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htm l PL/SQL Collections
The chart below lists the properties of the three collection types on a set of parameters such as size, ease of modification, persistence, etc. Index By Tables Nested Tables Varrays Bounded i.e. holds a declared number of elements, though this number can be changed at runtime Sequential numbers, starting from one Can be stored in the database using equivalent SQL types, and manipulated through SQL (but with less ease than nested tables) Standard subscripting syntax e.g. color(3) is the 3rd color in varray color

Size Unbounded i.e. the number Unbounded i.e. the of elements it can hold is not number of elements it pre-defined can hold is not predefined Subscript Can be arbitrary numbers or Characteristics strings. Need not be sequential. Database Index by tables can be used Storage in PL/SQL programs only, cannot be stored in the database. Sequential numbers, starting from one Can be stored in the database using equivalent SQL types, and manipulated through SQL.

Referencing Works as key-value pairs. and lookups e.g. Salaries of employees can be stored with unique employee numbers used as subscripts sal(102) := 2000;

Similar to one-column database tables. Oracle stores the nested table data in no particular order. But when you retrieve the nested table into a PL/SQL variable, the rows are given consecutive subscripts starting at 1. Almost like index-by tables, except that

Flexibility to Most flexible. Size can changes increase/ decrease

Not very flexible. You must retrieve and

dynamically. Elements can be added to any position in the list and deleted from any position. Mapping with Hash tables other programming languages

subscript values are not as flexible. Deletions are possible from noncontiguous positions. Sets and bags

update all the elements of the varray at the same time. Arrays

Which Collection Type to Use?
You have all the details about index by tables, nested tables and varrays now. Given a situation, will one should you use for your list data? Here are some guidelines. Use index by tables when:
• • • • •

Your program needs small lookups The collection can be made at runtime in the memory when the package/ procedure is initialized The data volume is unknown beforehand The subscript values are flexible (e.g. strings, negative numbers, non-sequential) You do not need to store the collection in the database

Use nested tables when:
• • • • •

The data needs to be stored in the database The number of elements in the collection is not known in advance The elements of the collection may need to be retrieved out of sequence Updates and deletions affect only some elements, at arbitrary locations Your program does not expect to rely on the subscript remaining stable, as their order may change when nested tables are stored in the database.

Use varrays when:
• • • •

The data needs to be stored in the database The number of elements of the varray is known in advance The data from the varray is accessed in sequence Updates and deletions happen on the varray as a whole and not on arbitrarily located elements in the varray

Sample Code

Associative Array
Declare

Nested Table

Varray

Declare a collection variable.
aa_0 p.aa_type ;

nt_0 p.nt_type ;

va_0 p.va_type ;

Declare, initialize, and load a collection variable.
aa p.aa_type ; -- cannot load values in -- declaration begin nt p.nt_type := p.nt_type( 'a', 'b' ) ; va p.va_type := p.va_type( 'a', 'b' ) ;

Let's inspect the variables to see what they look like at this point (NULL means the variable is not initialized).
p.print( p.print( p.print( p.print( p.print( 'aa_0 is ' ); aa_0 ); ' ' ); 'aa is ' ); aa ); p.print( p.print( p.print( p.print( p.print( 'nt_0 is ' ); nt_0 ); ' ' ); 'nt is ' ); nt ); p.print( p.print( p.print( p.print( p.print( 'va_0 is ' ); va_0 ); ' ' ); 'va is ' ); va );

aa_0 is NOT NULL .first = .last = .count = .limit = aa is NOT NULL .first = .last = .count = .limit =

and empty NULL NULL 0 NULL and empty NULL NULL 0 NULL

nt_0 is NULL nt is (1) a (2) b .first .last .count .limit

va_0 is NULL va is (1) a (2) b .first .last .count .limit

= = = =

1 2 2 NULL

= = = =

1 2 2 10

-. va(4) := 'd' .add 1 row va.print( va_0 ).of row #5 aa(6) := 'e' .extend(2. -.print( nt_0 ).va_type(). -. select into from where val aa(2) t val = 'B' .first = .add 2 rows va. NOT NULL .print( va ). nt.count .count = 7 . nt(5) := 'e' .count = . p. -.extend .last .limit = and empty NULL NULL 0 10 Add individual rows to a collection.last = 7 . p. p.create two copies -. aa(3) := 'c' . -.first .add 1 row nt.nt_type() .of row #5 va.add 2 rows nt. aa(5) := 'e' .print( nt ).limit = and empty NULL NULL 0 NULL va_0 := p.5) .print( aa ).extend(2.5) . -.last = .last .n/a nt_0 := p.extend(2) .count . NOT NULL .first = 1 . nt(4) := 'd' . . select into from where val va(2) t val = 'B' .add 1 row at a time aa(1) := 'a' .limit = = = = 1 7 7 NULL (1) a (2) b (3) c (4) d (5) e (6) e (7) e . va(5) := 'e' . select into from where val nt(2) t val = 'B' .extend . aa(2) := 'b' .extend(2) .first . -.create two copies -.first = .last = . p. aa(7) := 'e' .limit = = = = 1 7 7 NULL (1) a (2) b (3) c (4) d (5) e (6) e (7) e .count = .Initialize a collection after it has been declared. nt(3) := 'c' . (1) a (2) b (3) c (4) d (5) e (6) e (7) e .limit = 10 Load a single value from the database into a collection row. va(3) := 'c' . aa(4) := 'd' . p. -.

print ( 'va.tf( va. p.first = 1 .first .exists(3) is TRUE aa.print( nt ).tf( va.count . p.exists(9) is '|| p.limit = NULL .print( nt ).exists(3) is TRUE nt.print( aa ).p.last = 7 . p.tf( aa.first = 1 .print( va ).exists(3) is '|| p.exists(9) is '|| p. p.print( aa ).exists(3) ) ).last .exists(3) is '|| p.exists(9) is '|| p.tf( nt.exists(9) ) ). p.count = 7 p.print( va ). aa.first = 1 .exists(9) is FALSE . (1) A (2) B (3) C (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G . (1) A (2) B (3) C (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G . ).exists(3) is '|| p.limit = = = = 1 7 7 NULL (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) d (5) e (6) e (7) e .exists(9) ) p.exists(9) is FALSE nt.count = 7 p. select val bulk collect into nt from t .first . (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) d (5) e (6) e (7) e .print ( 'aa. ).count = 7 .limit = = = = 1 7 7 NULL (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) d (5) e (6) e (7) e . select val bulk collect into va from t .tf( nt. (1) A (2) B (3) C (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G .print ( 'nt.limit = 10 Test a row's existence by subscript. p.limit = NULL .exists(3) is TRUE va.first = 1 .count .exists(3) ) ).print ( 'va.last .limit = 10 Initialize a collection and load it with multiple database values (pre-existing contents will be lost).tf( aa.last = 7 .print ( 'aa. p.exists(9) ) p.count = 7 .last = 7 .exists(3) ) ).last = 7 .print ( 'nt.exists(9) is FALSE va. select val bulk collect into aa from t .

tf( 'X' member of nt ) -.count = 7 . -.limit = 10 Remove rows from the middle of a collection.last = 7 . va(1) := 'a' .limit = NULL . aa(1) := 'a' .first = 1 .count = 7 p.first = 1 . (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G .cannot use "=" with -. aa(3) := 'c' . (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G . .cannot use "=" with if nt_0 = nt then p.Test a row's existence by content.tf( 'C' member of nt ) ). (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G .last = 7 .two varrays end if. nt(1) := 'a' .limit = NULL .last = 7 . equal Update a collection row.two associative arrays nt_0 := nt .print( aa ).print( 'equal' ).print( 'not equal' ). -.print ( '''X'' member of nt is '|| p. p. va(3) := 'c' .print( nt ). 'C' member of nt is TRUE 'X' member of nt is FALSE Compare two collections for equality. -.first = 1 .print ( '''C'' member of nt is '|| p.use a loop (see below) ). else p. p.print( va ). nt(3) := 'c' .count = 7 p. -.use a loop (see below) p.

1.first = 4 .last = 4 .print( nt ).last = 7 . nt.next(i) .count = 1 p.first .trim(2).next(i) .trim. (1) a (5) E (6) F (7) G . aa.first = 4 .last = 4 .limit = 10 Loop through all rows in the collection.delete(2). declare i binary_integer . (1) a (5) E (6) F (7) G . (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G . begin i := aa.4). (4) D .first = 4 .limit = NULL .trim(2). G Remove row(s) from the end of a collection.print( nt ). '|| va(i) ).print ( i ||'.print( va ). F end.0) .last = 7 . for i in nvl(va. E 6.6). E 6. end loop.count = 7 . (4) D . '|| aa(i) ). while i is not null loop p. end loop. '|| nt(i) ). end. a B c D E F va. G 1.aa.limit = NULL .. 5. 7.print( aa ). end loop.limit = NULL .-1) loop p.print( va ).first .delete(7).trim. declare i binary_integer . nt.count = 1 p. a 5.delete(5. G 7.count = 4 p. 4. va. i := aa. aa. nvl(va. p. F 7.limit = NULL .last = 7 . 1.delete(3. 2. while i is not null loop p. a 5. i := nt. begin i := nt.4). nt. 3. (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) D . -.print ( i ||'.last.delete(3. aa.print( aa ). nt.delete(2). 6.first = 4 .count = 4 p.first.first = 1 .first = 1 .not possible p.print ( i ||'.

delete . p. nt(3) := 'C' .last = 7 . NOT NULL . p.last = . ----we need to call ". .last = .trim" .7 -.extend(3) nt(5) := 'E' nt(6) := 'F' nt(7) := 'G' .extend" for rows -. .delete" nt(2) := 'B' . aa(5) := 'E' . aa(2) := 'B' .3.extend" first since 5.2. NOT NULL . nt.4) and trim operations (rows 5.count = 7 (1) A (2) B (3) C (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G .".removed with ".trim" nt.call ".print( nt ). .count = 7 (1) a (2) B (3) c (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G .6. va.last = 7 .first = .count = and empty NULL NULL 0 .first = 1 .limit = 10 Reuse rows left vacant by earlier delete operations (rows 2.count = 7 .delete .first = 1 . va.print( nt ).limit = 10 Delete all rows in the collection (frees memory too). (1) A (2) B (3) C (4) D (5) E (6) F (7) G .which were removed with -.print( aa ).".first = 1 .6.count = and empty NULL NULL 0 p..extend" for rows 5.we do need to call -.7).count = 4 .4 which were -. aa(3) := 'C' .note we do not need to -.3.delete . -.print( aa ).count = and empty NULL NULL 0 p.last = 7 .limit = NULL . NOT NULL .limit = NULL .print( va ). aa(7) := 'G' . aa(6) := 'F' . nt(4) := 'D' .extend(3) va(5) := 'E' va(6) := 'F' va(7) := 'G' p.last = . . aa(4) := 'D' .first = .print( va ). .first = .last = 4 .6. -. aa. p. .7 were removed with ".

