viewed as a special or localized Snehana-Swedan a therapy. It can be

TOUS

to marmas on the head helps remove toxins from the region of and harmonizes the movement o f Prana in the mind and the ner system.

Introduction to Marmas

The use of heavy oils like sesame or almond is also part of Ayurvedi c tonification therapy and is indicate d for condition s of low body weight , poor tissue developmen t and high Vata. Fo r tonificatio n pur poses, it is importan t to combin e oil applicatio n to selected marma s with whole bod y massage , using large quantitie s of oil. Oil drips to various marma regions , particularl y the forehea d can be helpful as well. Oil enema s (combinin g half a cup of sesame oil and half a cup of warm water) are even more powerful as they work on site of accu mulation in the colon . On the other hand, the use of hot spices and aromati c oils is part of reduction therapy indicate d mainly for condition s of excess body weight , high Kapha and (accumulate d It is part of Ayurvedic palliatio n therapy , which aims at increasin g the di gestive power or in order to burn up toxin s (Ama). The use of hot aromatic oils on certain marma regions is goo d for weigh t reduction , stimulatin g digestio n and promotin g Oils and aromas can be used to manage differen t types of pain. Heav y oils like sesame or almond are better for pain owing to weaknes s or stiff ness Ho t aromati c oils like ginger or eucalyptu s are better for pain owing to cold or congestio n Cool aromati c oils like sandalwoo d or khus (vetiver ) are better for pain owing to inflammatio n (Pitta) . 3. (Acupressure ) is another method of Ayurvedi c massag e meanin g

We can also call it Mardan a is particularl y suitable for usage on marmas , especiall y smalle r points of one finger unit or less in size (the majorit y of marmas) , where the bodily energy is concentrated . Acupressur e consist s of applyin g pressur e to the marma , using the thumb or fingers , particularl y the index or middle fingers , which can hold a greater force. It is particularl y good for marma s on the extremitie s (legs and arms) or on the head, which are of easy access. Acupressur e can be done on sore or sensitiv e points (unless injured ) until the pain and tension is released . On e can use the thumb or the nail of the thumb for a mor e pointed This works well if combine d along with the index finger for marma s like Kurcha that one can grasp from both sides. In larger and deeper-seated marmas , like those on the hips or back, the elbow can be used for greater pressur e when necessary . Metho d o f Ayurvedi c Acupressur e Locate the respectiv e marma region and apply a steady and moderate pressure with the thumb or finger, starting slowly and gently and gradu ally increasin g in strength .

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73

Just as with marma use a slight circular motion clockwise in direction when tonification or strengthening the internal organs and tis sues is the aim. When the goal is to reduce excess doshas or excess tissues, apply a slight circular motion in a counterclockwise manner . Continue to apply pressure for three to five minutes or until the patient feels relief. Lightly massage the area to disperse any tension . Ayurvedic acupressure is best done as part of overall body It also works better, particularly on Vata types, if done with massage oils like sesame. It is good to end acupressure treatment with the application of aromatic oils to aid in restoring circulation into the area. The use of aromatic oils with acupressure is similar to that relative to marma so most of what was said there applies here as well. While more comple x massage oils and aromas can be used as per the indications of the marma, the following simple recommendation s can be followed in most instances : For Vata, plain sesame or almond oils are good to use along with acupressure. Fo r aromatic oils, cinnamon or calamus are best. For Pitta, sandalwood oil is the best general oil/aroma. Clove oil can be used when the intention is more to stimulate the point . For Kapha, it is best to use stimulating aromatic oils like camphor , cinnamon or eucalyptus along with acupressure . The F i v e P r a na s The five Pranas relate to the five We can use different fingers to project the different types of Prana to various marma points . Prana relates to the thumb . Udana relates to the index finger . Vyana relates to the middle finger . relates to the ring finger . Apana relates to the little finger. The palm carries the energy of all five Pranas and of Prana itself.

The five Pranas have their different roles in massage. Prana itself affords us overall energy. Udana allows our energy to move upward and holds the body erect. Apana moves downward and reflects the force of gravity, giv ing stability and grounding us. Vyana moves outward, expanding and re leasing, while Samana moves inward, holding and conserving . This means that we can use the force of Prana to energize that

74

Introduction to Marmas

of Udana to stimulat e them, that of Apana to ground them, that of Vyana to expand and release energy, and that Samana to contrac t and hold thei r energy. This can be done by the type of massag e performed , by the type of oils used or by how the therapis t directs his or her Prana during the treatment . A simple way to do this is relative to which fingers we use for acupressure . Acupressu r e don e with th e thu m b strengthe n s Pran a overall . Acupressure done with the index finger project s the upward moving en ergy of That done with the middle finger project s the outwar d moving energy of Vyana. That done with the ring finger project s the con tracting and consolidatin g energy of Samana . That done with the little finger project s the downwar d moving energy of Apana. However , an Ayurvedic practitione r must have a good pranic energy in order to do this . In additio n we can massag e the fingers of the hands and the toes of the foot in order to work on these differen t types of Prana that they hold. This is a kind of specia l Ayurvedi c han d and foo t 4 . Prani c o r Energ y Healin g Pranic or Energy Healing, called Prana Chikitsa in Sanskrit, is an integra l part of Ayurvedi c massage . Muc h of what we have already said relative to massage applies to it as well, but it can also be done by itself. In this prac tice one simply uses ones Prana on the marma point. In large marm a zones like the heart or the navel, one can simply put the palm of the hands on top of the marma , or a small distanc e of a few inches above it in order to bring in positive pranic energy and dispers e negativ e energy. Anothe r method is to touch the marma and use the pressur e of the touch (includ ing acupressure ) to convey Prana to the client . In pranic healing , where one aims at the transmissio n of energy from the healer to the client, the massag e techniqu e may be of little importance . Fo r this the Prana of the healer is the main focus. In pranic treatments , it is best to direct Prana along with your breath, projectin g positive vitalit y along with your inhalatio n and removin g negativ e energy along with you r pranic healing combine s well with other yogic method s men tioned in the last chapter like Pratyahar a and mantra , includin g the use of colors and It also goes well with Polarity which itself is a kind of pranic healing . Anothe r method that can be used along with pranic healing is the use of magnet s or magnet therapy . And, of course, when one is performin g massage , one should always conside r the positive flow of Prana to the client .
Note Ayurveda and Aroma Therapy (L h t and B n ig ria M iller) . Note Ayurveda and (Joshi) . Note The Ayurvedic Guide to Polarity Therapy

CHAPTER

which convey the pranic force of nature, are the main medicines used in Ayurvedic treatment. Ayurveda uses herbs accord ing to their tast e (rasa) , heating capacity post-digestiv e effect and other such Thi s allows herbs to target specific doshas, tissues and systems in order to counte r disease and increase posi tive vitality. There are special herbs for treatin g all the system s of the body and all Herbs have their special usage in marma therapy. They can be applied on the marma for direct treatment. Herbs can also be taken internally to aid in healing at the marma In this way, a broad range of herbal therapies can be used as part of marma therapy. A complete marma therapy should alway s include the taking of herbs . 1 . M a rm a T h e r ap y w i t h H e r ba l P a s t e s Treatment by applying herbal pastes is called Lepa Chikitsa or It is much like the western herbal usage of poultices, except in Ayurveda generall y an oil like sesame is added to powdered herbs in order make a paste. The oil allows the herbs to adhere better as well as helping the herbal propertie s penetrate through the skin. Demulcent herbs like aloe gel can be used instea d of oil, as can honey in some instances . Herbal pastes help reduce swelling and pain when applied over an in jured marma. They afford strength and stability to injured bones and joints. Pastes are sometimes applied after massage in order to seal the energy of the treatment and continue its healing effects. There are three types Lepa according to the thickness of the herbal paste : paste 1. paste

3.

past e

76

Introduction to Marmas

or a medium paste is used more often. To create this, get a suitable quantity of the powder of the herb to be used one or two ounces). Then add oil or ghee part to the amount of the herb for treating Vata conditions, 1/6 part for Pitta and 1/8 part for Kapha. Us e sufficient oil to create a consistent paste that will adhere to the skin. Then apply the paste over the marma. Apply the paste opposite to the direction of the bodily hair. Then it is less likely to irritat e the skin. Ghe e is the best oil to use for cooling and anti-inflammator y actions , including treatment for burns and sunburns and for most Pitta conditions . Sesame oil is best for pain relief, for countering dryness and protecting the bones and joints and for most Vata and Kapha conditions. Castor oil is good with herbs for treating injuries and swelling . Herbal pastes of spicy herbs like ginger, nutmeg, or cloves can be applie d for headache, nasal congestion or sinusitis at marmas on the head like Sthapani, Shankha or Phana marmas. The combination of ginger, calamus and cloves is excellent for such pur poses. Herbal pastes of carminative (gas-dispelling ) herbs to Nabhi marm a (navel) are excellent for countering cramping, bloating and distention . Asafoetida (hing) is good for this purpose . Turmeric paste is good for minor injuries and for improving circulation to marmas for all the However, it does leave a yellowish stain on clothes or skin. Sandalwood paste is good for cooling and stress-relievin g action, reduc tion of Pitta and and calming the mind and heart. It can be used on man y marmas for this purpose much like sandalwood oil. Aloe gel is great for cooling action on marmas, relieving inflammation , irritation or sunburn at the affected area. It can be combined with pow dered herbs like turmeric or sandalwood in order to strengthen its cool ing and healing action . Fo r soft tissue injuries, pastes of herbs like turmeric and aloe gel, or poultices of green herbs like comfrey leaf or plantain are helpful. Fo r injuries to the joints or bones, use pastes of bone tonic herbs like comfrey root, nirgundi or Siberian ginseng that promote healing and strengthen the bone tissue . Honey is a good ingredient for herbal pastes in the case of burns or wounds. It has a natural antiseptic action . Ghe e (clarified butter) is also excellent for burns, rashes and inflamma tions .

The Many Methods of Marma Therapy 2: Herbal Methods

77

2 . H e r ba l T r e a t m en t o f M a r m a s Ayurveda uses different herbal teas, powders and including a number of special formulas and preparation s as part of its vast pharmaceutica l industry . As marmas relate to key vital points on the body and important vital organs, many herbs can be used in their treatment. Fo r treating external application of herbs to the specific marma often goes along with ingestion of the herbs in order to treat the body as a whole . Note that the herbs and dosages recommended for internal usage are only general. Please consult an herbal text for more precise information before taking such Two great herbs for overall treatment of marmas are turmeric and guggul. Turmeric is excellent for all soft tissue injury, for improving healing at marma points and increasing circulation to marma regions. Guggul is per haps the best overall herb for marma therapy, working well on both soft tissue and bone injuries, relieving pain and restoring energy flow. It is ex cellent for keepin g marm a point s free of obstructio n or 1 . T r e a t m en t f o r P a i n Charaka indicated using special pain-relievin g or analgesic herbs (the Vedana-sthapana group of herbs) for pain relief at different Many herbs of a strongly spicy or bitter taste and aromatic nature have this property . Important herbs in the pain-relievin g group include cloves, guggul, shallaki, prasarini, nirgundi, jatamamsi, kadamba, mocharas, willow , padmak a (wild and Himalaya n ceda r (devadaru )

Additional western herbs of similar properties are wintergreen , valerian , lady's slipper, kava kava, chaparral, birch, licorice and myrrh. The Chi nese herb is also very good . Ayurvedic formulas like Yogaraj Guggul joint pain) and Guggul (for nerve pain) are great, if available. Such herbs are generally taken internally in dosages of 1 - 3 grams three times a day in the form of powders or herbal teas for short term but please note their specific indications in various herb books. They can also be applied in the form of a paste on the marma to be treated. Some are also available in ointment form like Tiger balm, Ayurvedic pain balms and ointments using wintergreen , mint , campho r or othe r pain-relievin g and muscle-relaxan t

78

Introduction to Marmas

2 . T r e a t m e n t fo r Bleedi n g Sushrut a as a surgeon indicate d various method s for controllin g bleedin g including ligation of bleedin g vessels , cautery , pressur e bandages , col d water or ice and the use of certain hemostati c or Many such herb s can be found in nature . Ayurvedi c herbs in this stopping-bleedin g group consist mainly of as tringents like turmeric , sandalwood , alum, lotus, nagakeshara , barks of pancha valkala (five fig laksha, gojihva and padmaka . The mineral alum , which is a strong astringent , is also excellent . Additiona l western herbs include arnica, plantain , yarrow, mullein , white oak bark, aloe and alum root. Also excellen t is the Chi nese paten t medicin e Yunnan Bai Yao . Such herbs are generall y taken internall y in dosage s of 1 - 3 grams thre e times a day in the form of powder s or herbal teas for short term but please note their specific indication s in various herb books. They can be applied in the form of a paste or poultic e on the marma to be treated . 3 . Swellin g an d Edema To relieve swellin g and edema at the site of injury, Sushrut a suggest s sev eral differen t water-dispellin g herbs . Ayurvedi c herbs for this include stimulant s and diuretic s like turmeric , ginger, nirgundi , gokshura , Himalaya n cedar, mochara s and shilajit , as well as leaves of lemon and onion . Turmeri c paste is good by itself and can be mixed with dry ginger pow der to promot e circulatio n to the region . Many diuretic herbs can be used internal ly like juniper berries, cubebs , plantain , uva ursi , coriande r or Pastes of certain tree resins like myrrh, guggul, fir or pine can be applie d to the marm a for thi s Such herbs are generall y taken internall y in dosage s of times a day in the form of powder s or herbal teas for Again please note their specific indication s in various can be applied in the form of a paste or poultic e on treated. 4 . T o Counte r Shoc k Charak a suggest s using the Consciousness-holdin g (Samjna-sthapana ) group of herbs for revival from Such herbs are generall y spicy and 1 - 3 grams thre e short term usage . herb books. The y the marma to be

The Many Methods of Marma Therapy 2: Herbal Methods

79

in They open the mind and senses and allow the Prana to nove throughou t the nervou s system . Such conscious-revivin g herbs are asafoetid a calamus , garlic , camphor , musk, bayberry , guduchi , jatamamsi , valerian , guggul, kola ) and ashoka , most of which have strong odors as aromati c For quickly revivin g a person, have them inhale a snuff of hing (asafoe calamus or ginger powder. Hing is best and will bring down Vata as well. Anothe r method is to crush a clove of garlic and put some of the juic e at the base of the nostrils and in the mouth of the person. Or have the person inhale a penetratin g aromati c oil like camphor , eucalyptu s or menthol. Ayurved a has special eye creams around the eyes. These are also very helpful . or anjanas ) to apply

If shock is owing to cold or poor circulation , use warmin g stimulant s like cayenne , ginger or mustard taken in the mouth . Once the patient is awake, have them drink warmin g and stimulatin g herbal teas like ginger, cinnamo n or cardamo m to stimulat e their circu lation. Once the patient is revived , give them a warm bath with a little ghee , sesame oil, milk or coconu t juice added to the bath water. This restores the bodily fluids. Administe r a cool sponge bath using a little sandalwoo d oil or powder when shock has occurre d owing to heat or fever . Such herbs are sometime s taken internall y in the form of powder s or herbal teas for short term usage. Some of these are powerful herbs like camphor that should not be taken internall y except in very small Please note their specific indication s in various herb books before usin g 1 them. They can be applied in the form of a paste or poultic e on the marm a I to be treated. 6 . T o Preven t Pu s Formati o n o n a Woun d Many commo n alterativ e or blood-cleansin g herbs are good for preventin g and promotin g healing . These are usually bitter or astringen t in Of course, one must be careful if there is a high fever or sever e use herbs like aloe gel, turmeric , myrrh, comfrey , dandelion ,

plantain and yellow dock as pastes or poultices .

Introduction to Marmas

Internally, use anti-bacterial herbs like golden seal, barberry, turmeric and katuka as powders or herbal teas . Such herbs are generally taken internally in dosages of 1 - 3 grams three times a day in the form of powders or herbal teas for short term usage. But please note their specific indications in various They can be ap plied in the form of a paste or poultice on the marma to be treated . The Ayurvedic text gives two excellent herbal formulas for healing of marmas that can be taken in pill Marma Gutika and Laghu Marma Gutika. Note Appendix 5 for their ingredients. 6 . H e a l in g W o u nd s a t M a r ma s Fo r healing wounds to there are many herbal combinations that can be used both internally and applied externally to the site as pastes or poultices . Turmeric or aloe gel can be used separately or mixed together. Man y western herbs can be used the same way like comfrey, arnica and plan tain, much like the herbs mentioned above for stopping-bleeding . This is mainl y for external application, but taking small amounts of the herbs internally can also be helpful . Fo r injuries affecting the bones or joints herbs like myrrh, arjuna , nirgundi, guggul, kava kava or Siberian ginseng are good, both inter nally and externally . Fo r soft tissue damage and clearing out any stagnant blood, circulator y stimulants like turmeric, saffron, angelica, rose and manjishta (mad der) are indicated. This is mainly for internal usage .

Honey applied externally is a simple and effective remedy to promot e healing and stop infection. Ghe e and butter are also good for externa l application in the case of burns and inflammation . To prevent scarring, the long-term use of an oil like sesame or vitamin E oil is good, applied daily until the wound is healed . Fo r internal usage of the herbs mentioned above, again generally follow the dosage of 1 - 3 grams three times a day in the form of powders or herbal teas for short-term usage Please note their specific indications in various herbals for more specific indications and for more long-term us age. Two additional special Ayurvedic decoctions for injuries to marmas are Marma Kashaya and Dhanvantara These are mainly for internal Note Appendix 5 for thei r

The Many Methods of Marma Therapy 2:

Methods

7 . T o Restor e Vita l Energ y If there has been severe injury to marmas , it is importan t that the patien t undergo a long-ter m tonificatio n and rejuvenatio n treatmen t to increas e vitality (Ojas) and rebuild damage d tissues . Fo r this purpos e there are many special tonic herbs that can be used, like and ginseng . Such treatment , however, should be started only after the acute injury has healed. It may be continue d for a long period of time, up to three to six months, when ther e is physica l or nervou s debilit y or exhaustion . Fo r rebuildi n g th e bon e s and muscle s use toni c herb s lik e ashwagandha, astragalus , and ginseng . For restorin g the blood and bodily fluids use tonic herbs like shatavari , marshmallow, America n ginseng , rehmannia , and amalaki , or the Ayurvedic jell y For healing the nervou s system , use nervin e tonics like kola, shankhapushpi , jatamamsi , haritaki , and licorice . gotu

Such herbs are generall y taken internall y in dosage s of 1 - 3 grams thre e times a day in the form of powder s or herbal teas and can generall y be used for period s of one month or more. They are also good taken as milk decoc tions (cooke d in milk) or taken with ghee. They are usually combine d wit h adequate rest, nutritiv e (tissue-rebuilding ) diets, deep breathin g exercise s and restorativ e Yoga poses .

Please e a in e b k s on A rved a like the Yoga of Herbs tor in rm tio n on the A u d c view of he s xm oo yu fo a y rve i rb and t e r u a e . hi s g Note b o s like the Yoga of Herbs (F w y and Lad) and Planetary ok ra le (Tierra) . IV.47. S h aS am it utrasthan a X .36 . IV C aa a S h a S hrk am it utrasthan a IV.48 . Charaka

section explains how to use the following Table of Marmas. Its is on preparing the reader to effectively use the therapies indicate d under each marma. It also contains tables and illustrations correlating the marmas according to the subdoshas and channel-system s to aid in broader Ayurvedic treatment strategies. We recommend going over it carefully before proceeding to the individual marma descriptions . The Table of Marmas describes each marma according to the Ayurvedi c factors discussed in the first section of the book, as well as anatomically in modern medical Fo r those unfamiliar with Ayurvedic terms such as the doshas, subdoshas and srotamsi, please refer to the earlier chapters in which these are Fo r the anatomica l terminolog y consul t a dictionary if needed .

O vervie w of Marm a Therapies


The Table of Marmas describes special treatments for each marma point described. The of treatment outlines simple methods for treatall marmas. Its purpose is to enable the reader to treat any marma on a general level, even if he or she may lack the specific knowledge of oils and herbs necessary for detailed treatment. Please examine previous chapter s the details of marma therapy as needed. In addition, remember to treat the person as a whole. Marma therapy is an important adjunct to be applied along with othe r Ayurvedi c therapies , diet and life-style It is usually given by those skilled in the broader field of Ayurveda. B However, marmas can be used for self-treatmen t as well. Many marma B points, particularly those on the extremities of the body, are easy to reach B for self-treatmen t with massage, acupressure, massage oils or aromatic Boils. You can do this on a daily or weekly basis to aid in energy circulatio n counter chronic ailments. You can use specific marmas to treat headaches, digestive problems, insomnia and many other conditions that you

be suffering

This kind of treatment is particularly good befor e

86 Table Treatment

of

Marmas

and

Their

taking shower s or baths, which can follow in order to wash off any exces s oil. However , it cannot substitut e for treatmen t by another , which bring s in a differen t and potentiall y transformativ e pranic source . Massage , aroma therapy and acupressur e are combine d togethe r un der one treatmen t section for each marma . This is because massag e oils and aromati c oil s are usuall y use d alon g wit h massag e or Oi l M a s s a g e Oil applicatio n is usually the best treatmen t for condition s of high Vata or for debility condition s generally. Remembe r to apply oils warm, particu larly for Vata. However , in cases of high Kapha, overweigh t or edema, it is not always necessar y to use a massag e oil. In these cases, dry massag e is usually better. Fo r simple treatmen t by oil marma s can be mas saged wit h the following oils : Sesame or almond oil for Vata types or condition s Coconu t or sunflowe r oil for Pitta types or condition s Mustar d or sesame oil (smalle r amounts ) for Kapha types or condition s Carry out the massag e as explaine d in the section on Marma Massage ,

Chapter 5 (p. 66) .


Ke y Sy mp to m s o f Hig h Dosha s a t M a r m a Point s Vata Pitta Cold and dry sensation s in the area, sensitivit y to wind or exp o sure, crackin g or roughnes s of the skin, severe or cutting pai n Ho t and damp sensation s in the area, oiliness of the skin, bleed ing, redness , skin rash, hot or burning pai n

Kaph a Cold and damp sensation s in the area, palenes s or whitenes s of skin, swelling , fatty deposits , congestion , edema, dull ach e 2. Aroma Therapy The use of spicy, penetratin g oils is specific for condition s of high Kapha or conditions of stagnatio n and congestio n generally. The use of sweet fra grances is specific for condition s of high Pitta or condition s of fever and inflammation generally. Fo r simple treatmen t by aroma therapy , marma s can be massage d or anointe d wit h the following A combinatio n of spicy and sweet oils like ginger, cinnamon , sandal wood and rose is good for Vata . Cooling sweet oils like sandalwood , rose or lotus are good for Pitta .

86 Table Treatment

of

Marmas

and

Their

taking shower s or baths, which can follow in order to wash off any exces s oil. However , it cannot substitut e for treatmen t by another , which bring s in a differen t and potentiall y transformativ e prani c Massage , aroma therapy and acupressur e are combine d togethe r un der one treatmen t section for each marma . This is because massag e oils and aromati c oils are usuall y use d alon g wit h massag e or Oi l M a s s a g e Oil applicatio n is usually the best treatmen t for condition s of high Vata or for debility condition s generally. Remembe r to apply oils warm, particu larly for However , in cases of high overweigh t or it is not alway s necessar y to use a massag e oil. In these cases, dry massag e is usually better . For simple treatmen t by oil marma s can be mas saged with the following Sesame or almond oil for Vata types or condition s Coconu t or sunflowe r oil for Pitta types or condition s Mustar d or sesame oil (smalle r amounts ) for Kapha types or condition s Carry out the massag e as explaine d in the section on Marma Massage,

Chapter 5 (p. 66) .


Ke y Sy mptom s o f Hig h Dosha s a t M a r m a Point s Vata Pitta Kapha Cold and dry sensation s in the area, sensitivit y to wind or exp o sure, crackin g or roughnes s of the skin, severe or cutting pai n Ho t and damp sensation s in the area, oiliness of the skin, bleed ing, redness , skin rash, hot or burning pai n Cold and damp sensation s in the area, palenes s or whitenes s of skin, swelling , fatty deposits , congestion , edema, dull ach e

2. Aroma Therapy The use of spicy, penetratin g oils is specific for condition s of high Kapha or conditions of stagnatio n and congestio n generally. The use of sweet fra grances is specific for condition s of high Pitta or condition s of fever and inflammation generally. Fo r simple treatmen t by aroma therapy , marmas can be massage d or anointe d wit h the following A combinatio n of spicy and sweet oils like ginger, cinnamon , sandal wood and rose is good for Vata . Cooling sweet oils like sandalwood , rose or lotus are good for Pitta .

Overview of Table of Marmas

and Marma Therapies

87

Spicy penetratin g oils like eucalyptus , campho r or mint are best for Kapha. Note that many of the specifi c treatment s in terms of oils and herbs men tioned under differen t marma s can be used on other marma s when ther e are similar problems . Also note the formula s below . Si mpl e M a r m a O i l s OI L Take cup of sesame oil. Hea t until slightly warm (not too hot or the aromatic oils will disperse ) and add a few drops of sandalwoo d oil and calamus oil (if you cannot get calamu s oil use cinnamo n oil). Us e the mixture slightly warm, but not so hot as to evaporat e the aromati c oils . ANTI-PITTA O I L Take cup of coconu t oil and heat to slightly warm. Add severa l drops of sandalwood oil and a little rose oil, until a mild fragranc e is produced . let the mixtur e cool for OI L Take cup of sesame oil and cup of mustar d oil and mix togethe r sesame and mustar d oil in ratios of one to heating slightly . Add a few drops of campho r oil, mentho l or until a good fragranc e is created . 3 . Acupressur e Acupressur e or finger pressur e is specificall y indicate d for treatin g man y different It is an importan t method for stimulatin g marma en ergy, particularl y for smalle r marma s or for trigger points within large r marmas. Generall y a strong level of pressur e with the thumb or middl e finger can be used for medium for Pitta, and more gentle for Vata, but be careful to note how painful each marma point may be and do not hurt the patient . 4 . Prani c g an d Energ y Healin

This can easily be done on any marma , using either the fingers or the pal m of the hand. It depend s upon the Prana of the healer, which should be stron g and Other T r e a t m e n t Method s

Additiona l treatmen t method s like acupunctur e and heat applicatio n are

mentioned for a few marma s by way of

Such therapie s can be

88

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

used on most marmas , but may require more trainin g in order to appl y effectively. Please examin e the Appendix 1 and Appendix 2 for more detail s on these therapies . Yogi c Methods

Yoga practice s like meditation , mantra , Pratyahar a and Pranayam a hav e been mentione d for severa l importan t marmas , particularl y relativ e to the chakras and nadis that they rule over. Holdin g the mind and Prana (our power of attention ) at marma s aids in their healing and facilitate s thei r energization at an interna l level. We have not mentione d gems or color s much relativ e to specifi c marmas but their genera l applicatio n can be use d here as well .

II. Marmas

and the Dosha s

Belo w are som e prime correlatio n s betwee n th e marma s , doshas , subdoshas and tissues of the body. This can help us understan d how to use various marmas . These correlation s are only by way of predominance . Most marma s can be used to treat any of the doshas dependin g upon the treatment method s and substance s used . M ar ma s an d th e Thr e e Dosha s
VATA

A s and Leg s rm K ra , ship M ib dh , G h a an an a ulp A d m n and C e t bo e hs B sti , N i , A a p a a abh p la Hips and B c k a K ta a , atika run A spa k a m a h la Nck a d Had e n e S thapani , V ura , idh K tika , rika U tkshe a , p
PITTA

A s and Leg s rm K rch ira , In asti , K rp r a (right) , J n u u ash drab u a a (rig t ) A do e n a h b m nd C e t hs H ridaya , Hips and B c k a B a i rih t N c k and H a d e e Sira A panga , A h at i d ip
KAPHA

A s and Leg s rm

K ra , K rp r a (left) , A , ship u a ni

B vi , ah

L hita a , K k h d aa , Ja u (left) , V a , o ksh as a h r n itap G lp a u h A d m n and C e t bo e hs S aroh tan ita , A astam a , A a p a p bh p la Hips and B c k a B ati , A s p a k a rih m a h la *T e e m r k the m s t im o n t m rm s for the co s o hs a o p rta a a rre p ndin g re io s of the b d . gn oy

2 . M ar m a Point s an d th e Subdosha s The followin g are a few key connection s betwee n marma points and the subdoshas or five forms of Vata, Pitta and Kapha .

Overview of Table of Marmas

and Marma Therapies

89

Prana V u ay

Vata Subtype s and M rm a P a oint s and S ap i m rm s on the h a d re t e to P n a th an a a e la ra V y u a d to the c w n (S ha ra ) ch a n ro a sra akra . T e y c n l the h o tro m d and the ce tra l ne u s system . P a a and V h r a in n rvo hn id u m rm s are also good for P n a as circu tio n in the h a d and a a ra la e se nses . K ip a and Talahridaya are goo d for g ra l stim la n sh r ene u tio of P a and its e tr y in o the b d . ran n t oy and m rm s on the n c k a a e and sh u e s re t e to U a a V y u and to the tho t o ld r la dn a ra c a ra . hk H a a (hea , rid y rt) and m rm s re t e to a a la V a a V y u a d the h a t c a ra . S ve l m rm s on the yn a n er hk e ra a a h n s and fe t are c n e te d with V a a as w l l as P n , ad e onc yn e ra a p rtic la y T rid y a and K a u rl alah a shipra .

2. U a a Vayu dn 3. V a a V y u yn a

4. S m n a Vayu N b i (navel) , A a m h a and K rc a ir a m rm s a a ah p sta b u h sh a a re t e to S m n a V y u and the na l cha la a a a ve kra . 5. A a a V y u pn a B st i (bladder) , G d a (anus ) and V p a (p rineu ) m rm s a u ita e m a a re t e to A a a V y u and the two lo e r c a r s . M rm s on la pn a w h ka a a the le s a g nd fe t like T la rid y a a d e ah a n a e c n e te d to r onc A a a as w l l as to V n . U s e a m rm a on the he d pn e ya a tk h p a a has an o ra l c n l of A a a a d V ta . ve l o tro pn n a .

90

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment Pitta S ubtype s and M rm a P a oint s S d a a Pitta ahk and H a a m rm s (on the h a d rid y a a e and h a ) a e re te d to S d a a P a and the e rt r la ahk itt d e tio n of k o le g e and e e n e . ig s nw d xp rie c K rch , K rch ira , S ap n i and A an a m rm s u a u ash th a p g a a are re te d to A c a a P a (s e g p w r of the la lo h k itt e in oe e s ) and v u l a u . ye is a c ity T lah aya , a rid and K tik ta n a a a ru m rm s a e re te d to B ra k a P a and d e tio n a a r la h ja itt ig s of lig t and h a t at the le l of the s in . h e ve k N h i (navel) , ab K rc a h a and u h s ir Ind b t i m rm s are re te d to P c a a P a ra as a a la ah k itt a nd the d e tiv e ig s N h i (navel) , K rp r a (elb ) , J n u (kne ) a ab u a ow a e nd K k n a a marmas are re te d to R n k a P a (dig tiv e uudr la a ja itt es p w r at the le e l of the b o ) a o e v lo d nd the live . r

2. A c a a P a lo h k itt

3. B ra k a P a h ja itt

4. P c a a P a ah k itt

5. R n k a P a a ja itt

Sadhaka Pitta

d e t s K o le g e ig s nw d Nila & M n a ay si n k

Bhrajaka

digests K o le g e nw d N hi ab
Pachaka

Sadhaka Pitta-

H y a rida

fire , spo s al P s u p rt l itta


Ranjaka

liv r e

K rc a u h
Alochaka

v io n is

Subdosh a s of Pitt a and Marm a s

Kurcha

Overview of Table of Marmas and Marma Therapies K h a Subtype s and M rm a Point s ap a Kp a ah A ip i and dh at on the h a d and H a a (h art ) e rid y e m rm s are re te d with T rp k a K p a (e o n l a a la a a ah m tio a c n n e t) . So are S rin a k a and K a a o te tm n h g ta rik tik m rm s on the he d and n c . a a a ek S ring h ataka , and P a a m rm s on the face hn a a a nd neck are re te d to B d a a K p a (p e r of la ohk ah ow taste) .a (h a , H ay rid e rt) and T la rid y a m rm s ah a a a a e re r late d to A la b k a K p a (lub tio n of the va m a ah rica m c u s membranes in the ch uo est) . N b i (n l ) and ah ave m rm s are re te d a a la w h K d k a K p a (K p a d e it le a ah ah ig stiv e se cretions) . So is K rc a h a on the h n s and fee . u h s ir ad t J n u (knee) , K rp r a (e ow , M n a d a (w a u a lb ) a ib n h rist) , Gulpha (a nkle ) and K tika ru a (hip ) m rm s are a ta n a a re te d w h S s a a K p a (lu ric tio n of the la it le h k ah b a jo ts . in )

91

2. 3.

Kp a ah Kp a ah

4. K d k a K p a le a ah

5. Se h k a K p a lsa ah

92

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

3 . Channe l System s and Marm a Point s The followin g are a few key marma s relating to the differen t channe l systems . Others are listed in the table of marmas .
T h a ala rid ya , K hip , H a a s ra rid y Pranavaha P a , S an i han thap (he art) , respiratory s te , lun s , h a t ys m g er 2. Annavaha N b i (nave , In ra s , ah l) d ba ti K rc a h a d e tiv e s s m , g . tra t u h s ir ig s y te .i c 3. A astam p bha , K rp u ara , Janu , e b lis yste ac a Bh i av B asti , m ta o m s m , p n re s 4. Rasavaha H a a (he rid y art) , K h ra , s ip S n m la , a d ly p a c s te , h a , skin ta a u n m h ti ys m e rt Na il 5. H a a (he rid y art) , N b i (nave , K rp r a ah l) u a rih a ne ) o ita s a ir (e o ) , system, bloo , h art , liv r B ati , J n u (k e , L h k h , S a lb w d e e M trik a a K rc a h u h s ira , 6. S a u , msu r ss m tan m la S na ta rohita , G d a (anus ) u u c la y te 7. a ip e s s m d os y te 8. Asthivaha s e ta l s s m k le y te Kkna u u d ra , K tik ta n , J n u (kn e ) a a ru a a e B s i (b dd r ) K tik ta n , at la e a a ru a

9. A h a , S a ta , S ani , d ip ti im n thap p s mh h g k A a p , n rvo s syste , b i n A a ta b a , S rin ata a p la a e u m ra Shukravaha (a k ) , re ro u tiv e syste , n le p dc m te te , u ru s s s te G a (anus) , V p a (perineum , G h a ud ita ) ulp B s i (lo e r a d m n ) at w bo e

B st i (bladder) , G d a (anus) , a u Mutravaha K k n a a u a y s te , k n ys , uudr rin r ys m id e u a yb de r rin r la d G a (anus) , P ud arshvasandhi , Purishavaha S hankh a e c to y s m , c lo n x re r yste o N , ila Swedavaha S n ro it a s e tin g s s m , s i n ta a h wa y te k 14. the m d in m n tru l s s m es a y te Stanyavaha S n roh ta a ita , la ta n s s m c tio y te K tik ta n , a a ru a

A hip , S a d ati im nta , S an , H a a (h a ) thap i rid y e rt B s i (blad at der) , G d a (anus) , N b i (nave , u ah l) K tik ta n a a ru a , K k n a a uu d r H a a (he rid y art) , S na u , ta m la N m a ita b

Overview of Table of Marmas

and Marma Therapies

93

Strategie s of Marm a Therapy/Marm a Formula s Marma therapy is not limited to the treatmen t of single marmas, howeve r important this can be. Several marma s are usually treated during a session . The numbe r and sequenc e of marma s treated will determin e the nature and effects of the therapy . Naturally , the development of marma formulas , like that of herbal formulas , can be complex . However , using the above correla tions one can combin e differen t marmas to treat specific doshas , subdosha s or channel-systems out of Generall y three to seven marma s is a good number to consider , focusin g on one as the mos t important or centra l marm a for the One method is to select marma s from each section of the body like the arms, legs, front of the body, back of the body and head. This can be combined with overall body massage . Fo r example , one can treat Vata in a comprehensive manne r throug h marma therapy on Adhipat i (head) , (back of the neck), Guda (anus), Talahriday a (palm of the hand) and Talahriday a (sol e of the Or one can focus on key region s of the subdoshas . For example , one can treat Sadhak a Pitta (Pitta in the nervou s system ) throug h marm a therapy on Simant a (skull) and Hriday a (heart) marmas . For anothe r ex ample, one can treat Sleshak a Kapha (lubricatio n of the joints) by doin g marma therapy on the main joint marmas : Janu (knee) , Kurpar a (elbow) , Manibandha (wrist) , Gulpha (ankle) and Katikatarun a (hip) . One can treat the channel-system s in the same manner . Fo r example , to open the Pranavah a Srotas or respiratory/energ y system , one can trea t Kshipra (hand) , Talahriday a (hand) , Hriday a (heart) , Phana (nostrils ) and Adhipati (head) marmas . Anothe r importan t principl e to conside r is that it is generall y good to treat the correspondin g marma s on both the right and left sides of the body or on both the upper and lower extremities . Fo r when treating Kshipr a make sure to treat both right and left points and also Kshipr a on the foot. An exceptio n to this is if one is trying to correct an energ y imbalanc e on the right and left sides of the body or on the upper and lowe r portion s of the body. Then one must focus on stimulatin g marmas on the side or portion of the body requirin g energization , while either not treatin g or sedatin g the marma s on the opposit e side . These are only a few suggestions . Marma formula s are an advance d topic usually taught in a clinica l setting and requirin g extensiv e Ayurvedi c knowledge and trainin g by the student .

C H A P TE R

Table of Marm a s o n Ar m s and Han d s

1 1 Marm a Re gi on s an d 2 2 Poi nt s

hands and arms contain a numbe r of importan t marma points for the and expressio n of Prana, particularl y for Vyana Vayu (th e ward-movin g pranic which they convey throug h the sense of touch. Such periphera l points on the body impact the circulatio n of energy in the organs and in the spine as well as the arms and leg position s where they are located . They are easy to reach and manipulat e for treatmen t purposes, whic h makes them very importan t in marma therapy . Marmas on the hands are the basis for therapeuti c touch. Their energ y should be kept strong and clear for those who wish to project their healin g power on to others. Treatin g these specifi c marma s goes along well wit h general massag e of the arms and hands . Marma s on the arms have two points, one for each arm. Generally , marmas on the right arm or solar side of the body are better for increasin g heat, promotin g circulatio n and improvin g digestion . They stimulat e bodily activities, increasin g Agni (fire) and the Pitta function s of the body . Marmas on the left arm or lunar side of the body are better for coolin g action, reducing inflammatio n and buildin g They have a calmin g effect, increasing the Kapha or watery function s of the body.