3.2**31 Varray Y Y Integer 1.print( nt )."va := null" will not -.limit = NULL .not possible -.limit = 10 Set a collection to NULL. -.print( va ).2**31 Legal subscript value ranges.e.. end.2**31 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y . MULTISET UNION. MULTISET INTERSECT.. Rows in the collection retain their order when the entire n/a collection is saved in a database column."nt := null" will not -.limit = NULL . use a null -. The collection can be initialized with multiple rows of data using a single command (i. uninitialized state. NULL end. (for Integers) The collection can be defined to hold a predefined maximum number of rows. p. i. p. Two collections can be compared for equality with the "=" operator.variable instead declare va_null p. begin va := va_null . use a null -.. a constructor).variable instead declare nt_null p. Nested Table Y Integer 1.e. -.va_type . Legal subscript datatypes. begin nt := nt_null . NULL / The next table presents operational characteristics of each collection type.8.g.work. Y The collection must be initialized before used. end. 1. There can be gaps between subscripts. Associative Characteristic Array The entire collection can be saved in a database column.nt_type . The collection can be unnested in a query using the TABLE() collection expression.work. The collection must be extended before a new row is added.. The collection can be manipulated in PL/SQL with MULTISET Operators e. e. any -2**31.g.

ranges of data had to be forced into discrete form making unwieldy code. CASE was introduced in Oracle 8.1.The Difference Between DECODE and CASE DECODE and CASE statements in Oracle both provide a conditional construct. 1. of this form: if A = n1 then A1 else if A = n2 then A2 else X Databases before Oracle 8. which DECODE cannot – which we’ll see in this article. case 3 when sal < 1000 4 then 'Grade I' 5 when (sal >=1000 and sal < 2000) 6 then 'Grade II' 7 when (sal >= 2000 and sal < 3000) 8 then 'Grade III' 9 else 'Grade IV' 10 end sal_grade 11 from emp 12 where rownum < 4.6 had only the DECODE function. . There is a lot more that you can do with CASE. Everything DECODE can do. though. CASE is capable of more logical comparisons such as < > etc. CASE can work with logical operators other than ‘=’ DECODE can do an equality check only. as a standard. To achieve the same effect with DECODE. SQL> select ename 2 .1. An example of putting employees in grade brackets based on their salaries – this can be done elegantly with CASE. CASE can.6. more meaningful and more powerful function.

illustrating these two uses of CASE.mark the category based on ename list 5 when e.put_line('poor'). 5 case grade 6 when 'a' then dbms_output. CASE can work with predicates and subqueries in searchable form. 9 when 'd' then dbms_output. SQL> select e.put_line('excellent').mgr = e.ename. An example of categorizing employees based on reporting relationship. 3 begin 4 grade := 'b'. 8 when 'c' then dbms_output.searchable subquery 8 -.ename in ('KING'.put_line('fair').ENAME ---------SMITH ALLEN WARD SAL_GRADE --------Grade I Grade II Grade II 2.'WARD') 6 then 'Top Bosses' 7 -. .'SMITH'. 7 when 'b' then dbms_output. CASE can be a more efficient substitute for IFTHEN-ELSE in PL/SQL.put_line('very good'). 2 case 3 -.predicate with "in" 4 -. SQL> declare 2 grade char(1). 10 when 'f' then dbms_output.empno) 11 then 'Managers' 12 else 13 'General Employees' 14 end emp_category 15 from emp e 16 where rownum < 5. ENAME ---------SMITH ALLEN WARD JONES EMP_CATEGORY ----------------Top Bosses General Employees Top Bosses Managers 3. CASE can work as a PL/SQL construct DECODE can work as a function inside SQL only.put_line('good').identify if this emp has a reportee 9 when exists (select 1 from emp emp1 10 where emp1. CASE can work with predicates and searchable subqueries DECODE works with expressions which are scalar values only.

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.put_line('output = '||i). 'NOT NULL' 4 ) null_test 5 from dual. 'NULL' 3 . end case.11 12 13 14 else dbms_output. null. column 7: PL/SQL: Statement ignored SQL> exec proc_test(case :a when 'THREE' then 3 else 0 end). Careful! CASE handles NULL differently Check out the different results with DECODE vs NULL. output = 3 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.'THREE'.0)).3. END. / Procedure created.0)). SQL> SQL> 2 3 4 5 6 create or replace procedure proc_test (i number) as begin dbms_output.'THREE'. end. NULL ---NULL .put_line('no such grade'). SQL> select decode(null 2 .3. / PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. SQL> exec :a := 'THREE'. CASE can even work as a parameter to a procedure call. while DECODE cannot. end. 4. * ERROR at line 1: ORA-06550: line 1. SQL> var a varchar2(5). SQL> exec proc_test(decode(:a. column 17: PLS-00204: function or pseudo-column 'DECODE' may be used inside a SQL statement only ORA-06550: line 1. BEGIN proc_test(decode(:a.

when '2' then '2' * ERROR at line 2: ORA-00932: inconsistent datatypes: expected NUMBER got CHAR 6. DECODE is proprietary to Oracle. NULL_TES -------NOT NULL The “searched CASE” works as does DECODE. though.1. 3 '3') t 4 from dual. CASE is ANSI SQL-compliant CASE complies with ANSI SQL.'2'. SQL> select case 2 when null is null 3 then 'NULL' 4 else 'NOT NULL' 5 end null_test 6* from dual SQL> / NULL_TES -------NULL 5. DECODE does not Compare the two examples – DECODE gives you a result. 2 '2'. SQL> select decode(2. T ---------2 SQL> select case 2 when 1 then '1' 2 when '2' then '2' 3 else '3' 4 end 5 from dual. CASE gives a data type mismatch error. . CASE expects data type consistency.1.SQL> select case null 2 when null 3 then 'NULL' 4 else 'NOT NULL' 5 end null_test 6 from dual.

5 'Unknown') as department 6 from emp 7 where rownum < 4. is a recipe for messy. Complicated processing in DECODE. and SQL> -. DECODE is shorter and easier to understand than CASE. 4 30. decode (deptno. The difference in readability In very simple situations. 'Research'. as in: SQL> -. unreadable code – while the same can be achieved elegantly using CASE. CASE is shorter and easier to understand.An example where DECODE and CASE SQL> -. even if technically achievable.7. 10.DECODE is cleaner SQL> select ename 2 . case deptno 3 when 10 then 'Accounting' 4 when 20 then 'Research' 5 when 30 then 'Sales' 6 else 'Unknown' 7 end as department 8 from emp 9 where rownum < 4. 3 20. . ENAME ---------SMITH ALLEN WARD DEPARTMENT ---------Research Sales Sales SQL> select ename 2 . 'Accounting'. ENAME ---------SMITH ALLEN WARD DEPARTMENT ---------Research Sales Sales In complex situations.can work equally well. 'Sales'.

grp_b .---------. grp_b. sum( val ) from t GROUP BY GRP_A order by grp_a . val from t order by grp_a. GRP_A COUNT(*) MAX(VAL) SUM(VAL) ---------. GRP_B order by grp_a.---------. count(*). sum( val ) from t GROUP BY ( GRP_A.---------b1 10 b1 20 b2 30 b2 40 b2 50 b3 12 b3 22 b3 32 GROUP BY allows us to group rows together so that we can include aggregate functions like COUNT. sum( val ) from t GROUP BY GRP_A. GRP_B ) order by grp_a. max( val ). MAX. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 a2 GRP_B VAL ---------. select grp_a. grp_b. max( val ).---------b1 2 20 30 b2 3 50 120 b3 3 32 66 Parentheses may be added around the GROUP BY expression list. select grp_a.---------. count(*). grp_b . select grp_a.---------.---------a1 5 50 150 a2 3 32 66 We can specify multiple columns in the GROUP BY clause to produce a different set of groupings. grp_b. . grp_b . Doing so has no effect on the result. select grp_a.Grouping Rows with GROUP BY GROUP BY Consider a table like this one. count(*). and SUM in the result set. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) MAX(VAL) SUM(VAL) ---------. max( val ).

sum( val ) from t . grp_b from t GROUP BY GRP_A. sum( val ) from t GROUP BY () . max( val ).---------.GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) MAX(VAL) SUM(VAL) ---------. GRP_B order by grp_a. select DISTINCT grp_a.---------8 50 216 The last example is equivalent to specifying no GROUP BY clause at all. COUNT(*) MAX(VAL) SUM(VAL) ---------. Parentheses are mandatory when specifying an empty set.---------. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B ---------b1 b2 b3 However. like this. COUNT(*) MAX(VAL) SUM(VAL) ---------. This groups all rows retrieved by the query into a single group. grp_b from t order by grp_a.---------. grp_b . the same result is usually produced by specifying DISTINCT instead of using GROUP BY. grp_b . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B ---------b1 b2 b3 . max( val ).---------8 50 216 GROUP BY and DISTINCT We can use GROUP BY without specifying any aggregate functions in the SELECT list. select count(*).---------. select grp_a. select count(*).---------b1 2 20 30 b2 3 50 120 b3 3 32 66 The GROUP BY expression list may be empty.

Queries that use DISTINCT are typically easier to understand. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 GRP_B ---------b1 b2 b3 b1 b2 b3 (We will learn about the CUBE and GROUPING_ID features later in this tutorial. 2 .) GROUP BY and Ordering .According to Tom Kyte the two approaches are effectively equivalent (see AskTom "DISTINCT VS. null as grp_b from t union all select distinct null. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 GRP_B ---------b1 b2 b3 b1 b2 b3 but a GROUP BY query could produce the same result with fewer lines of code. For example. grp_b from t union all select distinct grp_a. grp_b from t order by 1. 2 . grp_b ) having grouping_id( grp_a. grp_b ) != 3 order by 1. to produce a result set that is the union of: • distinct values in GRP_A • distinct values in GRP_B • distinct values in GRP_A + GRP_B the following query would be required if we used DISTINCT select distinct grp_a. but the GROUP BY approach can provide an elegant solution to otherwise cumbersome queries when more than one set of groupings is required. select grp_a. GROUP BY"). grp_b from t group by cube( grp_a.