96

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Kshipr a (hand ) Description Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it K h r a ( u k ; re c g its im e ia e e c ) s ip q ic fle tin md t ffe t 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h h n d a o ts a a L a e t (S yu ) ig m n na 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n S a d b tw e n the thu b and in e x fin e , lo a d itu te e e m d gr c te b te ll y on the d rsa l and p lm r s rfa e s of the h n d in ila ra o a a u c a d the web f r e by the d rs l in ro s o s m s l e b tw e n om o a te s e u uc e e the firs t a s c n d m ta a a l b ne . nd e o e c rp o s Note: (The s s b tw e n the o e r fin r s also h v e ite e e th ge a im o n t th ra e ti c p p rtie . T e y can be re a e d as p rta e pu ro e s h g rd s co d r y K h r a p in s a tre te d in a s ila r e na s ip ot nd a im mn e . a n r) C n o s p s a and re p to y s s m s (R s v h a o tr l la m s ira r y te aaa a nd Pranavaha he rt , lu g s and A a m a a a n v la b k K p a (lubrication of h a t and P n a and V a a V y s . ah er ra yn au

Cn l s o tro

A a m a l F x r p llici s b vis , o liq e and tra s rs e h a d of a d c r n to ic le o o re b u n ve e d u to S c re s p llici s m s le . B n h s of m d n n rve , d rsa l m ta a a l tru tu o uc ra c e e ia e o e c rp

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

97

a r y a s p rfic l p lm r a h s p ly g b o d to rte nd u e ia a a rc u p in lo the fin e . g rs Qa u litie s Relative to In r y ju S m to s y pm If In re d ju K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u g ) ty e an r ra a a og r e th a sin p m rm . B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y a a o r nd a r e re u ea ilit .

L s s of a d c n and fle io n of th m , and b e in g from o d u tio x u b le d the p lm r a . a a rch

Msa e , as g A u re s r c p su e and Ao a rm Therapy

A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g pl a as g re s tro c u r m tio n for a o t five m u s . irc la o bu in te This is also a g o d m rm a for a u re s r e to p m t e o a c p su ro o c u tio , in re s e e e y flow and get the P n a irc la n c a n rg ra m v g th u h u t the b d y as a w o . o in ro g o o h le U e s p i n s s m e o l or m s r d o l la ea i u ta i as m s a e as g Use s ic y ao a c oils like e c ly tu , c n m n , s g e p r m ti ua p s in a o a or to o e n the e e y and re v e p in . p n rg lie a A p y p w e s of c la u s or g g r for s ila r p rp se . pl o dr am in e im u o s

A u u cu e For tin lin , n m n s , e s e s , g u , ca e e l s u , c p nt r g g u bes ry ip la ot lc n a pr p o s s or c c e d h n s ; a u u c r e s o l d be d n e s ria i ra k ad c p n tu hu o two a g l i (fin e r u its ) p x a l to the s . nu g n ro im ite Te t e t If G n ra y a p y an ice p c . W e n th r e is b rn g r am n e e ll pl ak h e u in s n tio , a p y g e e (c rifie d b tte ) or, if the s n a n e sa n pl h la u r e s tio I jue d nr is m r e o in rn l , use s n a o d o . te a a d lw o il

98

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a T la rid y a (h a t or c n r of the ah a er e te 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h a o ts a

p lm ) N m e r a u b hnd a Tpe y Size Se it md e id l

Msl e uc a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n S a d in the c n r of the p lm , fa in g the ro t of the itu te e te a c o

j I

fin e r (c n r of the p lm r s rfa e of the h n d s p rfic l g e te a a u c a u e ia to th d ir joint) . 1 Cn l s o tro An im o n t p in t for e e y c u tio n for the e tir e b d y p rta o n rg irc la n o t a t is h lp l for all a u d h a h and b la ce . h e fu ro n e lt an 1 C n l s re p to y s s m (P n v h a S ta , h a , o tro s ira r y te ra a a ro s) e rt lu g , 1 ns B ra k a P a (c u tio n a h ja itt irc la nd h a t re e tio n on the s in ) e cp k

a d n A a m a a K p a (lu ric tio n of h a t and lu g . v la b k ah b a er n s) Controls Y s a v t i N d i (rig t h n ) and H s v a N d i ahsa a h ad a tijih a ( f t h n ) a n g with V a a V y u (p w r of c u tio ) , le a d lo yn a oe irc la n

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

99

in the u p r half of the b d y (a o e the n v l) . A so pe o bv ae l c n l s the h n s as a m to r o n . o tro ad o rga Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu Qa u litie s Relative to In r y ju | S ptom s ym In re d ju T n o n of fle o r ed x p fu d s , ro n u and e te s r x no Muscle tis u e of tu ic a m d a of s n ei s p rfic l and d e p p lm r a . In ro s i m s u e ia e a a rch te s e u cle . B n h s of the m d n n rv . ra c e e ia e e K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g m rm . B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of a a o r nd a r e re v ln r b y . u ea ilit )

L s s of fle io n and e te s n of the s c n , th d and o x x n io eo d ir fo rt h fingers and a d c n of s c n , th d and fo rt h u d u tio eod ir u m ta a a e c rp ls . B e in g m y lead to p in , s o k or in c n . le d a a hc fe tio

Treatm en t M s a e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r as g pl a as g re s tro irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s or u ti l the e e y in the c p su o bu in te n n rg h n d is and A m a re a e . This is also a go d m rm a for a ro le s d o a a u re s r e for Therapy cp su o e in g up the h a g e e y of the pn e lin n rg h n s . It is o n a s r e ad fte o p in t in m s t p o le . Use N ra a n o o ep a y s s m e or a o d ea lm n oil for m s a e . U s ic y a m ti c o s like e c ly tu , as g se p ro a il ua p s c mh r a po for c a g P n v h a S ta s le rin ra a a ro (re p to y sy m . For V a a V y u (p n c c u tio ) and s ira r ste ) yn a ra i irc la n to e e iz e the h n s , u e p n tra n rg ad s e e tin g a m ti c o s lik e ro a il e c ly tu , c n m n or c m h r . T i s is g a t for m s a e ua p s in a o a po h re as g p c n r s to p p r e th m e e s for tr a e t , e h n in g ra titio e re a e s lv e tm n nac the p w r of th ra e ti c to c . R b in g the p lm s to e e r oe e pu uh ub a g th q ic l y for a few s c n s e e iz s this p in . O c e the uk eo d n rg e ot n p lm s fe l w rm , th can be p c d on o e r m rm s for a e a ey la e th a a h a g p rp se , in lu in g o e r e lin u o s cd v the e e s for c lmn g P a or o e r the e r s to calm V ta . y a i itt v a a Aromatic oils like c n m n , c r a o in a o ad m m , s ffro n and a g g r a p d at th s p in t a g o d f sim lain g the in e p lie i o re o or t u t ha . e rt M dtao n A g o d p in t of c n e tra e i ti o o o c n tio n and m d tio n for b g g e ita rin in in andYoga p s e h a g e e ie s and P n a from the e te a l o itiv e lin n rg ra x rn e v n e t and for re a n iro m n le sin g n g tiv e e e y and s ss . ea n rg tre Te t e t A o g h it is a m s l e m rm , in r y to n a y v s e s c r am n lth u uc a a ju e rb es l an Inue d c u e ble d jr as e ing . To stop b e g , a p y ice to the a a . le din pl re

P i n g e e is g o d for h a g the area or the s e ia l la h o e lin pc A u e i c form l a S a d u a G y rv d u h ta ha t hrita . tu e c a lic ric e p w e s m d e in a p s e a n g rm ri nd o o dr a to at lo w h a litl e c s r o l for h a g p rp s s . it t a to i e lin u oe

1 00

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it K rc a (a k o t or b n le , of the m s le s at the b s e uh n ud uc a of the th m ) u b 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h h n d a o ts a a L a e t (S yu ) ig m n na 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n T m i n p in t is s a d o a g l i (fin e r u it ) d ta l he a o itu te ne n u g n is from the wis t jo t at t r in he b s e of the th m b jo t (ir t a u in f s la g a l jo t) , p x a l to K h r a m rm , but ne in ro im s ip a a the e tir e m r a c v r s a la e a a . Its la e size of fo r n am oe rg re rg u a g li s can be e p in d in th t the m rm a in lu e s the nu x la e a a cd jo t s of the o e r fin e s as w ll , w ic h can be re a e d as in th gr e h g rd se o d r y cna K rc a uh p in . o ts

C n l s C n l s A c a a P a (s e g fu c n of the e e ) , o e l l o tro o tro lo h k itt e in n tio ys v ra s n o y a u y and P n a V y u (o e l l p n c and n rv e esr c it ra a v ra ra i e

and

p rtic la y to the a u rl j

An im o n t p in t for P n a p rta o ra

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

Aa ma l n to ic Sr cue s tu t r

T n o n of e te s r ed x no e te s r in ic , te d n of x no d is no e te s r c rp i ra ia s b v s and lo g s and fle o r x no a d li ra i nu x d ito m ig ru and p fu d s . B n h s of m d n ro n u ra c e e ia n rv . e e Qate s u li i V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . R laiv e to a a et W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ar e re ue b I ju y nr S m to s In r y m y im a r c o in tio n of the c rp l and y pm ju a pi o rd a a a m ta a a l e c rp If In r d jue jo ts , e te s n a a d c n of the w t a c u e in x n io nd b u tio ris nd a s d to is rtio n of the T a e t re tm n Msa e , as g F llo w u u l m s a e p c d re . The c n l a a of th s o sa as g ro e u s e tra re i A u re s r e m rm a is g o d for a u re u c p su a o c p ss re , w ic h also stim la s the h u te m d . and Ao a in rm For c n llin g A c a a P a (se in g fu c n of o tro lo h k itt e n tio the e e ) T ea y ys hrp m s a e with s n a o d oil, as g a d lw o Sa dat a h ta h u G rit a h or p in la ge . he Use c o g and s e t a m ti c oils like s n a o d , o lin we ro a a d lw o r s , c a o il e and lo s . oe h m m tu For o e in g the e e y and s u tin g P n a use a m ti c pn n rg tim la ra ro a oils like c m h r , m t or c v s . T i s also h lp s to k e p a po in lo e h e e Te t e t A p y a s p o r am n pl u p rtiv e b n a e to m im e p in . Use tu e c adg in iz a rm ri If Inue d jr p s e or a at loe gel for m o r in ry . in ju

1 02

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Kurchashir a (hand ) D escription Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it K rc a h a (the h a d of K rc a ) u h s ir e u h 2 m rm a p in s (one on e h h n ) a ot ac ad L a e t (S yu ) ig m n na 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n T ro t of the th m b ju t a o e the wis . D ta l to he o u s bv rt is M n a d a , s a d two a g li s (fin e r u its ) a ib n h itu te nu g n p x a l to K rc a , or b tw e n K rc a a ro im u h e e uh nd M n a d a , firs t c r p m ta a a l jo t d ta l to a ib n h a o e c rp in is the C n l s A c a a P a (se in g p w r of the e s) , o tro lo h k itt e oe ye A n i (digestive p w r) , s m c , P c a a P , K d k a g o e to a h ahk itta le a K p a and ah V y u (fo s of P , K p a and a rm itta a h Vata g v rn ing d e tio ) . A o in e c s the h a , oe ig s n ls flu n e ed m d and n rv u s sy m , c lm g V ta . in e o ste s a in a T e th m b is re a e d as m n s tio n of h u g rd a ife ta not s p y im l

Cn l s o tro

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

1 03

as the p w r of d e oe ig stio n but also as the p w r of P n a oe ra a nd as the s u l its lf . T i s is an im o n t A n i p in t o e h p rta g o for c n l ling th s e d re t fo s of fire . o tro e iffe n rm Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu T n o n of fle o r c rp i ra ia , te d n of a d c r p llic s ed x a d lis no b u to o i lo g s , te d n of e te s r c rp i ra ia s lo g s , nu no x no a d li nu te d n of extensor p llic s lo g s and b v . no o i nu re is

R ja a a (P in u g ) type m rm . u kr a -ca sin a a Q ate s u lii B t h a y a fie y in d g e of o ir nd r e re R la e to e tiv v ln r b y . Injury u ea ilit S m to s y pm b e in g le d If In re d ju Treatment F llo w u u l m s a e p c d re s u in g a s n g o sa as g ro e u s tro Msa e , as g m s a e , Acupressure p ric lal y w h y u r th m b u t l the e e y as g at u r it o u ni n rg in the th m b is and A m a re a e . This is also a g o d m rm a for u le s d o a ro a u re s r e and T ea y c p su h lp s in re s e P n a and s ua e A n i e c a ra tim l t g hrp in the b d y o ra . o ve ll F r c n llin g A c a a Pt a (se in g p w r of the o o tro lo h k it e oe e e ) use ys coconut or s n w r u flo e o . Use c o g a m ti c o s like s n a o d , ro e or ils o lin ro a il a d lw o s ku . hs For A n i and d e tio , use s u tin g a m ti c o s g ig s n tim la ro a il like g g r , c n m n , c v s or c rd m m . in e in a o lo e a a o For c a g the m d , use oils like c la u , m rr h or c m le rin in a ms y a p o . For c lm g V t a use oils like s n a o d , v le n hr a in a a d lw o a ria Te tm n t A p y tu e c p s e or a e g l for m o r ra e pl rm ri at lo e in in ry . If In r d ju jue Im a e t of the fle io n a a d c n of the w t , p irm n x nd b u tio ris from the ra ia l a r y a d rte nd p i n due to in r y to the a ju ra ia l ne . d rve

1 04

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment


mar m a

Manibandha Description Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it M n a d a (b c le ) a ib n h ra e t 2 m rm a p in s (o e on e c h w ) a ot n a rist J in t (S n h ) o adi 2 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n T he w t , w h the m i n p in t o e a f a g l i (fin e r u its ) ris it a o n -h l nu g n la r l to the c n r of the wis t jo t (a te r ra ia l w t tea e te r in n rio d ris c a e in the w l l fo e d by the ju c r e of the ra iu s re s e rm n tu d w h the s a h id n t e c rp l b n s) . The site o p site , it c p o /lu a a a oe po on the b c k of the wis , is a o im ota t . B t h p in s c a rt ls pr n o ot an be tre te d a to e e . The o e l l m rm a is m d m in size and c v r s g th r v ra a e iu oe the c n l p t of the w t joint as a w o . e tra ar ris h le C n l s s e ta l s s m (A iva a S ta ) and m v m n t o tro k le y te sth h ro s oe e of h n s , S s a a K p a (lu rica n of the jo ts ) a ad le h k ah b tio in nd V a a V y u (p rip e l circ la n . yn a e h ra u tio )

Cn l s o tro

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

1 05

Aa ma l n to ic a nd S c re s tru tu Qa u litie s R la e to e tiv v ln r b y . u ea ilit S m to s y p m If In re d ju

W t jo t . ris in

and ra io rp l lig m n . R d l d -ca a a e ts a ia

m d n n rv e and a ry . e ia e rte R ja a a (P in u in ) type m rm . u kr a -ca s g a a B t h a y a fie y in d g e of o ir nd r e re Injury L s s of fle io , e te s n , a d c n and a d c n of the o x n x n io d u tio b u tio h n . In r y can also ca s e w a n g , ad ju u e ke in d c o in tio is o rd a n , d lo a n and d to is c tio is rtio n of the h n . ad

Treatm en t Msa e , as g F llo w u u l m s a e p c d re s w h m d ra e s n t h o sa as g ro e u it oe t tre g u ti l n A u re s r e the e e y in the w t is re a e . T c p su n rg ris le s d he c n l a a of e tra re ro th s and A m a i m rm a is also a g o d m rm a for a u re s r e for a o a c p su h ra in re s g T e p y e e y flow to the h n . c a in n rg ad For c n llin g A th a a S ta s (s e ta l s s m ) a d o tro s iv h ro k le y te n S s a a K p a , use S h c a a le h k ah a ahr Ah a a d a swgnh s s m e oil or a o d oil . ea lm n U e p n tra s e e tin g a h a g a m ti c o s lik e a g lic , nd e lin ro a il ne a b h , m rh , g g u l or w te re n w ic h re v e jo t irc yr ug in rg e h lie in p i n and s e g . a w llin A u u c r e In case of c rv a l ly p a e itis , p rfo rm a u u c r e on c p n tu e ic mh d n e c p n tu the (s c i k rm ) p in t t u a a o wo a g l i (fin e r u its ) d ta l to the m rm . nu g n is a a T a e t If F r d lo a re tm n o is c tio n or fra tu e a p y a b n a e to the w t c r pl adg ris jo t . In re d W e n th r e is a sm l e in r y wh u t fr c r , b th e the in ju h e i p ju it o a tue a a a re in w r m g e or s s m e oil . a he ea

1 06

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Indrabast i Description Nme a

(arm )

In ra a t i (In ra s a w or a s p rio r ty e of a w ; d bs d ' rro ue p rro o in g to the s a e of the m s le s in the re io n of the m w hp uc g id fo a re rm . B s i also m a s b d e r in o e r c n x . ) at en la d th o te ts 2 m rm a p in , one on ea h fo a m a o ts c re r Msl e uc 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n C n r of the fo a e te re rm , s h y at the la ra l a p c t lig tl te se w e e the radial a r y p s e s (a te r fo a m m lin e hr rte as n rio re r id b tw e n the e o w a d w t c a e in the b ll y of the e e lb n ris re s e fle o r c rp i ra ia s su e x a d li p rficia l to the in ro s u s te s e m m ra e . e b n)

Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

1 07

Cn l s o tro

C n l s d e tiv e s o tro ig s yste m (A n v h a S ta ) , A n i naa ro s g (d e tiv e fire), S m n a V y u (b la c g P n ) , ig s a a a a n in ra a Pitta (d e tiv e ju e ) and sm l l in stin . Has an e c t on ig s ic s a te e ffe the p s a (R s a D a ) as w ll . la m a h tu e

A a m a l F x r p llic s lo g s , e te s r c rp i r d lis , n to ic le o o i nu x no a a ia b c io d li s ra h ra ia S u tu s tr c re and p n to r te s m s le . R d l and m d n n rve , ro a re uc s a ia e ia e ra ia l a r y and trib ta s of c p a c v in . d rte u rie e h li e Qate s u li i K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g ) ty e p m rm . R la e to B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b a a e tiv o r nd a r e re u ea ility I ju y nr S m to s y pm In r y ju If In re d ju

T e im o n t s c r e at th s m rm a is the ra ia l a ry . h p rta tru tu i a d rte m y le d to d to a a is rtio n of the h n d re u g in a s ltin It m y a o c u e p ra s s of a ls as a ly i the fo a m or s v r e ble din . re r ee e g

T atm re en t Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g pl a as g re s tro c u r A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . T i s is also a g o d irc la c p su o bu in te h o m rm a for and A m a a u re s re . a ro cp su T ea y hrp For s u tio n of A n i (d e tim la g ig stiv e fire , use ) T ila , mustard or s s m e o . a ea ils For c n llin g the s a l in s e and A n v h a S ta s o tro ml te tin n aa ro (d e tiv e s s m , u w r m s ic y a m ti c o s like ig s y te ) se a p ro a il a is , fe l , g g r or c rd m m . ne nne in e a a o C la u s oil is g o d h r e for p m tin g c u tio n in b t h am o e ro o irc la o the digestive s s m and th u h the p sm . y te ro g la a Te tm n t If The sa e as K h ra . ra e m s ip Inue d jr

1 08

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

D escription Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it K rp r a (e o -jo t ) u a lb w in 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h a m a o ts a r J in t (S n h ) o adi 3 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n The e o w jo t as a w o , a la e m rm . The m i n p in t lb in h le rg a a a o is at the o ts e (tro h a r u id c le la ra l e o w s p rfic l te lb u e ia to ra ia l c lla ra l lig m n . H w v r , the c rre p n in g d o te a e t) o ee o sod p in t on the inside a the p in t im e ia l y b h d the o nd o m d te e in e o w jo t a e also im o n t p in . lb in r p rta o ts C n l s b o d and c u to y s s m (R k v h a o tro lo irc la r y te a ta a S ta , S m n a V y u (b la c g P n ) , R n k a ro s) a a a a n in ra a a ja P a (c lo g of itt o rin the b o d and b ) and U a a a a S ta s ( a r lo ile dkvh ro w tem ta o m . M rm a on rig t e o w c n l s the liv r a e b lis ) a h lb o tro e nd R n k a P . M rm a on left e o w c n l s the s le n , a ja itta a lb o tro p e

Cn l s o tro

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

1 09

A ao ic n t ma l Sr cue tu t r s

E o w jo , lig m n t c p u , u a , ra ia l and a n la r lb in a e a s le ln r d nu ra ia l collateral lig m n , m da n n rv e and b n h s . d a e ts ei e ra c e B c ia l a ry , trib ta ra h rte u rie s of c p a c and m d n c b l e h li e ia u ita v in . S p a to , e te s r c rp i ra ia , b e s , tric p s e u in r x no a d lis ic p e a d p n to r te s m s le . n ro a re uc s V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . Watery in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e re ue b In r y w l c u e b e in g a ju il a s le d nd d m g e the fu c n a a n tio of the fo a re rm .

Q aitie s ul Relative to I ju y nr S m to y pm s If In re d ju

Msa e , as g A u re s r c p su e and Ao a rm Therapy

For liv r d a s , m s a e the rig t K rp r a m rm . e ise se as g h u a a a U e Pd aa iMn h d i s a mk d a jis ta g e e or h s fflo e r o s for m s a e . U b o -c a s a w il as g se lo d le n in g a m ti c ro a o s like c ria d r , m rrh , w r w o , s ffro n or tu e . il o ne y om o d a rm ric For d a s of s le n and p n re s , m s a e the le t ise se pe ac a as g f Kurpara m rm a with M n h d i T ila , s fflo e r oil or a a jis ta a a w s s m e o . U e s ic y a m ti c o s lik e g g r , ea il s p ro a il in e c rd m m , m rr h or tu e . a a o y rm ric For a u re s re , the p in s on the o ts e and the in e , cp su ot u id sid in fro t and b h d the e o , are also g o d and can be n e in lb w o w rk d on w h s m e s n th . oe it o tre g F r e la e e t of the liv r , s le t a s n itiv e p in t on o n rg m n e ec es o the r h t m rm a and a p y h a t w h a m ta l p b . F r ig a pl e it e ro e o e la e m n t of the s le n , use a s n itiv e p in t on the n rg e pe es o le t m rm . The h a t a p d s o l d be m . The f a a e p lie hu ild p ce u e can be repeated e e y a rn t e day for s v n ro d r vr lte a ee d ys . a

Ha t e A p aio n p lic t (A n g ik rm ) a a

B o -le lo d ttin g For liv r d rd rs , b o -le e iso e lo d ttin g s o l d be d n e from the hu o rig t c b l ve . For sp e n d rd rs , it s o l d be d n e h u ita in le iso e hu o from the le t c b l v in . O l y s a l a o n s of b o d f u ita e n ml mu t lo s o l d be ta e n and the w u d c v re d w h tu e c hu k on oe it rm ri p w e r a a e g l or o e r s ita l e d in c n . od nd lo e th u b is fe ta t A u u c r e For b c ia l n u lg , c rv a l s o d litis , tin lin g or c p n tu ra h e ra ia e ic pny g

n m n s s of the p lm , a u u c r e s o l d be d n e on u b e a c p n tu hu o the p in t fo r a g l i (fin e r u its ) e e r p x a l or o u nu g n ith ro im d ta l to K rp r a m rm . is u a a a Te tm n ra e t If In re d ju A p y a c s s ty b n a e to the a a . U h rb s like pl ro pe a d g re se e tu r m ri c and m rr h in rn ll y to p m t e h a g , or g g u l e y te a ro o e lin ug a d n

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

An i ( ar m ) Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Ani (the p in t of a n e le ) o ed 2 m rm a p in , one on e h a a o ts ac rm L a e t and T n o n (S ig m n ed nayu ) 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

Se it Cn l s o tro Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu

In the a p c t of se a ,t rm wo (fin e r u its ) g n p x a l to the m d l e ic n y e of the h m ru . ro im e ia p o d l u e s C n l s U a a a a S ta s (w te e b lis o tro dkvh ro a r-m ta o s te ) , p n re s and k n y . ys m ac a id e s m

B e s and c ra o ra h ic p o c b c ia l m s s . Un r and m d n u cle la e ia n rv s . L w r end of the h m ru . B c ia l a r y e e oe u e s ra h rte a d ve . n in

Q ate s u lii V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) ty e a a aa isa ility a sin p m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b In r y ju S m to s y pm wl l e If In re d ju In r y to th s m rm a im a s e te s n of the a , as ju i a p ir x n io rm as the d w g of the arm fo a d a in a . In r y to ra in rw r nd w rd ju the n rv e m y c u e c m le e p ra s s of the a . e a as o pt a ly i rm In r y to the a r y m y c u e s v r e b e in . ju rte a as ee le d g An e s y area to re c h for m s a e . F lo w u u l m s a e a a as g o sa as g or a p s u e p ce u s . cu re s r ro d re F r c n llin g U a a a a So s (w te e b lis m o o tro dkvh r ta a r-m ta o s s m ) msa e w h y te as g it Taila or p i n m s r d la u ta U e s a m ti c oils like g g r , ro a in e cra o ad m m , p rs y or ju ip r . a le ne A p st e of aloe gel and tu e c can be u e d for m o r a rm ri s in in ry . ju

Treatment Msa e , as g A u re s r e c p su and A m a ro Te p y h ra o. il Ta e t re tm n If In re d ju

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Description Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it B h i (w a t re te s to the a ) or av h la rm of the u p r a ) p e rm 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h a m a o ts a r Vs l e se 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n In the ra ia l a p c t of the u p r arm a o t fo r and a d se pe bu u h l f anguli (fin e r u its ) from the m d l e ic n y . a g n e ia p o d le (th e w e re io n id g

Cn l s o tro

C n l s p s a and w te e b lis m (R s v h a a d o tro la m a r-m ta o aaa n Udakavaha V a a V y u and g v rn s h a y tis u e yn a oe e lth s g w . ro th B c ia l a r y and v in . L m h v s e l d in g e to a illa y ra h rte e y p es ra a x r g u p of g n s . M d n and u a r n rv s . Bc p s a d ro la d e ia ln e e ie n tric p s muscles. e

Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu

Qat s u liie V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) type of a a aa isa ility a sin m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b I ju y nr S m to s y pm If In re d ju a . rm D m g e to the a r y c u e s b e in . In r y may ca s e a a rte as le d g ju u im a e t of the fu c n of fle io n a e te s n of the p irm n n tio x nd x n io

Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a stro g pl a as g re s n c u r A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . A u re s r e irc la c p su o bu in te c p su a o w rk s w l l and A m a h r e for im ro in g ly p a c c u tio . ls o e ro e p v m h ti irc la n T ea y hr p M s a e w h p i n s s m , a o d or m s r d o s to asg it la ea e lm n u ta il w r m the re io . a g n For c n llin g R s v h a S ta s (ly p a c s s m ) u o tro aaa ro m h ti y te se d in g a m ti c o s like c m h r , c rd m m , b y e y or ry ro a il a po a a o a b rr mt. in F r im ro in g c u tio n u s u tin g a m ti c o p v irc la se tim la ro a o s like c n m n , t y e or g g r . il in a o hm in e Te t e t r am n For b e in g a p y ice to the site and if n c s a y a le d pl ees r p su e re s r If In re d ju b n a e . Use h m s ti c h rb s like y rro , adg e o ta e a w m lle , n g k s a a or p n in . u in aaeh r la ta

Table of Marmas and

Treatment

Description Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it L h k h a (re -jo te ; the lo e r fr n l in e t of the o ita s d in d w o ta sr s o ld r jo t ) hu e in 2 m rm a p in s (one on e h sh u e ) a ot ac o ld r V s e l (S ) es ira 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n C n r of the a p t or a illa y fo s a th u h w ic h e te rm i x r s ro g h a illa y a r y p s e , a te r a p c t of a illa y x r rte as s n rio se x r c a . re se

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

C n l s p s a and lym h ti c s o tro la m pa yste m (R s v h a S s) , aaa rota blood (R k v h a S ta ) and V a a V y u (p rip e l a ta a ro s yn a e h ra c u irc la p rtic la y to the le s . a u rl g A a m a l A illa y a r y and v in . L m h v s e l d in g e to a illa y n to ic x r rte e y p es ra a x r S u tu s g u p of g n s . M d n and u a r n rv s . tr c re ro la d e ia ln ee do i , rs p c ra s m jo r and m o , c ra o ra h e to li a in r o c b c ia l a d n s b c p la r m s le . usau uc s Qat s u l ie i V ik ly k r a (D a ility a s g ) a a aa is b -C u in m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of a a e tiv ar e re v ln ra ility . ue b In r y ju S m to s D m g e to the a illa y v s l s can c u e h m rrh g . y pm a a x r e se as e o ae In r y ju It In re d ju to the m s le s m y c u e loss of fu c n of the h m ru . uc a as n tio u e s T reatm en t M s a e , F llo w u a l m rm a m s a e p ced as g o su a as g ro ures . This is a g o d o A u re s re , m rm a f a u r s ue , w ic h w l h l p d i n the cp su a or c pe s r h il e ra d ly p ac s a and A m a m h ti n ro re a e m s u r te le s u c la nsion . Te p y h ra For co llin g ntro S ta s (ly p a c syste ) , use ro m h ti m B a i T ila , m s r d oil or s s m e oil for m s a e . Use ilv d a u ta ea as g K p a - re u in g a m ti c o s like e c ly tu , c n m n , ah dc ro a il ua p s in a o m t or c rd m m . in a a o For co tro g R k v h a S ta s (b o ) , use n llin a ta a ro lo d T il a a or s s m e o l a a m ti c o s like s ffro , ro e , ea i nd ro a il a n s m rr h or cin a o . y nmn Te t e t If th r e is b e in g a p y ice and if n c s a y p s u e r am n e le d pl ees r re s r b n a e . If In re d U e h m s ti c h rb s in rn ll y like y ro , adg ju s e o ta e te a ar w m lle n or u i ngksa a a e h ra . As fo d th ra y give a m tu e of b n n , o e p ix r aaa m k and s g r to re to e b d y flu s if n c s ry . il ua sr o id e e sa

Cn l s o tro

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Kakshadhara D escription Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size K k h d a a (w a t u h ld s the fla k ; n a r the top of as a h r h po ns e the s o ld r jo t ) hu e in 2 m rm a p in s (one on ea h s o ld r ) a ot c hu e L a e t (S yu ) ig m n na 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n

Marmas on the Arms and Hands

Se it

T o a g l i (fin e r u its ) b lo w the po t jo in g the la ra l w nu g n e in in te o e - third a m d l tw -th s of c v le , w e e the n nd e ia o ird la ic hr m d n n rv e is s a d , or la ra l e g e of the tip of the e ia e itu te te d c ra o d p c s s of the s o ld r g le . o ci ro e hu e ird C n l s msu r ss m o tro u c la y te S ta , ro s) s o ld rs , b d y p s r e and V a a V y . hu e o il o tu yn au P c ra s m jo r and m o r as well as in rc s l e to li a in te o ta m s le . M d n n rve . L m h v s l d in g e to uc s e ia e y p e se ra a a illa y g n s . A illa y a r y and ve . x r la d x r rte in V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) type of m rm a a sin a W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ar e re ue b In r y m y c u e im a e t of m v m n , d w w r d ju a as p irm n oe e t ona a fo a d d w g of the a , and d p s io n of the nd rw r ra in rm e re s s o ld r joint. N rv e in r y m y le d to p ra s s of the hu e e ju a a a ly i h n , w tin g of the m s le s or in c n . ad as uc fe tio

C nr l s o to A ao ic l n t ma Sr cue s tu t r Q aitie s ul Relative to I ju y nr S m to s y pm If In re d ju

Msa e , as g A u re s r c p su e and A ma ro Therapy

Te tm n ra e t if

A g o d m rm a for re v g m s u r te sio n e e r o a lie in u c la n ith th u h massage or th u h a u re re . G o d for stiff ro g ro g c p ssu o s o ld r s owing to high V ta . hu e a For c n llin g M m a a a S ta s (m s u r s s m ) o tro a svh ro u c la y te use T ila , a T il a or a p i n s s m e oil . la ea U e a m ti c o s lik e e c ly tu , c n m n , tu e , s ro a il ua p s in a o rm ric m rr h or s ffr n w ic h im ro e c u tio n to the y ao h p v irc la m s le . uc s A s e ia l A u e i c oil c lle d pc y rv d a T il a (4 p rt s a a s s m e oil, 2 p rt s g e e and 1 p r t c s r oil) is v r y ea a h a a to e A p y c s r o l for p i n re f . pl a to i a lie

1 1 Region s an d 2 2 Point s

The marma s on the legs and feet mirror those on the arms and hands in both number and location , which is why most have the same names. Th e legs contain importan t marma s for the receptio n of Prana from the Earth , which occurs mainly through the feet, and for the projectio n of Pran a through walking and running . This connect s the leg marma s both wit h Vyana Vayu, the outward-movin g air that govern s movement , and als o with Apana Vayu, the downward-movin g air that connect s us to the forc e of gravity and govern s the processe s of eliminatio n and reproduction . Treating these marma s goes along with massag e of the legs and the feet . Marma regions on the legs like those on the arms have two points, one each leg. Generally , marma s on the right leg or solar side of the body are better for increasin g heat, promotin g circulatio n and improvin g digestion . They stimulat e bodily activities , increasin g Agni and the Pitta func tions of the body. Marma s on the left leg or lunar side of the body are better for cooling action, reducin g inflammati on and buildin g tissue. They have a calming effect, increasin g the Kapha or watery function s of the body .

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Kshipr a Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it

(foot )

K h r a ( u k ; re c g its im e ia e e c ) s ip q ic fle tin md t ffe t 2 m rm a po ts , one on e c h fo t a in a o L a e t (S ig m n nayu ) a g l i (fin e r u it ) in s e nu g n iz In b tw e n the b toe a d t e e ig n he firs t toe (w b b tw e n e e e t he firs t d ta l p a n e l jo t a the s c n d m d l is h la g a in nd eo e ia p a n e l jo t s of the fo t) . h la g a in o Note: (The s s b tw e n the o e r to s also h v e ite e e th e a im o n t therapeutic p p rtie . ) p rta ro e s

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

C nro s ot l

C n l s ly p a c and re p to y s s m s (R s va a a o tro m h ti s ira r y te aa h nd Pranavaha A a m a a K p a (lu rica n for h a t v la b k ah b tio er and lu g ) and h a t and lu g s o ra . ns er n ve ll A d c r h llu i s b v s a d u to a c ra i nd m s le . P s rio r uc s o te

Aa ma l n to ic tib l ia Sru t r s t cue

n rv . D rs l m ta rs l a ry , p n r a h and m d l e e o a e ta a rte la ta rc e ia p n r a ry . M ta rs -p a n e la ta rte e ta o h la g a l jo t . in Qate s u li i K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g ) ty e p m rm . R lav e to B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y . a a e ti o r nd a r e re u ea ilit I ju y nr Smt m s y po the If In re d ju T reatm en t Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r pl a as g re s tro irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . T i s is also a g o d m rm a c p su o bu in te h o a for and A m a ro a u re s r e for p m tin g the flow of P n , cp su ro o ra a p rtic la y in the T ea y a u rl hr p lo e r lim s . w b Use M h n ra a n T ila , s s m e oil or am n d oil for aaa y a ea l o m s a e pu ose . as g rp s F r o e in g and cle rin g the lu g , h a t and ly p a s o pn a ns er m h tic use p n tra e e tin g a m ti c o s like c m h r , c n m n , ro a il a po in a o cra o ad m m , or e c ly tu . ua p s Te t e t r am n The s m e as the tre tm n t for K h r a on the a a e s ip h n . If In re d ad ju In r y m y im a r the fu c n s of a d c n a fle io n of ju a pi n tio d u tio nd x g a t to . D m g e to the a r y may ca s e b e in , re e a a rte u le d g h m to a in id e the p n r a o e ro i s a e am s la ta pnu s nd

1 22

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Talahriday a Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it to . e

(foot )

T la rid y a (h a t or c n r of the fo t ) ah a er e te o 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h fo t a o ts a o Msl e uc a g l i (fin e r u its ) in s e nu g n iz U p r c n r of the s l e in line w h the ro t of the th d pe e te o it o ir P n r a p c t of the th d la ta se ir jo t , w e e in hr the e te a l p n r a r y s e p s a ro s the p n r x rn la ta rte we c s la ta a h of the fo t . rc o

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 23

Cn l s o tro

C n l s re p to y s s m (P n v h a S ta ) , B ra k a o tro s ira r y te ra a a ro s h ja P a (c u tio n and h a t re e tio n on the s in , and the itt irc la e cp k) fe t as a m to r o a . e o rg n C n l s Y s a v t i N d i (ig t fo t ) and H s v a N d i o tro ahsa a rh o a tijih a (le t foot) a n g w h V a a V y u (p w r of c u tio ) , f lo it yn a oe irc la n p rtic la y for the lo e r p r t of the b d y (b lo w the n v l ) a u rl w a o e ae and A a a V y . C n l s the e rt h e m n t in the b d y pn au o tro a le e o as a w o e a d hl n the fe t as a m to r o an . e o rg F x r d ito m b v s and lo g s m s le . A d c r le o ig ru re i nu uc s d u to h llu is , fle o r d ito m a c s o r m s le . M s l e tis u e a c x ig ru ces uc s uc s of tu ic a m d a of p n r a h . P n r a h a r y a d n ei la ta rc la ta rc rte n trib ta s of u rie K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g ) ty e p m rm . B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y a a o r nd a r e re u ea ilit

Aa ma n to ic l S u tu s tr c re

Qa u litie s Relative to In r y ju S m to s y pm If In re d ju

In r y m y c u e im a e t of the fu c n of fle io n ju a as p irm n n tio x a nd e te sio n of p a n e s and a d c n of the g a t to . x n h la g d u tio re e S v r e b e in g m y o c r due to in r y to the p n r ee le d a cu ju la ta a h. rc Yga o

Treatment M ss g , a ae A u re s r c p su e and A ma ro Therapy

Te tm n t ra e If In re d ju

M d tio n e ita

Ap y pl m rm a a msa e as g to the a a, re u in g a s s ng tro c u r irc la m tio n o for ao t bu five mu s in te or u ti l n the ee y n rg in the fo t is o re a e le s d . This is also a g od o m rm a a for a u re cp s s re , u w ic h h w l re u e il d c Vt a a a nd cn l o tro Aaa , pn s n th n tre g e i ng the im u e mn ss m . y te Use B l a a T ila , a ssm e ea oil or a o d oil lm n to s n th tre g e n the fe t e and calm

the n rve . e s U e d re c a m ti c o s like c d r , H a y n c d r , s iu ti ro a il ea im la a ea p rs y or ju ip r for p m tin g c u tio n in the lo e r a le ne ro o irc la w bd . oy The a p a p lic tio n of g rli c oil h r e is v r y g u d g , c lm g a e e ro n in a in a d V ta e u in n a -r d c g . It also s n th n s the im u e s s m , tre g e mn y te the re ro u tiv e syste m and O s . p dc ja A m ti c oils like c n m n , c rd m m , s ffro n a ro a in a o a a o a nd g g r a p d at th s p in t a g o d f sim lain g the in e p lie i o re o or t u t ha . e rt A g o d p in t for m d tio n to c a e g u d g , calm V t a o o e ita re t ro n in a and to d w in h a g e e ie s from the E rt h into the b d y ra e lin n rg a o a nd the c c la r y s s m . It can also be u d to re a e ir u to y te se le s n g tiv e e e y and s s s d w n ea n rg tre o the E rth . a The sam e as T la rid y a of the hand . ah a

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Description Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it K rc a (a k o t or b n l e of m s le s and te d n ) uh n ud uc nos 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h fo t a o ts a o L a e t (S ig m n nayu ) 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n The m i n p in t is two a g l i (fin e r u its ) p x a l a a o nu g n ro im nd o e nh l f anguli (fin e r u its ) m d l to the c n r of the s l e of a g n e ia e te o the foot (w b b tw e n the first and s c n d m ta rs l e e e eo e ta a p a n e l jo t) , b t the e tir e m rm a c v r s a la e a a . h la g a in u n a oe rg re Its la e size of fo r a g l i c o l y be e p in d if it rg u n u an n x la e in lu e s the p in s at the ro t of the o e r to s . cd ot o th e

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 25

Cn l s o tro

C n l s A c a a P a (se in g p w r of the o tro lo h k itt e oe o ra l s n o y a u y and P n a V y . ve l e s r c it ra au

A a m a l T n o n of fle o r h llu i s lo g s and a d c r h llu i s n to ic ed x a c nu b u to a c m s le . S cue s uc tru t r M d l p n r n rve . M d l p n r and d rs l e ia la ta e e ia la ta o a m ta rs l a e ta a nd a u t e a rie . rc a rte s Qate s u lii V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b I ju y nr S m to s y pm re u g s ltin If In re d ju T atm nt re e Msa e , as g F llo w u u l m s a e p c d re . S n g p s u e c o sa as g ro e u s tro re s r an be Acupressure u d . The c n r of this m rm a is g o d for se e te a o a u re s r e for and A m a re v g s s s a cp su ro lie in tre nd im ro in g m n l p v e ta au . c ity T ea y hrp For c n llin g A ch k a P a (se in g p w r of the e s) , o tro lo a itt e oe ye u massage oils like T h l a G e , se rip a he T il a or p i n a la g e . U e s e t a m ti c o s like s n a o d , ro e or he s w e ro a il a d lw o s Te t e nt The s m e as K rc a on the r am a uh h d . If In re d an ju In r y m y c u e d m g e to the b n s and lig m n s ju a as a a oe a et in d c o in tio n of the m s le s of the fo t . The s a e of is o rd a uc o hp the fo t m y g t d to d . o a e is rte

1 26

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Description Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it K rc a h a (the h a d of k rc a ) u h s ir e u h 2 m rm a p ints , one on e c h leg a o a L a e t (S yu ) ig m n na 1 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n P n r s rfa e of the fo t , m p in t on the in rio r la ra l la ta u c o id o fe te s r c e of the ufa (os c lc , h e l b e . a is e on )

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 27

Cn l s o tro

Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu

Cn l s msu r ss m o tro u c la y te S ta , ro s) p rtic la y m s le s of the fo t , a a u rl uc o nd b d y p s re . L e o il o tu ik the K rc a h a h n d m rm a is also g o d for A n i and for u h s ir a a o g d s n . ige tio P ro e u s b v s and lo g s m s le . P ro e l a r y a d e no ra i nu uc s e na rte n trib ta s of s o t u rie hr ve . P ro e l n rv . in e n a e e

Qat s u l ie i R ja a a (P in u in ) type m rm . u kr a -ca s g a a R la e to e tiv B t h a y a fie y in d g e of o ir nd r e re v ln r b y . Injury u ea ilit S m to s y pm If In re d ju T reatm en t Msa e , as g F llo w u u l m s a e p c d r s , u in g a s n g o sa as g ro e ue s tro p s re . A u re s r e T e c n r of th s m rm a is g o d f re su c p su h e te i a o or a u re s r e for re v g and A m a m s u r te s n and im ro in g the cp su lie in ro u c la n io p v p s re . o tu T ea y hrp M s a e w h s n th n as g i t tre g e in g a nd p in lie in g o s a -re v il like s s m e or c s r . S e ia l A u e i c oils are ea a to pc y rv d D rv d i T il a and U h d i T ila . u a a s ira a A m ti c o s th t w r k on the m s le s like s ffro , ro a il a o uc a n m rrh , g g u l or c n m n are b s . y ug in a o et For im ro in g A n i and d e tio , use s u tin g o s p v g ig s n tim la il like ginger, c m h r or g rlic . a po a Ha t e F r c lc n l s u , it s o l d be d n e on the n a s t o a e ia pr hu o e re s n itiv e es A p a n p in . p lic tio ot Te tm n t ra e T ila . If a If In re d ju To re v e p in , m s a e with c s r oil or lie a as g a to th r e is pus f r a n , use a p u e of e om tio o ltic le v s or ae p n i n or a p s e of tu e . A g o d A u e i c la ta at rm ric o y rv d p p ra re a tio n is g d c i e tra t . uuh x c D m g e to the lig m n s and b n e may c u e s v r e p i n a a a et o as ee a a n g w h the im a e t of the fu c n s of the fo t . lo it p irm n n tio o

1 28

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Gulph a Description Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size S e it G lp a (a k e jo t ) uh nl in 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h a k ) a ot a n le J in t (S n h ) o adi 2 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n T he a k e jo t , p rtic la y the s n itiv e po t on the in id e nl in a u rl es in s a d b lo w the p tu e n e of the b n . The p in t on thed n e ro b ra c oe o o ts e a b lo w the p tu e n e of the a k e jo t is also u id n e ro b ra c nl in go . od

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 29

Cn l s o tro

C n l s fat, b n e and re ro u tiv e s s m s o tro o p dc y te A th a a a S u ra a a s iv h nd h k v h Va a yn (circulation of S s a a K p a (lu ric tio n of the le h k ah b a jo ts ) and m v m n t of the fe t in oe e e F x r h llu i s lo g s a b v , tib s p s rio r a le o a c nu nd ra is ilia o te nd fle o r x d it i lo g s m s le . P s rio r tib l n rv . P s rio r tib l ig nu uc s o te ia e e o te ia a r y and v in . rte e R ja r a (P in u in ) type m rm . u ka a -ca s g a a B t h a y a fie y in d g e of v ln r b o ir nd r e re u ea ility . In r y to the jo t w l c u e s e g a d im a r the ju in il a s w llin n pi fu c n s of fle io n and e te s n . n tio x x n io

Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu Qa u litie s Relative to In r y ju S m to s y pm If In re d ju

Msa e , as g A u re s r c p su e and A ma ro Therapy

A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u g a g n e c u r pl a as g re sin e tl irc la m tio n for a o t five m u s . For a u re s re , use the o bu in te c p su s n itiv e p in t ju t b lo w the joint on the in id . T es o s e se he p in t o b lo w the jo t on the o ts e can be u e d as w ll . e in u id s e For c n llin g A iv h a S ta s (s e ta l sy m , u o tro sth a ro k le ste ) se A h a a d a T ila , T h la i T ila , p i n s s m e oil or swgnh a rip a d a la e a a o d oil. Use a a e i c a m ti c oils like m rrh , g g u , lm n n lg s ro a y ugl a g lic a and wintergreen. ne F r the re ro u tiv e s s m u a m ti c o s like o p dc y te se ro a il s ffro , ja m e or rose for fe a s and n tm g or a n s in m le u e m s k for m le . This w l also in re s e O . u as il c a jas F r re u in g fa , m s a e w h m s r d o l a o dc t as g it u ta i nd u e lig t aromatic o s like c m h r , m t or g g r . s h il a po in in e For tu e u r kn e , s v r e pain in the g in , or p ra s s of b rc la e ee ro a ly i the le , it s o l d be d n e on the p in t fo r a g l i (fin e r g hu o o u nu g u its ) a o e the m rm . n bv a a The same as M n a d a of the hand . a ib n h

Au u c r c p n tu e (S c i uh Te t e nt r am If In re d ju

1 30

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Se it

Cno o tr Aa n to S c tru tu

Qa u litie R la e tiv In r y ju S m to y p If In re ju

T M T a h

Indrabast i Descriptio n Nme a

(leg )

Nme r u b Tpe y Size

In ra a t i (In ra s a w or a s p rio r ty of a w ; o in g d bs d ' rro ue pe rro w to th s a e of the m s le s in the re io n of the m -lo e r hp uc g id w e B s i also m a s b d e r in o e r c n x . ) at en la d th o te ts In re ju 2 m rm a po ts , one on e c h leg a in a Msl e uc a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n

T a re tm If

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

Se it

T p t at the m d e of the line , jo in g the p s rio r he oin id l in o te s rfa e of the u c w h the c n r of the p p a l it e te o lite fo s a (re e s fo e d b tw e n the in e s cs rm e e s rtio n p in s of the ot two g s c e iu s branches in the a tro n m to C n l s d e tiv e sys m (A n v h a S ta ) , A n i o tro ig s te n aa ro s g (d e tiv e fire), P c a a P , S m n a V y , and s a l ig s ah k itta a a au ml in s e . te tin G stro n m s , s le s and p n ri s m s le . P ro e l a c e iu ou la ta uc s e na of p s rio r tib l ) a p s rio r tib l a r y a v in . o te ia nd o te ia rte nd e D in g e of ly p h v s e s to the p p tia l ly p h g n s . ra a m es l o le m la d P s rio r tib l nerve . o te ia K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u g ) type of an r ra a a og r e th a sin m rm . a a B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y . o r nd a r e re u ea ilit At th s v l p in , the p s rio r tib l a r y is m r e i ita o t o te ia rte o th n any o e r m s l e or lig m n . In r y m y im a r the a th uc a et ju a pi fu c tio s of the fo t . If the a r y is d m g d , th r e n n o rte a ae e w l be s v r e b e in , s o k and co p . il ee le d g hc lla se

Cn l s o tro Aa ma l n to ic (b n h ra c S cr s tru tue Qate s u li i R laiv e to et In r y ju S m to s y pm im o n t p rta If In re d ju

Treatm en t Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r pl a as g re s tro irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . A u re u e h r e is also c p su o bu in te c p ss r e g o , and A m a od ro p rtic la y for in re s g A n i and p m tin g a u rl c a in g ro o hrp d e tio . T ea y ig s n For im ro in g the p v of s a l in s e and ml te tin Anvh a naa S ta s (d e tiv e s s m , m s a e w h a m ti c o s ro ig s y te ) as g it ro a il th t s u t e d e tio n like fe n l , g g r , a is e or a tim la ig s ne in e n a a . jw n For s u tio n of A n , sp cia l A u e i c fo u s a tim la gi e y rv d rm la re Kh r a sa or H g trig n d i in u u a c n in g g r , o ta in alic a ao tid a a d ro k s lt . Or a p y w r m a m ti c o s like sf e n c a pl a ro a il Te t e t The sa e as In ra a i of the r am n m d b st h d . If In re d an ju

1 32

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it J n u (k e e jo t ) a n in 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h k e ) a ot a ne J in t (S n h ) o adi 3 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n The k e e jo t as a w o , a la e m rm . V rio s n in h le rg a a a u s n itiv e points a u d the k e e can be u e . The fro t es ro n n sd n p in t is u u ll y o sa

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 33

u e , b t the b c k p in t can be u e d as w ll , as can the sd u a o s e p in s on the o tsid e and in e . ot u sid Cn l s o tro C n l s S s a a K p a (lu rica n of the jo ts ) and o tro le h k ah b tio in c u tion to the le s . T irc la g he rig t k e e m rm a c n l s h n a o tro the liv r a d R n k a P a (c lo g of b o d and e n a ja itt o rin lo the le t k e e m rm a c n l s the sp e n and p n re s and f n a o tro le ac a U a a a a S ta s (w te e b lis ) dkvh ro a r-m ta o m . K e e jo t . P s rio r c c t e lig m n , o liq e p s rio r n in o te ru ia a et b u o te lig m n . P n ri s and a et la ta m s le . P p a l uc s o lite a r y and v in . F m r , tibia and p te a b n s . M d l rte e e u a ll oe e ia p p a l nerve . o lite

Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu

Q a ie s u lit V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) ty e a a aa isa ility a sin p m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b In r y ju S m to s y pm Can c u e s v r e p in , e e a , d u y w lk g and as ee a dm iffic lt a in im a If In re d p ir ju m n t of the fu c n s of the jo t . e n tio in Treatmen t Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u g a g n e c u r pl a as g re sin e tl irc la A u re s r e m t n f a o t five m u s . T e c nr l p in t of th s c p su oio or b u in te h e ta o i jo t is and A m a in ro b s t for a u re s re , b t the p in s im e ia l y e c p su u ot m d te a o e and T e p y bv h ra b lo w the jo t can also be g o . e in od For im ro in g liv r fu c n , m s a e the m rm a on the p v e n tio as g a r h t k e e with ig n T ila , a T il a or p i n a la g e . Use P -re u in g a m ti c o s like lim , m rrh , he itta d c ro a il e y w rm o d or c ria d r . o wo o ne For im ro in g s le n fu c n , m s a e the m rm a on the p v pe n tio as g a left knee w h it T il a or p i n s s m e o . Use a la ea il a m ti c o s like g g r , le o n or ro a il in e m c rd m m . Saffron or tu e c o s c be u e d for e e r a a o rm ri il an s ith liv r or s le n . F r tr a g a riti s of the k e s and e pe o e tin rth ne S s a a K p a use w rm g m s a e oils like le h k ah a in as g Ah a a d s w g n h a T il a or s s m e oil a a ea nd s u tin g tim la a m ti c o s like e c ly tu , c m h r or c n m n . ro a il ua p s a po in a o H at e In s ia a , s le t a s n itiv e p in t fo r a g l i (fin e r c tic ec es o u nu g u its ) Application n p x a l or d ta l to the m rm a a a p y h a d ro im is a nd p l e te m ta l rod at e t he p in . ot Ta e t re tm n If In re d ju G n ra y the sa e as per K rp r a (e o ) m rm . C m h r e e ll m u a lb w a a a po or w te re n oils are g o d for k e e p in . in rg e o n a

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment


Ani Le g Marm a

An i (leg ) Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Ani (the p in t of a n e le ) o ed 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h leg a o ts a L a e t and T n o n (S ig m n ed nayu ) 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

T wo (fin e r u its ) a o e the top the k e e g n bv n and in the m d e of the line b tw e n the top of the a te r id l e e n rio fa e of the joint a the p p a l s rfa e . c nd o lite u c Cn l s o tro Aa ma l n to ic S cr s tru tue C n l s U a a a a S ta s (w te e b lis m s s m ) o tro dkvh ro a r-m ta o y te and c u tio n of b d y flu s d w w rd . irc la o il id ona M d l a la ra l lig m n s of the k e e jo t . Q a ric p s e ia nd te a et n in ud e m s l e and uc F m ra l a ry , trib ta s of fe o l e o rte u rie m ra vein a sa ha o s nerve . nd p n u

Qat s u liie V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) ty e a a aa isa ility a sin p m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b I ju y nr S m to s y pm In r y w l c u e s v r e p i n a lo s of fu c n s of the ju il a s ee a nd s n tio k e . If In re d ne ju

Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r pl a as g re s tro irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . A u re s r e h r e w l c p su o bu in te cp su e il p m t e and A m a the c u tio n of w te r a ro o ro irc la a nd flu s in the b d . id oy T ea y hrp F r c n llin g U a a a a So s (w te e b lis m o o tro dkvh r ta a r-m ta o ss m ) ms a e w h y te as g it T ila , a Taila or p i n s s m e or m s r d o . U e w te m v la ea u ta ils s a r-re o in g a m ti c o s like c rd m m , p rse , c d r or g g r . ro a il a a o a ly ea in e Te t e t r am n The s m e as Ani m rm a on the a a ha . If In re d nd ju

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Urv i Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it U i ( id ; the w e rv w e id

(leg )

of the th h ) ig

2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h th h ) a ot a ig V s e l (S ) es ira 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n In the m d e of the line jo in g the c n r of the in u a l id l in e te g in lg mn and the m d l c n y e of the fe u r w e e the ia e e ia o d l m hr fe o l a r y and long s p e o s vein pa s . m ra rte ahnu s t

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 37

Cn l s o tro

C n l s p s a and w te e b lis m (R s v h a a o tro la m a r-m ta o aaa nd Uaaa a dkvh K p a d s a and the w te r e m n t ah oh a le e in the b d y as a w o . o h le F m ra l a r y and v in . D in g e to the s p rfic l in u a l e o rte e ra a u e ia g in g nd . S p e o s n rve . A d c r la s ahnu e d u to and re tu s c ms s . u cle

Aa ma l n to ic S c re s tru tu

Qat s u l ie i V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) ty e a a aa isa ility a sin p m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b In r y ju S m to s y pm v l ita If In re d ju T atm re en t Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a stro g c u r pl a as g re s n irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . A u re s r e h r e a s in c p su o bu in te cp su e id w ig t - and A m a eh ro re u tio n and re o in g K p a . S n g p s u e dc mv ah tro re s r can be u e . T ea y For im ro in g the fu c n of R s v h a S ta s s d hrp p v n tio aaa ro (ly p a c m h ti s s m ) m s a e w h J k d i T il a (c m n m d a d o ) y te as g it ira a a u i e ic te il or w h p i n a o d o l or m s r d o . it la lm n i u ta il U e d re c a m ti c o s like c d r , ju ip r , p rs y s iu ti ro a il ea ne a le or c rd m m to k e p the w te r e m n t in the b d y a a o e a le e o Te t e t r am n If th r e is b e in , a p y ice to the a a and a m is r e le d g pl re d in te If In re d ju h m s ti c h rb s th t p m t e the c a u tio n of e o ta e a ro o o g la b o d like tu e c or m rrh . Or a p y a p s u e lo rm ri y pl re s r b n a e to the a a . adg re In ry to the im ota t s c re s p s in g th u h t i s ju pr n tru tu as ro g h p in atey , n rv e and v in a n c u e w s g , d sfu c o t- r r e e -c as a tin y n tio n of the m s le s and b e in . uc le d g

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a jo t ) in Nme r u b Tpe y Size (re -jo te ; the lo e r fro ta l re io n of the h d in d w n g ip 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h leg a o ts a V s e l (S ) es ira 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) /2 n u g n

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 39

Se it C nr l s o to

T o a g l i (fin e r u its ) la ra l to the s m h s s p b s w nu g n te y pyi ui w e e the fe o l a r y p s e , in fe o l tria g . hr m ra rte as s m ra n le

C n l s p s a and ly p a c syste m (R s v h a S tas , o tro la m m h ti aaa ro ) b o d (R k v h a S tas) , V a a and A a a V y s lo a ta a ro yn pn au (p rip e l a e h ra nd d w w r d m v m n s of e e y ona oe e t n rg p rtic la y to the a u rl A ao ic l F m ra l a r y and trib ta s of fe o l ve . F m ra l n t ma e o rte u rie m ra in e o n rve . Sr cue s e tu t r D in g e to the s p rficia l in u a l g n s . ra a ue g in la d P o s m jo r a d sa a n p c e l m s le . e tin a uc s V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) ty e a a aa isa ility a sin p Qualities m rm . a a W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ar e re ue b to I ju y nr S m to s y pm the If Inue d jr T a e t re tm n In r y can c u e p ra s s of the lo e r limb and e e a of ju as a ly i w dm leg a n g with d fo it y and s v r e p in . lo e rm ee a

Msa e , as g F llo w u u l m rm a m s a e p ce u s . A p s u e o sa a as g ro d re cu re s r hre e A u r s u e aids in d in g the n a y ly p a c sy m . c pe s r ra in e rb m h ti ste and Ao a For c n llin g R s v h a S ta s (p s a and ly p a s ) rm o tro aaa ro la m m h tic and it's d e s s , m s a e w h is a e as g it (c m h r ) T il a a po a or w h it p i n m s r d oil. Use d p o ti c (s e t-p m tin la u ta ia h re w a ro o g ) a m ti c oils like b sil , s g , c n m n and e c ly tu . ro a a a e in a o ua p s For c n llin g R k v h a S ta s (b o ) and p m tin g o tro a ta a ro lo d ro o c u tio , u irc la n se T il a or s s m e o l a a ea i nd a m ti c o s ro a il A u u cu e For tre tin g g la a d a (th ro d h p rtro h ) s le t a p in t c p nt r a a gn y i ye py ec o one anguli (fin e r u it ) m d l to the m rm . g n e ia a a Te t e t r am n The s m e as L h k a on the a o ita sh hand . It In r d jue

1 40

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Marmas on the Legs and Feet

1 41

Se i t

O e a g l i (fin e r u it ) la ra l to pubi c s m h s s in n nu g n te y pyi the superficial ring th u h w ic h the s e a c c r d ro g h p rm ti o p s e s in m n . In rio r a p c t of the p b c s m h sis . as e fe se ui y py

C n l s re ro u tiv e s s m (S u ra a a S ta , o tro p dc y te hk vh ro s) m n tru l s s m (A va h a S es a y te rta va rotas) , A a a V y u a pn a nd O . jas A a m a l In m n x rn l and in rn l o liq e m s le s of the n to ic e -e te a te a b u uc a d m n , Sr cue s re tu s a d m i s m s le , fe o l n rv e a bo e tu t r c b o in uc m ra e nd s e a c c rd . In p rm ti o w m n u d lig m n , la i a o e -ro n a et b and la i a m o . b in ra Qate s u li i V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u in a s g ) ty e p m rm . R laiv e to a a et W te y in d g e of vu e b ar e re ln ra ility . I ju y nr S m to s y pm If Inue d jr T a e t re tm n Msa e , as g A u re s r e is often e s r at th s n rro w re io n th n is c p su a ie i a g a A u r s u e m s a e w ic h m s t be d n e c re lly . But ta e c r e c pe s r as g h u o a fu k a as the and A m a ro re io n can be se sitive . g n T ea y hr p For c n llin g S u ra a a S ta s (re ro u tiv e s s m ) o tro hk vh ro p dc y te m s a e with M s a T ila , as g ah a T ila , a a o d oil or s s m e oil . lm n ea U e a m ti c o s t a t s n th n the re ro u tiv e s s m s ro a il h tre g e p dc y te a nd in re s e O s like ja m e , g rd n a or s ffro n for c a ja s in a ei a w m n and m s k (flo l h is u ) , n tm g or c v s for o e u ra ib c s u e lo e mn . e A u u cu e F r tre tin g in c n s in g n l tra t a c p nt r o a fe tio e ita c nd o o p rm lig s e ia , s le t a ( u h ec Sci p in t t o wo a g l i (fin e r u its ) m d l to the nu g n e ia m rm . F r tre tin g a a o a hydrocele, s le t a p in t p s rio r to ec o o te the s ro m . c tu Yoga and A g o d p in t for c n e tra o o o c n tio n a m d tio n to aid in the nd e ita M daio n c n l of s x a l e e y . T y g c p c e of e it t o tro eu n rg he o i ra tic M la a d a , which in o e s tig te in g the m s le s of the u bnh v lv h n uc p rin u m is g o d for th s m rm . e e o i a a Te t e t The sam e as r am n h n . If Inue d ad jr m rm a on the a Im o n e and s e m d fic n y in m n . In rtilit y a d p te c pr e ie c e fe n m n tru l p b m s for w m n . es a ro le o e

C nr l s o to

C H A P T E R

10

8 Region s an d

Point s

Marma s on the front side of the body, the abdome n and chest, are fewer in number but very importan t as this area houses our main interna l Some are large marma region s like the heart and the navel. Thoug h gener ally regarde d as only one marma region , they can have many smalle r marma points, trigger points or sensitiv e zones around them that can be used for therapeuti c purposes . These marma s on the front of the body are good for workin g on the organs connecte d to them. They are also good for workin g on thei r corresponding affectin g them throug h their location s on the front the body . The front of the body include s the main sites of the accumula tion of the doshas in the large intestin e (Vata) , small intestin e (Pitta) and stomach and can be used to promot e the eliminatio n of the doshas from thes e locations . Treatin g thes e region s is essentia l for prope r digestio n and for

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size S e it Cn l s o tro Guda (anus ) 1 m rm a p in t a o Msl e uc 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n A u s and s rro n in g area , a la e m rm . n u ud rg a a

C n l s the first c a r a (M la h ra , o tro hk u da ) n d , Aa a a i pn V y , the c a n l s of e c to , u a , re ro u tiv e and au hne x re ry rin ry p dc m n strual s s m s (P rish va a , M tra a a , S u ra a a e y te u a h u vh hk vh a nd A v v h a S ta s ) as w l l as the te te s and o a s . rta a a ro m i e s v rie R la s to V ta s s e of a c m la e te a' it c u u tio n in the la e rg in s e . te tin A a m a l S h c r a i in rn s a e te u , c rru a r c ti s a i n to ic p in te n te u nd x rn s o g to u n S c re s m s le . R c l p x s of n rv s . tru tu uc s e ta le u e e re ta l a r y and c rte v in . e Qa u litie s S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D a -C u g ) ty e ay ra a a md t e th a sin p m r a . R la e to F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . am e tiv ie e re ue b In r y ju S m to s y p m t he If In re d ju In r y to the s h c r m s le s re u s in lo s of c n l of ju p in te uc s lt s o tro a u . S ila y s d e n d tio n can c u e a re x ns im rl ud ila as fle s p a e of h a . to p g e rt

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

1 45

Treatm en t M s a e , Be c re l not to get any a m ti c oils on the m c s m m ra e s as g a fu ro a uu e b n A u re s r e as th s w l c u e p i n a a b rn g s n a n . A p y th s e c p su i il a s a nd u in e s tio pl e to the and A m a s rro n in g area o ly . The p in t at the b s e of the s in e ro u ud n o a p (c rre - Therapy s o d g to the first c a ra ) is p b b y the b s t re io n of th s o p n in hk ro a l e g i m rm a for m s a e , a u re s r e and a m a th ra y . a as g c p su ro e p To re u e V ta , use a g n e m s a e of w r m s s m e dc a e tl as g a ea or m d a d s s m e o s (ta s like e ic te ea il ila T ila . a ) F r im ro in g fu c n s of M tr v h a So s (u a y s s m ) o p v n tio uaa r ta rin r y te m s a e w h m s r d o . A o u d re c a m ti c as g it u ta il ls se iu ti ro a o s like ju ip r , b h or p r le . il ne irc as y F r a in g m n tru tio n u a m ti c o s like s ffro , m rr h o id es a se ro a il a n y or p n yo a , w ic h s n th n and s u t e the fe a e e nr y l h tre g e tim la ml re ro u tive s s m . p dc y te For co tro g o e it , use n llin b sy T il a or use a w ig t - re u in g a m ti c o s like c m h r a m rrh . eh dc ro a il a po nd y Bs i at ( n ms ) Ee a E e a s (B s ) w r k on this m rm a in rn lly . S s m e o nm a ti o a te a ea il e e a s are p rtic la y go d for re u in g Vata at this s . F nm a u rl o dc ite or th s p rp s e u 1 c of w r m w te r a 1 c of i u o se /2 up a a nd /2 up s s m e oil as an e e a a h l d in rn ll y in the re tu m ea nm nd o te a c for at le s t twenty m u s . T i s is for h h V t a c n itio s a in te h ig a od n of d b , in o n a and a x ty . e ility s mi n ie

Y g a and M d tio n on the first c a r a h lp s us c n l the e rt h o e ita hk e o tro a e m n , Meditation le e t the s n e of s e l and the e c to y s s m . For es ml x re r y te this p rp s e u o one can use the s e d m n a LAM for the c s i c e rt h e a tr om a e m n . We s o l d a s m e a s a d m d tio n p s r e like le e t hu su e te e ita o tu the lo s pose and c n e t with the E rt h e e y th u h the tu onc a n rg ro g b s e of the spine. For b t h s iritu l and p y ic l h a h one a o p a hs a e lt c an m d t e u o n the D it y G n sh a in this c a r a u g the e ita p e ae hk sin m n a OM G a tr AM G shay a ane T y g c pa t e of M la a d a , w ic h in o e s he o i r cic u bnh h v lv tig te in g the m s le s of the p rin u , is also g o d for th s h n uc e em o i m rm . a a Te tm n t In r y to this m rm a can be tra m tic . The p rs n can b c m e ra e ju a u a e o eo If In re d u c n c u . Use h rb s and oils to re a n c n c u n s s like ju n o s io s e gi o s io s e c m h r , c la u s or m s , p rtic la y as in a d th u h the a po am u k a u rl h le ro g n s . To re v e p , use a a e i c h rb s like v le n , oe lie ain n lg s e a ria k v a k v , or b y e a aa a b rry . A m is r la a e h rb s d in te x tiv e

like T h l a or haritaki, if c n tip tio n is in o e . rip a os a v lv d

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y (S yu ) na Size Se it 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n In b tw e n p b c s m h i s and u b u s in re io n of e e ui y p is m ilic g lo e r a d m n . The s rro n in g s rfa e area a o e the w bo e u ud u c bv b de . la d r C n l s the m s u r s se m and b d y fat o tro u c la yt o il a d n Md v h a e oa and K p a , the u a y a re ro u tiv e ah rin r nd p d c systems (M tra a a and S u ra a a S ta s ) and the s c n d u vh hk vh ro m i eo chakra (S a is th n v d h a a ) and K h u u B s i (b d e ) at la d r 1 m rm a p in t a o La e t ig m n

Cn l s o tro

R la s to V ta s s e of a c m la e te a ' it c u u tio n in the la e in s e , rg te tin w ic h is lo a d p rip e l to it, and to A a a V y u (d w w rd h c te e h ra pn a ona mv g a . o in ir)

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

1 47

Aa ma l Hp g s n to ic y o a tri c atey , a d m a l w ll , e te a l iliac a d in rn l rr b o in a x rn n te a iliac S c re s a rie s and ve s . D in g e to m d l s c l and in rn l tru tu rte in ra a e ia a ra te a a d e te a l iliac ly p h g n s . P lv c s la c n c n x rn m la d ei p nhi n rv , w ic h s p lie s s le n , p n re s and h p g s c e e h up p e ac a y o a tri p x s . Rc s le u e tu and o liq e e te u s m s le . b u x rn uc s P b c lig m n , m d n u b a l fo , s p rio r and ui a e ts e ia m ilic ld u e in rio . S m h s s p b . fe r y pyi u is Q a s S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D a -C u in u litie ay ra a a md t e th a s g ) ty e p m rm . Relative to F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . S m tim s a a ie e re ue b o e e g u e d u d r In r y ro p ne ju V ik ly k r a a a aa S m t m s S v r e in r y can c u e d a , w il e e e n m o r in rie s o n y po ee ju as e th h v in ju fte If In r d r s l t in d a ility . jue eu is b

M s a e , M s a e g n y in b a d c u r m tio s with the palm of as g as g e tl ro irc la o n the Acupressure h n d and fin e . G n e but s a y a u re s r e here is a g rs e tl te d c p su a o and A m a g o . T e e help re u e V ta , d p l gas and ls ro od hs dc a is e b a g , a d Therapy s n th n O s and the re ro u tiv e s s m . lo tin n tre g e ja p dc y te W r m oil m s a e h r e is e c lle t for c n llin g a a as g e xe n o tro nd re u in g dc V ta , p rtic la y in c s s of n rv u s e h u tio n or s x a l a a u rl ae e o xas eu d b y . Use stre g e in g m s a e oils like e ilit n th n as g T ila , a N ra a n T ila , p i n s s m e oil or c s r oil. M s a e s w y a y a la ea a to as g lo l a nd g n y as the re io n is s n e . e tl g e sitiv U e a m ti c o s like n tm g , v leia , lo s or s ro a il u e ar n tu s n a o d for c lm g and g u d g a tio n on V t a and for a d lw o a in ro n in c a stre g e in g O s and the re ro u tiv e fu c n . n th n ja p dc n tio C rm a a in tiv e (g s-d p llin a is e g ) a m s a p d h r e like ro a p lie e cra o ad m m , a fo tid a (h g ) or b si l help re o e V t a or sa e in a mv a g s a d te tio n in the la e in s e . a nd is n rg te tin K p a ty e s o n c rr y e c s s w ig t and w te r and h v e ah p fte a xe eh a a lax m s l e to e in the re io . T e y can b n fi t by s n e r uc n g n h ee tro g m s a e a n g w h p n tra as g lo it e e tin g a m ti c o s like ro a il c n m n , c v s or c m h r . in a o lo e a po Y g a and M d tio n on the s c n d c a o e ita eo h kra , w ic h is c n e te d to th s h onc i M d tio n m rm , b g s c n l of the w te r e m n , the s n e of e ita a a rin o tro a le e t es ta t e and the s o a s . For this p rp s e one can rg n u o use the s e d m n a V e a tr AM for the c s i c w te r e m n . om a le e t Te t e t Any s n a t in r y re u s im e ia e m d a l a n n . F r r am n ig ific n ju q ire md t e ic tte tio o If In re d m o r in r y to the b d e , A u e a u e s a d c c n of ju in ju la d r y rv d s e o tio s a v r i and p n rn v a for se e n d ys . A g o d w s r n h ta a ua a v a o e te

eu a q iv lent w u d be ol

and uva u . rsi

1 48

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nm e a Number Type Size Site Cn l s o tro N b i (n v l ) ah ae 1 m rm a p in t a o V ss l (S ) e e ira 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n The n v l and s rro n in g a a , b h d and a u d the ae u ud re e in ro n u blic s , so a la e m rm a re io . mi u rg a g n C n l s third or n v l c a r a (M n u ) , V h o h r a n d i as o tro ae hk a ip ra is v d a a w l l as d e tiv , b o d and c u to y s s m s (A n v h a e ig s e lo irc la r y te naa a nd Raktavaha M i n p n c c n r for d e a ra i e te ig stio n and e et n . Controls A n i (d e tiv e fire , P c a a P a (d e tiv e x rio g ig s ) ah k itt ig s ju e ) , R n k a P a (c lo g of b o d and bile , ic s a ja itt o rin lo ) V y u (b la c g e e y) , P a d s a and the fire e m n t in the a a n in n rg itt oh le e b d y as a w o . o h le

A a m a l In rio r e ig s c a r y and ve . In rio r v n a c v . A d m a l n to ic fe p a tri rte in fe e a a b o in S c re s a rta . S la r p x s of n rv s . R c s tru tu o o le u e e e tu e te a l x rn and in rn l o liq e m s le . te a b u uc s Qa u litie s S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D a -C u in ay ra a a md t e th a s g m rm . R la e to F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ie e re ue b In r y ju ) ty e p

S m to s S p e in r y d e s not c u e s d e n d a . H w v r if the y p m im l ju o as ud e th o ee

If In re d ju

a d m a l a rt a is ru tu d then it can c u e d a h from s o k b o in o p re as et hc

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

1 49

and h m rr a e . D e p in r y may also c u e re x e ohg e ju as fle s p a e of the h a . to p g e rt T atm re en t M s a e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a c u r m tio n as g pl a as g re s irc la o a u d A u re s r e the n v l for a o t five m u s . A u re s r e is d n e ro n c p su ae bu in te cp su o o l y g n y and A m a s c e this a s n itiv e p ce . S p y la in g on of the n e tl ro in es la im l y h n s a n g T e p y with a g n e m s a e is o n e o g . A p e area ad lo h ra e tl as g fte nuh rim for re u in g dc P a a d s p in g its a c m la itt n to p c u u tio n in the s a l in s e . ml te tin Use T ila , s s m e oil or a o d oil to re v e a ea lm n lie s s , nervous te s n a c u te r n rv u s in ig s n tre s n io nd o n e o d e tio For P -c u e d h a t and s s s in the n v l use itta a s e tre ae T il a a or c c n t o . oou il For in re s g A n i (d e tiv e p w r ) use a m ti c o s c a in g ig s oe ro a il th t s u t e d e tio n like b y , g g r , fe n l or a tim la ig s a in e ne c rd m m . a a o F r h p ra id y and h h P , m s a e w h c o g o y e c it ig itta as g it o lin a m ti c oils like ro a (ja m e , ro e or s n a o d . s in ) s a d lw o C v e oil is g o d for in re s g d e tiv e p w r in Pitta type lo o c a in ig s oe p o le . ep S p y p c g the h n d o e r the n v l has a p te tiv e a im l la in a v ae ro c nd n rtu g af c , c lm g V ta , p rtic la y if the t ea is t u rin fe t a in a a u rl hr p h a s n g p w r of P n . as tro oe ra a Hr a l eb S n a o d p s e is g o d for a v tin g Pitta (a ity ) in the a d lw o at o lle ia cid s a l ml P s e (L p ) in stin . A p s e of a a e a p w e r (h g ) is g o d for at ea te e at s fo tid od in o d e g gas and d te tio n (V ta . isp llin is n a ) u ao n In rn ll y the use of p rg tiv e h rb s like se n , rh b r b root or rg ti te a u a e na ua (Vre h n ) trip a a (in la e d s g s ) is u e d to re o e Pitta from the i caa hl rg oae s mv n v l region. It is part of P n h a K rm a th ra y and u e d only ae ac a e p s u d r s t c ic l s p rv io n e tric lin a u e is n . A u u cu e F r re u in g flu d a c m la c p nt r o dc i c u u tio n in the a d m n , s le t a bo e ec p in t (S c i - four a g l i (fin e r u its ) d ta l to the la ra l p ra e ia n o uh nu g n is te a md kr a ) am Y g a and M d tio n here can help b la c e all the P n s , s n th n o e ita an ra a tre g e M dt to n d e e iai ig stio n and im ro e p y ic l s n th . The m n a p v h s a tre g a tr can be u e d here to d v lo p e e y and p w r of a tio . s ee n rg oe c n M d tio n on the th d c a r a s n th n s the fir e e ita ir hk tre g e e m n , the s n e of s h , and the fe t as a m to r o a . le e t es ig t e o rg n

For th s p rp s e one can use the s e d m n a R i u o e a tr AM for the c s i c fire e m n . om le e t T am n t If b e in g o c rs , a p y cold w te r or ice to the area and g e re t e le d cu pl a iv If Inu d h m s ti c h rb s in rn ll y like a m , p n i n or tu e . j re e o ta e te a lu la ta rm ric To re v e p in , p u r a c n u u s drip of m tu e of g e e lie a o o tin o ix r h and o l o e r the m rm a a a for th y m u s . i v a re irt in te

1 50

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it (h a ) e rt 1 m rm a p in t a o V s e l (S ) es ira 4 a g l i (fin r u its ) nu ge n G n ra l re io n of the hea , m d e of s rn m , a la e ee g rt id l te u rg m rm a re io . a g n

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

C no s o tr l

C n l s p sm , b o d and c u to y s s m s (R sa h a o tro la a lo irc la r y te a va a nd R k v h a a ta a S d a a P a (p w r of m d , V a a ahk itt oe in ) yn and P n a V y s (o e l l p w r s of v lit y and c c la n , ra au v ra oe ita ir u tio ) O s ( tr n t h and im u ity , T rp k a K p a , ja s e g mn ) a a ah Kp a ah (lu ric tio n of the h a t and lu g , V ru a n d , and the b a er n s) a n ai fo rt h or h a t c a r a (A a a ) . A o a s in the flow of u er hk n h ta ls id b a t m . The h a t is the s a t of b t h m d (c itta ) a re s ilk er e o in h nd c n c u n s s (the h h r Self or o s io s e ig e It is the re io n w e e our a a n s s d e s d rin g the s t e of g hr w re e w ll u ta d e p s e . It g v rn s the p n c a d s u l fo s of A n . e le p oe ra i n o rm gi A c n in g a rta . S p rio r and in rio r v n a c v a and sed o ue fe e e p lm n r y veins from lu g . D in g e to tra h o ro c ia l u oa ns ra a c e -b n h ly p h g n s . Vagus n rve . C rd c m s le . S rn m b n e m la d e a ia uc te u o with se o d , th d and fo rt h rib . cn ir u s S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D a -C us g ay ra a a md t e th a in m rm . F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a ie e re ue b ) ty e p

Aa ma n to ic l Sr cue tu t r s Q aitie s ul Relative to I ju y nr S m to y pm s If In re d ju T atm n t re e Msa e , as g A u re s r c p su e and A ma ro Therapy

In r y w l c u e d u y be th g , in rn l b e in , ju il a s iffic lt r a in te a le d g s o k a de th . hc nd a

M s a e in a b a d and g n e way u in g the palm of the as g ro e tl s h nd . S p y p c g the h n d o e r the h a t has a c lm g a im l la in a v er a in a c , particularly if the th r p t has a s n g p w r of ffe t ea is tro oe P n . Acupressure at the c n l p in t of the s rn m c ra a e tra o te u an a o be u e d to re a e s s s and n g tiv e e o n . ls s le s tre ea m tio s S s m e oil m s a e is g o d for c lm g the re io n a ea as g o a in g nd re u in g V ta . M s r d o l is b tte r for im ro in g c u tio n dc a u ta i e p v irc la a d re o in g s g a n and K p a . n mv ta n tio ah F r a v tin g Pitta in c s s of in m a r y d e s s o lle ia ae fla m to is a e of the he r t like p r adis , m s a e the h a t re io n a eic r it as g er g wh it T ila , s n a o d o , or s e t a m ti c o s like ja m e , a a d lw o il w e ro a il s in lo s , rose and sa n . tu ffro S n a o d o l w l re v e b t h V t a a d P a from the a d lw o i il lie o a n itt h a t and help p m t e calm and sle p . er ro o e E c ly tu s o l w l c a r K p a from the h at . G g r , ua p i il le ah er in e

c nm in a o n or e cm le a p a e n a m ti c ro a o swl il il s ut e tim la the c u tio irc la n.