---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 The results are still ordered. grp_b . count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_B. grp_b. 'd2'.All other things being equal. count(*) from t group by grp_a. grp_b. insert into t values ( 'a2' . grp_b. What happens if we use no ORDER BY clause at all? select grp_a. 'c2'. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------.columns have been reversed order by grp_a. GRP_A -. 'd2'. 'b3' . '22' ) .of the Setup topic insert into t values ( 'a2' . changing the order in which columns appear in the GROUP BY clause has no effect on the way the result set is grouped. This is an illusion which is easily proved with the following snippet. insert into t values ( 'a2' . grp_b .---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 returns the same results as this one. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. '12' ) . this query select grp_a. GRP_A -----a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) -----. truncate table t. 'c2'. select grp_a.this time we insert rows into T using a different order from that -. . -. grp_b . count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_A. 'b3' . For example. Some programmers interpret this as meaning that GROUP BY returns an ordered result set.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 Gotcha: GROUP BY with no ORDER BY The last two snippets used the same ORDER BY clause in both queries. GRP_B order by grp_a. 'c2'. 'd2'. 'b3' . '32' ) . Note how the same query now returns rows in a random order given new conditions.

select grp_a.(your results may vary) The actual behaviour of GROUP BY without ORDER BY is documented in the SQL Reference Manual as follows.---------A1 5 A2 3 If we did include the same column two or more times in the GROUP BY clause it would return the same results as the query above. "The GROUP BY clause groups rows but does not guarantee the order of the result set. 'd1'. . . upper(grp_a). . . . . GRP_A -----a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) -----. 'c2'.) Duplicate Columns If a column is used more than once in the SELECT clause it does not need to appear more than once in the GROUP BY clause.insert insert insert insert insert commit. count(*) from t group by GRP_A. 'c1'. 'd1'. GRP_A UPPER(GRP_ COUNT(*) ---------. '50' '40' '30' '20' '10' ) ) ) ) ) ." (See AskTom .---------b2 3 b1 2 b3 3 -. . grp_b. .---------a1 A1 5 . . 'b2' 'b2' 'b2' 'b1' 'b1' . upper(grp_a). count(*) from t group by GRP_A order by grp_a . 'd1'. GRP_A order by grp_a . 'c1'. select grp_a. 'd1'. grp_b . count(*) from t group by grp_a. use the ORDER BY clause. . select grp_a. Group by behavior in 10GR2 for another discussion of this issue. To order the groupings. 'c1'. . into into into into into t t t t t values values values values values ( ( ( ( ( 'a1' 'a1' 'a1' 'a1' 'a1' . 'd1'. .---------. GRP_A ---------a1 a2 UPPER(GRP_ COUNT(*) ---------. 'c1'.

select GRP_A. 123 ---------123 123 123 'XY --XYZ XYZ XYZ SYSDATE ---------2009-06-07 2009-06-07 2009-06-07 GRP_A -----a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) -----.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 and we can GROUP BY constant columns that are not in the SELECT list. grp_b order by grp_a.---------a1 2 a1 3 a2 3 However we may not select table columns that are absent from the GROUP BY list. SELECT Lists We may group by table columns that are not in the SELECT list. select grp_a. count(*) from t group by 123. count(*) from t .a2 A2 3 While there is no practical use for the latter syntax in the upcoming topic GROUP_ID we will see how duplicate columns in a GROUPING SETS clause do produce different results than a distinct column list. grp_a. grp_a. GRP_B order by grp_a. GRP_A COUNT(*) -----. grp_b . as with GRP_A in this example. grp_b . like GRP_B in the example below. grp_b. count(*) * ERROR at line 1: ORA-00979: not a GROUP BY expression Constants The rules for columns based on constant expressions differ slightly from those for table columns. SYSDATE. 'XYZ'. count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_B . SYSDATE. As with table based columns we can include constant columns in the GROUP BY clause select 123. count(*) from t group by grp_a. grp_b. select GRP_A. 'XYZ'. select grp_a.

however. select 123. SYSDATE.---------a1 3 a2 3 Thia does. For example. prevent us from using conditions that involve aggregate values like COUNT(*) that are calculated after the GROUP BY clause is applied. select grp_a. which is not listed in the GROUP BY clause. SYSDATE. 'XYZ'. grp_b . 'XYZ'.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 Note how all three queries returned the same number of rows. grp_a. grp_b order by grp_a. HAVING When Oracle processes a GROUP BY query the WHERE clause is applied to the result set before the rows are grouped together.group by 123. 123 ---------123 123 123 'XY --XYZ XYZ XYZ SYSDATE ---------2009-06-07 2009-06-07 2009-06-07 GRP_A -----a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) -----. select grp_a. GRP_B order by grp_a. count(*) from t WHERE GRP_B in ( 'b2'. grp_b . This allows us to use WHERE conditions involving columns like GRP_B in the query below. grp_a. count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_A. count(*) from t WHERE COUNT(*) > 4 group by grp_a order by grp_a . the following will not work. WHERE COUNT(*) > 4 * ERROR at line 3: .---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 Unlike table based columns we can select constant columns that are absent from the GROUP BY list. grp_b. GRP_A COUNT(*) ---------. 'b3' ) group by grp_a order by grp_a . GRP_A -----a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) -----.

---------a2 3 . GRP_A COUNT(*) ---------. HAVING VAL > 5 * ERROR at line 4: ORA-00979: not a GROUP BY expression It can. count(*) from t WHERE GRP_A = 'a2' group by grp_a order by grp_a .---------a1 5 Note that the HAVING clause cannot reference table columns like VAL that are not listed in the GROUP BY clause.---------a2 3 but doing so yields the same result as using a WHERE clause. count(*) from t group by grp_a HAVING COUNT(*) > 4 order by grp_a . GRP_A COUNT(*) ---------. reference table columns like GRP_A that are in the GROUP BY clause. select grp_a.ORA-00934: group function is not allowed here For these types of conditions the HAVING clause can be used. count(*) from t group by grp_a HAVING GRP_A = 'a2' order by grp_a . select grp_a. on the other hand. select grp_a. GRP_A COUNT(*) ---------. select grp_a. count(*) from t group by grp_a HAVING VAL > 5 order by grp_a .

GRP_A NULL COUNT(*) ---------.---------a1 5 a2 3 select grp_b. GRP_B ) .Given a choice between the last two snippets I expect using a WHERE clause provides the best performance in most. select grp_a. select grp_a. count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A. With it the last query can be written as follows.---------. GRP_A COUNT(*) ---------. if not all. like this select grp_a.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 UNION ALL could be used. count(*) from t group by grp_b order by grp_b . grp_b. say we wanted to combine the results of these two queries. count(*) from t group by grp_a order by grp_a . count(*) from t group by grp_b order by 1. count(*) from t group by grp_a UNION ALL select null. null. For example. GROUPING SETS There are times when the results of two or more different groupings are required from a single query. 2 . GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. grp_b.---------a1 5 a2 3 b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 but as of Oracle 9i a more compact syntax is available with the GROUPING SETS extension of the GROUP BY clause. cases.

grp_b. GRP_A GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. select grp_a. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------.---------a1 5 a2 3 b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 It is important to understand how the clause grouping sets( grp_a.. GRP_B ) order by grp_a. For example.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 select grp_a. to write a query that returns the equivalent of these two queries select grp_a. GRP_B). grp_b . GROUPING SETS.order by grp_a.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 Note how the last query returned different rows than the GROUPING SETS query did even though both used the term (GRP_A. count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_A order by grp_a . count(*) from t GROUP BY ( GRP_A. null. and Empty Sets Composite Columns You can treat a collection of columns as an individual set by using parentheses in the GROUPING SETS clause. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. grp_b ) used in the last query differs from the clause group by ( grp_a. grp_b. grp_b . count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_A.---------. Composite Columns. GRP_A N COUNT(*) ---------. GRP_B order by grp_a.---------a1 5 a2 3 . grp_b ) in the next query. grp_b .

we could use the following GROUPING SETS clause. ROLLUP. For example this query select grp_a. In the example below the last row is generated by the empty set grouping. GRP_A ) order by grp_a. grp_b. count(*) from t GROUP BY (GRP_A.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 8 Gotcha . Empty Sets To add a grand total row to the result set an empty set. specified as (). () ) order by grp_a. GRP_B) is no different than the same expression without parentheses. select grp_a. grp_b. grp_b. or CUBE clause. count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( (GRP_A. count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( (GRP_A.---------b1 2 b2 3 5 b3 3 3 The term (GRP_A.---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 returns the same results as this query . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. GRP_B). GRP_B) is called a "composite column" when it appears inside a GROUPING SETS. GRP_A order by grp_a. can be used. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. GRP_B). grp_b . grp_b .Parentheses without GROUPING SETS Outside a GROUPING SETS clause (or ROLLUP or CUBE clauses) a parenthesized expression like (GRP_A. GRP_B). grp_b . select grp_a. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------.

---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 which in turn has the same result set as this one. I later learnt that an empty set term. select grp_a. grp_b . count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A. grp_b. "()". count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_A. GRP_A order by grp_a.select grp_a.---------a1 5 a2 3 b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 8 The last row in the result set is generated by the "0" grouping. grp_b . GRP_B order by grp_a. grp_b . . grp_b .---------b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 Gotcha: GROUPING SETS with Constants When I first started using GROUPING SETS I used constants to produce grand total rows in my result sets. was actually a more appropriate syntactic choice than a constant but I continued to use constants out of habit. GRP_B. GRP_B. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. After all.---------. count(*) from t GROUP BY GRP_A. GRP_A GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. grp_b. like this. 0 ) order by grp_a. select grp_a . both approaches seemed to produce the same results.

grp_b . GRP_B. GRP_B. This is because "0" appears in both the SELECT list and the GROUP BY clause. . () ) order by grp_a. grp_b . grp_b . count(*) . count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A.---------. GRP_A GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. nvl2( grp_b. grp_b grp_a. 1.---------(null) 5 (null) 3 1 2 1 3 1 3 0 8 Note how Query 2 returns "(null)" in the NVL2_GRP_B column and Query 1 does not.---------(null) 0 5 (null) 0 3 b1 1 2 b2 1 3 b3 1 3 (null) 0 8 GRP_A -----a1 a2 (null) (null) (null) (null) GRP_B -----(null) (null) b1 b2 b3 (null) NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. GRP_B. I later ran into a case where the two actually produced different results. GRP_A -----a1 a2 (null) (null) (null) (null) GRP_B NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) -----. 0 ) order by order by grp_a. Readers who want to understand more about why these two queries differ can reverse engineer the two into their . grp_b . 1. count(*) from from t t GROUP BY GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A. grp_b .---------a1 5 a2 3 b1 2 b2 3 b3 3 8 However. 0 ) nvl2_grp_b . 0 ) nvl2_grp_b .select grp_a . nvl2( grp_b. Query 1 set null '(null)' Query 2 set null '(null)' select select grp_a grp_a . () ) GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A.---------.

grp_b ) . grp_c . 3 . Readers who don't simply need to remember this rule of thumb . count(*) from t group by grouping sets ( ( grp_a.---------c1 2 (null) 2 c1 2 c2 1 (null) 3 (null) 5 c2 3 (null) 3 (null) 3 (null) 8 This arrangement is common enough that SQL actually provides a shortcut for specifying these types of GROUPING SETS clauses. count(*) from t . ( grp_a. grp_b.UNION ALL equivalents using the instructions at Reverse Engineering GROUPING BY Queries. ROLLUP It often happens that a query will have a group A which is a superset of group B which in turn is a superset of group C.always use an empty set term to generate a grand total row. grp_c ) . grp_b . grp_c . ( grp_a ) . Here is how the query above looks when implemented with ROLLUP. It uses the ROLLUP operator. grp_b . () ) order by 1. do not use a constant. set null '(null)' select grp_a . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 a2 (null) GRP_B ---------b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 (null) b3 b3 (null) (null) GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------. select grp_a . When aggregates are required at each level a query like this can be used. 2.