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

H d Bs i ri at (Oil B t h a on the Ha ) e rt

Yga a o nd M d tio n e ita

Hrid b s , a s e ia l A u e i c m th d of b th g the h a t a ti pc y rv d eo a in er re io n in s s m e o l or m d a d o s like A h a a d g ea i e ic te il s wgnh a T il a is very e c e for c n llin g a g v te d V ta , in a ffe tiv o tro g ra a a c s s of irre u r h a e t , a y m a and a g a p c ris . ae g la e rtb a rrh th i n in e to F r this p rp s e a la e a o n t of w r m oil is u e d e e r as o u o rg mu a s ith a drip or as h l d on the a a (u in g a ring of flo r d u h or e re s u og o e r s b ta c s to th u s ne k e p the oil from d p g a a ) . T i s tre tm n t is s ila r to e rip in wy h a e im the S d hiro har a used for the hea . d M d tio n on the h a t c lm s the m d , re v s e o n l e ita er a in lie e m tio a s s s and h lp s p m t e d e p s e p (and y g a nidra . tre e ro o e le o ) M d tio n on the h a t c a r a s n th n s the air e m n , e ita er hk tre g e le e t t he s in , s n e of to c h and the h n s as a m to r o a . It k es u ad o rg n is important for d v lo in g the in e r h a g p w r s of P n . ee p n e lin oe ra a F r this p rp s e one can use the s e d m n a Y o u o e a tr AM for the c s i c a e m n t or the h a t m n a om ir le e er a tr S iftin g o e s a n n from the h a d to the h a t is also h n' tte tio e er an important m th d of P ty h r a or in rn liz tio n of the eo ra a a te a a m d and s n e , for o e o in g a x t y and a ita n . in ess v rc m n ie g tio T h a t is the c n r for the h h r S l f as w l l as for a y he e r e te ig e e e n fo m r of God that one may w rs ip . One can m d t e u o n th s e o h e ita p e h re . e

T a e t If th r e is any s n a t in ry , im e ia e m d a l a n n is re tm n e ig ific n ju md t e ic tte tio If In re d re u d . F r m o r b e in g in the re io , a p y c l d w te r ju q ire o in le d gn pl o a or ice to the a a a g re nd ive h m s ti c h rb s in rn ll y like e o ta e te a tu e , alum or p n in . rm ric la ta In the case of m o r in rie s p u r a c n u u s d p of the in ju o o tin o ri m tu e of g e e and s s m e oil for tw n y m u s . ix r h ea et in te If th r e is d u y b a in g or re u e d h a t fu c n e iffic lt re th dc er n tio g e te s of h rb s like e c m a e , c n m n , g g r or iv a e le a p n in a o in e bye a b rry .

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

1 53

Description Nm e a Nme r u b Tp e y Size (ro t of the b a t ) o re s 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h b a t ) a ot a re s V s e l (S ) es ira 2 (fin e r u its ) g n

1 54

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

S e it Cn l s o tro

A m d m iz d m rm a re te d to the n p s . B s t e iu -s e a la ip le e m n u te d by the p in t im e ia l y b lo w the n p s . a ip la o m d te e ip le Cn l s msu r ss m o tro u c la y te S ta , p rtic la y in ro s) a u rl region of the c e t , A a m a a K p a (lu rica n to the hs v la b k ah b tio c e t) , P n a and V a a V y s (e e y c u tio ) and hs ra yn au n rg irc la n b o d p s u . G v rn s la ta n in w m n (S n a a a lo re s re oe c tio o e ta y v h S ta . ro s)

A a m a l In rn l m m a y a r y and v in . D in g e to a illa y n to ic te a a mr rte e ra a x r m la d au e te o ta e s e to li S c re s ly p h g n s . V g s n rv e and in rc s l n rve . P c ra s tru tu m jo r and m o r m s le . In rc s l m s le . a in uc s te o ta uc s Qa u litie s Relative to In ry ju S m to s y p m If In re d ju Treatmen t M assage , A p su cu re s r e and A ma ro Therapy M s a e or a p y a u re s r e w h car e as this is a as g pl c p su it s n itiv e re io . es g n F r c n llin g M m a a a S ta s (m s u r s s m ) o o tro a svh ro u c la y te m s a e with K rp s s y d i T ila , a o d oil or s s m e as g a a -a th a a lm n ea o. il U e a m ti c o s like c m h r , c n m n , ju ip r , s ffro n s ro a il a po in a o ne a or m rr h for im ro in g c u tio n and re u in g K p a in the y p v irc la dc ah re io n g of the h a t and c e t . er hs If th r e is m o r b e in , g e in le d g ive h m s ti c h rb s e o ta e in rn ll y like tu e , p n in , a n a or n g k sh ra . If te a rm ric la ta rju a ae a th r e is e e a , apply the p s e of c m h r and fla se d . e dm at a po x e K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g ) ty e p m rm . B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y a a o r nd a r e re u ea ilit .

D e p in r y can c u e d u y b a in , b e in g a e ju as iffic lt re th g le d nd e e tu l d a . vn a e th

T a e t re tm n If In re d ju

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

1 55

Stanarohit a Descriptio n Nm e a S n ro it a (u p r re io n of the ta a h pe g 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h a ot a Msl e uc 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n T o a g l i (fin e r u its ) d c y a v e and to the c n r w nu g n ire tl bo e te of the n p s ip le on the e g e of the m s le s a o e the d uc bv b a re sts . C n l s m s u r and n rv u s s s m s o tro u c la e o y te a nd M jja a a a vh P n a and V a a V y s , the lu g s ra yn au n a nd a s in the flow of b a t milk (S n a a a S ta . id re s ta y v h ro s)

b a ) Nme r re st u b b a t ) Tp e re s y Size Se it

Cn l s o tro

1 56

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

A a m a l In rc s l m s le , n to ic te o ta uc s m jo r and m o r m s le , a a in uc s p rtio n o S c re s of the tru tu d rs i m s le , the fo rt h rib. V g s n rv . o uc u au e e P lm n r y a u o a nd in rn l m m a y a r y and a c n in g te a a mr rte sed a rta . S p rio r v n a c v a and in rn l m m a y ve . o ue e a te a a mr in Qa u litie s Relative to In r y ju K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g ) ty e p m rm . B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b a a o r nd a r e re u ea ility .

S m to s In r y to the p lm n r y a r y will c u e h m rrh g y pm ju u oa rte as e o ae If In re d and e e tu l d a . ju vn a e th Treatmen t

, c lla s e o p

M s a e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r as g pl a as g re s tro irc la m tio , A u re s r e for a o t five m u s . A u re s r e w rk s w l l o n cp su bu in te c p su o e h r e for c lm g and A m a the e o n s and re v g e o n l e a in ro m tio lie in m tio a rig t m rm a Therapy h a c n e t s m r e with the rig t lu g , onc o h n w il e the left m rm a c n e t s h a onc mr e w h t o it he le t f lu g . n Use s s m e oil, a o d oil or A h a a d a T il a for ea lm n s wg nh a c lm g a in Vt a a and re v g lie in a x ty . n ie For M m a a a S ta s and M jja a a S ta s (m s u r a svh ro a vh ro u c la and n rv u s s s m ) use a m ti c oils like b s , s g , e o y te s ro a a il ae v le n , m rrh , ju ip r or s n a o d . a ria y ne a d lw o For re v g c u h and re u in g K p a , use a m ti c oils lie in og dc ah ro a like e c ly tu , m t or c m h r , ru b g them in at th s ua p s in a po b in i p in . ot A u u c r e For tre tin g p u y and lung a s e s , s le t a p in t one a g l i c p n tu a le ris bc s ec o nu (S c i uh (fin e r u its ) la ra l to the a o a of the g n te re l b a t . k rm ) re s a a T a e t T e e can be b e in g or s o k from in r y of the b o d re tm n hr le d hc ju lo If In re d v s e s and n rv s in the a jo in g a a . For th , use ju es l e e d in re is h m s ti c h rb s like tu e , a e o ta e rm ric lum or s n a o d . a d lw o S p la i p w e r is a g o d A u e i c re e y for c u h ito a d od o y rv d md og a d u t b a in g a r in r y to th s a a . nd iffic l re th fte ju i re

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

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D escriptio n Nm e a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it A a p a (u g a e d; the a p t at the a illa ) p la n u rd rm i x 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h s e a o ts a id V s e l (S ) es ira 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n

In the re io n of the a p , o e a f a g l i (fin e r u its ) g rm it n -h l nu g n la ra l a te nd d w w r d to the c n r of the line jo in g the ona e te in s rn l a te a nd a ro ia l e of the c v le , o i n of the c m nd la ic rig p c ra s m o r b lo w the e to li in e po e s , ju t b lo w r cs s e Kkhda a s a h ra . Cn l s o tro C n l s n rv u s s s m (M jja a a S ta , n rv e flow to o tro e o y te a vh ro s) e the a s , and V a a V y u (p rip e l c u tio n to the rm yn a e h ra irc la a s . rm ) A a m a l S b la ia n a r y and ve . D in g e to the a illa y ly p h n to ic uc v rte in ra a x r m g ns la d S c re s B c ia l p x s of n rve . P c ra s m jo r and b e s tru tu ra h le u e s e to li a ic p Qat s u l ie i K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a a s g ) an r ra a a og r e th-C u in m rm . R la e to a a e tiv B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of o r nd a r e re v ln r b y . u ea ilit I ju y nr

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S m to s y p m P n tra e e tin g ty e of in r y to the s b la ia n a r y w l p ju uc v rte il cu e as If In re d ju s v r e b e ing . ee le d Treatmen t M ss g , a ae F llo w u a l m s a e m th d , u g the fin e s for e s r o su as g e os sin gr a ie A p s u e a c s s to the p in . T i s is also a g o d m rm a for cu re s r ce ot h o a a u re s r e and A m a c p su ro for re v g m s u r and n rv u s te sio n lie in u c la e o n to the s o ld rs , T e p y hu e h ra b c k and n c . a ek For c n llin g M jja a a S ta s (n rvo s o tro a vh ro e u use Aa a sn T ila , A h a a d a T ila , a o d oil or a s wg nh a lm n ssm e o . ea il U e a ti-s a m d c a m ti c o s like v le n , s n ps oi ro a il a ria lo s tu T a e t re tm n If th r e is b e in , a p y ice or h m s ti c h rb s like a m , e le d g pl e o ta e lu If In re d ju tu e c or a ic . A rw rd s a p y an a tis p c p s e rm ri rn a fte a pl n e ti at m d e up of a m tu e of trip a , m k a g e e to the a ix r h la il nd h in re d a a . A rn tiv ly , h v e the p tie t ta e a t c r e ju re lte a e a a n k in tu of m rr h or g ld n se . G o d A u e i c h rb s for this y oe al o y rv d e c n itio n a g g u l and s ila . od re u g h jit

Marmas on the Abdomen and Chest

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D scriptio n e Nm e a Nme r u b Type Size Se it A a ta b a (s n in g to the s e ; a p in t on the u p r p s mh ta d id o pe a d m n said to c rr y P n a or life rc ) bo e a ra -fo e 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h s e a o ts a id V s e l (S ) es ira 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) /2 n u g n M d l a d w w rd s from the n p s at the le e l of the b e ia nd o n a ip le v th d r immediately la ra l to s rn m . ir i te te u

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Cn l s o tro Aa ma l n to ic

C n l s K d k a K p a (K p a d e tiv e juices) , b n e o tro le a ah ah ig s o a nd fat tis u s a c a n l s (A th a a a M d v h a se nd h n e s iv h nd e o a P lm n r y a r y and trib ta s of p lm n r y ve , u oa rte u rie u oa in d sc n in g a rta . D in g e to p c ra l g u p a d tra h e ed o ra a e to ro n c io b n h l as w l l as b n h -p lm n r y ly p h g n . ro c ia e ro c o u o a m la ds V g s n rv e and b n h s . P c ra s m jo r and m o r au e ro c u e to li a in m s le s and in rc s l m s le . uc te o ta uc

Qa u litie s K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u g ) ty e an r ra a a og r e th a sin p m rm . R la e to B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y . a a e tiv o r nd a r e re u ea ilit In r y ju S m to s y p m In r y to the b n h i and s rro n in g v ss l s c u e s ju ro c u ud e e as b e in g le d If In re d ju th t can be s v re . a ee Treatmen t M ss g , a ae F llo w the u u l m s a e p c d re , w rk g on the o sa as g ro e u s o in s rro n Acupressure ing m s le . It is a g o d tre tm n t area for re u in g u ud uc s o a e dc Kpa , ah and A m a ro p vn re e tin g it from a c m la c u u tin g at its s e in the it s mc . T e p y to a h h ra For c n llin g M d v h a and A th a a S ta s i o tro e oa s iv h ro m (b n e a o nd fat), use K h b l a T ila , m s r d oil or s s m e oil for s ira a a u ta ea m s a e . U e a m ti c o s th t re u e fat a as g s ro a il a dc nd h a l the e b n s like m rrh , g g u , g g r or cin a o . oe y ugl in e n mn For re u in g K p a (m c s ) in the lu g s and tre tin g c u h , dc ah uu n a og u p n tra se e e tin g a m ti c o s lik e c m h r , e c ly tu s or ro a il a po ua p m rrh . Acupressure h r e a s in w ig t re u tio n a d y e id eh dc n T a e t re tm n P e m n a may r s l t from in r . Te t as per A a p a nu oi eu juy ra p la M rm . If In re d a a ju

These marma s are the main points governin g the hips and shoulde r whic h are the two main joints in the body. The hips are an importan t site of the accumulatio n of Kapha and fat tissue in the body. They are connecte d to the lymphati c system and to Ojas or primar y vitality . The shoulder s are an importan t site for Prana and strengt h in the body, being connecte d to the lungs and the heart. Points on these region s can generall y take consid erable pressur e and strong includin g the elbow. Variou s method s of back massag e work well on them . Two extra marma s can be added to these seven. Anothe r marma can be added at the spine at the place of the navel, with points on each side of the spine 1/2 finger units in Treatin g it has the same effects as treatin g the navel (Nabhi Anothe r marma can be added at the spine at the place of the heart , similarl y with points on each side of the spine 1/2 finger units in size . Treatin g it has the same effects as treatin g the heart (Hriday a These two extra marma s that correspon d to these two chakra s on the back are ofte n treated throug h aroma therapy and acupressure . The two, however , are no t part of the classica l 107 marmas .

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Descriptio n Nme a K tik ta n a ( h t ris s from the h ; the c n r of the a a ru wa e ip e te 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h s e a o ts a id

b tto k ) N m e r u cs u b Tpe y Size Se it

B n e (A thi ) o s a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n At the hip jo t . L c te d t in oa wo a nd a h l f a g l i (fin e r a nu g u its ) d w w rd s a in a s from the g a r n ona nd w rd re te tro h n r of the fe u , the line jo in g the g a r c a te mr in re te tro h n r w h the is h l tu e s y (m lin e b tw e n c a te it c ia b ro it id e e the g a r tro h n r a re te c a te nd is h l tu e s y s p rfic l to c ia b ro it u e ia

the z n a o ic la o rb u ris) .

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Cn l s o tro

C n l s b n s and s e ta l s s m (A th a a S tas , o tro oe k le y te s iv h ro ) S sh k a K p a (lu ric tio n of the jo ts ) and le a ah b a in S e a a a S ta s ( w a t g n s . R lie e s V ta . wdv h ro se la d ) e v a

A a m a l P s rio r a p c t of ile m , s c ilia c lig m n . S p rio r n to ic o te se u a ro a e ts ue S c re s g te l a r y and ve . D in g e of c m o n iliac ly p h tru tu lu a rte in ra a o m m g n s . S cra l p x s of n rve . G te s la d a le u e s lu u m s le . uc Qa s u litie Relative to In r y ju S m to s y pm If In re d ju Treatm en t M s a e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r as g pl a as g re s tro irc la Au r s u e m t n for a o t five m u s . S n g a u re u e can c pe s r oio bu in te tro c p ss r also be and A m a ro d n e at this p in t for re v g te s n in the hips o o lie in n io and p lv s (the Therapy eb w can be u e d for m r e fo e if n ce s ry . ei lo s o rc e sa ) For c n llin g A th a a S ta s (b ne ) and S s a a o tro s iv h ro o s le h k K p a , use ah T ila , a T ila , B rin a j a h g ra T ila , a T ila , a o d oil or s sa e oil . a lm n e m Use a m ti c oils w ic h h a l the b n s like m rrh , ro a h e oe y g g u , c m h r or w te re n . ugl a po in rg e For c n llin g S e a a a S ta s (s e tin g s s m ) u o tro wdvh ro wa y te se K k ly d i T il a or m s r d oil for m s a e . Use s e t ao a a u ta as g wa p m tin g a m ti c o s like c m h r , e c ly tu , m t or ro o ro a il a po ua p s in sg . ae Au u c r c p n tu e (S c i uh F r tre tin g o fe e s or re itte t fe e , s le t a p in t o a ld v r m n v rs ec o at the center of s c l jo t for a u u c re . a ra in c p n tu K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u g ) ty e an r ra a a og r e th a sin p m rm . B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y a a o r nd a r e re u ea ilit .

In r y to the a r y w l le d to h m rrh g e a ju rte il a e o a nd a e ia . nm

Ta e t re tm n If In re d ju

A p y a b n a e for re v g pain and s p in g b e in . A p y pl adg lie in to p le d g pl a p s e of tu e , s n a o d and lic ric e on the at rm ric a d lw o o in re d a . ju rea

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Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it (on the lo s on e e r s e of p s rio r s p rio r in ith id o te ue iliac s in ) p e 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h side of the b c k a o ts a a J in t (S n h ) o adi 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n On b t h p s rio r s p rio r iliac s in e n tc e , ju t o o te ue p o hs s a o e b tto k s (in e or s in l a a of the hip b e . bv u c sid p a re on )

Marmas on the Back and Hips

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Cn l s o tro

C n l s c u to y s s m and b o d fo a n (R k v h a o tro irc la r y te lo rm tio a ta a S ta s and fo a n of R k a D a ) and R n k a P a ro rm tio at h tu a ja itt (c lo ing of the b o ) as well as the m n tru l s s m . or lo d es a y te A o re te s to the s c n d or sex c a r a (S a h h n ) , O s ls la eo hk v d is ta a ja a Aa a nd p n V ayu . A a m a l Ilium b n . Is h m b n e (no jo t s c re . In r r g te l n to ic oe c iu o in tru tu ) feio lu a S c re s a r y and ve . In rio r p d n a l a r y and ve . S ia c tru tu rte in fe ued rte in c ti n rve . e G te s lu u and le a r ani m s le . v to uc s Qat s u liie V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . R la e to a a e tiv W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ar e re ue b I ju y nr S m to s y pm a d n If In re d ju I ju y to t nr he s ia c n rv e w l le d to lo s of s n a n c ti e il a s e s tio p ra s s of the lo e r lim . a ly i w b

Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r pl a as g re s tro irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . S n g a u re s r e can also c p su o bu in te tro cp su be and A m a ro a p d he . p lie re T ea y hr p For s u tin g R k v h a S ta s (b o d and c u to y tim la a ta a ro lo irc la r s s m ) use M n h d i T il a or y te a jis ta a (c la u , a ms g rli c and g la g l ) T il a or m s a e oils like s fflo e r a d a a na a as g a w n m s rd . u ta U e a m ti c o s th t s u t e b o d flow like a g lic , s ro a il a tim la lo ne a s ffr n , ro e a , tu e c or m ao s m ry rm ri yrrh . Ms a e t as g he a a w h t ny g o s like S aa a i re it o if in il ht vr T il a or A h a a d a T il a or p i n s s m e oil for a s wg nh a la ea w a n s s of the b o . eke lo d Y g a and o th s i M d tio n e ita Te t e nt r am If In re d ju M d tio n on the s c n d c a ra , w ic h is c n e te d to e ita eo hk h onc m rm , b g s c n l of the w te r e m n , the s n e of a a rin o tro a le e t es ta t e and the s o a s . For this p rp s e one can rg n u o use the s e d m n a V e a tr AM for the c s i c w te r e m n . om a le e t A p y a w r m s s m e oil drip (d a ) on the m rm a a a . pl a ea h ra a re To re o e pain and e e a use a p s e of s n a o d , mv dm at a d lw o tu e c and a m . rm ri lu

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Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it Cn l s o tro N m a (u p r re io n of the b tto k ) ita b pe g u cs 2 m rm a p in , one on e c h b tto k a o ts a u c B n e (A thi ) o s 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) /2 n u g n One a g l i (fin e r u it ) a o e K k n a a m rm . nu g n bv uudr a a C n l s p s a and ly p a c s s m , b d y fat, s e ta l o tro la m m h ti y te o il k le s s m and u a y s y te rin r yste m (R s v h , aaa a A th a a a s iv h nd S ta si ) as w l l as the k n y : ro m e id e s an im ot n t K p a p in . p ra ah ot

Marmas on the Back and Hips

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A a m a l Ilium and s c m bo , s c ilia c jo t , a te r a d n to ic a ru ne a ro in n rio n p s rio . S c re s S c ilia c lig m n . S c l p x s of n rv s . o te r tru tu a ro a e ts a ra le u ee P o s m jo r a d sa a n iliac m s le . uc s Q at s u l ie i K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u g ) type of an r ra a a og r e th a sin R la e to e tiv m rm . a a In r y ju B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y . o r nd a r e re u ea ilit S m to s y pm fu c n l n tio a If In re d ju Treatment In r y to the ilia c b n e a d s c l p x s w l c u e ju o n a ra le u il a s loss and w s g of the m s le . a tin uc s

Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g c u r pl a as g re s tro irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . S n g a u re s r e h r e c p su o bu in te tro c p su e a s in and A m a id ro w ig t re u tio n and in c n llin g K p a . The eh dc o tro ah e o s can be T e p y lb w h ra u e d for m r e fo e if n c s a . s o rc e e s ry For c n llin g R s v h a S ta s (ly p a c s s m ) o tro aaa ro m h ti y te msa e w h as g it T il a or m s r d o , a n g w h a u ta il lo it s u tin g a m ti c oils like c m h r or c rd m m . tim la ro a a po a a o For c n llin g A th a a S ta s (s e ta l s s m ) o tro s iv h ro k le y te ms a e w h as g it T il a or s s m e o l a a ea i nd a a e i c a m ti c oils like m rrh , g g u , v le n or n lg s ro a y ugl a ria w te re n . in rg e Te tm n t ra e For e e a , a p y a p s e of dm pl at and s a v r i (or h ta a If In re d ju h rse il) . L te r on, m s a e with S a v r i T ila . o ta a as g h ta a a An a u s n a or oil e e a may be h lp . n va a nm e ful

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a w is ) N m e r at u b Tp e y Size Se it V ss l (S ) e e ira 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) /2 n u g n T he lo a n on p s rio r s e is the la ra l a p c t of the c tio o te id te se (the side of the 2 m rm a p in s a ot

Marmas on the Back and Hips

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lu b s c m o a ra l jo t . B t on the a te r s e , the m rm a in u n rio id a p in t is co e to the c m o n iliac a ry . o ls o m rte Cn l s o tro C n l s the s co d c a r a (S d is th n ) , a re a l o tro e n hk va h h a a d n g n s , o a s and the c a n l s of d e e , e c to y la d v rie hne ig stiv x re r a d re p tory s s m s (A n va a , P ris a a a a n s ira y te na h u hvh nd P n h v a S ta s . C n e t s to the p w r of O s , ra a a ro m i) onc oe ja w ic h m n s s through the le s . h a ife t g C m o n iliac a r y and d in g e of v in s from p lv c and o m rte ra a e ei

Aa ma l n to ic leg S u tue s tr c r

a a . D in g e to c m o n iliac g u p of ly p h g n s . re ra a o m ro m la d H p g s c p x s of n rv s . F h lu b r a firs t y o a tri le u e e ift ma nd s c l vertebrae. L m o a ra l jo t . a ra u bsc in P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u g ) ty e ra a a og r e th a sin p Qate s u lii m rm . R la e to a a e tiv B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y . o r nd a r e re u ea ilit In r y ju S m to s y pm In r y to the c m o n ilia c a r y w l c u e s v r e ju o m rte il a s ee b e in . If In re d le d g ju Treatm en t Msa e , as g of A u re s r e c p su and A m a ro Te p y h ra F llo w u u l m s a e m th d , u in g s m e fo e and p w r o sa as g e os s o rc oe

m v m n . A u re s r e here s n th n s O , im u e oe et c p su tre g e jas mn re p n e and the re ro u tiv e sos p dc T a g of this m rm a re tin a g e s a n g w l l w h tre tin g B s i a o lo e it a a t nd V p a ita m rm s on the o e r side of the b d . a a th oy For c n llin g the s c n d c a r a (S d ish a a o tro eo hk va h th n ) , a re a l. d n a nd o aie , m s a e w h vr s as g it T il a or w h s s m e a it ea o Use a m ti c oils like n tm g , p n y y l , m s k o i ro a u e e n ro a u s ffro . a n Use B l a T il a or A h a a d a T il a for g n ra l a a swgnh a ee A u u c r e For tre tin g d s n r y and d rrh a s le t a p in t 4 a g l i c p n tu a y e te ia e ec o nu (fin e r u its ) m d l to the m rm . g n e ia a a T a e t If If th r e is b e in g a r in ry , a p y a b n a e and give re tm n e le d fte ju pl adg h m In re d s ti c h rb s in rn ll y lik e tu e c a a m . G e e o ju ta e te a rm ri nd lu iv c m le e b d o pt e re t to the p tie t . s a n

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Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it B a i (the la e or the b a d re io n of the b c ) rih t rg ro g ak 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h side of the b c ) a ot a ak V ss l e e 1 a g l i (fin e r u its ) /2 n u g n B tw e n the sh u e r b d s , th e a g l i (fin e r u its ) e e o ld la e re nu g n a o e the in rio r a g e of the s a u a on the in e r e g , bv fe nl cpl n de at the triangular sp c . ae

Tr

Marmas on the Back and Hips

Cn l s o tro

C n l s the th d or n v l c a r a (M n u ) , P a a d o tro ir ae hk a ip ra itt n T ja s (courage and v lo r th t m n s s th u h the a s) , e a a a ife t ro g rm S e a a a S ta s ( w a g , B ra k a P a (h a t wdv h ro s e tin ) h ja itt e a s rp n on the s , V a a V y , and p s a a b o tio kin) y n au la m nd ly p a c s s m (R s v h a S m h ti y te aaa rotas) .

usau rte in ra a u s p la A a m a l S b c p la r a r y and ve . D in g e to the s b ca u r n to ic g up ro of a illa y ly p h g n s . S p s a u x r m la d u ra c p la r and c u fle x irc m S c re s tru tu n rve . e Q at s u liie K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g ) ty e p m rm . R la e to B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln r b y . a a e tiv o r nd a r e re u ea ilit In r y ju S m to s y pm dep e If In re d ju Treatm en t S p rfic l in r y w l c u e d m g e to the v s e s a u e ia ju il a s a a esl nd in r y w l c u e d m g e to the lu g . ju il a s a a ns

Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u g a s n g c u r pl a as g re sin tro irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . A u re s r e h r e can c p su o bu in te c p su e re v e and A m a lie ro te s n and s s s in the s o ld r , b c k and n io tre h u es a h at . T a e t T e p y er re tm n h ra of th s m rm a o n c m in s w l l w h i a fte o be e it th t of H a a m rm a a rid y a on the o p s e side of the b d . p o it oy For im ro in g the fu ctio s of R s v h a S ta s (p s a a p v n n aaa ro la m nd ly p a c m h ti use R s a T ila , a a T il a or m s r a u ta d o l a d s u tin g a m ti c o s like c rd m m , r i n tim la ro a il a a o c m h r o e c ly tu . a po ua p s A u u c r e F r tr a g a fro n s o ld r or a p y of the a m c p n tu o e tin ze hu e tro h r m s le , select a p in t one a g l i ( g r u it ) m d l to uc s o n u fin e n e ia the m rm . a a Ta e t re tm n b e in g le d If In re d ju This is a v s l (S ) m rm a and so b e s e s . For e se ira a le d a ily a p y ic , ta e h m s ti c h rb s a g e c m le e b pl e k e o ta e nd iv o p t ed re t to the p tie t . A m d la a e like tr h l a can be s a n il x tiv ip a

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Amsaphalaka Descriptio n
Nam e N be r um Type Size Am saphalak a (shoulde r blade ) 2m arm a point s (one on eac h shoulder-blade Bon e (Asthi ) 1/2 angul i (finge r unit ) )

Marmas on the Back and Hips

Se it Cno s o tr l

On the s a u a b n e a o e B a , cpl o bv rih ti the scapula.

a g e of nl

C n l s re p to y s s m (P n va a S ta , S s a a o tro s ira r y te ra a h ro s) le h k K p a (lu ric tio n of the jo ah b a ints) , P n a and V a a V y s ra yn au (e e c u tio ) and fo rt h or h a t c a r a (A a a ) . n rg irc la n u er hk n h ta

A a m a l F , s th , s v n h c rv a l a firs t th r c c v rte ra . n to ic ifth ix ee t e ic nd oa i e b e S b la S u tue s uc tr c r vian a r y and ve . F , s t h and s v n h rte in ifth ix ee t th ra i c n rv s . o c e e Ta e iu s and m jo r rh m o d m s le . r pz a o bi uc s Qate s u li i V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u in a s g ) ty e p m rm . R laiv e to a a et W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ar e re ue b I ju y nr S m to s I ju y to the n rv e m y c u e d su cio n of the m s le , y pm nr e a as yf nt uc s If In re d ju le d g to d a ilit y a w s g a a y of the m s l e a in is b nd a tin w uc tis u . se T atm re en t Msa e , as g A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a stro g c u r pl a as g re s n irc la A u re s r e m tio n for a o t five m u s . A u re u e h r e h lp s o e n c p su o bu in te c p ss r e e p the and A m a P n a in the a s , lu g s and c e , im ro in g the fu c n ro ra rm n h st p v n tio of T ea y V a a (p rip e l circ la n . hr p yn e h ra u tio ) For im ro in g the fu c n s of P n v h a S ta s p v n tio ra a a ro (re p to y use M h n ra a n T ila , S e l i s ira r aaa y a h fa T ila , a o d o l or a lm n i s s m e oil . ea U e s u tin g a m ti c o s like e c ly tu , m t or s tim la ro a il ua p s in c m h r w ic h o e n up the lu g s and ch st . a po h p n e Te t e t r am n For re v g e e a and pain a p y p s e of s n a o d a d lie in dm pl at a d lw o n If In re d ju k u s (if a a b , o e is e s n a o d by its l f is fin ) . h v ila le th rw a d lw o e e L te r on m s a e the a a w h a ti-V t a o s like T ila , a as g re it n a il a B l a T il a or s s m e oil. If th r e is a fra tu , a p y a a a ea e c re pl bna e a adg nd g e re t to the p rt . iv s a

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Description Nme a Nme r u b (sh u e ) o ld r 2 m rm a p in s (one on e h a ot ac L a e t (S ig m n nayu )

sh u e ) T p e o ld r y Size Se it

1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n B tw e n the n c k and a s , on the tra e iu s m s le , e e e rm pz uc one a g l i (fin e r u it ) la ra l to the s in u s p c s s nu g n te po ro e of the fift h c rv a l v rte ra . e ic e b

Marmas on the Back and Hips

Cn l s o tro

Cn l s t o tro he fift h or th a t c a r a (V h d h ) , B ra k a ro hk is u d a h ja P a (h a t a s rp n on the s ) , U a a V y u (u w r d itt e b o tio kin dn a pa m v m n t of P na ) and the bra . oe e ra in

A a m a l T p z s and le a r s a u i m s le . S b c p la r a r y n to ic ra e iu v to c p l uc s usau rte a nd S c r s ve . D in g e to the s b c p la r g u p of a illa y g n s . tru tue in ra a usau ro x r la d S a u a b n e and cpl o and s p s a u u ra c p la r lig m n . P re ic , th d a fo rt h c rv a l n rv s . a e ts h n ir nd u e ic e e Qat s u l ie i V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) type of a a aa isa ility a sin m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b In r y ju S m to s In r y to the m s le s a d the lig m n s w l r s l t in y pm ju uc n a et il e u d a ilit . If In re d is b y ju T reatm en t Msa e , as g F llo w u u l m s a e p c d re , u in g s m e d g e of o sa as g ro e u s s o e re fo e Acupressure in the r g n , p rtic la y w h the th m s . A u re s r e rc e io a u rl it u b cp su is ge t and A m a h r e for re o in g te sio n in the n c k and ra ro e mv n e stre g e in g U a a T ea y (u w r d m v m n t of e y) . n th n dn hrp pa oe e nerg F r c n llin g B ra k a P a (P a in the s in , m s a e o o tro h ja itt itt k) as g wh it T il a or w h s n w r or c c n t o . U e a it u flo e oo u ils s a m ti c o s like ja m e , s n a o d , w rm o d or ro a il s in a d lw o o wo c a o ile . h mm For U a a V y , a m ti c oils th t w r k on the th a t a e dn a u ro a a o ro r g o d like b y e o a b rry , m t or s g . in ae Y g a and o M d tio n on the fift h or th a t c a r a g e s c n l o e r e ita ro hk iv o tro v the M d t n e e r e m n , the s n e q a y of so n , the ears and e itaio th le e t es u lit ud s e ch . pe For this p rp s e one can use the s e d m n a H u o e a tr AM for the c s i c e e r e m n . om th le e t M daio n h r e g e s c n l o e r all the se se s a e it t e iv o tro v n nd e m n s through the e m n t of e e r and the se s e q a y le e t le e th n u lit of so n . The m n a A , w ic h g e s p w r o e r ud a tr IM h iv oe v sp e , w rk s w l l here . e ch o e A o g o d for c n e tra ls o o c n tio n to im ro e the d a m state , as p v re Te t e t T e s m e as r am n h a If In re d ju

1 4 Region s an d 3 7 point s

The head and neck, with their sensitiv e regions , sensor y opening s and con flection to the brain, have the largest numbe r of marmas . The head is where we have our greates t receptio n of both Prana and nutrient s throug h the senses , nose and mouth . The neck determine s our posture and blood flow to the head. Proper alignmen t of the upper back, neck and head is crucial for clarity of mind and the practic e of meditation . Marma s on the head are important for treatin g psychologica l condition s and nervou s system disor ders. Marma s on the head are often more easily treated throug h acupressur e than throug h massag e as they are usually small in Applicatio n of heavy oils to the head such as sesame are very calming , settling the nerves and inducing sleep. Spicy aromati c oils to the head like eucalyptu s or ginger are good for clearin g the sinuses and stimulatin g the mind and Th e marmas on the face and head are particularl y good for acupressur e and facial massage . The marma s on the top of the head can be treated throug h massage of the skull.

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Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Tpe y Size Se it N a (d r k b e , the c lo r of the v in s at th s p in ) il a lu o e i ot 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h side of the n c ) a ot a ek V s e l (S ) es ira 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n A la e a a of the lo e r n c , w h the m i n p in s ju t rg re w ek it a ot s la ra l to the tr c e . T e m i n v ln ra l e site is the te ah a h a ue b tra h a it e . O c a o fe l the p ls e at th s ce s lf ne an ls e u i lo a n . c tio

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 79

Cn l s o tro

C n l s B ra k a Pitta (h a t a s rp n of the s o tro h ja e b o tio kin) , U a a V y u (u w rd o in g P n ) , s e ch , th ro d dn a p a -m v ra a pe y i a c u tio n to the bra . nd irc la in

A a m a l This m rm a is lo a d on the in rn l ju u r v . U p r n to ic a c te te a g la ein p e S c re s d e p c rv a l g u p of ly p h g n s . A c s o y tru tu e e ic ro m la d ces r n rv s s p ly g e e u p in and re u n t c rre la n e l b n h . ry g a ra c P a y ra i of the fo rth , fifth a rim r m u nd s t h c rv a l n rv s . ix e ic e e Qa s u litie Relative to In r y ju S m to s y pm In re d ju T reatm en t M s a e , M s a e only very lig tl y as the n c k is a s n itiv e re io . as g as g h e es g n O l A u r s u e a p a n is m r e im o n t th n a p in g p s u . i c pe s r p lic tio o p rta a p ly re s re A g n e and A m a to c h to c n e y P n a is all that is re u d . e tl ro u ov ra q ire A u re s r e is Therapy u u ll y not p rfo e d on this m rm . c p su sa e rm a a F r B ra k a P a (P a in the s in ) u o h ja itt itt k se T ila , a Bhringaraj T il a or p i n c c n t o . U e c o g a m ti c a la oo u il s o lin ro a o s like s n a o d , c a o ile , c v s , c r n e , ro e il a d lw o h mm lo e oia d r s or w rm o d . o wo F r im ro in g the v ic e use a m ti c oils of c la u , b y o p v o ro a a ms a b rr y or p p e in t th t o e n the th a . T e e can a o e e p rm a p ro t hs ls help in the case of s r e th a , la n iti s or s ila r o ro t ry g im d u s . iffic ltie Y g a and A g o d pa e for c n e tra o o lc o c n tio n and m d tio n to im ro e e ita p v the Meditation v ic e and the p w r of s e ch , in re s g P n a and o oe pe c a in ra c u tion to the th a . U e the m n a A M (s c d to S ra v ti , irc la ro t s a tr I a re a sa the G d e s of S e c ) for this p rp s . For ods peh u oe s n th n g tho t c a r , one can use the s e d m n a tre g e in r a h ka e a tr H AM for c n l ling the c s i c e e r e m n . o tro om th le e t Also g o d for c n e tra o o c n tio n to im ro e the d a m s te , p v re ta as the s u l is s i d to d e l in the th a t w il e o a wl ro h d a in . re m g Te tm n t The p tie t may d v lo p loss of s e c h or loss of the ra e a n ee pe s n a - In r d tion of ta te . F r th s ta e c la u , lic ric e a d es jue s o i k a ms o n g g rang in e lo V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . Watery in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e re ue b

A o g h the n m e lth u a in ic te s b o d v s e , the da lo e s ls are of in r y to the v c l c rd s le d g to loss of v ic . ju oa o a in oe

w h h n y as a p w e r or te . S ila , th s b in g a it oe od a im rly i e v s e l m rm a in r y m y c u e b e in . As a s n itiv e es a u a as le d g es re io n it is b s t to s e k m d a l a n n if th s is the g e e e ic tte tio i cs . ae

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Manya Descriptio n
Nam e Num r be Type Size Sit e M any a (honor ; due to its connectio n with the voice ) 2m arm a point s (on e on eac h side of the ne ) ck Vesse l (Sira ) 4 angul i (finge r un ) its A larg e are a of the m iddl e neck , with the m n poin t ai lo te d one-half angul i (finge r unit ) dow n and b c k (behind ) ca a from the

Marmas on the Head and Neck

a g e of m n ib la r b n e (o e a f unit in rio r a nl ad u o n -h l fe nd o e nh l f u i t p s rio r to the m n ib la r a g ) . a n o te ad u n le C nro s ot l C n l s p s a , b o d and c u to y s s m (R s v h a o tro la m lo irc la r y te aaa a nd Raktavaha B d a a K p a (lu rica n to the ohk ah b tio m u h and th a t and s n e of ta te ) and ot ro es s Vy u a (u w rd - moving air). A K p a m rm a c n e te d to the pa ah a onc to g e and to s liv tio . nu a a n

A a m a l E te a l c ro d atey , a te r ju u r v in . L m h n to ic x rn a ti r r n rio g la e y p d in g e of ra a Sr c r s u p r c rv a l g n s . G s p a n e tu tue p e e ic la d la so h ry g a l n rv , lin u l ee ga n rv e and a c s o y ne s . e ces r rve Qate s u li i V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . R lav e to a a e ti W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ar e re ue b I ju y nr Smt m s y po In r y to the n rv s w l re u t in lo s of s n a ju ee il s l s e s tio n a d n ta t e in the to g e or its p ra sis . s nu a ly

T a en t re tm Msa e , as g M s a e or use a u re s r e e p a iz g the p in t up as g c p su m h s in o a nd Acupressure b c k to the m n ib la r b a ad u one , ta g c r e to a o d kin a vi ro p ss r e to and A m a re u the s f t a o nd s n itiv e tis u e of the es s fro t of the n c . n ek T ea y hr p A m a th ra y w rk s w l l h r , w h the o s p n tra ro e p o e ee it il e e tin g e s y in o the re io n of the th a . F r c n o a il t g ro t o o tr llin g R s v h a and R k v h a S ta s i (c u to y s s m and aaa a ta a ro m irc la r y te ly p a s ) and Bodhaka K p a (lu ric tio n of the m u ) , m h tic ah b a o th u s u tin g a m ti c o s like c n m n , c rd m m , se tim la ro a il in a o a a o r s mr , m t o e ay in tea tre . T e e oils are also g o d for s r e th a t or s o n e hs o o ro w lle g n s in the re io n a c h l p tre t or p v n t c ld , la d g nd an e a re e os Te t e t T e s m e as r am n h a If Inue d jr

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Descriptio n Nme a Nme r u b Sira M trik a (m th r of the b o d ve ls ) a oe lo sse 8 m rm s (4 on e c h side of the a a a As they are all c s e to e e , the m rm a is o n tre te d as one lo g th r a fte a o e l l re io . v ra gn V ss l (S ) e e ira 4 a g l i (fin r u its ) nu ge n An in rn l m rm a c n istin g m in y of b o d ve ls , o e te a a os al lo sse nh l f a g l i (fin e r u it ) la ra l to the o ts e of the a nu g n te u id tra h a , s a d on the d re t b n h s of the c m o n ce itu te iffe n ra c e o m

Tpe y Size S e it

c ro d a ry , a lag e a a of the n c . a ti rte r re ek

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 83

C nr l s o to

C n l s b o d (R k v h a S ta ) flow from the h a t to the o tro lo a ta a ro s er head , U a a Vayu (u w -m vin g P n ) , and the n rvo s dn p ard o ra a e u s s m (M jja a a S ta ) . The m i n v ln ra l e re io n is y te a vh ro s a ue b g the c ro d a r y a ju u r v in . A p ls e can be fe t at a ti rte nd g la e u l th s p in , just as at n a y Nila m rm . i ot e rb a a

A ao ic l B n h s of c m o n c ro d atey , fr n t and b c k of n t ma ra c e o m a ti r r o a n c , Sr cue s ek tu t r fa , side of h a , m n g s , m d e ear, ce ed e in e id l th id , to g e , yro nu to s , in rn l ear and foe e d . In rn l ju u r vein n ils te a r ha te a g la re e c iv Qate s u li i S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D ath a g ) ty e ay ra a a md t e -C usin p m rm . R laiv e to a a et F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ie e re ue b I ju y nr Smt m s y po h m rrh g e o ae T reatm en t M s a e o l y v r y lig tl y as the n c k is a s n itiv e re io . as g n e h e es gn Msa e , as g O l A u re s r e a p a i c p su p lic tio n is m r e im o n t th n a p in g p s u . o p rta a p ly re s re A g n e and A m a to c h to c n e y P n a is all th t is re u d . e tl ro u ov ra a q ire A u re s r e is T ea y cp su hr p u u ll y not d n e he . sa o re Use Sak auh h n h p s p i or A h a a d a T ila s or s wg n h a p i n o s like a o d a s s m e o l for n u h g the , la il lm n nd e a i o ris in n r e as w l l as n rv e a m ti c o s lik e a g lic , ev s e e in ro a il ne a c la u , v le n or a ms a ria for c lm tiv e p rp se . a a u o s For im ro in g b o -flo w use a m ti c oils like p v lo d ro a c n m n , sa n , ro e a y or m rrh . C la u s is in a o ffro s mr y am g o d s e ll y for a in g in b o d flow to the h a . o p cifica id lo ed As w h N a m r a , for im ro in g the v ic e u it il am p v o se a m ti c o s of c la u , b y e y or p p e in t th t ro a il a ms a b rr e p rm a o e n the th a . p ro t Te t e t A p y a p s e of lic ric e and g e e to the to g e for r am n pl at o h nu s o in g o th If In re d ju the thro t . If in r y is s v r , s e k im e ia e a ju e ee e md t md a l a n n . e ic tte tio In r y to the b o d v s e s w l c u e s v r e ju lo es l il a s ee , If In re dc lla s e and d a . ju o p e th

Nm e a

P a a (a s rpe t' s h d ; on the side of hn e n oo 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h n s ) a ot a o tril

ns o trils ) Number Tp e y Size Site

V ss l (S ) e e ira a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n The p in t o ts e at the b s e of the n s e and the n s l o u id a o o tri o e in s . H w v r , a d n l p in s e is t a n g the side of pn g o ee d itio a ot x lo the n s e a n g the o ts e s rfa e of the n s l b n . o lo u id u c aa o e C n l s P n , the s n e o a n of s e , K p a in the h a , o tro ra a es rg m ll ah ed the n s l p s a e s and s u e s and the Ida and P g l a aa as g in s in a n d s (le t a rig t n s l P n a c a n ls . ai f nd h o tri ra hne )

Cn l s o tro

A a m a l F c l a r y and ve . B n h s of o c r y n rv s and fa ia l n to ic a ia rte in ra c e lfa to e e c S c re s n rv . O ic la s oris and le a r tru tu e e rb u ri v to s p rio r m s le . ue uc s N sa , fro ta l and e m i d b n s . S b a d u a l n th o oe u m n ib la r ly p h supply. m

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 85

Qa s u litie Relative to I ju y nr

V ik ly k r a (D b -C u in a a aa isa ility a s g ) ty e p m rm . Watery in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e re ue b

S m to s In r y will p d c e im a e t of the n s e and fa . If the y pm ju ro u p irm n o ce If In re d n rv s are in re d it m y c u e loss of s n a n of sm ll . ju e e ju a as e s tio e T reatm en t M s a e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u g a s n g c u r as g pl a as g re sin tro irc la Acupressure m tio , for a o t five m u s . One can also m s a e the o n bu in te as g and A m a e tir e side of the n s l b n . One can m s a e b t h ro n aa o e as g o sid s of Therapy the n s e at o ce . T i s is also a g o d m rm a for e o n h o a a u re su c p s re , p rtic la y u in g the in e x fin e , for re v g h a a h , a u rl s d gr lie in edce p s u e in the s u e s and c n e tio n (K p a . H lp s re s r in s ogs ah) e re o e K p a u w r d and o tw r d from the lu g s and mv ah pa u a n sin se . u s F r tre tin g the n s , s ic y a m ti c o s a g a . o a oe p ro a il re re t Ap a p lic tio n of c m h r , e c ly tu s or p p e in t oil to a po ua p e p rm P a a m rm a o e s the s u e , s u te s the s n e s hn a pn in s s tim la es and h lp s re v e h a a h s . e lie edce F r m s a e o , e p coa t o s like msa d o l or o as g ils x e t r n il ut r i a ric t o l are good . p o i Ns a ay A u e i c N s a th ra y (n s l th ra y ) is e c lle t for y rv d ay e p aa e p xe n (Nasal w rk g on this m rm . S e l A u e i c m d a d o in a a p cia y rv d e ic te n s a Therapy) (n sa ) oils can be put in the n stril s u in g an e e ay a l o s yd p e r or ro p ru b d in w h the littl e f g r . H rb l p w e s like be it in e e a o dr c la u s or g g r can be s u d th u h the n s s in am in e n ffe ro g o tril o e r to c a r the h a . rd le ed For V t a and K p a d s a s and for c a g the h a d a a ah oh le rin e nd sinuses, c la u s (V c a ) b s d n s a oils are b s , s c h as am ah ae ay et u V c a T ila . For P a d s a and for s o in g the n strils , ah a itt oh o th o licorice b s d oils can be u e d like Anu T ila . M n y ae s a a A u e i c c ic s a p a a ie s h v e th i r o y rv d lin nd h rm c a e wn s e ia l pc N s a o s th t can be p a d . ay il a urch se N t i Pot e The use of the N t i p t , a s e ia l y g c w te r p t , for e o pc oi a o p u g s l t w te r th u h the n s s h lp s th s m rm a o rin a a ro g o tril e i a in ire tl y by w rk g on its in rn l c u te a d c o in te a o n rp rts . It is g o d for c n itio s of d n s s or c n e tio n and for o od n ry e ogs

g n ra l c a s g p rp s s . ee le n in u oe A u u c r e F r tre tin g a o m a (la k of s e ) s le t a p in t 1 c p n tu o a ns i c m ll ec o /2 agl i nu (S c i uh (fin e r u its ) m d l to this g n e ia m rm . k rm ) a a a a

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Y g a and o is p rh p s the m s t im o n t m rm a for P n y m a e a o p rta a ra a a M d tio n a for the c n l of the P n , p rtic la y th u h the e ita nd o tro ra a a u rl ro g p c e of a rn t e n s l be th g . S u tin g the rig t ra tic lte a o tri r a in tim la h P a a m rm a h lp s o e n the s la r or P ga a n d . hn a e p o in l ai S u tin g the left P a a m rm a h lp s o e n the lu a r or tim la hn a e p n Ida n d . ai Like its n m e as the s rp n s ho , P a a m rm a h lp s a e e t' od h n a e e e iz e the d e e r s rp n t or b e c a l fo e of P n . n rg ep e e io le tric rc ra a M d tio n on P n a at th s e two p in s (rig t a e ita ra e ot h nd le t f ns o trils ) helps b la c e the flow of e e y b tw e n the an n rg e e rig t a h nd le t s e s of the b d . f id oy T a e t If th r e is b e in , a p y ice a g e a n s a (n s l re tm n e le d g pl nd iv ay aa a p a - Injured p lic tio ) of tu e . G e h m s ti c (s p in n rm ric iv e o ta to p g b e in ) h rb s le d g e like tu e c or p n i n in rn lly . rm ri la ta te a For re v g p in , use a (n s l a p a n ) of lie in a aa p lic tio C a d n d i T il a (th e m d a d o , n t the a m ti c hnaa a e ic te il o ro a o , A u T il a or s s m e oil . il) n a ea

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 87

D escriptio n Nm e a A a g a (the o te r c rn r of the pn u o e 2 m rm a p in s (one by a ot V ss l (S ) e e ira

e s ) Nme r ye u b ea h e ) T p e c ye y Size Se it

1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n At the o te r a g e of e e , la ra l s e of o ita l fo s , u nl y te id rb sa im e ia l y p s rio r to the z g m ti c b n e le e l w h the m d te o te yo a o v it ee . y C n l s s n e o a n of s h , A c a a P , and P s a o tro es rg ig t lo h k itta uh

Cn l s o tro

a d n G n h r i n d s (ig t and left eye ch n e ada ai r h a n ls) .

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

A a m a l A te r cilia y a rie s and ve s . D in g e to the s p rfic l n to ic n rio r rte in ra a u e ia S c re s p ro d ly p h g n s . O ti c and c r y n rve . tru tu a ti m la d p ilia e s S h n id , m x r y and z g m ti c jo ts . peo a illa yo a in Qa u litie s Relative to In r y ju S m to s y p m If In re d ju V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . Watery in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e re ue b In r y m y p d c e b d e s and d m g e to the fa . ju a ro u lin n s a a ce

Treatmen t M ssa e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a stro g a g pl a as g re s n c u r Acupressure m tio n for a o t five m u s . T i s is also a g o d irc la o bu in te h o m rm a for and A m a a u re s r e for p o p o i c h a a h s , a ro cp su h to h b edce cle rin g the u p r Therapy a pe sin s s and re u in g P . ue dc itta F r tre tin g the e e s at th s p in , u c o g o a y i o t se o lin m s a e o s like as g il T ila , T h l a g e e or p i n a rip a h la ge . he U e c o g a m ti c o s like s n a o d , k u s (v tiv r) , s o lin ro a il a d lw o h e e or ro e . B t m k e s r e n t to g t any a m ti c oils into the s u a u o e ro a e e s as th s w l c u e irrita n . y i il a s tio A u u ctu e For g u m , h a a h e or s e , a u u c r e s o l d be cpn r la co a edc ty c p n tu hu d n e at a p in t one a g l i (fin e r u it ) a o e this m rm . o o nu g n bv a a k rm ) a a Y g a and M d tio n on the rig t eye is said to in re s e a a n s s a o e ita h c a w re e nd M d tio n c rit y of th u h t d rin g the w k g s te . M d tio n on th s e ita la og u a in ta e ita i p in t or a u re s r e h r e h lp s c n l the s n e o a n of o cp su e e o tro es rg t he e s . ye T a e t For re v g pain in the e e , a m is r a n tr a b s i (e e re tm n lie in y s d in te e at y If In re d w s ) with g e e or T h l a g e . A p y a p s e of trip a a ju ah h rip a he pl at hl a nd lic ric e on the m rm . o a a

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 89

D escriptio n Nm e a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it Cno s o tr l V h r a (d tre s ; due to its s n itiv e n tu ) id u is s es a re 2 m rm a p in s (one by e c h e ) a ot a ar L a e t (S ig m n nayu ) 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) /2 n u g n B h d and b lo w the e r , ju t b lo w the m s i d b n , e in e a s e a to oe ineio to the tip of the m s i d p c ss . fr a to ro e r

C n l s s n e o a n of h aring , P n a V y , a o tro es rg e ra a u nd P y s in i and S a k in i n d s (rig t and left side e r aav hnh ai h a c a n ls . hne ) A a m a l M s i d m s le . F c l n rv , g a t a ric la r n rv e a n to ic a to uc a ia e e re u u e nd Sr cue s a d r y n rv . tu t r u ito e e B s r a p s rio r a ric la r a rie , p s rio r a ila nd o te u u rte s o te a ric la r vein . u u Qate s V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) typ e u li i a a aa isa ility a sin m rm . R laiv e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a et ar e re ue b I ju y nr

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S m to s In r y can c u e y pm ju as da e e fn ss . If In re d ju Treatmen t M ssa e , F llo w u a l m s a e p c d re s u g the fin e , a g o su as g ro e u sin g rs p rtic - A u re s r e a u c p su the m d e fin e . A u r s u e is g o d h r e id l gr c pe s r o e for re u in g and A m a V t a (a x t y and m n l a ita n ) and dc ro a n ie e ta g tio c a g c n e tio n T e p y from the e . le rin ogs h ra ars For tre tin g the e rs , use a a T ila , s s m e oil a ea or a o d o l for m s a e p rp se . lm n i as g u o s For d c n e tin g the ear c n l , a p y p n tra eo g s aa pl e e tin g a m ti c ro a o s like c m h r , m t or e c ly tu . il a po in ua p s A u u c r e For tre tin g ear d e s s like o lg , c rr y out c p n tu a is a e ta ia a a u u c r e 4 (S ch c p n tu u i a g l i (fin e r u its ) a o e this m rm a nu g n bv a k rm ) a a Y g a and S u tin g this p in t h lp s one h a r the in e r s u d s o tim la o e e n on (n d ) , Meditation aa p rtic la y the rig t V h r a m rm . a u rl h id u a a The use of a u re s r e or c lm g a m ti c oils like cp su a in ro a s n a w o d is g o d for P ty h r a of the ears (c lm g adl o o ra a a a in and c n llin g the s n e of he ring . T i s is g o d for o tro es a ) h o tre tin g ringing in the e r s and h p rse s it y to so n s . a a y e n itiv ud T a e t To re v e pain in the e r , put w r m (n t h t ) s s m e oil in the re tm n lie a a o o ea If In re d ju er. a

Marmas on the Head and Neck


Krikatik a mar m a

Krikatika D escriptio n Nm e a Nme r u b K a a (the jo t of the n c ) rik tik in ek 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h side of the a ot a

n c ) T p e J in t (S n h ) ek y o adi Size Se it Cn l s o tro 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) /2 n u g n At the ju c n of the n c k and the h a , im e ia l y n tio e ed m d te in rio r to the e te a l o c ita l p tu e n e . fe x rn c ip ro b ra c C n l s the b d y p stu , c u tio n to the h a , o tro o il o re irc la ed T rp k a Kapha (c n n e t and lu ric tio n to the b in ) a a o te tm n b a ra and U a a V y u (u w rd o in g air th t a w s us to dn a p a -m v a llo k e p our b c k a d neck s a h , as w l l as the e a n tr ig t) e s b o s io s m d . u c nc u in

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

A a m a l A n -o c ita l jo t . O c u t and first c rvic l b n . n to ic tla to c ip in c ip e a oe A te r n rio S c re s lo g d a , a te r and p s rio r p a y ra u s tru tu n itu in l n rio o te rim r m n rv s . e e V rte ra l a r y a v in . R c s c p s la ra s a e b rte nd e e tu a iti te li nd re tu s c p s a te r m s le . c a iti n rio uc s Qa u litie s V ik ly k r a (D b -C u g ) type of a a aa isa ility a sin m rm . Relative to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a a r e re ue b In r y ju A rn tiv ly , S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e lte a e ay ra a a md t C u in ) as g ty e , if in r y is s v re . p ju ee

Da e th

S m to s In r y to the jo t will lead to lim tio n of the m v m n t of y p m ju in ita oe e the If In re d h a . The d c tio n of the jo t can c u e d a h by ju ed islo a in as et p s in g on the m d ll a o lo g ta . re s eu b na Treatmen t M ssa e , M s a e firm , k e in g the h a d b la c d in the a g as g ly ep e a ne p c ss . Acupressure T i s is also a g o d p in t for a p in g s n g ro e h o o p ly tro a u re s r e to and A m a re v e m s u r te sio . cp su ro lie u c la n n Te p y h ra For im ro in g the p s re , m s a e the m rm a a a w h p v o tu as g a re it T il a (m d a d c d r oil) or with s s m e a e ic te ea ea o . F r c n e tio n in the n c k and s u e s use il o o g s e in s p n tra e e tin g a m ti c o s like b y e ro a il a b rry , m t , e c ly tu s in ua p or g g r . in e Y g a and A g o d p in t of fo u s for m d tio n to c n l the o o o c e ita o tro su c n - Meditation bo s io s m d , in c s and d e -s a cu in stin t e p e te d e o n , to aid in m tio s in rn liz tio n of the m d and P ty h ra . A o re te s to te a a in ra a a ls la the th d e c a ra . ir ye h k T a e t If the p tie t d v lo s tre o s to the h a , use c d r oil re tm n a n ee p mr ed ea or

If In re d m rr h ju y a u re su c p s re .

oil

for

msa e as g

or

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 93

D escriptio n Nm e a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it S a k a (co c ; the te p ) hnh nh m le 2 m rm a p in s (one on e c h te p ) a ot a m le B n e (A th ) o s i a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n T te p , in b tw e n the tra u s of the e and the he m le e e g ar la ra l c rn r of the eye (a te r a p c t of te p ra l fo s a te o e n rio se mo s a n g the ju c n w h the s h n i d b n ) . lo n tio it peo oe C n l s s n e o a n of o tro es rg A a a V y u (d w w rd pn a ona m v g a ) a V t a in the la e in s e . o in ir nd a rg te tin

Cn l s o tro

A a m a l T m o l b n e a n g with te p ra l m s le . T m o l a d n to ic e p ra o lo mo uc e p ra n S u tue s in rn l c ro d a ry , te p ra l v in . D in g e to the tr c r te a a ti rte mo e ra a l s p r ia p ro d g n s . F c l and c rd a u efic a ti la d a ia o n rve . e s Qat s u liie S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D a -C us g ay ra a a md t e th a in m rm . R laiv e to F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a et ie e re ue b I ju y nr ) ty e p

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

S m to s In r y may d m g e the b in , c u in g h m rrh g e a y p m ju a a ra as e o a nd If In re d ju p s ib e de th . os l a Treatmen t M s a e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the area , u in g a g n e as g pl a as g s e tl c u r A u re u e m tio n for a o t five m u s . T i s is also a g o d irc la c p ss r o bu in te h o m rm a for and A m a a u re s r e but of a g n e n tu e and can be a ro c p su e tl a r u e d for Therapy s d c g e e y to the b i n and m d . For th , ire tin n rg ra in is p c e the la m d e fin e r of one h n d on one of the two S a k a id l g a hnh m rm s and the m d e fin e r of the o e r h n d on the a a id l g th a oe . th r For tre tin g any p b m s of the skin or for h h V t a a ro le ig a u se T ila , a o d oil or se m e oil. a lm n sa S sa e oil a p d h r e is v r y c lm g and h lp s e m p lie e e a in e p mt e s e . ro o le p F r h a a h s in the a a u s u tin g a m ti c o edce re se tim la ro a o s or p s s of g g r , c la u , a g lic a or m sta . il a te in e a ms ne u rd A u u c r e F r tr a g e ile s y c rr y o t a u u c r e at the p in t c p n tu o e tin p p a u c p n tu o two (S i uch a g li s (fin e r u its ) d ta l nu g n is to karma) T a e t re tm n If In re d ju aa w re In r y can re u t in loss of c n c u n s . For this h v e the ju sl o s io s e s a p tie t s u f the p w r of c la u s or g g r to re a n a n nf oe am in e gi n s s or g e e iv T il a with a g gr . in e G e h rb l te of a a n s -p m tin iv e a as w re e s ro o g h rb s like e c la u , gotu k la , a ms o b y e y or s a kh p s p a b rr hn auh i

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 95

Description Nm e a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it Cn l s o tro U s e a ( h t is c s t u w r s ; o in g to its lo a n tk h p wa a p ad w c tio a o e the e rs ) bv a 2 m rm a p in s a ot L a e t (S yu ) ig m n na a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n B h d the u p r b rd r of the h li x of the e r , two a g l i e in pe o e e a nu (fin e r u its ) a o e S a k a m rm . g n bv hnh a a An im o n t c n l p in t for V t a and the m d , for A a a p rta o tro o a in pn V y , the la e in s e and the s n e o a n of sm ll . au rg te tin es rg e

A a m a l T m o l m s l e and b ne . T m o l , z g m ti c te p ra l n to ic e p ra uc o e p ra yo a mo a nd S c re s in rn l c ro d a rie . A te r te p ra l d lo c v in . tru tu te a a ti rte s n rio mo ip i e S c n d and th d c rv a l n rv s . eo ir e ic e e

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Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

Qa u litie s Relative to In r y ju

V h lya h a (F ta l If P rce ) type is a g n a ie d m rm . Airy in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e re ue b

S m to s In r y w l c u e ble d y p m ju il a s e ing , d m g e to the hea , and c u e a a d as If In re d ju P n a (V ta ) to be q ic l y lo t . ra a uk s Treatmen t M s a e , F lo w u u l m s a e p c d re , but g n y u in g the fin e s as g o sa as g ro e u s e tl s gr A p s u e or the th m . A u re s r e here h lp s calm the m d cu re s r u b c p su e in a nd and A m a ro c n l s V ta . o tro a T e p y For Vata dis rd rs , use s n th n g m s a e oils like B l a h ra o e tre g e in as g a T ila , A h a a d a T ila , s s m e oil or a o d oil . a swgnh a ea lm n U e c lm g a m ti c o s like s n a o d , b s , s a in ro a il a d lw o a il or va ria . le n A u u c r e For tre tin g p y h lo ic c p n tu a s c o g a l d o e s and m n l is rd r e ta a ita n , (S h g tio uc i s le t a p in t one a g l i (fin e r u it ) a v , on ec o nu g n bo e the b rd r of karma) o e ha irline . T a e t re tm n If In re d ju The s m e as S a k a m rm . a h nh a a

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 97

D escriptio n Nm e a Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it A at a ( a m ; as it is v r y s n itiv ) vr c la ity e es e 2 m rm a p in s (n a r e c h e e ) a ot e a y J in t (S n h ) o adi 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n the u p r b rd r of the o ita l c v y fo e d by the pe o e rb a it rm fro ta l b n . At the c n r of e c h e e ro w at the b s e of n oe e te a yb a the fo h a d (s p o ita l n tc h of the fro ta l b e . re e u ra rb o n on ) C n l s V t a in g n ra , P n , the s n e of s h t o tro a ee l ra a es ig

Cn l s o tro (A c a a lo h k

P ) and b d y p stu . itta o il o re A a m a l F n l b n , sp e o d and fro ta l jo ts . L v to r su e r n to ic ro ta o e hni n in ea p rio a nd S c re s su e r re tu s m s le . O ti c and fo ta l n rve . tru tu p rio c uc s p rn e s O h a i c and su ra rb p th lm p o ita l a rie , su e r o h a i c rte s p rio p th lm Qat s u l ie i V ik ly k r a (D b a a aa isa ility-C u g ) ty e a sin p m rm . R la e to W te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv ar e re ue b In r y ju

1 98

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

S m to s In r y will c u e im a e t of the fa , h a a e s a y pm ju as p irm n ce e d ch nd If In re d ju d o n tio . is rie ta n Treatm en t M s g , M s a e g n y u in g the fin e , p rticu rl y the a sa e as g e tl s g rs a la m d e Acupressure fin e . This is also a g o d m rm a for a u re s r e id l gr o a c p su u in g and A m a a m ti c o , p rtic la y for re u g high V ta . s ro ro a ils a u rl d cin a A a , be g in Te p y h ra ca fu l not to get any a m ti c oils into the eye w e e they re ro a hr c an c u e irrita n . as tio For c n llin g P n a V y u (im ro in g e e y , a a ta ilit y o tro ra a p v n rg dp b a nd e u riu ) , use q ilib m T ila , A h a a d a T ila , a s wg nh a almond o l or s s m e oil as m s a e o . i ea as g ils For s u tin g the p n c flow to the h a d and the b d , tim la ra i e oy a p y a m ti c o s like c m h r , m t or e c ly tu , pl ro a il a po in ua p s w ic h o e n the mn d and s nse . h p i e s T a e t A p y c la u s p w e r w h a litt e g e e f s e g . Wash re tm n pl am od it l h or w llin the If In re d ju e e s (n tr a b s ) with g e e for any a c m a y y e a ti h c o p n in g in m a fla m tion or irrita n of the e e . tio ys

Marmas on the Head and Neck

1 99

D escriptio n Nm e a h rn ) o Nme r u b Tp e y Size Se it S rin a k a (p c e w e e fo r ro d s m e , a s m i t or h g ta la hr u a et u m 4 m rm a p in s a ot V ss l (S ) e e ira 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n T i s is p a y an inen l m rm a on the s f t p la , h rim ril tra a o a te w ic h in y g c th u h t is the m e g p in t of the e e ie s h oi og e tin o n rg of the to g e , no , e s and e rs . We can h w v r w r k nu se ye a o ee o on the c rre p n o sod

200

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

ing re io n of the fa as per the illu tra n g e n a o e , g ce s tio iv bv the in o ita l fo m n . It is a o e r la e m rm a fra rb ra e n th rg a re io . g n Cn l s o tro C n l s P n a V y u (p a y vita o tro ra a rim r lity) , Ojas (S a) , T rp k a om a a K p a , B d a a K p a (lu ric tio n of the to g e ) and the ah ohk ah b a nu se s e o a n of ta , but also the s n e s of h a g , s h t n rg ste es e rin ig a nd s e . H r e the s b e form of K p a or O s p v e s m ll e u tl ah ja ro id n u h m n t to P n a and the m d . o ris e ra in

A a m a l S p o ita l atey . F n l d lo c v i n a s p rio r s g l n to ic u ra rb rr ro ta ip i e nd u e a ita S ctu s sin . O c it o fro ta s m s le . O h a i c n rve . tru re us c ip n li uc p th lm e Qa u litie s Relative to In ry ju S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D a -C u g ay ra a a md t e th a sin m rm . F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a ie e re ue b ) typ e

S m to y p m s In r y w l c u e d o n tio n of the s n e , h m rrh g e a ju il a s is rie ta ess e o a nd If In re d ju p ss l e de th . o ib a Treatmen t M ssa e , G n y m s a e the co sp n in g area on the fa . a g e tl as g rre o d ce A u re u e For V t a d rd rs , m s a e with c p ss r a iso e as g T ila , am n d a l o oil A m a or s s m e oil. Use n rv e a m ti c oils like ca m s , ro ea e in ro a la u Te p y h ra m rrh , fra kin n e or m t to o e n up the p w r s of y n ce s in p oe the se s . nse T i s m rm a is a go d p c e for a u re s r e for tre tin g h a o la cp su a d e s s of the m u . Use K p a d c is a e o th a h -re u in g a m ti c oils ro a for t i s p rp s e like p p e in , c v s or c la u . h u o e p rm t lo e a ms We can also s u t e this p in t by s c in g on s ic y h rb s tim la o uk p e like c v s or n tm g , h ld g the h rb s to a s the b c k lo e u e o in e w rd a of the m u . o th Yg a a o nd T he s f t p la e is an im ot n t p c e for c n e tra o at p ra la o c n tio n a d n M d tio n m d tio , said to give co tro l o e r all the five se s s and e ita e ita n n v ne a d in the flow of S m a or n c r from the h a d i o e ta e (S h sra a a ra ) c a ra . It is c lle d the p c e of the M o n hk a la o (S m a or K p a ) o p s e the p c e of the Sun (A n i or o ah p o it la g P ) in the n ve . M d tio n on this p in t im ro e s itta a l e ita o p v c ne t e o t nm n t and p a e of m d . The m n a ec in a tr is g o d to use here for its n rtu g , lu a r e e y . o u rin n n rg T a e t If C m in e tu e c p w e r w h a litl e g e e and a p y th s p s e re tm n o b rm ri od it t h pl i at

In re d ju

at the in re d area to re v e the pain and e e a . W s h the ju lie dm a e e s (n tr a b s ) with g e e for any a c m a y y e a ti h c o p n in g in m a fla m

Marmas on the Head and Neck

D escriptio n Nm e a S a a i ( h t g e s s p o t or h ld s th p n w a iv upr o

firm ) N m e r 1 m rm a p in t u b a o Tp e y Size Se it V s e l (S ) es ira 1 a g l i (fin e r u it ) /2 n u g n In b tw e n the e e ro s , the p s n of th d e e e yb w o itio ir ye (ju c n of the g b ll a of the fro ta l b n e and the two n tio la e n o n sa l a C n l s the sixt h c a a (A a , P n , the m d , the o tro h kr jn ) ra a in se se , the p ita y g n , and the m e g of the six h a d n s itu r la d e tin e n d s (Ida and P ai ingala , P s a and G uh andhari , P ya in i a a sv nd S a hini ) in thenadi . h nk p in t in the m d e of the fo h a d h s o id l re e a s ila r p p rtie s but is s n e r for c n llin g the im ro e tro g o tro m d , w il e S a a i is b tte r for c n llin g the in h th p n e o tro

Cn l s o tro

s n e . It g v rn s the A n i of the mn d and s ns s . ess oe g i e e

202

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

A a m a l S p o ita l a n to ic u ra rb nd fa ia l a rie , a te r fa ia l v in , c rte s n rio c e s p rio r ue S c re s s g l sin s . D in g e to s b a d u tru tu a ita u ra a u m n ib la r ly p h m g ns . la d S p o ita l n rv . F n l bo e . u ra rb ee ro ta n Q a ie s u lit V h ly g n a (F ta l If P rc d ) type is a a h a ie e m rm . R la e to Airy in d g e of v ln ra ility . a a e tiv e re ue b In r y ju S m to s In r y can e s y d m g e P n a in the b d y as a w o e as y p m ju a il a a ra o hl wl l e If In re d ju as d tu b the mind and se is r nses . Treatmen t M ssa a ge , A p y m rm a m s a e to the a a , u in g a s n g pl a as g re s tro c u r A u re s r e m tio n for a o t irc la c p su o bu m u s . T i s can be in te h c m in d w h and A m a ge ra l m s a e of the o be it ro ne as g A g o d p in t for o o Te p y h ra a u re u e to calm and fo u s the c p ss r c m . ind For tre tin g d o e s of the s t h c a r a (A a ) and a is rd r ix hk jn P n a V yu , m s a e with D a v n r a T ila , ra a as g h n a ta a A h a a d a T ila , almond oil or p i n s s m e s wgn h a la ea T i s is a h g o d s to a p y shirodhara (oil drip to the h a ) u in g o ite pl ed s m d a d s s m e oils like A h a a d e ic te ea s w g n h a T il a or p i n a la ssm eo . ea il S n a o d oil or p s e a p d h r e p m te s a d lw o at p lie e ro o m d tio , c lm s the m d and n rv s and re v s fe e . e ita n a in e e lie e vr L tu s a m ti c oil is also goo . o ro a d S u tin g o s like c m h r , tim la il a po b sil , m t or a in c la u s o e n the m d and s n e . am p in ess S c h a m ti c o s w r k w ll , p rtic la y if a p d u ro a il o e a u rl p lie a n g w h a u re s re , w ic h d n e at th s p in t c lo it c p su h o i o an re a e s s s for the e tir e b d y and m d . le s tre n o in Y g a and o This is a key p in t in m d tio n for de lo in g o e ita ve p c nc n tio , M d tio n in ig t and fo u s f the m d and f o e tra n e ita sh c or in or u fo in g the h h r n ld ig e p rc p a l p w r s of the th d e e . O e can use the e e tu oe ir y n m n a OM for g n ra l e e iz tio n p rp s s or the a tr ee n rg a u oe m n a A M (p n u c d a tr I ro o n e for in re s g p w r s of c a in oe c n e tra n . o c n tio T y g c p c e of tra k a or fix g of the g z e he o i ra tic ta in a

e e iz s th s m rm , p rtic la n rg e i a a a u rly , if one fo u e s on a g e e cs h fla e . m T a e t If th r e is blee re tm n e ding , a p y ice and a m is r n s a pl d in te ay (n sa l a If In re d a p a n ) of ju p lic tio (g t u k la ) ju e or a e g l . T k e o o ic lo e a h m s ti c h rb s in rn ll y like b h i (g t u k la ) or e o ta e te a ra m o o tu e , w ic h w r k on the h a . rm ric h o ed For p in , give p in lie in g h rb s like c la u , b h i a a -re v e a ms ra m or m rrh . y