---------c1 2 (null) 2 c1 2 c2 1 (null) 3 (null) 5 c2 3 (null) 3 (null) 3 (null) 8 CUBE There are times when all combinations of a collection of grouping columns are required.---------c1 2 (null) 2 c1 2 c2 1 (null) 3 . 3 . ( grp_c ) . grp_c ) .group by ROLLUP( GRP_A. ( grp_a. 2. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 GRP_B ---------b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------. () ) order by 1. grp_c . grp_b. GRP_B. grp_c ) . set null '(null)' select grp_a . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 a2 (null) GRP_B ---------b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 (null) b3 b3 (null) (null) GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------. ( grp_b ) . grp_b ) . ( grp_b. grp_b . 3 . ( grp_a. as in this query. count(*) from t group by grouping sets ( ( grp_a. grp_c ) . GRP_C ) order by 1. 2. ( grp_a ) .

GRP_C ) order by 1. grp_b . Here is how the query above looks after re-writing it to use CUBE. GRP_B. 2.a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 a2 a2 (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) b3 b3 (null) (null) b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 b3 b3 (null) (null) (null) c1 c2 (null) c2 (null) c2 (null) c1 (null) c1 c2 (null) c2 (null) c1 c2 (null) 4 1 5 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 1 3 3 3 4 4 8 This arrangement is common enough that SQL provides a shortcut called the CUBE operator to implement it. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 a2 a2 (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) GRP_B ---------b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 (null) (null) (null) b3 b3 (null) (null) b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 b3 b3 (null) GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------. select grp_a . 3 . count(*) from t group by CUBE( GRP_A. grp_c .---------c1 2 (null) 2 c1 2 c2 1 (null) 3 c1 4 c2 1 (null) 5 c2 3 (null) 3 c2 3 (null) 3 c1 2 (null) 2 c1 2 c2 1 (null) 3 c2 3 (null) 3 c1 4 .

count(*) from t group by grouping sets ( ( grp_a. 2.(null) (null) (null) (null) c2 (null) 4 8 Concatenated Groupings The last type of grouping shortcut we will examine is called a Concatenated Grouping. grouping sets( grp_b.---------b1 2 b2 3 c1 4 c2 1 b3 3 c2 3 into one like this. grp_c .---------. 3 . With it one can re-write a query like this one. which effectively performs a cross-product of GRP_A with GRP_B and GRP_C. count(*) from t group by grp_a . grp_c ) order by 1. grp_b . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 GRP_B GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------.---------. grp_b ) .---------- . set null '(null)' select grp_a . 3 . 2. grp_b . grp_c ) ) order by 1.---------. grp_c . select grp_a . GRP_A GRP_B GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------. ( grp_a.

grp_c . ( grp_b.---------c1 4 c2 1 (null) 5 c2 3 (null) 3 c1 2 (null) 2 c1 2 c2 1 (null) 3 c2 3 (null) 3 is re-written into one like this. grp_b ) . grp_d ) order by . 3 . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) ) ) ) ) GRP_B ---------(null) (null) (null) (null) (null) b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 b3 b3 GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------. grp_b . grouping sets( grp_c. grp_c . count(*) from t group by grouping sets( grp_a. grp_d . grp_d ) order by 1. select grp_a . ( grp_b. grp_b .a1 a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 b1 b2 (null) (null) b3 (null) (null) (null) c1 c2 (null) c2 2 3 4 1 3 3 The cross-product effect is more apparent when a query like this one select grp_a . count(*) from t group by grouping sets ( ( grp_a. grp_c . 2. grp_c . ( grp_a.

however. GRP_A.. prove useful in data warehouse queries that deal with hierarchical cubes of data. Concatenated groupings can. 1. See Concatenated Groupings for more information. 3 GRP_B ---------(null) (null) (null) (null) (null) b1 b1 b2 b2 b2 b3 b3 GRP_C COUNT(*) ---------. count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A.---------a1 5 a1 5 a1 5 a2 3 a2 3 a2 3 . GRP_A ) order by grp_a .---------a1 5 a1 5 a2 3 a2 3 select grp_a. GRP_A ) order by grp_a . including the same column more than once in a GROUPING SETS clause produces duplicate rows. count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A. 2. select grp_a. GRP_A COUNT(*) ---------.---------c1 4 c2 1 (null) 5 c2 3 (null) 3 c1 2 (null) 2 c1 2 c2 1 (null) 3 c2 3 (null) 3 GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) (null) Personally I have never found the need to use concatenated groupings. GROUP_ID Unlike a regular GROUP BY clause. GRP_A COUNT(*) ---------. I find that specifically listing the desired groupings in a single GROUPING SETS clause or using a single ROLLUP or CUBE operator makes my queries easier to understand and debug.

It is in such queries that GROUP_ID proves useful.---------. Let's now look at grouping a table that does contain null values.The GROUP_ID function can be used to distinguish duplicates from each other. GRP_A.---------. There are times when more complex GROUP BY clauses can return duplicate rows however. GROUP_ID() from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A. grp_b . GRP_B ) order by grp_a. count(*). Note that GROUP_ID will always be 0 in a result set that contains no duplicates. select grp_a. grp_b. count(*). select grp_a. GRP_A GRP_B COUNT(*) GROUP_ID() ---------.---------a1 5 0 a2 3 0 b1 2 0 b2 3 0 b3 3 0 Grouping by NULL Values In the examples used thus far in the tutorial our base table had no null values in it. GRP_A ) order by grp_a. GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 GRP_B VAL ---------. GROUP_ID() from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( GRP_A.---------a1 5 0 a1 5 1 a1 5 2 a2 3 0 a2 3 1 a2 3 2 In the trivial example above it seems there would be little practical use for GROUP_ID. grp_b . set null '(null)' select * from t2 order by grp_a. group_id() .---------. GRP_A COUNT(*) GROUP_ID() ---------.---------X1 10 X2 40 (null) 20 (null) 30 (null) 50 .

GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A1 A2 GRP_B TEST COUNT(*) ---------. Gotcha .grp_b.---------X1 1 X2 1 (null) 3 (null) 5 (null) 1 (null) 1 We now have two rows with "(null)" under GRP_B for each GRP_A value.GRP_B.NVL and NVL2 One might expect that NVL() or NVL2 could be used to distinguish the two nulls. count(*) from t2 GROUP BY GROUPING SETS( (GRP_A. GRP_A ) order by grp_a. 0 ) as test . count(*) from t2 GROUP BY GROUPING SETS( (GRP_A.A2 (null) 60 Now consider the following GROUP BY query. grp_b. grp_b . grp_b order by grp_a.GRP_B and the other representing the set of all values in T2. but let's use GROUPING SETS next and see what happens. GRP_B). GRP_A ) order by grp_a.GRP_B. 1. one representing the null values stored in T2. NVL( t2. count(*) from t2 group by grp_a. select grp_a. grp_b. 'n/a' ) AS GRP_B . like this select grp_a . GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A1 A2 A2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------.---------.---------X1 1 X2 1 (null) 3 (null) 1 So far so good.---------X1 1 1 X2 1 1 n/a 0 5 n/a 0 3 n/a 0 1 . nvl2( t2. GRP_B). grp_b . grp_b . select grp_a.

2 . In the output of the following query two of the four nulls represent the set of all GRP_B values. However. count(*) . GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A1 A2 A2 GRP_B COUNT(*) GROUPING_GRP_A GROUPING_GRP_B ---------.-------------. GROUPING The GROUPING function tells us whether or not a null in a result set represents the set of all values produced by a GROUPING SETS.---------. GROUPING can be used with DECODE to insert labels like "Total" into the result set. GROUPING( GRP_B ) GROUPING_GRP_B from t2 group by grouping sets( (grp_a. grp_a ) order by 1 . A value of "1" tells us it does.A2 n/a 0 1 but this is not the case because functions in the SELECT list operate on an intermediate form of the result set created after the GROUP BY clause is applied. grp_b . select grp_a as "Group A" . grp_b ) as "Group B" . or CUBE operation. ROLLUP. In the next topic we see how the GROUPING function can help us distinguish the two types of nulls. grp_b). Here is one example. set null '(null)' select grp_a . a value of "0" tells us it does not. not before. decode ( GROUPING( GRP_B ) . 'Total:' . 1. count(*) as "Count" .-------------X1 1 0 0 X2 1 0 0 (null) 3 0 0 (null) 5 0 1 (null) 1 0 0 (null) 1 0 1 Of course adding a column with zeros and ones to a report isn't the most user friendly way to distinguish grouped values. GROUPING( GRP_A ) GROUPING_GRP_A .

say we attempted this query. 'Total:'. grp_b). For example. decode( grouping( grp_b ). To work around the error we can either prefix the column name with its table name select . grp_b . 1.from t2 group by grouping sets( (grp_a. 1. GROUPING( GRP_B ) . grp_b ) AS GRP_B . 'Total:'. Group A ---------A1 A1 A1 A1 A2 A2 Group B Count ---------. hence the ORA00979 error. but Oracle interprets it as referring to the column alias. Gotcha . To learn how aggregate functions like COUNT() and SUM() deal with null values in non-GROUP BY columns see Nulls and Aggregate Functions. decode( grouping( grp_b ). In the ORDER BY GROUPING( GRP_B ) clause one might expect the "GRP_B" term to refer to the table column.---------X1 1 X2 1 (null) 3 Total: 5 (null) 1 Total: 1 Nulls and Aggregate Functions In this topic we explored working with null values in GROUP BY columns.ORA-00979 When using ORDER BY we need to be careful with the selection of column aliases. count(*) from t2 group by grouping sets( (grp_a. grp_b). grp_a ) order by grouping( GRP_B ) . grp_b ) AS GRP_B * ERROR at line 3: ORA-00979: not a GROUP BY expression Note how the table has a column called GRP_B and the SELECT list has a column alias also called GRP_B. select grp_a . . grp_a ) order by grp_a .

grp_a ) order by grouping( T2. 'Total:'. 'Total:'. select grp_a as "Group A" . grp_b).---------(null) 3 X1 1 X2 1 (null) 1 Total: 5 Total: 1 or change the column alias. Group A ---------A1 A1 A1 A2 A1 A2 Group B Count ---------. 1. What if we wanted to distinguish entire rows from each other? We could use a number of different GROUPING() calls like this column bit_vector format a10 select TO_CHAR( GROUPING( GRP_A ) ) || TO_CHAR( GROUPING( GRP_B ) ) AS BIT_VECTOR . grp_b). DECODE ( TO_CHAR( GROUPING( GRP_A ) ) || TO_CHAR( GROUPING( GRP_B ) ) . '01'. 'Group "' || GRP_A || '" Total' . grp_b ) AS "Group B" .GRP_B ) . grp_b ) AS GRP_B . GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A2 A1 A2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. count(*) from t2 group by grouping sets( (grp_a. or CUBE operation. decode( grouping( grp_b ). 1.---------(null) 3 X1 1 X2 1 (null) 1 Total: 5 Total: 1 GROUPING_ID In the preceding topic we saw how the GROUPING function could be used to identify null values representing the set of all values produced by a GROUPING SETS. ROLLUP. decode( grouping( grp_b ). grp_a ) order by grouping( GRP_B ) .grp_a . count(*) as "Count" from t2 group by grouping sets( (grp_a.

grp_b. '10'.---------. grp_b . The following example shows how it works. grp_b. () order by GROUPING( GRP_A ) . grp_b . grp_a . () ) order by GROUPING_ID( GRP_A.this column is only included for clarity . Fortunately for us the GROUPING_ID function exists. GROUPING( GRP_B ) .---------01 1 A1 5 01 1 A2 1 10 2 X1 1 10 2 X2 1 10 2 4 .-----------------------.---------Group "A1" Total 5 Group "A2" Total 1 Group "X1" Total 1 Group "X2" Total 1 Group "" Total 4 Grand Total 6 but if the number of grouping sets were large concatenating all the required GROUPING() terms together would get cumbersome. select to_char( grouping( grp_a ) ) || to_char( grouping( grp_b ) ) as bit_vector -. GRP_B ) . 'Group "' || GRP_B || '" Total' '11'. grp_a .---------.GRP_B) GRP_A GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. GRP_B ) . grp_b . BIT_VECTOR GROUPING_ID(GRP_A. GROUPING_ID( GRP_A.. grp_a . count(*) from t2 group by grouping sets ( grp_a. . . BIT_VECTOR ---------01 01 10 10 10 11 ) LABEL COUNT(*) -----------------------. It yields the decimal value of a bit vector (a string of zeros and ones) formed by concatenating all the GROUPING values for its parameters. 'Grand Total' NULL AS LABEL count(*) from t2 group by grouping sets ( grp_a. ) .

---------Group "A1" Total 5 Group "A2" Total 1 Group "X1" Total 1 Group "X2" Total 1 Group "" Total 4 Grand Total 6 Composite Columns The following example shows how GROUPING_ID works when a composite column. count(*) from t2 group by grouping sets ( (grp_a. grp_b . grp_b . grp_a. grp_b. select GROUPING_ID( GRP_A. 2 . () ) order by GROUPING_ID( GRP_A. 3. 'Group "' || GRP_B || '" Total' . grp_a . 'Group "' || GRP_A || '" Total' . GRP_B ) . grp_b. (GRP_A. grp_a . grp_b). GRP_B). is included in the GROUPING SETS clause.GRP_B) -----------------------0 0 GRP_A ---------A1 A1 ) GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. 3 . select DECODE ( GROUPING_ID( GRP_A. GRP_B ) . GROUPING_ID(GRP_A. () order by 1 . LABEL COUNT(*) -----------------------.11 3 6 Here is how we could use GROUPING_ID to streamline our original query. 'Grand Total' . GRP_B ) . 2. NULL ) AS LABEL . count(*) from t2 group by grouping sets ( grp_a.---------X1 1 X2 1 . 1.

We simply add a HAVING clause as follows. Say. for example. grp_a . grp_b ) HAVING GROUPING_ID( GRP_A. count(*) from t2 group by cube( grp_a. GRP_B ) != 3 order by . we started with a query like this one select grouping_id( grp_a.GRP_B) -----------------------0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 2 3 GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A2 A1 A2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. select grouping_id( grp_a. grp_b ) order by 1. grp_b . grp_a . 2. 3 . grp_b . GROUPING_ID(GRP_A. grp_b ) . grp_b ) .0 0 1 1 2 2 2 3 A1 A2 A1 A2 X1 X2 3 1 5 1 1 1 4 6 GROUPING_ID and HAVING GROUPING_ID can also be used in the HAVING clause to filter out unwanted groupings. count(*) from t2 group by cube( grp_a.---------X1 1 X2 1 3 1 5 1 X1 1 X2 1 4 6 and then we wanted to exclude the empty set grouping (the one with a GROUPING_ID of "3").

for example. nvl( grp_b. grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . grp_b . set null '(null)' select grp_a . 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . grp_b . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) GRP_B ---------b1 b2 (null) b3 (null) (null) NVL_GRP_A_ NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------.---------b1 1 2 b2 1 3 a1 0 5 b3 1 3 a2 0 3 (null) 0 8 is not simply the result of unioning together three identical subqueries with different GROUP BY clauses. count(*) from t GROUP BY ROLLUP ( GRP_A. 2.GRP_B) -----------------------0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 2 Reverse Engineering GROUPING BY Queries At times we are faced with a complex GROUP BY query written by someone else and figuring out the equivalent UNION ALL query can help us better understand its results. GRP_B ) order by grp_a . grp_b . nvl2( grp_b. 1.---------. nvl( grp_b. grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . 1.---------X1 1 X2 1 3 1 5 1 X1 1 X2 1 4 GROUPING_ID(GRP_A. set null (null) select grp_a .. This is not as easy as it first may seem. 3 GRP_A ---------A1 A1 A1 A2 A1 A2 GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. A query like this.

nvl2( grp_b. 1. GRP_B ) order by grp_a . count(*) from t GROUP BY () UNION ALL select grp_a . nvl2( grp_b. Step 1 Replace any ROLLUP or CUBE operators with their equivalent GROUPING SETS operator. To determine the real equivalent UNION query we can use the following algorithm.. In our example the query select grp_a . such a query produces an error because the first and second subqueries select columns that are not in the GROUP BY clause. 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . 1. nvl( grp_b. count(*) from t GROUP BY ( GRP_A ) UNION ALL select grp_a . grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . nvl( grp_b. count(*) from t GROUP BY ROLLUP ( GRP_A. count(*) from t GROUP BY ( GRP_A. GRP_B ) order by . nvl2( grp_b. grp_b . grp_b . grp_a * ERROR at line 2: ORA-00979: not a GROUP BY expression As you can see. nvl2( grp_b. 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . grp_b . 1. 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . 1. grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . nvl( grp_b. grp_b . 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b .

0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . GRP_B ) ) order by grp_a . nvl2( grp_b. 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) GRP_B ---------b1 b2 (null) b3 (null) (null) NVL_GRP_A_ NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. count(*) from t GROUP BY GROUPING SETS ( () . nvl( grp_b. grp_b .---------. grp_b .---------b1 1 2 b2 1 3 a1 0 5 b3 1 3 a2 0 3 (null) 0 8 is replaced with select grp_a . nvl2( grp_b. 1. grp_b . ( GRP_A. select grp_a . 1. which is an empty set in our example. ( GRP_A ) . count(*) from t . nvl( grp_b. grp_b .---------. GRP_A ---------a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) GRP_B ---------b1 b2 (null) b3 (null) (null) NVL_GRP_A_ NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) ---------. grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b .---------b1 1 2 b2 1 3 a1 0 5 b3 1 3 a2 0 3 (null) 0 8 Step 2a Next start with a query that groups by only the first term in the GROUPING SETS clause.grp_a . grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b .

----------. grp_b .---------a1 (null) a1 0 5 . If the SELECT list contains columns that are not in the GROUP BY clause then replace those columns with NULL. select grp_a . nvl2( NULL. select grp_a .GROUP BY () . NULL ) as nvl_grp_a_b . 1. NULL as grp_b . 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . count(*) from t GROUP BY ( GRP_A ) . nvl2( NULL. 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b .----------. NULL as grp_b . 1. grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . ( GRP_A ). count(*) from t GROUP BY () .---------. nvl( NULL.---------(null) (null) (null) 0 8 Step 2b Now we repeat the first step using the second term in the GROUPING SETS clause. GRP_A GRP_B NVL_GRP_A_B NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) -----.---------. In the query above both GRP_A and GRP_B are absent from the GROUP BY clause so we replace all occurrences of these columns in the SELECT list with NULL.-----. nvl2( grp_b. 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . This time GRP_B is in the SELECT list but it is not in the GROUP BY list. GRP_A GRP_B NVL_GRP_A_B NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) -----. column column column column grp_a grp_b nvl_grp_a_b nvl2_grp_b format format format format a6 a6 a11 999999999 select NULL as grp_a . nvl( grp_b.-----. We therefore need to replace GRP_B with NULL. 1. nvl( NULL. count(*) from t GROUP BY ( GRP_A ) .

---------. count(*) from t GROUP BY ( GRP_A. select NULL as grp_a . nvl2( grp_b. select grp_a . 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b .a2 (null) a2 0 3 Step 2c For the last set in the GROUPING SETS clause all selected columns are listed in the GROUP BY clause so no further transformation is needed. nvl( grp_b. nvl( grp_b. GRP_A -----a1 a1 a2 GRP_B -----b1 b2 b3 NVL_GRP_A_B NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) ----------. nvl( NULL. grp_b . grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . count(*) from . 1. GRP_B ) . grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . count(*) from t group by () UNION ALL select grp_a . 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . count(*) from t group by ( grp_a ) UNION ALL select grp_a . 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . NULL ) as nvl_grp_a_b . nvl2( grp_b. 1. NULL as grp_b . nvl( NULL. grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b .---------b1 1 2 b2 1 3 b3 1 3 Step 3 The next step is to combine the three step 2 queries with UNION ALL and add an ORDER BY clause. 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . NULL as grp_b . We can use the original SELECT list as-is. nvl2( NULL. 1. nvl2( NULL. grp_b . 1.

0 ) as nvl2_grp_b .---------. count(*) from t group by ( grp_a ) union all select grp_a . grp_b ) order by grp_a . grp_b . GRP_A -----a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) GRP_B -----b1 b2 (null) b3 (null) (null) NVL_GRP_A_B NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) ----------. select null as grp_a . GRP_B . nvl( grp_b. 1. nvl2( grp_b. 0 ) to simpler. null as grp_b . 0 AS NVL2_GRP_B . count(*) from t group by ( grp_a. NULL ) and nvl2( NULL . null as grp_b . GRP_A AS NVL_GRP_A_B . grp_b .---------b1 1 2 b2 1 3 a1 0 5 b3 1 3 a2 0 3 (null) 0 8 Step 4 (Optional) Lastly we reduce expressions like nvl( NULL. 1. grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . equivalent terms.t group by ( grp_a. GRP_A GRP_B NVL_GRP_A_B NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) . NULL AS NVL_GRP_A_B . 0 AS NVL2_GRP_B . count(*) from t group by () union all select grp_a . grp_b ) ORDER BY GRP_A .