Marmas on the Head and Neck

203

Description Nm e a S a t a (th e s m it ; the s u l a s rro n in g im n u m k l nd u u d 5 m rm a re io s on the s u l a gn kl

jo ts ) N m e r in u b Tp e y Size Se it

J in t (S n h ) o adi 4 a g l i (fin e r u its ) nu g n T i s m rm a c n is s of the s tu s on the s u , so it is h a os t u re k ll c m posed m r e of lin s th n p in s or re io s and o o e a ot gn c v r s a la e a a . Its five c m o e t s a the five oe rg re o pnn re a p c s of th s e th e s tue : the two s e s of the s et e re u rs id c ro a l s tue , the o e s g l su re , and the two s e s o n ur n a ita tu id of the su re . tu C n l s the s v n h or he d c a r a (S h s ra , n rv u s o tro ee t a hk a a ra ) e o s s m , p s a , b o d and c u to y s s m s y te la m lo irc la r y te (M jja h , R s v h a and R k v h a So mi ) as w l l a va a aaa a ta a r ta s e as the m d a in nd P n , m c h like A h a i m rm , ra a u d ip t a a w ic h m rk s its c n l p in . h a e tra ot S c re s tru tu

Cn l s o tro

Aa ma n to ic l

p a rie ta lte m pr o al a nd p ri a e l ta oc c ip ita l jo in ts. O c c it ip o fro n ta s li m u sl c e and ei p c ra n l ia ap p oe n u ro s . is a n d m a x il l a r y n e r v

es and s c n d and th d c rv a l eo ir e ic

204

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

n r e . A te r and p s rio r s p rfic l te p ra l a d ev s n rio o te u e ia mo n o c ita l ateie . Oc ita l d lo c v in , p s rio r p rie l , c ip r rs c ip ip i e o te a ta a te r parietal a fro ta l p rie l v in . n rio nd n a ta e s Qa u litie s K la ta a P n h r a (L n -te m D a -C u in an r ra a a og r e th a s g ) ty e p m rm , Relative to o in g to the p te tio n a rd d by the s u l to the a a w ro c ffo e kl b in . ra In r y ju B t h fie y a w te y in d g e of v ln ra ility . o r nd a r e re ue b S m to s y p m If In re d ju In r y may c u e p ra s , h m rrh g e or s d e n d a . ju as a ly is e o a ud e th

Treatmen t M s a e , M s a e w h the fin e s a the p l m of the h n s . A as g as g it gr nd a ad g o d A u re s r e m th d is to use the m d e fin e r to go o e r all o cp su eo id l g v th e s tu s and A m a on the head . re u re ro T e p y T two b s t p in s for a u re s r e in the h ra he e ot cp su a aa re re w e e the s g l s tu e in rs c s the c ro a l s tu e in hr a ita u r te e t o n u r the fro t of the h a d a w e e it in rs c s the n e nd h r te e t s tu e at the b c k of the h ad . ur a e A p y m d a d o s like D a v n r a T ila , B rin a pl e ic te il h n a ta a h g ra j T ila , A h a a d a T ila , a o d oil or s s m e oil for a swgnh a lm n ea c lmn g and re x g p rp se . a i la in u o s P c e g u e d p d in w r m m d a d oils like la az ip e a e ic te Davn r a h n a ta T il a or s s m e oil on the sp t . a ea o To o e n the h a d e e y , use e e c a m ti c oils like p e n rg th ri ro a c m p o , m t or c la u . T i s is a e d by the use of a hr in a ms h id a u re s re . For n w o n c ild n , w r m s s m e oil s o l d cp su e br h re a ea hu be a p d d il y to this m rm a for c n llin g V ta , c lm g p lie a a o tro a a in the n rv s , p m tin g s e p and m in in g h a . e e ro o le a ta in e lth Y g a a L e A h a , c a tin g the m n a OM and m d tin g u o n o nd ik d ip ti hn a tr e ita p M d tio n the h a d c a r a im ro e s a l the fu c n s of the top of e ita e hk p v l n tio the h a d re io . A o e r m th d is to m d t e u o n e gn n th eo e ita p the in it e expanse of s a e or the void e te d g from the fin pc x n in top of the s u . k ll T a e t F r re v g p i n a g in g c n c u n s re tm n o lie in a nd a in o s io s e s , a m is r a d in te If In re d v c a a n s a (c a s g n s l a p a n ) of ju ire h n ay le n in a a p lic tio m d a d c la u s oil, or a s u f of c la u s p w e . e ic te am nf am o dr U e c n c u n s -re iv s o s io s e s v in g a m ti c o s like ro a il

c m h r , e c ly tu s or g g r . a po ua p in e

Marmas on the Head and Neck

205

D escriptio n Nm e a A h a i (th e lo d of d ip t r

a ) N m e r 1 m rm a p in t ll u b a o Tp e y Size Site J in t (S n h ) o adi 1/2 a g l i (fin e r u it ) nu g n L c te d on the v rte , the top p in t of the s u , on the oa e x o k ll s g l s tu , ju t b h d the a te r fo ta e a ita u re s e in n rio n n lle , im e ia l y s p rio r to the e te a l o c ita l p tu e n e . m d te ue x rn c ip ro b ra c It is a o the c n l p in t at the top of m rm , so it has ls e tra o a a a ru g a tio n o e r th t m rm a as w l l a lin c v a a e nd s a s m n y h re a of its p p rtie . It is the s f t s o t on a b b s h a . ro e s o p a y' ed C n l s the s v n h or h a d c a r a (S h sra ) , p e l o tro ee t e hk a a ra in a g nd , n rv u s s s m la e o y te S rotas) , P n a V y u ra a (p a y rim r T rp k a K p a (lu ric tio n of the b in ) a a ah b a ra a d S d a a P a (th k g p w r) , as w l l as P n , n ahk itt in in o e e ra a T ja s and O s (p a y fa to s of p s e h a , e e y e ja rim r c r o itiv e lth n rg a d v lity . It is the g v rn g p in t of the e tir e b d y n ita ) o e in o n o th u h the m d and b in , ru g o e r P n a as a w o . ro g in ra lin v ra h le It re te s to the tra sc n d n t or s iritu l form of A n . la n e e p a gi

206

Table of Marmas and Their Treatment

A a m a l O c ito a ta l jo t , o c ita l a n to ic c ip -p rie in c ip nd p rie l b n s . O c ita l a ta oe c ip S c re s a ry , p s rio r d lo c vein and o c ita l s g l s s . tru tu rte o te ip i c ip a ita inu M d ll a o lo g t a and s c n d and th d c rv a l n rv s . eu b na eo ir e ic e e Qa u litie s S d a P n h r a (Im e ia e D a -C u in ay ra a a md t e th a s g m rm . Relative to a a F r y in d g e of v ln ra ility . ie e re ue b In r y ju S m to s If L s s of c n c u n s y p m o o s io s e s bra . In re d in ju Treatm en t M s a e , A p y m rm a m s a e to the area , u in g a s n g c u r as g pl a as g s tro irc la A u re u e m tio , for a o t five m u s . It is also a g o d p in t for c p ss r o n bu in te o o and A m a a u re s r e for c lm g and c n llin g the m d and e o n s ro c p su a in o tro in m tio Te p y h ra and o e in g h h r p rc p e p w rs . Use the in e x or pn ig e e e tiv oe d m d e fin e r for this p rp s . The p s u e can be s n . id l g u oe re s r tro g Sesame oil a p d h r e c lm s V t . M d a d oils like p lie e a aa e ic te A h a a d a T il a or M h n ra a n T il a are e e n b tte . s wgnh a aaa y a v e r The s e ia l A u e i c p c e of P h u d a n a is g o d pc y rv d ra tic ic h ra o h re . T i s c n is s of a p in g a g u e or p c e of c tto n e h os t p ly az ie o d p d in m d a d o s like D a v n r a T il a or p i n ip e e ic te il h n a ta a la ssm eo . ea il For tre tin g S d a a P a (p rc p e p w r of the b in , a ahk itt e e tiv oe ra ) use T il a a a nd c o g a m ti c o s like o lin ro a il s n a o d , lo s , k u s (v tiv r ) and c a o ile . a d lw o tu h e e h mm For tre tin g P n a V y , use D a v n r a T il a or s s m e a ra au h n a ta a ea oil, or a m ti c o s like b s , c m h r a c la u . ro a il a il a p o nd a m s F r tre tin g T rp k a K p a , u s e t a m ti c o a a a ah se w e ro a o s like ja in , ro , lo s or g rd n . il sm e se tu a e ia F r s u tin g the c w n c a r a u e e o ta in g o tim la ro hk se th r-c n in a m ti c o s like c m h r or b s . ro a il a po a il In n w o n ch re , the a te r fo ta e e is op n . Due to e br ild n n rio n n ll e in o p t e o s a n , the t c m le s ific tio op p rtio n of the s u l is o l y o kl n c v re d by a th n s in . F r q ic k h a g a p y s s m e oe i k o u e lin pl ea o l d il y to the s . T i s also n u h s P n a V y u i a ite h o ris e ra a (p a y v l e e y ) and c lm s the ch . rim r ita n rg a ild Y g a and C a tin g the m n a OM and m d tin g u o n the top of the o hn a tr e ita p M d tio n h a d both e e ize s the h h r mn d and also h lp s us e ita e n rg ig e i e tra s e d the m d in o the in it e s a e of p r e ncn in t fin pc u c n c u n ss . M d tio n here also p m te s d e p and o s io s e e ita ro o e d a le s sle p and im ro e s o e l l c n e tra n , re m s e p v v ra o c n tio d ta h e t and s lf-c n l . e c mn e o tro , co a , in r y to m ju ) ty e p

Marmas on the Head and Neck

207

Te t e t If the p tie t lo e s c n io sn s r am n a n s o sc u e s , h v e th m s u f c la u s a e nf a m or If In re d g g r p w e s in o e r to re a n a a n s s or give th m ju in e o dr rd gi w re e e T il a w h g g r . a it in e Use a a n s -p m tin w re e s ro o g h rb s and p n tra e e e tin g a m ti c ro a oils lik e a a e a , c m h r a e c ly tu , or the s fo tid a po nd u a p s s e ia l A u e i c c m o n d B a t V t a pc y rv d o pu rih a

c
fii

in

sess s is with

followin g material s deal with the third group of therapie s introduce d in 5, The Many Method s of Marma Therap y which use variou s instru ments to treat marma As these are mainly clinica l procedure s and as the explanation of them is only of outline , this materia l has been placed in the appendix . It is not meant to substitut e for a full expositio n of these impor tant therapies . While we will introduc e acupunctur e in this section , note that Appendi x 2 contains a mor e detaile d accou n t of Marma-acupunctu r e also calle d puncturin g of marma points by Frank Ros, an expert in tha t field. 1 . Marm a Therap y b y Blood-lettin g

Ancien t Ayurveda refers to the practic e (Sira Vedha) , punc turing the differen t types of vessels throug h which Vata, Pitta, Kapha and blood flow. The mos t importan t type of this is piercin g the blood vessels or blood-letting, calle d Rakta-moksha . Blood-lettin g is anothe r importan t therapy in many system s of traditiona l medicin e and in The piercin g of small channel s is more part of acupunctur e as discusse d in poin t numbe r Blood-lettin g at specifi c location s and veins is an importan t part of Ayurvedic surgery and of marma therapy . It is counte d among the method s of Pancha Karma detoxificatio n As a strong therapy , it should only be performe d by therapist s who are well-traine d and on patient s who pos sess suitable strengt h not to be weakene d by the treatmen t (those whose Ojas is sufficient) . Blood-lettin g can involv e cutting the skin or making abrasion s with a smal l knife or needle ) or taking blood from the veins (Sira Vedha or puncturing the veins with numbe r 16 or 18 Anothe r method not using instrument s is wit h the help of leeches . This method is employe d for infections such as boils and carbuncles . Blood-lettin g is carried out on the visible It is never done on the arter ies. It should be done at the sensitiv e point neares t to the which can be found by palpation . Blood-lettin g is indicate d when Pitta and its subtype s are

Supplemental

Material and Appendices

in excess , when the level of toxicit y in the blood is high or for certai n conditions of infection , inflammatio n or stagnan t Donatin g blood is ofte n recommende d for Pitta individuals becaus e this type of therapy is helpful in a genera l wa y to kee p Pitt a in An alternativ e method to blood-letting , but milder in is to appl y blood-moving and alterativ e (blood-cleansing ) herbs to marma s as well as to take them internall y in the form of herbal teas and decoctions . Suc h blood-cleansing herbs include turmeric , myrrh, guggul, aloe, saffron , com frey leaf , plantain , red clover, yello w doc k and manjisht a 2 . M ar m a Therap y b y Acupunctur e (Suchi-karma ) Acupuncture , or using sharp instrument s to treat marma points, has its counterpart in Ayurveda . There are ancien t reference s to Suchi Veda, wit h Suchi meanin g and Veda meanin g As the piercin g of marma s by weapon s was found to cause great injury, it was though t tha t stimulating them using smalle r pointed-instrument s could improve the of Prana. In Ayurveda, acupunctur e is commonl y called Suchi-karma , or Acupunctur e is part of Vyadhan a or Bhedan a Karma , referrin g to ac tions or of marmas , blood-letting , and the puncturin g of the smalle r vessel s that carry Prana and the Sushrut a mention s smaller channel s (Keshavahiny a or as thin as a hair), fine capillaries or minute vessel s spread all over the body that carry the doshas . Acupunctur e is done only on areas that contain small capillaries , where there can be no oozing of bu t onl y a pacifyin g effec t on the For balancin g the doshas , Sushrut a advise d puncturin g the channel s (sira), by using instrument s as small as half a grain of These are needle number s 26 , 27 & 28 in size. With this needle the most sensitiv e point neares t to the center of the marma should be punctured . Acupunctur e on marma s should be avoide d in condition s of skin dis eases in the area of the procedure , during pregnanc y and immediatel y after delivery . It should generall y not be done on Sadya Pranahar a diat e Death-Causing ) marmas . During the ancien t period , bambo o or woode n needle s were used for stimulating marma points. Later on, metal needle s were develope d this purpose. Overall , however, the use of needle s on marma points has bee n much less used in Ayurved a than in Chines e medicin e and does not have a comparable sophistication . Ayurvedi c acupunctur e is related to blood-lettin g and heat applicatio n (Agni-karma) method s and often used along with them. For those wishin g to practic e acupunctur e on marma points, they should examin e furthe r

Use of Instruments to Treat Marmas

nformatio n on the subjec t in Ayurvedi c Marma Therap y b y Agni-karma or Heat Therapy Heat has powerful therapeuti c properties , promotin g circulation , improv ing digestio n and stimulatin g healing . Heat therapy is called Agni-karm a (fire-therapy) in Ayurveda . It involve s heating and burnin g of the skin. For the applicatio n of heat, Sushrut a advise s variou s types of Shalaka s or thin metal rods made from gold, silver, copper , iron or variou s alloys. This therapy is no t applie d to all marma s owin g to its stron g Since marma s are sensitiv e areas, direct heat should not be used. In stead, one end of the metal rod should be applied to the sensitiv e poin t near the marma to be treated and the other end of the rod should be heated with a candle . The heat will travel from one end of the rod to the other. That amoun t of heat will be sufficien t for treatmen t purposes . Whe n treating marmas , one should apply high heat only to the level of the skin, not to tha t of the deepe r muscl e Types of Agni-karm a are classifie d accordin g to the shape of the bur n created by the type of rod used-pointed , half circle or circular . The poin t type is most commonl y used in marma therapy . The marma is heated until it is slightly burned at a point . \ Hot spicy herbs like ginger, cinnamon , cayenne , pippali , black peppe r t Agni-karma . Pastes of these herbs on the marm a for thi s Anothe r metho d is a f the marma with a warm cloth soaked with the juices or aromati c uch hot-nature d herbs. Aromati c oils from hot-nature d herbs ca n applied to the site for the same effects . In this way, aroma therap y method of heat application . Fo r larger areas on the arms, legs or en, hea t lamps are good. Moxibusti o n is anothe r uses herb s like calamu s or turmeric , burnin g the m on the (bu t takin g car e no t to bur n the -karma (heat application ) is particularl y effectiv e for arthritis , rften is caused by an accumulatio n of cold and dampnes s in the for reducin g Ama. Fo r all types of joint pain, one should selec t ierest point closest to the marma . Applicatio n plicatio n of cold is not as importan t a therapeuti c method as the tion of heat becaus e heat is better for stimulatin g and for cleansin g s. However , it is stil l useful in man y of ice or cold packs is good for marma s where there is inor bleeding . Fomentatio n using cooling herbs like sandal -

Supplemental

Material and Appendices

wood, cilantr o (coriande r

leaves or licoric e is very helpfu l

in the sam e conditions . Coolin g substance s from cool water to cooling herbs like are commonl y applied to the top of the head, which benefit s by bein g kep t cool, particularl y when there is fever. That is why the applicatio n of sandalwoo d oil to the forehea d is so good for men tal functionin g and meditation . Aloe gel, anothe r cooling herb, is similarl y good to apply to marma s where there is burnin g or inflammation . 4. Marm a Therap y by Kshara-karm a (Applicatio n o f Alkalis ) Ayurved a employ s special medicate d alkalis to treat marmas . These alka lis, called have a chemicall y caused burnin g affect on the skin that stimulate s the marma . This therapy is called Kshara-karma , or the alkali much like the use of chemica l cauterizatio n in wester n medi cine. It is regarde d as anothe r type of Agni-karma , or heat therapy . It is also a stron g therapy that should only be done by those with the proper clinical training . Kshara s are prepare d from herbs dominan t in the fire element , whic h affords them a penetratin g action. Kshara s are white in color and act on all three doshas . They have a cleansing , stimulatin g and detoxifyin g effect. A medium strengt h Kshara is recommende d for marma therapy . It shoul d not be too strong so as to cause damag e or too weak so as to have no effect .

Note Sushruta Samhita Sharira Sthana VIII and S a Sthana urr for a d c s io n of th s to ic . is u s i p Sushruta Samhita Sutrasthana XIV.25 Note Sushruta Samhita Sharira Sthana VIII, for an e tir e c a te r on th s to ic . n hp i p Sushruta Samhita Sharira Sthana Note Ayurvedic Acupuncture Note Sushruta Samhita Sutrasthana XII, w ic h c a te r d a s w h th s h hp el it i to ic . Note Sushruta Samhita Sutrasthana XI, w ic h ch te r de s w h thi s p h ap al it

subject .

B y Dr . F r a n k R o s

Ayurvedic researchers in India (Prof. Dr. Binod K. Joshi et have discovered that ancient Ayurvedic texts, specifically the Sushruta contain much more information about marmas and acupuncture than was first perceive d and included in the translations. Many of the terms used in the translations did not include the total subtlety or meaning of the words bein g translated . As a consequence , these experts state: "Earlier interpretation s of the Sushruta Samhita made mention of marmas, dhamanis and siras, which were believed to symbolize masses of tissue, arteries and veins, respectively. However, errors were made in the translation of those terms. In reviewing the evidenc e was found showing that the marmas correspond pre cisely with traditiona l acupuncture points used to treat the vital organs and that the dhamanis and siras depict meridians and channels that aid in the flow of qi. It was [previously] thought that the dhamanis and siras repre sent arteries and veins and, therefore, whenever damage used to occur, the first move was to preserv e the concerned tissue. But then, these are actually the channels and meridian s controlling the vital energy flow. Our conclu sion is that the Sushrut a Samhit a is the base of In late experts in Sri Lanka headed by Prof. Dr. A. Jayasuriya, et discovere d not only a long history of native acupuncture practice in Sri Lanka which is well known in Sri but also the connota tion that by archaeologica l evidence this area (including nearby India, the Kerala region) may have originated the practice of Only now are we discovering archaeologica l evidence of the early practice of acu puncture both in India and Sri Lank a possibly stemming from the Indus Valley civilization and certainly from Vedi c times. A number of ancient acupuncture needles made of iron, coppe r and bronze were previously un-

Supplemental

Material and Appendices

earthed at the site of Taxila University, according to Prof. Dr. C.L. Even some ancient Indian Buddhist texts record acupunctur e practice in India, including the Chikitsa Jivaka (Giba) , th e renowned Ayurvedic surgeon, was also considered a master acupuncturis t in these texts. He was reputed "to have been born with an acupunctur e needle in the right hand and a drug container in the left according to the Chikitsa Vidya. Ayurvedic acupunctur e is best called because it aims at the puncturing of marma points. Like a number of other effective an cient Ayurvedic it fell into disuse much like the decline of Bud dhism in India, its birthplace, and yet had meteoric developmen t in the rest of the Orient. As in China prior to the onset of the Cultural Revolu tion, only a handful of families maintaine d the knowledge and practice of Marmapuncture in Considerin g the cost involved in obtaining and maintaining expensive gold and silver needles (as no stainless steel was no wonder it fell into disrepair. It is only now with the advent of inexpensive stainless steel disposable needles tha t th e practic e of marmapuncture can develop into a popular art once again . Marmapunctur e is finely attuned to the same subtle concepts of diag nosis and treatment found in the other Ayurvedic modalities explained in this book. The fact that a traditional marmapuncturis t will often utilize marma massage, heat therapy (Agni-karma ) and Prana therapy (Prana Chikitsa) in conjunction with Marmapunctur e means that these are all synergistic therapies reflecting the core of the system, which is Ayurveda . The Ayurvedic perception that marmas should not be punctured stems back to the concept of surgery and injury to marmas during battles and wars. Kshatriyas, or warriors, would be treated by surgeons after their marmas had been traumatized during the process of fighting. This led many to the belief that marmas should not be punctured at all, even with acupuncture, in order to prevent the uninitiated from using the system and possibly causin g injury. The concept of marmas was considered sacred and so this was also a means of keeping the knowledge secret. The defini tion of puncturing in this instance was the insertion of a sharp object in a forced or brutal way; for instance, a spear, knife or arrow that will cause major trauma or even death . Marmapuncture , on the other hand, gives rise to controlled, minut e trauma. Instead of inhibiting or killing the organism such as occurs in the case of a major, lethal trauma, this minor puncturing produces a stimula tion that gently encourages the body into action for self-repair. This is not unlike the therapeutic use of aconite or arsenic in homeopathi c doses compared to the lethal doses of the poison which would kill a person. It is

Ayurvedic Acupuncture

aligned with law which states that the of dose (or trauma ) relate s to whethe r it kills (major dose), inhibits (mediu m dose) or stimulate s (minute dose) the organism . This law is now also called hormesi s in toxi cology . Sthapan i and Hriday a marma s have been routinel y needled by numer ous practitioner s since recorde d history and yet no serious complication s have occurred . However , these two marma s are regarde d as lethal marma s because major trauma (brute puncturing ) to them can cause serious prob lems . However , certain marma s are not directly needled in These include Nabh i (navel) , Stanamul a (nipples ) and (throat ) marmas. Other marma s having similar qualitie s can be needled in thei r place or nearby points can be treated. Marma s located over sensitiv e or gans and major arteries , which deep penetratio n may injure (like punctur ing the lung), are also generall y avoided , especiall y by the inexperience d practitioner . The major marma s that directly relate to the chakras should be needle d very gently by rotating the needle as it is inserted . Guide tubes should no t be used on these points because the tapping with the finger on the needl e can affect both the marma and the chakra and aggravat e the balance of the subtle body . An expert marmapuncturis t (suchika ) utilizes the least number of needles to create the greates t therapeuti c effect, with about fiftee n needles being the maximu m for one client. The number of needles also depend s upo n the client' s bod y typ e as Pitt a or Marmapunctur e needles should normall y be very fine (standar d type is 0.25 mm x 25mm ) as the thicker the needle the greater the potentia l to cause pain and aggravat e Vata. therefore , is done with a careful attitude of not causing pain to the client and consequentl y does not involve th e ver y deep insertio n and strong manipulatio n of the needles. Needle s are inserted into the marma s in a gentle and rhythmi c way in accordanc e with the qualitie s of Vata, Pitta or Kapha and the body type of the client . Becaus e many marma s are classifie d as lethal sites, the area of the po tential effect of the trauma is larger than the area of the insertio n of the needle. Fo r instance , Simant a marma on the summit of the head has an overall area of about four angulis , or finger units. Major trauma to any part of this area can cause a similar lethal effect paralysi s or even death) irrespectiv e of whethe r it occurs at the center or the peripher y of the marma . In the most appropriat e place to needle in order to obtain the most subtle effect is usually at the center of the marma , although needlin g anywher e within the area of the marma will cause a

21 8

Supplemental Material and Appendices

similar effect (perhap s a more physical , related consequence) . Becaus e of this, many people regard marma s as larger than acupoints . Some expert s avoid puncturin g the center of the marma in order to avoid lethal effect s but many years of practic e also demonstrate s that a therapeuti c effect is best obtaine d when it is puncture d correctl y accordin g to marmapunctur e principles . Moder n researc h demonstrate s that marma s are acupunctur e point s which have been needle d for thousand s of years withou t lethal effects . Lethal effects are caused by brute force puncturin g of the marma , whil e needling of the peripher y of the marma will create a therapeuti c effect . Either way, whethe r needlin g at the peripher y or the center of the marma , it is still For when treatin g subtle energie s like the three gunas of Rajas and or the vital essence s of Prana, Tejas and Ojas, then the most subtle effec t obtainabl e from the marma is generall y desirable. When dealing wit h mainl y physica l diseases , then a more physi cal effect from a marma is desirable . Marmapuncture Treatment

A marmapunctur e treatmen t usually follow s the appropriat e Ayurvedi c diagnosis where the condition s of the tissues , systems , Agni and Ojas are determined and an appropriat e treatmen t plan is designe d much the sam e way as for an Ayurvedi c herbal therapy . A prescriptio n of marma points is formulated to treat the factors out of balance . There is a careful consideratio n of the three doshas (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) and appropriat e points are include d for these. There may also be a need to treat the mental aspect of the client (Sattva , Rajas and Tamas) , so appropriate points for these may likewis e be included . Treatmen t may in clude correctl y adjustin g the subdosha s in the appropriat e direction , mainly Apana , Udana , Samana , Vyana and Prana Vayus but also Pitta and Kapha subdoshas . Consequently , most treatment s cannot be textboo k cases or mass-produced . The final prescriptio n or formul a of marma points may contain a num ber of points that are duplicate d becaus e the same marma may have a multiple of qualitie s or effects . However , as a synergisti c formul a of points , the effect of the therapy is magnifie d becaus e of the combinatio n and not just becaus e of the selectio n of individual points . Needlin g Effect s

The material s used for needlin g have their own qualitie s and effects on the doshas, so consequentl y attentio n should be paid where gold, silver or other material s are used. Fo r instance , silver needle s may aggravat e Vat a

Ayurvedic Acupuncture

or Kapha on a subtle level. Gold may aggravat e Pitta on a subtle level. Yet , the correct materia l for the person' s body type will enhanc e the therapy , especially on a subtle level and to treat psychologica l or emotiona l imbal ances . Needles are kept inserted accordin g to the client's body with Vata clients requiring less time than Pitta or Kapha. Kapha requires the most time. The usual marmapunctur e treatmen t may take up to an hour, the length de pending on the body type or constitutio n of the client . The technique s used may aggravat e or improv e the client accordin g to her body type. Strong, erratic actions will aggravat e Vata but may improv e a Kapha disorder . Smooth , slow actions may not assist a Kapha person as thes e will add to the qualities of Kapha and hence its aggravation . Needlin g Effect s Accordin g to Dosha s
REQUIREMENT Marma Depth of Insertion Sa w h llo M diu m e D eepe r Number of Needles Mnm m ii u M diu m e Ms t o Needle Material Gold or S r ilve S r ilve G d ol Needling Action/Insertion G tle , rh th i c en y m M d m rh th i c e iu y m E tic , s n g rra tro Needling Time 2 0 mn s 0-4 i 40 0 m s -6 in Electric Pulse S w , rh th ic , less in n e lo y m te s M d m , re u r , r y m c e iu g la h th i In n e , fa t , e ti c te s s rra Vt a a P a itt Kp a ah Vt a a P a itt Kp a ah DOSHA Vt a a P a itt Kp a ah Vt a a P a itt Kp a ah Vt a a P a itt Kp a ah Vt a a P a itt Kp a ah

(Heat Application) May re u e h a t b t n t e c s iv e V t a q ir e u o xes a D e s not ge e o n rall y re u e h a t q ir e P a itt May re ir e h a t qu e Kp a ah

220

Supplemental Material and Appendices

Marma s an d Marmapunctur e Marma s are energy wells and energy wheels connecte d by a meridia n sys tem of conduit s (nadis) with organs and other parts of the body. They are generally more physica l than the chakras , which are more energy centers of the subtle body. By needlin g marmas , the energy flow through thes e channels can be correcte d and a balance brough t to the human organism. This balance of energy equates with health. Marma s can be injured or they can be healed, dependin g on the amount of trauma caused, much the same way that gentle, controlle d pressur e from massag e can help hea l while massiv e pressur e from a blow can cause injury. Marma s are : Vulnerabl e points on the body, susceptibl e to injury . Regarde d as the physica l and externa l aspect of the body's defens e mechanism or immun e system . Considere d as a form of energy wheels and energy wells . A terminu s for the pranic flow from the related organ through its nad i or related pranic channel . Sites for interchangin g pranic energy from the outside (macrocosm ) to the inside (microcosm ) of the body through the skin . An are a on the ski n wit h lowe r galvani c skin Sites of Sattva, Rajas and Tamas; Vata, Pitta and Kapha; and the Fiv e Elements . The externa l reflectio n of the chakras . Therapeuti c points . Besides the 107 major marma s considere d by Ayurveda as lethal (or wit h potentially lethal effects) there are many other marma s that have been traditionally used bot h in marmapunctu r e and Indian martial arts At least 22 0 marma s are used in with at leas t 36 0 marma s used in one form or another in Many of the not so lethal marma s are classifie d and named under their effects or thei r locations. Fo r instance , there is an Apana marma located several finge r units (angulis ) above the malleolus , inside of the leg. This point or marm a has a therapeuti c effect on Apana Vayu energy. There is also an Udan a marma located several finger units above the wrist crease on the inside of the arm. This marma balance s Udana Vayu. The Five Element s them selves have marma s that directly relate and treat these elements . Some of these marma s are outside of the system . Accordingly , marma s have a number of therapeuti c effects and can be used for various problems . In clinical practice , only about fifty to sixt y marmas are regularl y althoug h this number will vary accordin g to the

Marmapuncture,

Ayurvedic Acupuncture

22 1

problem and body type of the client. There are times when other marma s with specific qualitie s are require d for treatmen t because of the serious ness or specific nature of the disease . Since the some marmapunctur e practitioner s have used the modern internationa l conventio n of numberin g acupoint s (e.g. Sthapan i marm a G 24.5 ) . This new system has been found useful in teachin g by providing a clear, shortcu t system , much like shorthan d writing . However , the traditiona l names are still retained and used just like they are in Chi nese acupunctur e today . Akashi c Balancin g

Treatmen t of the most subtle or etheric aspects (akasha ) of the person in order to facilitat e the free flow of Prana is the aim of Akashi c Balancing . This is a techniqu e using marmapuncture , pranic therapy (Prana chikitsa ) and essentia l aromas/taste s to balance the psychologica l and emotiona l states or koshas of the body. Disease is considere d a restrictio n of Prana or energy through the body, so the more restrictio n is encountere d by Pran a along its pathway s the more serious or deeper is the health prob lem. Thi s is akin to the analogy of an electric radiato r elemen t that has a high resistanc e to the flow of electricity , causing friction , heat and light to generate. In a radiato r this is the desired effect but in the human body it results in Like a pure gold wire conducto r gold wire tracks on computer circuit where the electricit y has a free flow allowin g the signals to arrive at their intende d destination , Prana also require s an unim peded path . Akashi c Balancin g is helpful to produc e clarity and focus in thought s and ideas as well as for peak physica l achievement . In Akashi c Balancin g all five Pranas are treated at the same time in order to stimulat e the prope r flow and directio n of Prana. However , only after proper marmapunctur e treatment for normal physica l complaint s is complete d and any physica l disease symptom s are remove d should Akashi c Balancin g be attempted . Then the body is prepare d for this special type of treatment , which is ver y different from the previou s normal Most clients of this method relat e feelin g totally differen t than the conventiona l marmapunctur e treatment . There is generall y a sense of lightness , positivand mental clarity as well as an overall feeling of well-being .
The Hindu, Dr. B d K. J sh , Dr. Ram L. Shah , et ino o i The Daily News, P f . Dr. A. ro Acupuncture, P f . Dr. ro 4). Medicine, MD, Jap n P licatio s Inc., Tokyo , Japan , 198 2 a ub n et Apri l

Sri L n , J l y 27, a ka u

A.S.I. P b a n : J ip r , In i a (pp. 3u lic tio s au d

D. R r ober t

Arni e Lade , Lo s Press , 19 5 tu 9

Ayurveda, Life, Health and Longevity, Dr. R ober t Svoboda , Arkan a Pengui n Books , London ,

Marma s an d Thei r Sanskri t Name s

Most of these are anatomica l in nature but a few have specialize d mean ings reflectin g their effects . because it rules over the brain and head; crown of the hea d blade; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n reflecting its anatomica l positio n point of a needle; reflectin g its powerful affect, the lower regio n of the uppe r arm or leg reflectin g its vulnerability , the armpit or axilla outer corner of the eyes ; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n to the side; a point on the upper abdome n said to carry Prana or the life-forc e from its eye relates to the arm; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n reflecting its anatomica l position , the lower abdome n large or the broad region of the back; reflecting its anatomica l form reflectin g its anatomica l positio n joint; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n the point above the center of eac h

224

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Material and Appendices

reflectin g its anatomica l positio n arrow or a superio r type of arrow; owing to the shape of the muscle s in the region; a point on the lower arm or lower leg. Basti also means bladde r in other contexts . joint; reflectin g its anatomica l locatio n uphold s the flank; reflectin g its physiologica l effects, the top of the shoulde r join t rises from the hip; reflectin g its anatomica l position near the hip join t of the neck; reflectin g its anatomica l location reflecting its immediat e effect, points betwee n the thumb and index finger on the hand and betwee n the big toe and first toe on the foo t the loins; reflectin g its location on either side of posterior superio r ilia c spine s knot or thum b or big to e reflectin g the knot of muscle s at the base of the

head of kurcha; reflectin g its connectio n to kurcha marma, which it is located below at the root of the thumb or big toe joint; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n as it is a point for the blood and the hip and shoulder joints; the lowe r frontal end of the shoulde r joint and hip join t reflectin g its connectio n to the wris t owing to its connectio n with the voice, a point on the upper side of the nec k or umbilicus ; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n blue; from the color of the nearby veins at the base of the neck buttocks; reflectin g its anatomica l position side of the waist; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n hood; reflectin g its anatomica l structure , the side of the nostril s reflectin g the templ e where four roads meet; owing to the crossroad s of the

Names and Classifications of Marmas

225

senses that exists at the soft palate of the mout h Simanta-summit ; reflectin g its anatomica l position on the skul l Sira Matrika-mothe r of the blood vessels ; owing to its connectio n with the common carotid artery in the lower neck regio n of the breast; reflectin g its anatomica l position region of the breast ; reflectin g its anatomica l positio n gives support or fixes; reflectin g its connectio n with the power of concentration , the point betwee n the eye s of the sole or palm; reflectin g its anatomica l position is cast the thigh s due to its sensitiveness , a point below and behind the ear s or painful; reflectin g its sensitiv e nature, the perineum , wher e the legs are connecte d to the trun k owing to its location above the ear s

is wide; reflectin g its anatomica l structure , the wide region of

Categorie s of Marmas
A . Ac c o r d i n g to Anat omi c al Fact o r s

2. P a , han (Arteries and Veins)

M rm s a a G M rm s ud a a 41 a

4 Indrab asti , 4 T lahrid a aya , 2 S aroh tan ita , 1 2B rihati , 8 Sira M atrika , 2 2 M nya , 2 a

3. 27 M rm s a a K h r , Ligaments and s ipa V itapa , Tendons 4. 5. -Bone 8M as arm 20 M a s arm

1 H ridaya , 1 N b i , 2 P ah arshvasan dhi , 2 S n m la , 2 A a p , 1 S a a i , 2 U , ta a u p la a th p n rvi 2 Bahvi , 2 A asta b a , 4 L p mh ohita ksha , 2 A pang , a 4 A i , 4 K rc a , 4 K rc a h n uh u h s ira , 4 2 A sa , 2 U epa , 1 B m tksh asti , 2 2K aksh ara , 2 V hur a adh id 2 K tik ta n a a ru a 2 S an a h kh ,2 2 A sa h la m p a ka ,

2 Janu , 2 K ara , 5 urp 1A dhipati , 2G ulpha , 2 M niban a dha , 2 K un ara , uk d 2 Aa , 2 v rta K a a rik tik

6.