'd1'. . 'c1'. data. '10' '20' '30' '40' '50' '12' ) ) ) ) ) ) . . nvl2( grp_b. . grp_b . . 1. . 'd2'. insert insert insert insert insert insert into into into into into into t t t t t t values values values values values values ( ( ( ( ( ( 'a1' 'a1' 'a1' 'a1' 'a1' 'a2' . 'd1'.---------. grp_b varchar2(10) . which is repeated below for your convenience. 'd1'. 'b1' 'b1' 'b2' 'b2' 'b2' 'b3' . val number ) . 'c1'. 'c2'.---------b1 1 2 b2 1 3 a1 0 5 b3 1 3 a2 0 3 (null) 0 8 Setup Run the code on this page in SQL*Plus to create the sample tables.---------. .-----a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) -----b1 b2 (null) b3 (null) (null) ----------. GRP_B ) order by grp_a . nvl( grp_b.---------b1 1 2 b2 1 3 a1 0 5 b3 1 3 a2 0 3 (null) 0 8 Result The end result of the last step is a query which returns the same rows as the original GROUPING SETS query. . GRP_A -----a1 a1 a1 a2 a2 (null) GRP_B -----b1 b2 (null) b3 (null) (null) NVL_GRP_A_B NVL2_GRP_B COUNT(*) ----------. count(*) from t GROUP BY ROLLUP ( GRP_A. . etc. grp_c varchar2(10) . 0 ) as nvl2_grp_b . . grp_b . create table t ( grp_a varchar2(10) . . . 'c2'. . . used by the examples in this section. grp_d varchar2(10) . grp_a ) as nvl_grp_a_b . . . select grp_a . 'd1'. 'c1'. . 'd1'. 'c1'.

exit . . drop table t . those made by SET. etc. insert into t values ( 'a2' . . . .insert into t values ( 'a2' . val number ) . . . 'X1' 'X2' null null null null . . To clear session state changes (e. 'b3' . . created in earlier parts of this section. . . 'd2'. . 'c2'. . 'c2'. . 'b3' . and VARIABLE commands) exit your SQL*Plus session after running these cleanup commands. 'd2'. create table t2 ( grp_a varchar2(10) .g. . drop table t2 . '22' ) . '32' ) . commit . '10' '40' '20' '30' '50' '60' ) ) ) ) ) ) . . commit . insert insert insert insert insert insert into into into into into into t2 t2 t2 t2 t2 t2 values values values values values values ( ( ( ( ( ( 'A1' 'A1' 'A1' 'A1' 'A1' 'A2' . Cleanup Run the code on this page to drop the sample tables. grp_b varchar2(10) . procedures. COLUMN.

Hierarchical Data This section presents various topics related to hierarchical data (also known as "tree structured" data). Connecting Rows Say we wanted to take the following directory names from a file system and store them in a database table. KEY ---------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig PARENT_KEY ---------(null) nls nls (null) server server config server ctx ctx data data data ctx It is often useful to order and display such rows using the hierarchical relationship. An example of hierarchical data is shown below. /nls /nls/demo /nls/mesg . KEY_INDENTED --------------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig KEY_PATH ------------------------/nls /nls/demo /nls/mesg /server /server/bin /server/config /server/config/log /server/ctx /server/ctx/admin /server/ctx/data /server/ctx/data/delx /server/ctx/data/enlx /server/ctx/data/eslx /server/ctx/mig In this tutorial we explore various Oracle mechanisms for working with hierarchical data. Doing so yields a result set that looks like this (KEY values are indented to highlight the hierarchy).

The following snippet returns rows sorted hierarchically. . level from t START WITH parent_key is null CONNECT BY parent_key = prior key . which holds the directory name. (Directory names like these would not typically be used as primary keys.) select * from t . We are bending the rules here for illustrative purposes. and a PARENT_KEY column. starting from the root rows (those with no parents) on down through to the leaf rows (those with no children). CONNECT BY identifies all subsequent rows in the hierarchy. which connects the directory to its parent directory./server /server/bin /server/config /server/config/log /server/ctx /server/ctx/admin /server/ctx/data /server/ctx/data/delx /server/ctx/data/enlx /server/ctx/data/eslx /server/ctx/mig To do this we could use a table with a KEY column. START WITH identifies the topmost rows in the hierarchy. KEY ---------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig PARENT_KEY ---------(null) nls nls (null) server server config server ctx ctx data data data ctx NAME ---------NLS DATA DEMO SERVER BIN CONFIG LOG CTX ADMIN DATA DELX ENLX ESLX MESG To connect and order the data in this table using the PARENT_KEY hierarchy we can create a Hierarchical Query using the START WITH and CONNECT BY clauses of the SELECT command. select key .

To better illustrate hierarchical relationships the LEVEL column is commonly used to indent selected values. KEY_INDENTED LEVEL --------------.-----nls 1 demo 2 mesg 2 server 1 bin 2 config 2 log 3 ctx 2 admin 3 data 3 delx 4 enlx 4 eslx 4 mig 3 The LEVEL pseudocolumn in the previous result indicates which level in the hierarchy each row is at. It can be used outside the CONNECT BY clause if required.KEY LEVEL ---------. level-1 ) || key as key_indented . The topmost level is assigned a LEVEL of 1. . level from t START WITH parent_key is null CONNECT BY parent_key = prior key . level-1 ) || key as key_indented .-----nls 1 demo 2 mesg 2 server 1 bin 2 config 2 log 3 ctx 2 admin 3 data 3 delx 4 enlx 4 eslx 4 mig 3 The PRIOR operator in hierarchical queries gives us access to column information from the parent of the current row. like this. select lpad( ' '. select lpad( ' '.

level-1 ) || key as key_indented . KEY_INDENTED --------------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig PRIOR_KEY ---------(null) nls nls (null) server server config server ctx ctx data data data ctx as prior_key as prior_name . KEY_INDENTED LEVEL --------------. level from t START WITH KEY = 'delx' connect by key = PRIOR PARENT_KEY .-----delx 1 data 2 ctx 3 server 4 Gotchas . select lpad( ' '. simply choose a leaf row as the starting point and apply the PRIOR operator to the PARENT_KEY column instead of the KEY column.PRIOR key PRIOR name from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key . from leaf to root. PRIOR_NAME ---------(null) NLS NLS (null) SERVER SERVER CONFIG SERVER CTX CTX DATA DATA DATA CTX Changing Direction To traverse the tree in the opposite direction.

CONNECT BY conditions are not applied to rows in level 1 of the hierarchy. level from t WHERE LEVEL != 3 start with key = 'server' connect by parent_key = prior key -. level from t start with key = 'delx' connect by key = PRIOR PARENT_KEY and KEY <> 'delx' . level-1 ) || key as key_indented . START WITH clause 3. In the following snippet note how the KEY <> 'delx' condition did not filter out the row with a KEY value of 'delx'. 1. Filter Condition in WHERE select lpad(' '. . Filter Condition in CONNECT BY select lpad(' '. The following two snippets demonstrate how this order of operations affects query results when filter conditions are in the WHERE clause versus when they are in the CONNECT BY clause. select lpad( ' '. CONNECT BY clause 4. KEY_INDENTED LEVEL --------------. level from t --start with key = 'server' CONNECT BY parent_key = prior key and LEVEL != 3 .-----delx 1 data 2 ctx 3 server 4 Order of Operations The clauses in hierarchical queries are processed in the following order. join conditions (either in the FROM clause or the WHERE clause) 2. level-1 ) || key as key_indented . WHERE clause conditions that are not joins. level-1 ) || key as key_indented .

in your hierarchical queries. you should generally not use any features that apply other sorting schemes. For example. such as ORDER BY or GROUP BY. Hierarchical Query select key from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key ORDER BY NAME . Doing so would negate the need for START WITH and CONNECT BY in the first place.-----server 1 bin 2 config 2 ctx 2 delx 4 enlx 4 eslx 4 KEY_INDENTED LEVEL --------------. Regular Query select key from t ----ORDER BY NAME . It yields the same results as if CONNECT BY was not used at all.-----server 1 bin 2 config 2 ctx 2 Sorting Since START WITH and CONNECT BY apply a hierarchical sorting scheme to your data. .KEY_INDENTED LEVEL --------------. given data with the following hierarchies KEY_INDENTED --------------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig the ORDER BY clause in the hierarchical query on the left below destroys the hierarchical order.

KEY_INDENTED --------------server ctx mig data eslx enlx delx admin config log bin nls mesg . level-1) || key as key_indented from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key ORDER SIBLINGS BY KEY DESC . It allows you to control the sort order of all rows with the same parent (aka "siblings"). KEY_INDENTED --------------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx Descending Siblings select lpad(' '. the ORDER SIBLINGS BY clause will not destroy the hierarchical ordering of queries. The following examples show how ORDER SIBLINGS BY can be used to sort siblings in ascending and descending order respectively. level-1) || key as key_indented from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key ORDER SIBLINGS BY KEY ASC . Ascending Siblings select lpad(' '.KEY ---------admin bin config ctx data demo delx mesg enlx eslx log mig nls server KEY ---------admin bin config ctx data demo delx mesg enlx eslx log mig nls server ORDER SIBLINGS BY Unlike ORDER BY and GROUP_BY.

if v_parent_key is null then return ( p_separator || v_key ). level-1) || key as key_indented as key_indented . key v_parent_key.to guard against things like separator characters -. Ascending Siblings Descending Siblings select select lpad(' '.etc.appearing in KEY values. exception when no_data_found then return( null ). -. ). hierarchical loops in the data.In a real application more robust code would be needed -. p_separator varchar2 default '/' ) return varchar2 is v_parent_key t. end. else return ( KEY_PATH( v_parent_key. level-1) || key lpad(' '.Note: --. -. / show errors No errors.key%type .This function is only for demonstration purposes. v_key t.key%type . p_separator ) || p_separator || v_key end if.parent_key%type . v_key t key = p_key . -----------------------------------------------------------create or replace function KEY_PATH ( p_key t.mig demo Oracle 8i and Earlier The ORDER SIBLINGS BY clause is only available in Oracle version 9i or greater. ------------------------------------------------------------. recursive PL/SQL function can be used in place of ORDER SIBLINGS BY. For earlier versions a custom. begin select into from where parent_key.

select lpad(' '. '/' ). 50. 0 otherwise.KEY For descending siblings the code RPAD( KEY_PATH( KEY.KEY 2. '/' ). KEY_INDENTED --------------server ctx mig data eslx enlx delx admin config log bin nls mesg demo Gotchas KEY_PATH's p_separator character should be a character that 1. does not exist in values under T. CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF The CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF pseudocolumn returns 1 if the current row is a leaf of the tree defined by the CONNECT BY condition. level-1 ) || key as key_indented . sorts lower than all characters that exist in T.KEY ("~" in this example). 50. '~' ) should use a length larger than any possible KEY_PATH value ("50" in this example) and it should use a padding character that sorts higher than all characters contained in T. '/' ) ASC . CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF from t start with key = 'server' connect by parent_key = prior key . KEY_INDENTED --------------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key ORDER BY RPAD( KEY_PATH( KEY. '~' ) DESC . Violating these rules can result in incorrectly sorted output.from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key ORDER BY KEY_PATH( KEY.