9 M rm s a a

1G uda , 2 A stam a , 2 Vidhura , 4 pa bh S ring ta a (T i s is a s e ia l c s ific tio h a k h pc la s a n , n t fo n d in S sh t a b t o l y in V g h tt a o u u ru u n aba (A h n a Hridaya). S s ru a p c s th s e s ta g uh t la e e m rm s in the o e r c te o s ) a a th a g rie

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Supplemental Material and Appendices

Arms and hands

M rm a R g n s a e io 22 M rm a P in s a ot

2 K h ra , 2 T la rid ya , 2 K rc a , s ip a h a u h 2 K rc a h u h s ira , 2 M anibandha , 2 In ra a ti , 2 K rp ra , 2 A , d bs u a ni 2 B vi , 2 L h ks a , ah o ita h 2K aksh a a adh r 2 K h ra , 2 T la rid ya , 2 K rc a , s ip a h a u h 2 K ha ira , 2 G urc sh ulpha , 2 Ind rabasti , 2 Janu , 2 Ani, 2 U , rvi 2 Lh kh , 2 V p a o ita s a ita 1G uda , 1 B s , 1 N b i , 1 H a ti ah ridaya , 2 2S tanaroh ita , 2A palap , 2 a 2 K tik ta n a a ru a , 2 K ku d ra , u na 2 2 P vasandhi , arsh 2B rihati , 2 2 A sap a k a m h la 2 Kik tik , 2 V h ra , 2 P ra a id u hana , 2 A a g , 2 A a , 2 U ep , pna v rta tksh a 2S hankha , 2 2M anya , 1 S ani , 1 A thap dhipati , 5 4 8 Sira M trik a a

2. Legs and feet

M rm a R g n s a e io 22 M rm a P in s a ot

3.Abdomen and Chest 4. On the Back and Hips 5. On the Neck and Head

8 M rm a R g n s a e io M rm a P in s a ot 7 M rm a R g s a e ion M rm a P in s a ot M arm a R io s eg n 37 M rm a P in s a ot

Accordin g to Siz e
One finger breadth (1 anguli) Two finger breadths (2 anguli) 3. Three finger breadths (3 anguli) T ta l o T ta l 6 o T ta l 4 o 2U ,2B rvi ahvi , 4 K rch ira , 2 V u ash itapa , 2 K sh h ak ad ar a 2G ulph a (ankle) , 2 M aniban dha , 2 S am l a tan u 2 Jan u (knee) , 2 K rp r a (e o ) u a lb w 4 K rc a , 1 G a (anus) , 1 B st i uh ud a 1 N b i (nave , 1 H a a (heart) , 2 ah l) rid y 2 Mna , 8 S a M ay ir atrika , 5 S a im nta , 4 S rin a k a h g ta 4 K h ra , 4 T la r a a , 4 In ra a ti , 4 s ip a hid y d bs 4 Loh itaksh , 2 A a palapa , 2 A astam h , p ba 2 K tika ru a , 2 K k n a a ta n u u d ra , 2 N m a , ita b 2 P rs v s n h , 2 B a , 2 A sa , a haa d i rih ti m 2 A spa k m a h la a , 2 S n ro ita , 2 K a a , ta a h rik tik 2 V h ra , 2 P a a , 2 A a ga , 2 Avarta , id u hn pn 2 U sea , 2Saka , 1S tk h p h nh thapani , 1Ah a i d ip t

4. Fist size or Four T ta l 29 o (bladde , finger breadth r) N , (4 anguli) ila 5. One half finger A , ni breadth anguli) T ta l 56 o

Names and Classifications of Marmas

22 7

D. Accordin g to Symptom s If Injure d


Type Pranahara (Immediate Death(anus) , Causing or fiery) Number 19 Specific Marmas 4S hringataka , 1 A dhipati , 2 S an a h kh (te p m les) , 8 S ira-M atrika , 1 G d a u 1 H a a (heart) , 1 B t i (bladder) , rid y as 1 N h i (n l ) ab ave 4 T la r a a , 4 K h ra , a hid y s ip 2 A a p , 2 A a ta b a p la a p s mh 2 S n m la , 5 S a ta a u im nta 2 P rs v s n h , 2 B a a haa d i rih ti 2 U s e a , 1 S ap tk h p th an i 4 L h k h , 4 A , 2 Jan u (knee) , o ita s a ni 2 2B ahvi , 4 K rch , 2 V u a itapa , 2 K rp u ara , 2 K ku a , 2 K u nd ra aksh dh a ara , 2 V hu , 2 K a a , 2 id ra rik tik (sho r) , ulde 2 2A panga , 2 N , ila 2 M n , 2 P a a (n a ya hn ostrils) , 2 A vart a 2 M n a d a , 4 K a ira , a ib n h urch sh 2 G lp a (a uh nkle ) 4 In ra a ti , d bs ,2 ,2 , 2N m a ita b

2. Kalantara Pranahara 33 (Long-term DeathS n ro ita , Causing or both fiery ta a h K tik ta n , and watery) a a ru a 3. Vishalyaghna (Fatal If Pierced or airy) 4. Vaikalyakara (Disability-Causing or watery) 3 44

5. (Pain-causing or both fiery and airy)

the digestiv e fire; generally, fire as a cosmic principl e therapy in the eye s in the digestiv e tract, as oppose d to the doshas, which are more specifi c toxin s Ambhuvah a Annavah a unit Apana tissu e Asthivah a Self of Kapha in the ches t therapy ; bathing an area with herbs or oils; also refers to the bladde r Bhrajak a Bodhak a in the ski n of Kapha on the tongue or tissue-buildin g therapy center of the subtle bod y ancient Ayurvedi c teache r generall y nerv e Dhanur hea d martial art s or drippin g of oils onto a particula r usually the fore carryin g bone or skeleta l syste m form of Vat a Udakavah a Srota s carryin g food, or the digestiv e system

230

Supplemental Material and Appendices

humo r (clarifie d butter ) qualitie s of nature as sattva, rajas and Ida nostril channe l fire water-humor Kledak a of Kapha in the stomac h use of caustic herbal alkalis power; energy source for the subtle bod y therap y paste tissue Majjavah a tissu e Mamsavah a Mani Manovah a Mantra therap y carryin g though t or the mind sounds for healing the min d and promotin g meditatio n therap y or pressure-base d massag e point or sensitiv e regio n Marma Marma tissue Medovah a Mutravah a carryin g fat or the adipose syste m syste m pranic channel s of which 14 are most importan t application of herbs, oils or liquid s form of Kapha as power of immunit y and enduranc e Pachak a of Pitta in the digestiv e syste m of marma therap y carryin g the muscle s or muscula r syste m carryin g nerve impulse s or nervou s syste m

Sanskrit Ayurvedic Terms

Pancha therapy, as nasya or nasal Pingala

five methods of Ayurvedi c purification , or Shodhan a or vomiting , or purgatives , basti or enemas, and or blood-lettin g nostril channel fire-humor matter or manifestatio n principle , constitutio n

Prana Pranavah a

therap y carrying Prana, or the respirator y system the Prana, breat h control exercise s methods of sensory control and interiorizatio n of the

mind principle , higher Sel f Purishavah a of Aggressio n Raktavah a carrying blood or circulator y system of Pitta in the live r and bloo d and lymphatic s Rasavah a Sadhaka Samana carrying the plasma or lymphati c system therapy of Pitta in the brai n air of balancing , harmonizin g or healing or calming therapy, particularl y for improvin g diges tion and removin g toxins from the digestiv e tract or detoxificatio n therapy , particularl y of the dosha s tissue s syste m Siddha Ayurved a Sira Vedh a or Sir a Sleshak a of Kapha in the joint s Indian yogic and healing tradition connecte d to generall y blood-vesse l literall y system

232

Supplemental

Material and Appendices

oil therapy, includin g oil massage system of the bod y of srota s ancient Ayurvedi c teacher sweating therap y Swedavah a system, sebaceou s gland s medicate d oil, generall y sesame oil based, with various herbs cooked in the oil of inerti a tradition of energy practice s using body and mind of Kapha in the brai n and nervous system form of Pitta as positive force of fire and vitalit y Udakavaha system, water intake portion of di gestive syste m Udana air ancient Ayurvedi c teacher vitality and sexual energ y as marma but as a place that requires protectio n air-humor of Prana or Vata; particularl y the five Vayus of Prana, Apana , Udana, Samana and Vyan a Vedic traditions Virechana Vyana izatio n Yoga therap y and sacred sciences through the Vedic and Yoga or purgatio n therapy nasa l applicatio n air science of physica l and mental disciplin e aiming at Self-real

A . Specia l Ayurvedi c Herb s an d Botanica l Name s (Note that we have not listed the botanical s for the common wester n herbs listed in the text, for this consult any good western herbal text, also note The Yoga of Herbs by Frawley and Lad) agalocha integrefolia officinalis Guduch i aspera arjuna gigantean indic a somnifer a rhombifoli a cordifolia anacardiu m alba chirata belerica marmelos, asiatica, gotu kola indicum virginiana, juniper album, sandalwoo d zeylonica pallens

234

Supplemental Material and Appendices

deodar, Himalaya n ceda r dactylo n cardamomum , cardamo m luzonicum castor bea n Galbanu m (ferula species) . ordorantissiu m bractatum cordifoli a chebul a inermis, aromati c oil of henna Himalayan jatamams i reticulat a paniculata kadamba cubeba, cubeb s pruriens herbaceum, cotto n glabr a nagi, Ushir a kurro a saffro n lapp a deoda r Jatamamsi

hispid a

Herbs and Oils

235

clove s racemosu s

cordifolia , madder roxburghii paniculata malabaricus adescendens rotundus, nutgrass ferrea indic a nimba negundo cerasoides nucifera , lotu s cucumeri a

foetida diffusa lanceolata prionitis cinerea buchanani robusta serrata malabarica verrucosa racemosus

pterigosperm a

236

Supplemental Material and Appendices

(a mineral ) ginge r haritaki, bibhitaka and amalak i sanctum religeosa zizanoide s or calamus, calamu s arundinacea e vasik a fero x zizanoides , note Ushira ribes digitat a muricatus , khus

B . Ay u r v e d i c M e d i c a t e d Oil s (Tailas ) an d Herba l Formula s Agaru 2. or Amalaki and sesame oil (B R ) 3. 4. 5. 6. oil (SY) 7. nut oil (SY) 8. licorice and sesame oil (B R ) haritaki, bibhitaka , bilva, sariva, cordifolia , triphala and sesame oil (BR ) other herbs and sesame oil of the bark of arjuna and sesame oil (BR ) ela, jivanti, bilva, bilva, bala, roots, deodara, sesame camphor , milk, coco

and sesame oil

9. Bala guduchi, rasna, ela, agaru, manjishtha , atibala, lico rice, tulsi, cloves, kankola, nagakeshar a and sesame oil (AH ) 10 . Bilvad i and sesam e oil

and coconut oil (BR )

Herbs and Oils

23 7

12. Brihat Marma compose d of extracts of vidari, jivanti, shatavari, amalaki , sariva, and triturate d with a de coction of gokshur a and ushira . Then powders of licorice, red and white sandalwood are added to make the tablets . Dosag e is 50 milligram s thre e time s a day for days 13. Brihat Saindhavad i salt (saindhava) , arka, black pepper, chitraka, turmeric and sesame oil (B R ) 14. Bhringara j alba, manjishtha , lodhra, rice, sandalwood , and sesame oil (BR ) 15. Bhringamalakad i and sesam e oil (SY ) 16. Chandanad i bala, kutki, sesam e oil (YR ) barberry, lico

of bhringara j and amalaki , licorice, milk licorice, khus, jatamamsi , agaru,

17. and white sandalwood , bala root, laksha, madhuka , devadaru , manjishtha , agaru, ashwagandha , rasna and sesame oil (YR ) 18. Dashamul a 19. 20. Dhanvantar a valerian, calamus , (ten special roots) and sesame oil (Himalaya n cedar) and sesame oil of bala root, dashamula , sariva, manjishta , sandalwood , jaggery and honey .

21 . Dhanvantar a roots, cow's milk, kushtha , bilva, patala, agaru, sandalwood , calamus , punarnava , licorice, sariva, haritaki , amalaki (AH and Vaidya 22. coconu t oil 23. Gandha in kakolyad i group (kakoli, kshira kakoli, black gram, mahameda , guduchi , jivanti, kakadshingi , vamsha-rochana ) cow's milk and sesame oil (AH ) 24. Himasagar a kushmanda , vidari, valerian , sandal wood, manjishtha , agaru, licorice, lodhra, musta, shalmal i and sesame oil (BR) 25. Jirakadi 26. Jyotishmat i and sesame oil and apamarg a (YR ) rasna, deodaru , ksheera , licoric e and

27. Karpas-asthyad i seeds, bala, punarnava, shigru , kushtha , coconut oil (SY ) 28.

and other herbs in sesame oil

238

Supplemental

Material and Appendices

29 . Kshara alkali of apamarga , calamus , ginger, kushtha , deodaru and sesame oil (B R ) 30 . Kshirabal a 31 . Kottamachukad i laksha, deodaru , sesam e oil 32 . Kumkumad i ushira, manjishtha, sesame oil sandalwood , licorice, roots, cow's milk, sesame oil (AH ) calamus , garlic ,

3 3 . Laghu Marm a prepared with extracts o f shatavari , amalaki, guduchi , both types of sandalwoo d and licorice. To this is added shilaji t and the mixture is triturate d with the decoctio n of bark of various plant s and made into The dosage is 100 milligram s three times a day for 15 days . 34 . Lakshad i Lashunadi turmeric , manjishth a and sesame oil (BR ) and sesame oil

36 . Mahamanjishtad i Agnimantha , patala , brihati, rasna, ashwagandha , punarnava , atibala, sandalwood , manjishtha, kushtha , ela, musta, camphor , sesame oil (B R ) 37 . Mahamas h a gokshura and sesame oil (B R ) dashamula , calamus , blac k pepper,

38 . Mahanaraya n ashwagandha , brihati, bala, kantakari, atibala, rasna , deodaru , agaru , haritaki , cardamom , licorice , ca lamus , sesam e oil 39 . Manjishtad i sariva, musta, kutki, nutmeg, triphala , kushtha, jatamamsi , aloe juice and sesame oil (SY ) 4 0 . Marm a containin g te n roots: casto r root, kushtha, licorice, ushira , nagakeshara , vasa, kapikacchu , guggul, rasna and ashwagandha. Masha and sesame oil udumbara, 42 . Nalapamarad i of fresh curcuma , parpata, plaksha, triphala , agaru , kushtha , and sesam e oil

4 3 . Narayan dashamula , punarnava , ashwagandha , kantakari, jatamamsi , calamus , kushtha , milk and sesame oil (BR ) of leaves of and sesame oil

Nimbapatrad i of leaves of nimba, shatavari , manjishtha, licorice , ushira , musta, sariva, milk and sesame oil (SY )

Herbs and Oils

239

46.

Taila (Shefal i stem,

of nirgund i and sesame oil oil and five sour plant s sesame oil .

47. Panchaml a 48. Padmakad i 49 . Pind a dhanyamla , sesam e oil 50 . and sesam e oil 51. Shankhapushp i 52. Shatadhaut a washed with wate r 53. Shatavar i Triphal a 55. Triphalad i milk , sesame oil 56. Ushirad i 57. Vacha 58. 59. Vishagarbh a chitraka and sesame oil (YR ) Abbreviation s Used

wax , manjishtha , sarjarasa , sariva , gokshura , sandalwood , shilajat , bilva, agaru and sesame oil prepare d ghee in a copper vessel and and sesame oil and ghe e guduchi , castor, kushtha , ushira ,

other herbs and sesame oil haritaki , laksha, kutki and sesame oil garlic and sesame oil alba, kushtha , vatsanabha , calamus ,

ratnavali . Sangraha

Datt a

Varanasi, India:

Prof. K.R. Srikantha Academ y 2000 .

translation.

Samhita. R.K. and Bhagwan Dash translation. Varanasi, India: Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, 197 6 . Douillard, Dr. John. Body, Mind and Sport. New York, New York: Crown Trade Paperbacks 199 4 . Frawley, David. The Astrology of the Seers. Twin Lakes, 2 0 00 . Lotus Press ,

Frawley, David and Subhash Ranade. Ayurveda: Nature's Medicine. Twin Lakes, Lotus Press, 200 1 . Frawley, David. Ayurvedic Healing. Twin Lakes, Frawley, David. Yoga and Ayurveda. Twin Lakes, Lotus Press, 2000 . Lotus Press, 199 9 .

Frawley, David and Sandra Yoga for Your Type: An Ayurvedic Ap proach to Your Asana Practice. Twin Lakes, Lotus Press, Frawley, David and Vasant Lad. The Yoga of Herbs. Twin Lakes, Press, 198 6 . Joshi, Dr. 1997 . Ayurveda and Twin Lakes, Lotus Lotus Press ,

Lad, Dr. Vasant. The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies. New York, New York: Harmony Books, 199 8 . Dr. Avinash, Ranade and Qutab. and Ayurvedic Mas sage. Pune, India: International Academy of Ayurveda, 199 8 . Miller, Light and Brian. Ayurveda and Aromatherapy. Twin Lakes, tus Press, 199 5 . The Lotus Press, 20 0 1 . Dr. Gyanendra. India: Krishnadas Academy, 199 8 . Lo

Guide to Polarity Therapy. Twin Lakes, (three volumes). Varanasi ,

242

Supplemental

Material and Appendices

Ranade, Dr. Subhash, Qut a b and Deshpande. Health and Disease in Ayurveda and Yoga. Pune, India: Prakashan, 199 8 . Ranade, Dr. Subhash, Qutab and Deshpande. History and Philosophy of Ayurveda. Pune, India: International Academy of Ayurveda, 199 8 . Ros, Dr. Frank. Ayurvedic Acupuncture. Twin Lakes, 19 93 . Selvara, John. Varma I.I.T.S. Publication, 198 4 . Lotus Press,

100 (Tamil Publication). Madras, India:

Simon, Dr. David. Vital Energy. New York, New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2 0 00 . Smith, Prana: The Secret of Yogic Healing. York Beach, Maine: Samue l Weiser, 199 6 . Smith, Atreya. Secrets of Ayurvedic Massage. Twin Lakes, 1 9 99 . Susruta. Susruta Samhita. Chaukhambha Visvabharati, 199 9 . Lotus Press,

translation. Varanasi, India:

Dr. D .G . Acupuncture, Marma and Other Asian Therapeutic Tech niques. Delhi, India: Chaukhamba Orientalia, 197 6 . Michael. Planetary Herbology. Twin Lakes, Sada Shiva. The Ayurveda Encyclopedia. Ayurvedic Holistic Center, 199 8 . Lotus Press, 1988. New York:

Van Howten, Donald. Ayurveda and Life-Impressions Bodywork. Twin Lakes , Lotus Press, 199 7 . S a n s k ri t O n l y Ashtanga Hridaya of Vagbhatta. Ashtanga Sangraha of Vagbhatta. Gananat h Sen . Pratyakshasariram Academy, 199 8 . (three volumes) . Varanasi, India: Madhva Yoga

Vasishta Samhita. Lonavala, India; Kaivalya Mandira 198 4 .

A
Abhyanga 64 , 66-6 8 Acupressur e (not e also unde r Tabl e o f Marmas and Their Treatmen t 96 -2 07 ) 64 , 72-73 , 8 7 Acupunctur e 65 , 97 , 105, 109, 129 , 139 , 141 , 149 , 156 , 163 , 169 , 171 , 185, 188 , 190, 194, 196, 2 12 -2 13 , 215-22 1 Acupunctur e point s 3-4 , Adipose system (Medavah a Srotas ) 24 , 92 , 129, 146-147 , 160 7 Agni 17-18, 25-26 , 44 , 102-103 , 107, 127, 131 , 148-149 , 151 , 2 00 , 2 01 , 20 5 Agni-karm a 65 , 109, 127, 133, 21 3 Air elemen t 12, 13, 42 , 56 , 151-1 5 2 Akashi c balancin g Ajna chakra 42 , 45-47 , 51 , 192, 2 01-20 2 Alkalis 21 4 Almond oil 67, 70 , 72 , 73 , 86 , 173 Alochaka Pitta 16, 17, 4 6 , 90 , 10 0-103 , 125, 187-188 , 197 75 , 25 Taila 103, 139 Ambhuvah a Srota s (water-metabolis m sys tem) , see Udakavah a Srotas 23 Taila 97 chakra (heart chakra) 42 , 44 , 51 , 150-152 , 173 Ancient India 8 Angul i Srotas (digestiv e system) 23 , 92 , 102-103 , 107, 148-14 9 Taila 115, 135 , 80 , 101 , 103, Alternat e nostri l breathin g 56-5 7 nadi 42 , 44 , 144

Apana Vayu 5, 15, 18, 44 , 73 , 74 , 89 , 123 , 139, 141 , 144-147 , 165, 19 3 Apricot oil 67 Arnica 78 , 80 , 15 8 Aroma therapy (note also unde r Tabl e of Marmas and Their Treatmen t 9 6-2 07 ) 64 , 68 -73 , 86-87 , 2 1 3 Aromatic oils 69-7 1 Srotas 25 , 92 , 141 , 144-14 5 system) 24 -

Asafoetid a (hing) 76 , 79 , 131 , 147 , 149 , 20 7 Asanas 5, 48-4 9 Asanabilvad i Taila 145 Taila 15 8 Ashwagandh a 38 , 68 , 81 , 109, 15 2 Ashwagandh a Taila 105 , 129 , 133 , 156 , 158, 163, 165, 169, 183, 194, 196 , 198 , 202 , 2 04 , 2 0 6 Asth i dhat u (bon e tissue ) Asthi marmas (bone-base d marmas ) 35 Asthivaha Srotas (skeleta l system) 24 , 92 , 104-105 , 129, 163, 166-16 7 Astrology , Vedic 7, 59 46 , Kapha 17, 18, 44 , 96 , 98 , 121 , 151-152 , 154 Ayurveda 4-5 , 7, 8, 11 Ayurvedi c constitutio n 18-2 1 Ayurvedi c therapie s 63-6 4

B
Bala 68 , Bala Taila 123, 169, 17 3 Bandhas (Yoga) 49 Basil 139, 156, 202 , 2 04 , 2 0 6 Bhrajaka Pitta 16, 18, 44 , 48 , 90 , 98 , 123 , 171 , 175, 17 9 Bhringamalakad i Taila 13 3

244

Supplemental

Material and Appendices


Circulator y system (Raktavah a Srotas ) 24 , 42 , 44 , 92 , 108 , 115 , 139, 150-152 , 165 ,

Bhringraj Taila 25 Bilvadi Taila 11 5

179 , 20 4

Bladder 24 , 28 , 36 , 44 , 146-14 7 Bleeding 7 8 Blood 21 , 22 , 24 , 35 , 108 , 115 , 165 , 18 1 Blood-lettin g 64 , 109, 211-21 2 Blue Sapphir e 61 Bodhaka Kapha 17, 45 , 9 1 , 181 , 20 0 Bodily posture 117, 127, 191 , 197 Bon e 15, 21 , 22 , 2 4 Bone-base d marmas (Asthi 79 , 81 , 194, 20 2 Taila 101 , 103 , 109 , 125 , 133 , 149 , 151 , 175 , 179 , 188 , 2 0 6 Brain 17, 42 , 45 , 184, 191 , 194, 2 0 0 -20 6 Brihat Marma Gutika 8 0 Brihat Vata Chintaman i 20 7 Buddhism 8, 9 35

c
Calamu s 38 , 68 , 71 , 73 , 76 , 79 , 87 , 97 , 107, 145 , 165 , 169, 179 , 183 , 194 , 198 , 2 00 , 202 , 2 04 , 20 6 Campho r 71 , 73 , 77 , 79 , 87 , 99 , 10 1 ,

121 , 133, 139, 145, 154, 156 , 163 , 167, 171 , 173, 18 1 , 198 , 20 2 , 20 4 , 20 6 Cardamom 107, 137, 171 Castor oil 70 , 76 , Cautery 6 5 Cayenne 3 9 Cedar oil 123, 137, 192 Chakras , seven Chandanbalalakshad i Taila Channel systems 23- 25 , and marma s 92 Charaka 5, 8, 27 , 33 , 77 , 78 Che s t 18 Chinese medicine 3-4, 9 Chyavan prash 81
Cinnamon 68 , 70 , 71 , 73 , 79 , 86 , 97 , 133 , 152, 181

113, 123 , 135 ,

181 , 18 3 Cloves 71 , 73 , 76 , 149, 20 0 Coconu t oil 39 , 67 , 71 , 86 , 8 7 Col d applicatio n 78 Color therapy 57-5 8 Comfrey 76 , 78 , 80 , 127 Consciousnes s 4 2 Coral 6 0 Coriander 71 , 109 , 13 3 77 Crown chakra (Sahasrara ) 42 , Crystals 58-5 9 Cumin 137 203-2 0 7

D
Dalhana 2 4 Taila 127, 145 , 147, 149,17 3 Taila 192 Dhanur Veda 7 Dhanvantar a Kashaya 80 Dhanvantar a Taila 163 , 190, 202 , 2 04 , 20 6 Dharana 5 0 25

Diamon d Diabetes 2 3 Digestive system (Annavaha Srotas ) 1718, 23 , 42 , 44 , 92 , 1 0 2 - 1 03 , 107, 127, 1 3 1 , 1 4 8 - 14 9 Diseases, Kapha 17, 2 1 , 38- 39 , Pitta 15, 2 1 , 22 , 3 8- 39 , Vata 14, 2 0 -22 , 38-39 Doshas, three 12-13 , 28 , 3 8 Drea m state Taila 127

E
Ears 42 , 47 , 18 9- 190 , 20 0 Earth element 12, 16, 42 , 55 , 123, 145 Edemas 78 , 145
Elecampan e 152 Elements, five 12, 55-5 7 Emerald 6 0 Enemas 72 , 145 , 167

Index
Ether element 12, 13, 42 , 56 , 175 , 179 Eucalyptu s 39 , 68 , 71-73 , 87 , 97 , 99 , 121 , 156 , 160 , 171 , 173 , 192 , 198 , 20 4 Excretory system (Purishavah a Srotas ) 24 , 42 , 92 , 14 4-14 5 Eyes (see also Alochak a Pitta) 42 , 46 , 100 , 102, 125 , 187-188 , 197-198 , 2 0 0 - 20 2 F Fat tissue (see also adipose system ) 15, 21 , 24 Feces 2 2 Fennel 107, 131 Finge r unit s Fire element (see also Agni) 12, 15 , 42 , 56 , 1 48 -14 9 Flaxseed 154 G Galangal 165 Gandha Taila 163 Gandhari nadi 42 , 46 , 187-188 , 20 1 Veda 7 Ganesha 145 Id a nad i 4 2 , 4 3 , 4 6 , 1 8 4 - 1 8 6 , 2 0 1 150-152 , 173 Hea t applicatio n 65 , 21 3 Hemagarbh a Taila 20 7 Herbal pastes 64 , 75-7 6

245

Herba l treatmen t o f marma s (not e also under Table of Marma s and Their Treat ment 96-207 ) 63-8 1 Herb s Himasagar a Taila 171 Hing (asafoetida ) 76 , 79 Hingutrigunad i Taila 131 Honey Hri d Bast i 76 , 8 0

I m m u n e syste m (se e als o O j as ) 1 2 3 India , ancien t 8 Injury t o J Jasmine 71 , 141 , 151 , 20 6 77 , 79 , 8 1 , 145 , 158 , 19 6 Jatharagn i 2 5 35-3 8

Garlic

165, 16 9

Jirakadi Taila 137 Joint-based marmas (Sandhi Marmas ) 35 Jyotishmati Taila 183 K Kakolyadi Taila 163 Pranahara Marmas (Long-ter m Death-Causing) 36 , 37, 22 7 Kalari 3, 9, 2 2 0 Kapha dosha 12-13, 16-17, 22 , 38 -39 , 45 , 7 0 - 71 , 7 3 , 86 , 9 1 , 1 4 6 - 1 47 , 1 5 0 - 1 52 , 1 5 6 , 1 60 , 1 6 6 - 1 67 , 1 81 , 1 8 4 - 1 86 , 2 04 , 20 6 vessels Sira)

Ge m therapy 57- 6 1 Ghee 67, 76 , 80 , 97 , 99 , 101 , 105, j 149, 183, 188, 198 Ginger 38 , 39 , 70 , 72 , 76 , 78 , 79 , 86 , 97 , 103, 109, 127, 131 , 179, 185, 194 , 2 04 , 2 0 6 - 20 7 Ginseng 76 , 81 Golden Seal 80 , 15 8 j j I 68 , 79 , 81 , 194 , 20 2 Guduchi 127 Guggul 77, 78 , 80 , 109 , 158, 16 0 Gunas, three 12, 34

1
\

H Haritaki 145

35
Hastijihva nadi 48 , 98 , 123 Heart (see also circulator y system ) 23 ,

28 , 36 , 44 , 99 , 121 , 123 , 150-152 , 171 , 17 3

Kapha, five types 17, 91


Kaph a typ e person s Taila 15 4 Taila 13 9 Kavacha 53

Heart chakra (see ,

42 , 44 , 5 1

24 6

Supplemental

Material

and

Appendices

Khus 71 , 72 , 173, 20 6 Kidneys (see also Mutravah a Srota s and Udakavah a Srotas ) 121 , 137 , 166 16 7 Kledaka Kapha 17, 44 , 9 1 , 102 , 148-149 , 16 0 Kottamchukad i Tail a 16 5 65 , Kshar a Taila Kshirabal a Taila 16 0 Kuhu nadi 42 , 44 , 146 Tail a Tail a

92 , 117, 127, 154-15 6 Manjishtad i Taila 10 9 Manipura chakra 42 , 44 , 51 , 148-14 9 , 171 Manovah a Srotas (mental system) 24 Mantr a 5 3 -5 6 , 74 , 145 , 147 , 149 , 152 , 165, 175, 179, 200 , 202 , 204 , 20 6 Mantras, AI M 54 , 175 , 179 , G A M 145, H A M 56 , 175 , 179 , 55 , 152, H U M 54 , 55 , 55 , 149, LA M 55 , 145, RA M 56 , 149, 55 , 200 , VAM 56 , 147, YA M 56 , 152 Mantras, Bija 54-55 , and five element s 5556 , and yantras 62 Mantra 54 Mardana (Ayurvedi c acupressure ) 72-7 3 Marmas 3-10 , 13, 16, 223 2 27 , and chakras 42 -43 , compositio n 3 4 - 3 5 , definition s 3 3 - 3 4 , and three doshas 38-39 , 88 , externa l and interna l 29 , lethal and therapeuti c 28-2 9 , and nadis 43 , and subdosha s 88-89 , table of 31-32 , and Yoga 48 -5 0 Marma formula s 83 Marma kashaya 8 0 Marm a therapy 14, 16-17 , 20-22 , 63-65 , 75 , 85-86 , 93 , 21 1 Marma massage 66-6 7 Marma meditatio n 51-5 3 Marm a regions 9 5 , 119 , 143 , 16 1 , 177, eighteen 50-5 3 Marmapunctur e Marshmallo w 14 7 Martial arts 3, 8-9 Mash a Tail a Massag e (not e als o unde r Tab l e o f Marmas and Their Treatmen t 96-207 ) 6 4 -6 7 Massag e oils (not e also unde r Table of Marmas and Their Treatmen t 96-207 ) 6 7 -6 8 Mauna 5 0 Me d a dhat u (fat tissue ) Medavaha Srotas (adipose system) 24 , 92, 146-147 , 160, 166-16 7 Meditation 46 , 51-53 , 123, 141 , 147,

L
Lactation system (Stanyavah a Srotas ) 24 25 , 92 , 154 Laghu Marma Gutika 8 0 Large intestine 14, 20 , 143-147 , 19 3 , 19 5 167 Lepa (herbal pastes) 64 , 75-76 , 14 9 Licorice 77, 81 , 99 , 163, 179, 183 , 18 8 Liver (see also Ranjaka Pitta ) 1 0 8 -1 09 , 13 3 Ligament s 15 Ligament-base d marmas (Snay u Marmas ) 35 Lotus 86 , 20 6 Lungs (see also respirator y system ) 2 3 , 121 , 154-156 , 171 , 173, 185 Lymphati c system 24 , 92 , 113, 115 , 121 , 137, 139, 166-167 , 171

M
Mahabharat a 9 Taila 107, Mahanaraya n Taila 121 , 173, 20 6 Mahayogara j Guggul 77 Majj a dhat u (nerv e tissue ) Majjavah a Srotas (nervou s system ) 24 , 92 , 155-158 , 183 , 2 0 3- 20 4 (waste-materials ) 2 2 dhat u (muscle ) Mamsavah a Srotas (muscula r system ) 24 ,

149, 152, 165, 175, 179, 188 , 192 , 200 ,

Index
2 02 , 2 04 , 2 0 6 Menstrua l system 25 , 92 , 141 , 14 4-145 , 16 5 Mental system (Manovah a Srotas ) 92 Mind 24 , 25 , 34 , 42 , 103 , 125 , 15 1 , 191 192 , 194, 2 0 0 - 20 4 Mint 71 , 77 , 87 , 156, 173 , 175 , 18 1 , 190 , 198 , 20 4 Moo n 20 0 Mulabandh a 141 , 14 5 Muladhar a chakra 42 , 44 , 144-14 5 Muscle 14, 21 , 24 , 3 4 Muscle-base d marma s 34 Muscula r system 92 , 15 4-15 6 marmas ) Srotas) 24 , Srotas) 24 -

24 7

Mustard oil 67 , 71 , 86 , 87 , 107 , 129 , 14 5 Mutravah a Srotas (urinary system ) 24 , 92 , 144-147 , 166-16 7 Myrrh 77 , 80 , 105 , 109 , 129 , 137 , 160 , 163 , 167, 192, 20 2

N
Nada 47 , 19 0 Nadis, fourtee n 41-4 8

Nalapamaradi Taila 133 Narayan Taila 99 , 147 Nasya (nasal therapy ) 185- 18 6 49 Navel 36 , 44 , 148-14 9 Navel center or chakra (Manipura) 42 , 44 , 46 , 51 , 1 4 8 - 1 49 , 171 Ne c k 17 Nerve tissue 14, 2 1 , 24 Nervous system (Majjavaha Srotas ) 17, 24 , 42 , 45 , 92 , 1 5 5 - 1 58 , 1 83 , 2 0 3 20 4 Neti pot Taila Nimbapatradi Tail a 167 Nose 42 , 184- 186 , 195- 196 , 2 0 0
Nutmeg 141 , 147, 169, 2 0 0

o
Ojas 17, 34 , 45 , 68 , 81 , 123 , 129 , 14 1 , 151 ,

165 , 169, 2 0 0 Oil massage 66-68 , 8 6 Olive oil 67 O M 6 , 5 4-56 , 202 , 2 04 , 2 0 6

P
Pachaka Pitta 16 , 17, 44 , 90 , 102 , 107 , 131 , 148 -14 9 Padmakad i Taila 10 9 Pain 34 , 7 7 Pancha karma 71 Panchaml a Taila 135 Pancreas (see also Udakavah a Srotas ) 109 7 Payasvin i nadi 42 , 47 , 189-19 0 , 20 1 Pearl 6 0 Pichu dharana 20 6 Pingala nadi 42 , 43 , 45-46 , 184-18 6 , 20 1 Pitta dosha 12-13 , 15-16 , 22 , 38-3 9 , 45 , 7 0 - 71 , 73 , 86 , 90 , 148 -149 , 171 , 202 , 2 04 , 20 6 Pitta-carryin g vessels (Pittavah a Sira ) 35 Pittas, five 90 Pitta type persons 18-21 , 71

Plantain 76 , 78 , 149, 152, 154 Plasma 2 1 , 22 , 24 , 9 6 Polarity therapy 74 Poultices 7 5 Prakrit i Prana 6, 8, 14, 15, 22 , 26 , 28 , 29- 30 , 34 , 41 , 45 , 6 5 - 66 , 68 , 73 , 74 , 97 , 10 0, 1 01 , 1 21 , 152, 184, 186, 197, 2 0 0 - 20 4 Prana Vayu 14, 17, 45 , 89 , 96 , 100 , 125 , 152, 154, 155, 173, 1 8 4 - 1 86 , 1 8 9 - 1 90 , 198, 2 0 5 - 20 6 Pranas, five 14, 73-7 4 Pranagni 25 Pranavaha Srotas (respiratory system ) 23 , 92 , 93 , 96 , 98 , 99 , 1 21 , 123, 173 Pranic healing 64 , 74 , 87
Pranayama 49-50 , 56-57 , 18 6 50-53 , 74 , 152 , 190, 192 147 Purgation 14 9

248

Supplemental

Material and Appendices


system) 24 , Samana Vayu 15, Samkhy a 44 , 73 , 74 , 89 , 102 ,

Purishavah a Srotas 92 , 144-145 , 16 9 Purush a 6, 11-1 2 Pus formatio n 79-8 0

107, 131 , 148-14 9

Pusha nadi 42 , 46 , 187-188 , 20 1

Sandalwood 86 ,

68 , 70 , 72 , 73 , 76 , 78 ,

R
dhatu (blood) 21 Raktavaha Srotas (circulator y system ) 24 , 92 , 108 , 115 , 139, 165 , 1 8 1 , 1 8 3 Ranjak a Pitt a 16, 18, 44 , 90 , 108 , 149, 16 5 Rasa dhatu (plasma ) Rasa Taila 171 Rasavaha Srotas (lymphati c system ) 24 , 92 , 96 , Rasayana 6 3 Reduction therapies 63 , 7 2 Reproductiv e tissu e Reproductiv e system (Shukravah a Srotas ) 24 , 92 , 141 , 146-147 , 169 Respiratory system (Pranavah a Srotas ) 23 , 42 , 44 , 92 , 93 , 96 , 98 , 99 , 121 , 1 23 , 154 , 17 3 Rig Veda 6, 9 137, 139 , 166-167 , 171

Root chakra 14 5

42 , 44 , 45 ,

Rose 39 , 70 , 71 , 86 , 87 , 15 1 , 2 0 6 Ruby 6 0 Rujakara marmas 22 7 36- 3 8 ,

s
Sadhaka Pitta 16, 17, 45 , 90 , 93 , 15 1 , 20 1 20 6 Sadya Pranaha r a Mar m a s (Immedia t e Death-Causing) 36 , 22 7 Safflower oil 67 Saffron 115 , 127, 129 , 141 , 151 , 169 , 18 3 Sahachara Taila 105 Sahasrara chakra 42 , 5 1 , 203- 2 0 7

87 , 97 , 101 , 125 , 149 , 151 , 16 3 , 173 , 179, 188 , 196, 20 2 Sandhi marmas (joint-base d marmas ) 35 Sarasvati 179 Sarasvati nadi 42 , 45 , 17 9 Senses 17, 25 , 175 , 185 , 200-20 2 Sesame oil 67 , 70 , 75 , 76 , 86 , 87 , 105 , 107, 145 , 165 , 186, 190 , 202 , 2 04 , 20 6 Se x center or chakra 44 , 51 , 146-147 , 165 , 169 Shaligrama s Shankhapushp i Taila 18 3 Shankhini nadi 42 , 47 , 189-190 , 20 1 Shatadhaut a Ghrita 99 , 101 Shatavari 68 , 81 , 147, 167 Shatavari Taila 16 5 Shefali Taila 173 Shirodhara 72, 20 2 Shiva 7 Shivalinga s 61 Shock 78-7 9 Shodhana 71 dhatu (reproductiv e tissue) 2 1 , 92 Shukravah a Srotas (reproductiv e system ) 42 ,