" LEVEL <= 2 " is placed in the WHERE clause. In the following query however.----------------server 0 bin 1 config 0 log 1 ctx 0 admin 1 data 0 delx 1 enlx 1 eslx 1 mig 1 It is important to recognize that CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF only considers the tree defined by the CONNECT BY condition. not the CONNECT BY clause as above. causing CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF to be 0 for "config" and "ctx" even though those rows look like leaf nodes in the end result.. connect_by_isleaf . select lpad(' '. KEY_INDENTED CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF --------------. In it. not that of the underlying table data. They are filtered out by the " LEVEL <= 2 " condition. The following example illustrates this. the order of evaluation of the CONNECT BY and WHERE clauses can also affect the behaviour of the CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF pseudo column.----------------server 0 bin 1 config 1 ctx 1 As we saw happen with the LEVEL column in the preceding tutorial. connect_by_isleaf from t start with key = 'server' CONNECT BY parent_key = prior key and LEVEL <= 2 -. For example. KEY_INDENTED CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF --------------. level-1 ) || key as key_indented . those same rows are considered leaf nodes (they have a CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF value of 1) because none of the descendents exist in the tree as defined by the CONNECT BY clause.filters out descendents of "config" and "ctx" . select lpad(' '. in table T the rows with a KEY of 'config' and 'ctx' have descendents (children and grandchildren) and are therefore not leaf nodes in that context. level-1 ) || key as key_indented .

KEY_INDENTED CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF --------------.----------------server 0 bin 1 config 0 ctx 0 CONNECT_BY_ROOT The CONNECT_BY_ROOT operator returns column information from the root row of the hierarchy. level . name . CONNECT_BY_ROOT name as root_name from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key . level-1 ) || key as key_indented . KEY_INDENTED LEVEL KEY --------------. CONNECT_BY_ROOT key as root_key .filter out descendents of "config" and "ctx".-----.from t WHERE -.this time using the WHERE clause start with key = 'server' connect by parent_key = prior key . key . select lpad(' '. LEVEL <= 2 -.---------nls 1 nls demo 2 demo mesg 2 mesg server 1 server bin 2 bin config 2 config log 3 log ctx 2 ctx admin 3 admin data 3 data delx 4 delx enlx 4 enlx eslx 4 eslx mig 3 mig NAME ---------NLS DATA DEMO SERVER BIN CONFIG LOG CTX ADMIN DATA DELX ENLX ESLX MESG ROOT_KEY ---------nls nls nls server server server server server server server server server server server ROOT_NAME ---------NLS NLS NLS SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER SERVER Gotchas .

which already operates on the root row itself. KEY_INDENTED LEVEL ROOT_KEY --------------. In the following example we use CONNECT_BY_ROOT in the CONNECT BY condition to prevent any rows beyond level 3 under only the "server" root row from being included in the results. select lpad(' '. SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH The SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH function returns a single string containing all the column values encountered in the path from root to node. in practice. level-1 ) || key name . CONNECT_BY_ROOT key as root_key from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key and not ( level > 3 and connect_by_root key = 'server' ) . The Gotchas section of topic CONNECT BY LEVEL Method has an example where using CONNECT_BY_ROOT in CONNECT BY does not work so well. as key_indented .-----.The manual page for CONNECT_BY_ROOT states You cannot specify this operator in the START WITH condition or the CONNECT BY condition. While there would be little use for CONNECT_BY_ROOT in the START WITH condition. select lpad(' '. level-1 ) || key as key_indented . level . . actually works in some cases (as tested in Oracle 10g).---------nls 1 nls demo 2 nls mesg 2 nls server 1 server bin 2 server config 2 server log 3 server ctx 2 server admin 3 server data 3 server mig 3 server The fact that the query above contradicts the documentation yet works without error in 10g suggests a bug in either the documentation or the SQL engine. using CONNECT_BY_ROOT in the CONNECT BY condition can be useful and.

begin select parent_key.SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH( key .to guard against things like separator characters -. key from t into where v_parent_key.key%type . hierarchical loops in the data.This function is only for demonstration purposes.Note: --. recursive PL/SQL function can be used in place of SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH. For earlier versions a custom. KEY_PATH ------------------------/nls /nls/demo /nls/mesg /server /server/bin /server/config /server/config/log /server/ctx /server/ctx/admin /server/ctx/data /server/ctx/data/delx /server/ctx/data/enlx /server/ctx/data/eslx /server/ctx/mig NAME_PATH ------------------------/NLS /NLS/DATA /NLS/DEMO /SERVER /SERVER/BIN /SERVER/CONFIG /SERVER/CONFIG/LOG /SERVER/CTX /SERVER/CTX/ADMIN /SERVER/CTX/DATA /SERVER/CTX/DATA/DELX /SERVER/CTX/DATA/ENLX /SERVER/CTX/DATA/ESLX /SERVER/CTX/MESG SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH is only available in Oracle version 9i or greater. -. p_separator varchar2 default '/' ) return varchar2 is v_parent_key t.key%type . -----------------------------------------------------------create or replace function KEY_PATH ( p_key t.In a real application more robust code would be needed -.appearing in KEY values. v_key key = p_key . KEY_INDENTED --------------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig NAME ---------NLS DATA DEMO SERVER BIN CONFIG LOG CTX ADMIN DATA DELX ENLX ESLX MESG as key_path as name_path . ------------------------------------------------------------. '/' ) SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH( name.etc. '/' ) from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key . -. v_key t.parent_key%type . .

e. if v_parent_key is null then return ( p_separator || v_key ). name . . level-1 ) || key as key_indented . KEY_INDENTED --------------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig NAME ---------NLS DATA DEMO SERVER BIN CONFIG LOG CTX ADMIN DATA DELX ENLX ESLX MESG KEY_PATH ------------------------/nls /nls/demo /nls/mesg /server /server/bin /server/config /server/config/log /server/ctx /server/ctx/admin /server/ctx/data /server/ctx/data/delx /server/ctx/data/enlx /server/ctx/data/eslx /server/ctx/mig With this approach an additional function would be needed if the path for another column. other than a path is required then the START WITH and CONNECT BY clauses can be omitted since KEY_PATH already knows how to traverse the hierarchy. LEVEL. were required.). select key . exception when no_data_found then return( null ). If no hierarchical information. KEY_PATH( key. else return ( KEY_PATH( v_parent_key. like NAME. select lpad(' '. p_separator ) || p_separator || v_key end if.g. '/' ) as KEY_PATH from t start with parent_key is null connect by parent_key = prior key . name . end. / show errors No errors.

). . varchar2(10) . . . 'nls' . . 'delx' . 'ctx' . varchar2(10) . '/' ) as KEY_PATH from t order by KEY_PATH . null . . ). 'SERVER' 'BIN' 'CONFIG' 'LOG' 'CTX' 'ADMIN' 'DATA' 'DELX' 'ENLX' 'ESLX' 'MESG' ). used by the examples in this section. 'log' . . 'mig' . ). ). 'eslx' . . 'bin' . t varchar2(10) . etc. 'enlx' . 'admin' . 'data' . ). create table ( key parent_key name ). ). KEY ---------nls demo mesg server bin config log ctx admin data delx enlx eslx mig NAME ---------NLS DATA DEMO SERVER BIN CONFIG LOG CTX ADMIN DATA DELX ENLX ESLX MESG KEY_PATH ------------------------/nls /nls/demo /nls/mesg /server /server/bin /server/config /server/config/log /server/ctx /server/ctx/admin /server/ctx/data /server/ctx/data/delx /server/ctx/data/enlx /server/ctx/data/eslx /server/ctx/mig Setup Run the code on this page in SQL*Plus to create the sample tables. ). ). 'DEMO' . column level format 99999 column key_indented format a15 column root_key format a10 into into into into into into into into into into into t t t t t t t t t t t values values values values values values values values values values values ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( 'server'.KEY_PATH( key. ). 'NLS' . 'config'. 'DATA' . data. . insert into t values ( 'nls' insert into t values ( 'demo' insert into t values ( 'mesg' insert insert insert insert insert insert insert insert insert insert insert commit. ). . . ). ). 'nls' null 'server' 'server' 'config' 'server' 'ctx' 'ctx' 'data' 'data' 'data' 'ctx' . . ).

drop function KEY_PATH . drop table t . and VARIABLE commands) exit your SQL*Plus session after running these cleanup commands.column root_name column key_path column name_path set null '(null)' format a10 format a25 format a25 variable v_target_key varchar2(10) Cleanup Run the code on this page to drop the sample tables.g. exit . those made by SET. procedures. etc. COLUMN. created in earlier parts of this section. To clear session state changes (e.

With materialized views. For more complex applications links at the end of the tutorial will point to information on advanced features not covered here. Materialized views can be used for many purposes. e. This tutorial explores materialized view basics. The power of materialized views comes from the fact that. but should not be used in new code. including: • • • • Denormalization Validation Data Warehousing Replication. You may still see this term in some Oracle 11g materialized view error messages. Since SQL Snippets is concerned mainly with relational uses of materialized views we will avoid the contradictory terms "master" and "detail" all together and instead use the term "base tables". Terminology With relational views the FROM clause objects a view is based on are called "base tables".g. these objects are either called "detail tables" (in data warehousing documentation) or "master tables" (in replication documentation and the Oracle Database SQL Reference guide). partitioning. on the other hand. After completing it you should have enough information to use materialized views effectively in simple applications. thus remaining consistent with relational view terminology. refresh groups. This keyword is supported for backward compatibility. . once created. Oracle can automatically synchronize a materialized view's data with its source information as required with little or no programming effort. updatable materialized views.Materialized Views A Materialized View is effectively a database table that contains the results of a query. Materialized Views were originally known as "Snapshots" in early releases of Oracle.

KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c select * from V .Views vs Materialized Views Like its predecessor the view. materialized views allow you to store the definition of a query in the database. select * from MV . select * from T . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c . Table View create view v as select * from t . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c Materialized View create materialized view mv as select * from t .