24 , 25 , 92 , 129, 1 46 - 1 47 , 169 Siddha medicine 7 Sinuses 185, 188, 192, 194, 198, 20 0 , 204 , 20 6 Sira marmas (vessel-based marmas ) 35 Sitopaladi 15 6 Skeletal system (Asthivaha Srotas) 24 , 92, 1 0 4 - 1 05 , 129 , 163, 1 6 6 - 16 7 Skin (see also plasma) 18, 2 1 , 42 , 194 Sleep 194 Sleshaka Kapha 17, 18, 48 , 9 1 , 93 , 104105 , 129, 133, 163, 173 Small intestine 16, 2 1 , 107, 143, 148-14 9 Smell, sense of 45- 4 6 Snayu marmas (ligament-base d marmas) 35
Snehana 71 Som a 20 0 Soul 4 6

Speech 179, 183

Index
Spleen 108-109 , 13 3 Stif f shoulder s Stomach 17, 2 1 , 143 , 159-16 0 Smal l intestin e 15 , Stanyavaha Srotas (lactatio n system ) 24 25 , 92 , 154 , 15 5 Subdoshas 14-1 7 Subtle body 6 Sun 2 0 0 Sunflower oil 67 , 86 Sushruta 5 , 8 , 27 , 34 , 78 , 2 1 5 Sushumn a nadi 42 , 43 , 4 5 Svadhishthan a chakra 42 , 44 , 5 1 , 146-147 , 165 , 16 9 Sweat 22 , 2 4 Sweating system (Swedavah a 92 , 163 , 171 Swedana 71 Swedavaha Srotas 24 , 92 , 163 , 171 Swelling 78 T Tailas 67-6 8 Tantra 7 Tarpaka Kapha 17, 45 , 91 , 151 , 20 0 , 24 ,

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127, 137, 149, 152, 154 , 156, 158 , 163 ,

2 0 5 - 20 6 Taste, sense of (see also Bodhak a Kapha ) 42, 179, 181 , 2 0 0 Tejas 15, 34 , 45 , 68 , 171 Third eye (Ajna chakr a ) 4 2 , 45- 4 7 , 5 1 , 192, 2 0 1 - 20 2 Throat chakra (Vishuddha) 42 , 45 , 47, 5 1 , 175, Tiger balm 77 Tissues, seven Tonification therapies 63 , 72 Touch, sense of 42 , 193 , 2 0 0 Trataka 20 2 Triphala 145, 171 Triphala Gh e e 125, 18 8
Taila 12 9 (see also basil) 77, 79 , 202 , 2 04 , 20 6 Turmeric 76-80 , 99 , 101 , 103 , 109 ,

169, 186, 188, 200 , 20 2 u Udakavaha Srotas (water-metabolis m sys tem ) 23 , 92 , 1 08 -109 , 133 , 135 , 13 7 Udan a Vayu 14, 17, 45 , 73 , 74 , 89 , 175 , 179, 181 , 183 , 191 Upavedas 7 Urine 2 2 Urinary system (Mutravah a Srotas ) 24 , 42 , 92 , 137, 144-147 , 166-16 7 Ushiradi Taila 127 Uva ursi 14 7 V Tail a Vagbhatta 5 , 34 , 3 6 Vaikalyakar a marma s (Disability-Causing ) 36 , 37 , 22 7 Valerian 77 , 145 , 158 , 19 6 Varma 9 Varuna nadi 42 , 44 , Vasishta Samhit a 50-5 2 vessels (Vatavah a Sira) 35

Waste-material s 22 Wate r elemen t 12, 15, 16, 42 , 56 , 137 ,

1 4 6 - 14 7

Vata dosha 12-15 , 22 , 28 , 3 8 , 6 1 , 6970 , 73 , 86 , 89 , 93 , 100, 1 0 2 - 1 03 , 123, 1 44 147, 190, 1 9 3 - 1 95 , 1 9 7 - 1 98 , 2 02 , 20 4 , 2 0 6 Vata type persons Vayus, five 14, 89 Vedic science 6-7 Vessel-based mannas (Sira marmas) 35 Vishalyaghna Marm a s (Fat a l I f Pierced ) 36 , 37, 22 7 Vishuddha chakra 42 , 45 , 5 1 , 175, 179 nadi 42 , 44 , 148 Vyana Vayu 14, 18, 44 , 47 , 48 , 73 , 74 , 89 , 9 8 , 9 9 , 104 , 11 3 , 115 , 121 , 154 , 155, 158, 173
w

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Yarro w 78 , 11 3 , nadi 47-48 , 98 , 123 Yellow sapphire 60 Yoga 5-6, 8 , 11 , 47-56 , 81 , 88 , 123 , 141 , 145 , 147, 149 , 152, 165 , 175 , 179, 186, 190, 192, 2 00 , 202 , 2 04 , 2 0 6 Yoga nidra 152 Yogaraj Guggul 77 Yunnan Yao 78

Wate r metaboli s m syste m (Udakava h a Srotas) 23 , 92 , 108-109 , 133, 135 , 13 7 Weight reductio n 137, 16 0 Wintergree n 77 , 87 , 105 , 129 , 133 , 163 Wounds 79-8 0

Y
Yantra s

Inde x of Marmas
Adhipati 31 , 42 , 45 , 51 , 56 , 8 8 -91 , 93 , 2 03 ,
2 05-206

Kurcha 72 , 88 , 9 0 Kurcha (foot) 32 , 1 2 4 - 1 2 5 Kurcha (hand) 32 , 1 0 0 - 1 0 1

Amsa 31 , 42 , 88 , 93 , 1 7 4 - 1 7 5 Amsaphalak a 31 , 1 7 2 - 1 7 3
Ani (arm) 31 , 110-111

Ani (leg) 3 1
Apalap a 157- 158 Apang a 31 , 42 , 46 , 51 , 1 8 7 - 1 8 8 Apastambh a 31 , 1 5 9 - 1 6 0 Avart a 197-198 Bahvi (arm ) 32 , 88 , 1 1 2 - 1 1 3 Basti 32 , 44 , 1 4 6 - 1 4 7 , 16 9 Brihat i 32 , Guda 32 , 42 , 44 , 51 , 88 , 89 , 93 , 1 4 4 - 1 4 5 Gulph a 32 , 50 , 93 , 1 2 8 - 1 2 9 Hriday a 29 , 32 , 42 , 44 , 51 , 8 8 - 9 1 , 93 ,

1 5 0 - 152 , 171
Indrabast i (arm ) 32 , 93 , 1 0 6 - 1 0 7 Indrabast i (leg) 32 , 51 , 93 , 1 3 0 - 1 3 1 Janu 29 , 32 , 51 , 91 , 93 , 1 3 2 - 1 3 3 Kakshadhar a 32 , Katikatarun a 32 , 93 , 1 6 2 - 1 6 3 Krikatik a 32 , 1 9 1 - 1 9 2

Kshipra 48 , 9 1 Kshipra (foot) 32 , 50 , 93 , Kshipra (hand) 32 , 93 , 9 6-97


Kukundar a 32 , 42 , 51 , 88 , 1 6 4 - 1 6 5

Kurchashir a (foot) 32 , 1 2 6 - 1 2 7 Kurchashir a (hand) 32 , 1 0 2 - 1 0 3


Kurpar a 32 , 93 , 1 0 8 - 1 0 9 Lohitaksh a (arm ) 32 , 1 1 4 - 1 1 5 Lohitaksh a (leg) 32 , 1 3 8 - 1 3 9 Manibandh a 32 , 93 , 1 0 4 - 1 0 5 Many a 32 , 42 , 45 , 89 , 1 8 0 - 1 8 1

Nabhi 32 , 42 , 44 , 5 1 , 56 , 76 , 88-91 , 1 4 8 1 49

Nila 33 , 42 , 45 , 51 , 89 , Nitamb a 33 , 51 , 88 , 1 6 6 - 1 6 7 Parshvasandh i 33 , 1 6 8 - 1 6 9

Phana 33 , 46 , 5 1 , 56 , 76, 88 , 91 , 93 , 1 8 4 1 86

Shankh a 33 , 76 , 1 9 3 - 1 9 4 Shringatak a 29 , 33 , 51 , 1 9 9 - 2 0 0 Simant a 33 , 37 , 42 , 93 , 2 0 3 - 2 0 4

Sira Matrika 33 , 1 8 2 - 1 8 3
Stanamul a 33 , 37 , 1 5 3 - 1 5 4 Stanarohit a 33 , 37, 1 5 5 - 1 5 6

Sthapani 33 , 37 , 42 , 45 , 5 1 , 76 , 88 , 89,
2 01-202

Talahridaya 48 , 91 Talahridaya (foot) 33 , 55 , 93 , 1 2 2 - 1 2 3 Talahridya (hand) 33 , 88 , 93 , 9 8 - 9 9


Urvi (leg) 33 , 51 , 56 , 88 , 1 3 6 - 1 3 7 Utkshep a 33 , 1 9 5 - 1 9 6 Vidhur a 33 , 47 , 91 , 1 8 9 - 1 9 0 Vitapa 33 , 42 , 51 , 1 4 0 - 1 4 1 , 16 9

ABOU T THE AUTHOR S


Dr . D a v i d F r a w l e y ( P a n d i t ) Shastri

Dr. Frawle y (Pandit Vamadev a Shastri ) is regarde d as one of the mos t important western exponent s of Vedic knowledg e in the world today. He has studied the Vedas, Puranas , Tantras and Yoga Shastra s in the origina l Sanskrit and written extensivel y on their wisdom and their practices . He is the author of over twenty five books and numerou s articles on diverse as pects of Vedic and Yogic knowledge , as well as several training program s on Ayurveda, Yoga and Vedic Astrology . Dr. Frawle y is a Pandit or traditiona l teache r of Vedic knowledg e an (traditiona l teache r of Ayurveda) , Jyotish Brihaspat i (professo r of Vedic Astrology ) and Medica l In India, where he has lectured and taught throughou t the country , his Vedic work, includin g his translation s from the Vedas, is highly regarded . Dr. Frawle y is the directo r of the America n Institut e of Vedic Studie s and is also on th e advisor y boards for the Nationa l Associatio n of Ayurvedic Medicin e and the magazin e Yoga International. He works closel y with the Californi a College of Ayurveda, the Europea n Institut e of Vedi c Studies and the America n College of Vedic Astrology . Dr. Frawle y is one the main western pioneer s of Ayurvedi c medicine , particularly relative to its interfac e with the greater system of Yoga. He presents detailed informatio n for those who want to go deeply into thes e profound traditions . The aim of his work is to train serious student s and practitioners, who can authenticall y represen t the real teachings . He has a special connectio n with the teaching s of Bhagava n Maharshi , which he has been involve d with over the last thirty years . America n Institut e o f Vedi c Studie s The America n Institut e of Vedic Studies is an educationa l center, directe d by Dr. David Frawley, devoted to the greater system s of Vedic and Yogi c

knowledge. It teaches related aspects of Vedic Science includin g Ayurveda ,

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Vedic Astrology , Yoga and Vedant a with a special referenc e to thei r background in the Vedas. It offers publications , courses and classes , in cluding special tutorial program s for advance d students . The Institut e is engaged in several researc h project s including : Ayurvedi c Psycholog y and Yoga: The mental and spiritua l aspects of Ayurveda and the Ayurvedi c usage of Pranayama , Mantra and Medita tion. Vedic Yoga: Restorin g the ancient Vedic Yoga that perhaps is the founda tion for the Yoga tradition , particularl y the Vedic Agni or Fire Yoga . Translation s and interpretation s of the Vedas, particularl y the Rig Veda . Vedic History : The history of India and of the world from a Vedic per spective , reflectin g the latest archaeologica l work in India . The Soul and the Sacred Fire: Showin g the ancient fire and enlighten ment religion of all humanity . The Institute , located in Santa Fe , New Mexico , has helped found various organizations includin g the Europea n Institut e of Vedic Studies , Califor nia College of Ayurveda , the America n Counci l of Vedic Astrology , the World Associatio n o f Vedi c Studies , th e Vedi c Friend s Association , and the British Associatio n of Vedic Astrology . America n Institut e of Vedic Studie s P O Bo x 83 5 7 Santa Fe , N M 87504- 835 7 Dr. David Frawle y (Pandit Vamadev a Directo r Ph: 505-983-9385 , Fax: 505-982-580 7 Website : www.vedanet.com , Email: vedicinst@aol.co m America n Institut e o f Vedi c Studie s Ayurvedi c Healin g Correspondenc e Cours e This comprehensiv e distanc e learnin g program covers all the main aspect s of Ayurvedi c theory, diagnosi s and practice , with detailed informatio n on herbal medicin e and dietary therapy . It also goes in depth into Yoga phi losophy and Ayurvedi c psychology , outlinin g an integra l mind-bod y medi cine and its practica l application . It contain s the main materia l covered in two-year Ayurvedi c program s for foreign student s in India and The course is designe d for Health Care Professional s as well as for seriou s students to provide the foundatio n for becomin g an Ayurvedi c practitio ner. It has been taken by doctors , nurses, acupuncturists , herbalists, massag e therapists , yoga therapist s and psychologists . How ever, there is no require d medica l backgroun d for those wishing to take the

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course and many non-professional s have complete d it successfully . Topic s include: Ayurvedi c Anatom y and Physiolog y Dhatus, Malas, Determinatio n of Constitution , Diagnosi s of Disease , the Disease Pro cess, and Yog a Die t and Nutrition , Ayurvedi c Herbology , Pancha Karma, Arom a Therapy, Pranic Healing , Ayurvedi c Psychology , Yoga and Ayurveda , Mantra and Meditation , and more . The course is authored by Dr. David Frawley (Pandit Vamadev a uses his books on Ayurved a and represent s his approac h to Ayurveda , adapting Ayurved a to the modern world without losing its spiritual integrity . America n Institut e of Studie s Astrolog y o f th e Seer s Correspondenc e Cours e This comprehensiv e distance learning program explains Vedic Astrolog y in clear and modern terms, providin g practica l insights regardin g how to adapt and use the system relative to our changin g circumstance s today . For those who have difficult y approachin g the Vedic system, the cours e provides many keys for unlockin g its languag e and its methodolog y for the western student . The goal of the course is to provide the foundatio n to become a profes sional Vedic astrologer . Its orientatio n is two-fold : 1) to teach the lan guage, approac h and way of thinking of Vedic Astrology , and; to teach the Astrolog y of Healing or Ayurvedi c Astrology . Topics include : Planets, Signs, Houses, Aspects , Yogas, Nakshatras , Dashas, Divisiona l Charts , Ashtakavarga , Ayurvedi c (Medica l ) Astrology , Spiritua l Astrology , Karma, Gem therapy, Color-therapy , Mantras , Deities, and detailed Principle s of Chart Analysis . The course can be taken as part of a longer tutorial program of training in Vedic Astrolog y through the America n Counci l o f Vedic Astrolog y (ACVA), the largest Vedic Astrolog y organizatio n outside of India. Th e course author, Dr. David Frawley, has been awarded the titles of Jyotis h Kovid (proficienc y in Vedic astrology ) and Jyotish Brihaspat i of Vedic Astrology ) through the Indian Council of Astrologica l Science s

Prof . S u b h a s h R a n a d e Dr. Subhash Ranade is a leading academicia n and physicia n in the field of Ayurved a worldwide . He has written over sixty books on differen t aspect s

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of Ayurveda, which have been published in Marathi, Hindi, Polish , Japanese, Italian and German. He has worked as Professor and Head of the Department of Ayurveda, Pune University and Principal of Ashtanga Ayurveda College in Pune, India . At present Dr. Ranade is the Chairman of the International Academy of Ayurveda in which offers Ayurveda courses as well as Pancha Karma and Rejuvenative treatments for foreigners and Indians in Pune and Goa. He is also Chairman of the Ayurveda International Diffusing Association, Japan. Professor Ranade has given many television interviews on Ayurveda, not only in India but in Poland, Italy and Germany as well. He has spoken at man y international and national seminars on Ayurveda and Yoga. He has writte n numerous articles published in various magazines, newspapers in India and abroad and is also on the editorial board of several Ayurvedic journals. He has had the honor of being visiting Professor to many Ayurvedi c Institutes in the United States, the SEVA Academy in Munich, Germany , Ateneo Veda Vyasa, Savona, Italy and the Foundation for Health, Warsaw , Poland. He is in charge of the new Ayurveda courses that have been started at Barcelona, Spain and Graz, Austria . His pioneering work in the field of C D - R O M ' S like Dhanvantari Ayurvedic Massage and Marma Therapy have been whole-heartedly wel comed and highly appreciated. Since 1981 , he has visited and conducte d hundreds of Ayurveda courses for medical practitioners in Europe, USA , Canada and Japan . D r . A v i n as h Dr. Avinash Lele graduated from R. A. Podar Government Ayurvedic College in with distinction in Ayurvedic surgery and did his post graduate study from College. He is an expert in Ayurvedi c surgery, Pancha Karma and Rasayana (rejuvenation therapy), which he practices and teaches worldwide . Dr. Lele has a broad professional experience having served as principal of Maharashtra Mandal's College of Ayurveda, Vice-Presiden t of Savitri Ayurve d Pratishthan, Director of the International Academy of Ayurved, and professor of the Shalya Shalakya (surgery), Ashtang Ayurved College. He has been a post-graduate teacher and examiner since 1983. Dr. Lele has a vast clinical experience as Medical Director of Janaki Clinic and Panchakar m a Healt h club, Chi e f Medica l Consultan t Atreya Rugnalaya and Research Center, and Director of Aushadhi which manufactures numerou s Ayurvedic herbal products .

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Dr. is the author of several books on Ayurveda in both Marath i and English includin g and Ayurvedi c Massag e and Secrets of Marma. He has written many articles on differen t Ayurvedi c subject s pub lished in variou s journal s in India and the West. He has organize d various national scientifi c seminar s and workshop s on Ayurveda and conducte d courses for foreig n and Indian student s with clinical training in Pancha Karma, Ayurvedi c Massage , marm a therapy , Ayurvedi c acupressur e and acupunctur e and Dr. Lele has been travelin g and teachin g Ayurved a worldwid e sinc e 1994 includin g Singapore , Japan, Hawaii , Bahamas , Italy, Switzerland , Netherlands, Austria , German y and USA . He is a visiting professo r and advisory boar d membe r for variou s Internationa l Academ y o f Ayurved a The Internationa l Academ y of Ayurveda in Pune, India - whose chairma n is Dr. Subhas h Ranade and directo r is Dr. Avinas h one of the fore most institution s for training foreign student s in India. It has complet e facilitie s and program s for all levels of training from beginne r to advanced , including special clinical instruction . It feature s a renowne d faculty of Ayurvedic experts from throughou t the world includin g Dr. Subhas h Ranade, Dr. Avinas h Lele, Dr. Abbas Qutab, Dr. Hans Dr. David Frawley and Mukund a Stiles. Pune itself is one of the most modern cities in Indi a with a pleasan t year round climate and easy airport access from Bombay making it an ideal place in India to study . The institut e offers practica l courses in Ayurveda, both basic and ad vanced. Special program s are availabl e on the Fundamental s of Ayurveda, Pancha Karma, Ayurvedi c Massage , Marm a Therapy , Herbolog y and Clinical Program s are given and November-Januar y every year in batche s of about ten students . Please register at least two months ahead of tim e to reserve your place . The institut e has its own line of a dozen importan t books on Ayurveda in English by Dr. Ranade , Dr. Lele , Dr. Frawle y and others, as well as other educationa l material s (Ayurvedi c CD-RO M ) and herbal products , making it an importan t Ayurvedi c resourc e center as well. Internationa l Academ y of Ayurved a Nand Nandan , Atreya M.Y. Lele Chow k Erandawana , Pune 00 4 Indi a Telefax: Website : www.ayurveda-int.com

America n Institut e of Vedic Studie s Dr. David Frawle y (Pandit Vamadev a Shastri), Directo r P O Box 835 7 Santa Fe , N M 87504-83 5 7 Ph: 505-983-938 5 Fax: 505-982-580 7 Email: vedicinst@aol.com Website: www.vedanet.com (Coimbatore ) 136-13 7 Trichy Roa d Coimbator e 64 1 045 , T.N. , India Email: ayurveda@vsnl.com Website: www.avpayurveda.com Australia n Colleg e of Ayurvedic Medicin e Dr. Fran k Ros, Directo r P O Bo x 32 2 Ingle Farm S.A. 5098 , Australi a Website : homepages/suchi-karm a Australia n Schoo l of Ayurved a Dr. Krishn a Kumar , MD , 27 Blight Stree t South Australia 5 00 8 Ph. 08-346-063 1 Bo x 78 , 28 5 2 2 Esplanaden 2, Swede n Ph: 0433-10 4 9 0 Fax: 0433-10 4 9 2 Email: info@ayur-veda.se Ayurved a Academ y Dr. P.H. Presiden t 36 Kothrud , Mhatob a Templ e Pune 029 , Indi a Ph: 91-212-33213 0 Fax: 91-212-363132 / 3 4 3 933 . Email : Ayurved a for Radian t Healt h & Beaut y Ivy 16 Espira Cour t Santa Fe , N M 8 750 5 Ph: 505-466-766 2

Ayurvedi c Holisti c Cente r Sadashiv a Directo r N Y 117 0 9 Website: www.ayurvedahc.com Ayurvedi c Institut e and W ellness Cente r Dr. Vasant Lad , Director Menaul, N E Albuquerque, N M Ph: 505-291-969 8 Website: www.ayurveda.com Californi a Associatio n of Ayurvedic Medicin e Website : Californi a Colleg e of Ayurved a Mai n Stree t Grass Valley, C A 9594 5 Ph: 530-274-910 0 Email : info@ayurvedacollege.com Website: www.ayurvedacollege.com Two year state approved progra m in Ayurveda The Chopr a Cente r At La Cost a Resort and Spa Deepak Chopra and Davi d Simon Estrella de Ma r Roa d Carlsbad, C A 93 00 9 Ph: 888-424-677 2 Website: www.chopra.com John Douillar d Life Spa , Rejuvenatio n through Ayurved a 306 5 Cente r Gree n Dr . Boulder , C O Ph: 303-442-116 4 Website: www.LifeSpa.com East Wes t Colleg e of Herbalis m Ayurvedi c Progra m Marsh Green, Sussex TN 7 4ET, U K Ph: 01342-82231 2 Fax: 01342 -82 634 6 Email: ewcolherb@aol.com

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Europea n Institut e of Vedic Studie s Atreya Smith, Directo r Editions Turiy a I.E.E. V 4 3 0 17 0 Monoblet , France Ph: (33 ) 4 6 6 8 5 0 4 11 (33 ) 4 6 6 8 5 054 2 Website: www.atreya.com Website : www.ayurvedicnutrition.com Ayurvedi c training in Europ e Ganesh a Institut e Pratich i Presiden t 489 8 Real, Suite 20 3 Los Altos, C A 9402 2 Ph: 61 5 -9 61 -8 31 6 Website : Himalaya n Institut e RR1 , Bo x 40 0 Honesdale , PA 1843 1 Website : Institut e for Wholisti c Educatio n Dept. M T 33 71 9 116th Street Twin Lakes , Ph: 2 62 -8 77 -939 6 Website: www.wholisticinstitute.org

Kayakalp a Sri Dixi t 22/ 2 Judge Jumbulinga m Roa d Of f Mylapor e Chennai 60 0 Indi a Website : Dr. Avinash Lele Atrey a Rugnalay a Erandwana, Pun e Indi a Tel/Fax: 91-2 0-5 67853 2 Email: avilele@hotmail.com Life Impression s Institut e Donald Van Howten , Directo r Street Santa Fe , N M 8 750 1 Ph: 5 05 -988 -2 62 7 Light on Ayurveda : Journa l of Healt h Geneviev e Ryder , Editor/Publishe r Quinaquisse t Avenu e Mashpee, M A 0 2 64 9 Ph: 508 -477 -478 3 Website: www.loaj.com Ligh t Institut e of Ayurved a Bryan & Light Mille r P O Bo x 3 5 28 4

Internationa l Academ y of Dr. Avinas h Nand Nandan, Atreya Rugnalay a M.Y. Lele Chow k Erandawana, Pune 41 1 004 , India 9 1 - 2 1 2 - 3 78 5 3 2 / 52 4 4 7 2 Email: Internationa l Yoga Studie s Sandra Kozak, Directo r 69 2 Andrew Cour t Benicia, C A 9 4 51 0 Ph: 7 0 7 - 7 4 5 - 5 2 4 2 Email: Kaya
Dr.

Sarasota, F L 34 24 2 Email: earthess@aol.co m Website: www.ayurvedichealings.co m Lotus Ayurvedi c Cente r 41 4 5 Clares St., Suite D Capitola, 9 5 01 0 Ph: 4 0 8 - 4 7 9 - 1 6 7 6 Website: www.lotusayurveda.co m Lotus Pres s Dept. M T P O Bo x 32 5 Twin Lakes, WI 531 8 1 Ph: 2 6 2 - 8 8 9 - 8 5 1 6 Fax: 2 6 2 - 8 8 9 - 2 4 1 6 Email: lotuspress@lotuspress.co m Website: www.lotuspress.co m Publisher of books on Ayurveda , Reiki,
aromatherapy , energeti c healing , herbalism, alternativ e health and U.S . editions of Sri Aurobindo' s writings .

Internationa l
Panda y

Satto, N Y 1001 2

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Nationa l Associatio n of Ayurvedic Medicin e Website : www.ayurvedic-association.org Nationa l Institut e of Ayurvedi c M edicin e 58 4 Roa d Brewster, N Y 1050 9 Ph: 8 4 5-2 7 8-870 0 Email : Website : Dr. Subhas h Ranad e Rajbharati , 36 7 Sahaka r Nagar 1 Pune 009 , Indi a Emai l: Rock y Mountai n Institut e of Yoga and Ayurved a P O Bo x 109 1 Boulder, C O 8 030 6 Ph: 3 0 3-49 9- 2 91 0 Email: rmiya@earthnet.net Website : Sanskri t Sound s - Nicola i Bachma n P O Bo x 435 2 Santa Fe , 8750 2 Email: shabda@earthlink.net Website : www.SanskritSounds.com

Texas Yoga & Ayurved a Institut e Dr. Rob Francis, directo r 400 8 Vista B, Suite 20 1 Pasadena, Texas 77 50 4 Ph: 7 1 3 - 9 4 1 - 9 6 2 4 Website: www.texasyoga.ne t Ayurved a Cente r 250 9 Virginia NE , Suite D Albuquerque , N M Ph: 5 0 5 - 2 9 6 - 6 5 2 2 Website: www.vinayakayurveda.co m Vedic Cultura l Fellowshi p Howar d Director H C 70 , Bo x 6 2 0 Pecos, N M 8 7 55 2
Ph: 5 05 -7 57-619 4 Website : www.vedicworld.org Wise Eart h Schoo l of Ayurved a Maya Tiwar i

9 0 Davis Cree k Roa d Candler , N C 2 8 71 5 Ph: 8 2 8 -2 5 8-999 9 Website : www.wisearth.org

Ayurvedic Herba l Supplier s


Internationa l Dept. M T P O Bo x 100 8 Silver Lake, 5317 0 Ph: 2 62 -8 8 9-8 56 9 Fax: 2 62 -88 9-2 46 1 Email : Website : Importe r and maste r distributo r of Auroshikha Incense , Ayurvedi c Soa p and Herbal Vedic Ayurvedic products . Ayur Herba l Corporatio n P O Bo x 6 39 0 Santa Fe , N M 8750 2 Ph: 2 62 -8 89 -8 56 9 Website : www.herbalvedic.com Manufacturer of Herba l Vedic Ayurvedic products .

Ayush Herbs , Inc . 1002 5 N.E . 4th Street W A 9 8 00 4 Ph: 8 0 0 - 9 2 5 - 1 3 1 7 Banyan Tradin g Compan y P O Bo x 13 00 2 Albuquerque, N M 871 9 2 Ph: 5 0 5 - 2 4 4 - 1 8 8 ; 8 0 0 - 9 5 3 - 6 4 4 0 2 Website: www.banyantrading.co m Traditional Ayurvedic Herbs - Wholesale Bazaar of India Imports University Avenue Berkeley, C A 9 4 70 3 Ph: 8 0 0 - 2 6 1 - 7 6 6 ; 5 1 0 - 5 4 8 - 4 1 0 2 1 Website: www.bazaarofindia.co m
Bio Veda 2 1 5 North Route 30 3 Congers, N Y 10920-172 6 Ph: 8 00 -2 92 -600 2

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Earth Essential s Florid a Bryan and Light Mille r 406 7 Shell Roa d Sarasota, F L 3424 2 Ph: 941-316-092 0 Email: earthess@aol.com Website : Frontie r Herb s PO 22 9 Norway , 52 31 8 Ph: 800-669-327 5 HerbalVedi c Product s P O Bo x 63 9 0 Santa Fe , N M 8750 2 Website: www.herbalvedic.com

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Yog a
by D

Your Type
a r e y M . S .
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r. D v i d F a w l & Sa n d r a S u m m e r f i e l d
This is the first book that details how to choose Yoga asanas (Yoga poses ) most appropriat e for your unique body type accordin g to the five thousand year old system of Ayurvedic medicine . These two systems of healing and energ y management have long been re garded as effectiv e methods of relieving stress, creating persona l balance, eliminating ailments , and relieving chronic pain. Y o gaf o r
Your Type present s a fundamenta l

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Foreword by Atreya Smith Preface Part Introduction to Marmas : Energy Points Yoga and Ayurveda Chapter 1 Marmas: Energy Points of Yoga and Ayurveda Chapter 2 The Ayurvedic System of Healin g and Marm a Therap y Chapter 3 Marmas: Their Nature and Classification Chapter 4 Marma s and the Practic e of Yoga Chapter 5 The Man y Method s of Marm a Therap y Aroma Therapy and Pranic Healing Chapter 6 The Many Methods of Marma Therapy 2: Herbal Methods Part II Table of Marmas and Their Treatment Chapter 7 Overview of Table of Marmas and Marma Therap y Chapter 8 Marmas on the Arms and Hand s Chapter 9 Marmas on the Legs and Fee t Chapter 10 Marmas on the Abdomen and Ches t Chapter 11 Marmas on the Back and Hips Chapter 12 Marmas on the Head and Nec k Part III Supplemental Material and Appendices Appendix 1 Us e of Instruments to Treat Marmas: Blood-letting , Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Index Resource s Acupuncture , Agni-karm a and 2 Marmapuncture , Ayurvedic Acupunctur e by Dr. Frank Ros 3 Names and Classification of Marma s 4 Sanskrit Ayurvedic Terms 5 Ayurvedic Herbs and Oils 6 Bibliograph y

v vii 1 3

27

63 75 83 85 95 143 161 177 20 9

21 5 22 3 22 9 23 3 24 3 25 1

The subject of pranic energy as a biological force is well documented in but until now, poorly understood in the West. Prana as the posi tive energy of the vata dosha is the primary source of physical and energetic health. Ayurvedi c medicine has a wonderful therapeutic system to work directly on this bio-energetic principle that is called Marma therapy . Prana as the source of the is the single most important factor in health and therapeutic treatment. All Ayurvedic therapies work on the prana of the patient in some manner, striving to stabilize and harmonize its primaril y through the three vata, pitta and kapha. Marma therapy is the most direct method of harmonizing prana in the physical body (Sthula of anothe r person . It can also aid in the study of yoga practices such as pranayam a and asana, which are chiefly concerned with increasing and regulatin g prani c function through the nadis or channels of the subtle body. Marm a therapy supplements and supports all Ayurvedic therapies, increasing their effectiveness and ability to awaken the healing power of the body. Prana as the source of mental function and perception allows us to think and perceive. It allows us to interact with the five senses, body and physical universe. The higher forms of Yoga are concerned with the devel opment of prana on this level, the subtle body (Sukshma sharira), which governs the mind and The advanced aspects of Ayurveda can assist to harmonize prana here and aid in all forms of personal development and spiritua l unfoldment. Marma therapy plays a key role in bridging the physical and subtle bodies of yogic science. Therefore, a working knowl edge of Marma therapy is an important assistance on all yogic Marma therapy is a multidimensiona l approach to health that includes the physical, energeti c and mental sheaths and Koshas) that in turn have an effect on the souls apparent jour ney Marma therapy is used as a part of most Ayurvedic treatments and is of primary importance in self-care and self-healing. Indian doctors prescribe it as a matter of course for patients who are also taking herbal or other Ayurvedic medicines. Yet, Marma therapy is used alone to treat a variety of disorder s ranging from paralyses to psychosomati c disorders. The uses of Marma therapy are almost unlimited for health care and form a corne r

vi

Ayurveda

and Marma

Therapy

stone of classical Ayurvedic medicine . Fo r the first time we are presented with a clear book on the subjec t from three world famous authors, lecturers and doctors. Ayurveda and Marma Therapy is an updated and revised edition first published in India. The present edition goes far beyond the old and adds much practical infor mation for the Western therapist of massage and acupressure. A number of misconceptions and confusions are cleared up in this edition to form a clear, practical therapeutic guide for the Westerner. In short, the present edition of this landmark work has little to do with the original and is much improved. The main confusion regarding Marma therapy in the West is the con cept of 107 fixed points on the physical anatomy. In reality the Ayurvedic vision of marma points is flexible and adapted to the individual, as are all Ayurvedic therapies. The marma points can differ from one individual to another and require a certain sensitivity on the part of the therapist to find the area of prani c congestion. In practice we find a variety of differences manifesting according to the prakriti and (temporary state) of the person. Applyin g the information in this book too rigidly would be a disservice and would ignore the main vision of Ayurveda as an individualized medicine . There are also a number of minor marma points that are not classifie d under the primary 107 points. Additionally, the ancient restriction on the use of Marma therapy by unqualified persons shows the need of respect and sensitivity when working on these dynamic points of energy. Further there are regional differences on marma location in What we may learn in Western India can be different from Northern or Souther n India. There are also different approaches from different doctors or practi tioners. While this may seem confusing to the beginner it actually adds to the richness of the tradition and forces the practitioner to use his or her intelligence when applying the marma system to a patient. After all, the main purpose of Ayurveda is for us to become more intelligent. Ayurveda and Marma Therapy assists everyone in this endeavor with clear, profoun d knowledge. Atreya Smith
Autho r of Secrets of Ayurvedic Perfect Balance, Ayurvedic and di rect o r o f th e Europea n Institute o f Ved i c Studie s i n Franc e .

The science of Yoga, which has become very popular all over the world in recent decades, is intimately connected to Ayurveda as its correspondin g system of natural medicine. As Yoga and Ayurveda become better known , more interest is developing in their specific healing modalities as well. A new Yoga and Ayurveda therapy is arising, integrating their renewed mu tual application using yogic tools like asana according to Ayurvedic guide lines as well as applying Ayurvedic therapies to aid in yogic healing . The use of pressure points, called marmas in Sanskrit, is an important part of this interface. Marmas are a common topic in clas sical Ayurvedic texts and are referred to in modern books as well. They are also frequentl y mentione d in yogic teachings. But up to this present vol Ayurveda and Marma Therapy is no single book that at tempts to make this subject easily accessible and readable in the West . This book is meant to help fill in that gap. Ayurveda and Marma Therapy has three authors: Dr. David Frawle y (Pandit Vamadeva Shastri) of the U S A along with Dr. Subhash Ranade and Dr. Avinash Lele both of Pune, India. Dr. Frawley is one of the leading western Ayurvedic experts, having authored half a dozen books on the subject as well as developed extensive course material for Ayurvedic pro He has taken the main lead in shaping the book. Dr. Ranade is one of the most importan t Indian Ayurvedic doctors teaching in the western world as well as in India. He has written many books, including textbooks used in Ayurvedic colleges . Dr. Ranade and Dr. Frawley co-authored the book Ayurveda: Nature's Medicine. Dr. Lele, a colleague of Dr. Ranade, is another important Ayurvedi c docto r who has specialized in marma therapy. He is trained in traditiona l Ayurvedic methods of surgery, which carefully considers the use of marmas . Dr. Ranade and Dr. Lele have col laborated on several Ayurvedic books published in India. Dr. Frawley wrote the greater portion of the material in the book, in cluding the explanations of Ayurvedic principles and treatments in the first section, as well as most of the information on the treatment of marmas in the Table of Marmas in the second section. He specifically developed the material explaining the use of marmas relative to the practice of Yoga and meditation, including their treatment with gem and color therapy, drawing on various yogic teachings and other related Vedic sciences. Dr. Ranad e

V I I I

Ayurveda and Marma Therapy

and Dr. Lele provided the illustration s and most of the information on the description of marma points, as well as the initial outline of the book . The book aims both at identifying marmas and indicating the appropri ate methods to treat them effectively. Such methods include massage with special oils, herbs and aromas as well as acupressure , acupunctur e and various herbal While classical Ayurvedic herbs and massage oils are presented for those who have access to these, we have also offered commonly availabl e herbs and oils so that any interested reader can begin to use marma therap y for self-care purposes. The treatment of marmas with aroma therapy, whic h is quick and easy to do, has been a major topic . We would like to offer a special thanks to Dr. Frank author of The Lost Secrets of Ayurvedic Acupuncture for his chapter on explaining Ayurvedi c acupunctur e in detail. Dr. Ros is perhaps the western world's foremost exper t on this important topic . We would like to emphasize that this book is not meant to present the last word on the number of marmas, their location or their manner of treatment. The book emphasizes the main classical Ayurvedic marmas , whic h are 107 in number, but many other such sensitive points can also be used. While it introduces various methods of treating marmas, particularly oil massag e and aroma therapy, such methods can be delineated in greater detail and adapted relative to various treatment strategies and a compre hensive Ayurvedic therapy. The book is a good place to start working with marmas, but still only an introductio n to this profound topic. It should be supplemented by a further study of Ayurveda for its full application and integration with the entire range of Ayurvedic modalities . We have not dealt a great deal with how Ayurvedic marma therap y interfaces with the many forms of bodywork and massage that are prac ticed today. That is another vast field for research which, hopefully, other therapists will take up in time. We have included several references in the bibliography for those who wish to take up related forms of Ayurvedic healing, energ y healing or bodywork. We welcome any feedback from our readers, in order to improve any future editions of this book in light of their suggestions . Ayurveda remains a vast ocean and we are still but getting acquainte d with its waves and currents. Ma y we gain the power to sail into its endles s horizons and enter new universes of healing and self-transformation ! Dr. David Frawley, Dr. Subhash Ranade & Dr. Avinash Lele
M A Y 2 00 2