Refreshing can either be done manually. . ROWID -----------------AAAgZFAAEAAADyEAAA AAAgZFAAEAAADyEAAB AAAgZFAAEAAADyEAAC AAAgZFAAEAAADyEAAD The difference between views and materialized views becomes even more evident than this when table data is updated. after the update. differ from those of the table. In the following queries note how the rowid's for the table and the view are identical. as below. on the other hand. ROWID -----------------AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAA AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAB AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAC AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAD View select rowid from V order by rowid . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----A B C View select * from V . Data in materialized views must be refreshed to keep it synchronized with its base table. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----A B C select * from V . materialized views also store the results of the query in the database. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c View Materialized View Note how. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----A B C select * from MV . select * from T . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----A B C Materialized View select * from MV .Unlike views. indicating the view returns the exact same data stored in the table. ROWID -----------------AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAA AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAB AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAC AAAgY9AAEAAAAVfAAD Materialized View select rowid from MV order by rowid . The rowids of the materialized view. Table update t set val = upper(val). KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----A B C execute dbms_mview.refresh( 'MV' ). This indicates the materialized view is returning a physically separate copy of the table data. Table select rowid from T order by rowid . Table select * from T . Now that the materialized view has been refreshed its data matches that of its base table. or automatically by Oracle in some cases. the view data matches the table data but the materialized view data does not. however.

even when the new result set is identical to the old one. for Complete refresh. drop view v . select key. select key. METHOD => 'C' ). We will explore this type of refresh next. The REFRESH COMPLETE clause tells Oracle to perform complete refreshes by default when a materialized view is refreshed. the simplest way being a complete refresh. Let's see a complete refresh in action now. . val. create materialized view mv REFRESH COMPLETE as select * from t . When a complete refresh occurs the materialized view's defining query is executed and the entire result set replaces the data currently residing in the materialized view.Cleanup drop materialized view mv . REFRESH COMPLETE There are various ways to refresh the data in a materialized view. rowid from mv . The "list" parameter accepts a list of materialized views to refresh (in our case we only have one) and the "method" parameter accepts a "C". KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c ROWID -----------------AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAA AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAB AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAC AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAD execute DBMS_MVIEW. val.REFRESH( LIST => 'MV'. This is because complete refreshes create a whole new set of data. If a materialized view contains many rows and the base table's rows change infrequently refreshing the materialized view completely can be an expensive operation. commit. We will use the DBMS_MVIEW. rowid from mv . In such cases it would be better to process only the changed rows. even though the data in table T was unchanged throughout. update t set val = lower(val). KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c ROWID -----------------AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAE AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAF AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAG AAAWgHAAEAAAAIEAAH Note how the rowids in the second query differ from those of the first.REFRESH procedure to initiate it.

Cleanup drop materialized view mv .-------KEY SNAPTIME$$ DMLTYPE$$ OLD_NEW$$ CHANGE_VECTOR$$ Type ---------------------NUMBER DATE VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) RAW(255) The MLOG$_T.KEY. The other MLOG$ columns are system generated. In practice developers other than Dizwell never actually need to reference this table. This is called fast refreshing. Before a materialized view can perform a fast refresh however it needs a mechanism to capture any changes made to its base table. describe MLOG$_T Name Null? -------------------------------------------. This is because a table can only ever have one materialized view log related to it at a time. Rows are automatically added to MLOG$_T when base table T is changed.KEY column mirrors the base table's primary key column T. no rows selected The query above shows that a materialized view log is initially empty upon creation. We can create a materialized view log on our test table. Fortunately there is a way to refresh only the changed rows in a materialized view's base table. . To see what a materialized view log looks like we can examine the table used to implement it. UPDATE t set val = upper( val ) where KEY = 1 . select * from MLOG$_T . This mechanism is called a Materialized View Log. but showing it here helps illustrate materialized view log behaviour. describe T Name Null? Type -------------------------------------------. like this. Materialized View Logs As mentioned earlier. so a name is not required. complete refreshes of materialized views can be expensive operations.------------------------------------KEY NOT NULL NUMBER VAL VARCHAR2(5) create materialized view log on t . T. Note how the materialized view log is not given a name.

dmltype$$ from MLOG$_T . drop materialized view log on t . drop materialized view log on t . val ) values ( 5. because WITH PRIMARY KEY is the default option when no WITH clause is specified.KEY.-------KEY SNAPTIME$$ DMLTYPE$$ OLD_NEW$$ CHANGE_VECTOR$$ Type --------------------NUMBER DATE VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) RAW(255) Note how MLOG$_T contains T's primary key column. dmltype$$ from MLOG$_T . create materialized view log on t WITH ROWID . Rollback complete.INSERT into t ( KEY. WITH ROWID To include rowids instead of primary keys WITH ROWID can be specified. desc mlog$_t Name Null? -------------------------------------------. no rows selected WITH PRIMARY KEY To include the base table's primary key column in a materialized view log the WITH PRIMARY KEY clause can be specified. T. This materialized view log is equivalent to the one created earlier in this topic. 'e' ). create materialized view log on t WITH PRIMARY KEY . which did not have a WITH clause. column dmltype$$ format a10 select key. so are the changes to MLOG$_T. KEY ---------1 5 DMLTYPE$$ ---------U I If the changes affecting T are rolled back. rollback . select key. .

UPDATE T2 set amt = 333 where key = 60 .------------------------------------KEY M_ROW$$ SNAPTIME$$ DMLTYPE$$ OLD_NEW$$ CHANGE_VECTOR$$ Type NUMBER VARCHAR2(255) DATE VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) RAW(255) In this case both KEY and M_ROW$$ appear in the log table. 'e' ).g. INSERT into T values ( 5. 3. drop materialized view log on t . key. 300 ). create materialized view log on t WITH ROWID. UPDATE T set val = upper(val) where key = 5 . drop materialized view log on t .-------M_ROW$$ SNAPTIME$$ DMLTYPE$$ OLD_NEW$$ CHANGE_VECTOR$$ Type --------------------VARCHAR2(255) DATE VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) RAW(255) Note how the KEY column was replaced by the M_ROW$$ column. commit. create materialized view log on t2 WITH SEQUENCE . dmltype$$ from mlog$_T . INSERT into T2 values ( 60. SEQUENCE$$ KEY DMLTYPE$$ . A materialized view log can also be created with both a rowid and a primary key column. e. insert. PRIMARY KEY . select SEQUENCE$$. are performed on multiple base tables in a single transaction. create materialized view log on t WITH SEQUENCE . which contains rowids from table T. desc mlog$_t Name Null? -------------------------------------------. update and delete.desc mlog$_t Name Null? -------------------------------------------. WITH SEQUENCE A special SEQUENCE column can be include in the materialized view log to help Oracle apply updates to materialized view logs in the correct order when a mix of Data Manipulation (DML) commands.

column old_new$$ format a10 .---------. In fact. key.---------. dmltype$$ from mlog$_T2 . SEQUENCE$$ KEY DMLTYPE$$ ---------.---------60082 60 I 60084 60 U Since mixed DML is a common occurrence SEQUENCE will be specified in most materialized view logs. drop materialized view log on t . "Oracle recommends that the keyword SEQUENCE be included in your materialized view log statement unless you are sure that you will never perform a mixed DML operation (a combination of INSERT. In the next snippet we include the VAL column.------------------------------------KEY VAL SNAPTIME$$ DMLTYPE$$ OLD_NEW$$ CHANGE_VECTOR$$ select * from t . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 5 VAL ----a b c E Type NUMBER VARCHAR2(5) DATE VARCHAR2(1) VARCHAR2(1) RAW(255) UPDATE t set val = 'f' where key = 5 .from Creating Materialized Views: Materialized View Logs" WITH Column List The WITH clause can also contain a list of specific base table columns. or DELETE operations on multiple tables). Oracle recommends it. desc mlog$_t Name Null? -------------------------------------------. create materialized view log on t WITH ( VAL )." -.---------. UPDATE.---------60081 5 I 60083 5 U select SEQUENCE$$.

There is no need to store the new value for an update because it can be derived by applying the change vector (a RAW value stored in CHANGE_VECTOR$$. old_new$$ from mlog$_t . create materialized view log on t with sequence.select key. However this does not appear to be the case when the component is a column list. KEY VAL OLD_NEW$$ ---------. primary key * ERROR at line 1: ORA-00922: missing or invalid option Omitting the comma before the column list works better. primary key .---------5 E O INCLUDING NEW VALUES Clause In the last snippet we see that the VAL column contains values as they existed before the update operation. old_new$$ from mlog$_t order by sequence$$ . We can do that using the INCLUDING NEW VALUES clause. The OLD_NEW$$ column identifies the value as either an old or a new value. VAL. ( VAL ). update t set val = 'g' where key = 5 .g. e. val. create materialized view log on t with sequence. aka the "old" value. drop materialized view log on t . it helps to have both the old value and the new value explicitly saved in the materialized view log. column old_new$$ format a9 select sequence$$.----. like this. which Oracle uses internally during refreshes) to the old value.----60085 5 f 60086 5 g OLD_NEW$$ --------O N Note how both the old and the new values are stored in the same column. ( VAL ). "( VAL )".---------. drop materialized view log on T . val. key. which we will identify in later topics. Gotcha .Commas The syntax diagrams for the CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW LOG command indicate a comma is required between each component of the WITH clause. . In some situations. create materialized view log on t with sequence ( VAL ) INCLUDING NEW VALUES . SEQUENCE$$ KEY VAL ---------.

2) . Gotcha . . No horizontal or vertical subsetting is permitted. nor are any column transformations. i.create materialized view log on t with sequence ( VAL ). delete t . insert into t select * from t_backup . • For materialized view logs and queue tables.1) . the subsequent refresh of any dependent materialized view must be a complete refresh. First we use the REFRESH FAST clause to specify that the default refresh method should be fast.e. insert into t2 select * from t2_backup . commit. -. Earlier in this tutorial we saw how the rowids for each row in a materialized view changed after a complete refresh. refreshes where only the individual materialized view rows affected by base table changes are updated. No horizontal or vertical subsetting is permitted. drop materialized view log on t2 .Restrictions for Online Redefinition of Tables Cleanup delete t2 .Restrictions for Online Redefinition of Tables In Oracle 11g they are: • After redefining a table that has a materialized view log. Now let's see what happens to a materialized view's rowids after a fast refresh.from Oracle® Database Administrator's Guide 10g Release 2 (10. In Oracle 10g these restrictions are: • Tables with materialized view logs defined on them cannot be redefined online.DBMS_REDEFINITION The DBMS_REDEFINITION package has certain restrictions related to materialized view logs. The only valid value for the column mapping string is NULL. The only valid value for the column mapping string is NULL. drop materialized view log on t . • For materialized view logs and queue tables. This is also called "incremental" refreshing. REFRESH FAST Now that we know how materialized view logs track changes to base tables we can use them to perform fast materialized view refreshes. online redefinition is restricted to changes in physical properties. -. nor are any column transformations. primary key. online redefinition is restricted to changes in physical properties. Materialized view log created.from Oracle® Database Administrator's Guide 11g Release 1 (11.

update t set val = 'XX' where key = 3 . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b XX ROWID -----------------AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAA AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAB AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAC AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAD . val. select key. The "F" value for the "method" parameter ensures the refresh will be a Fast one. method => 'F' ). select key. create materialized view mv REFRESH FAST as select * from t . rowid from mv . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c ROWID -----------------AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAA AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAB AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAC AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAD Now we refresh the materialized view. select key. execute dbms_mview. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c ROWID -----------------AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAA AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAB AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAC AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAD The rowids did not change. val. commit. rowid from mv .refresh( list => 'MV'. rowid from mv . Now let's update a row in the base table. unlike a complete refresh where each row would have been created anew. execute dbms_mview.refresh( list => 'MV'. Thus. method => 'F' ). val.create materialized view log on t with sequence . with a fast refresh the materialized view data is not touched when no changes have been made to the base table.

execute dbms_mview. This indicates that a complete refresh was performed. select key. A materialized view created with REFRESH FAST can still be refreshed completely if required though. telling us that row 3 was updated during the refresh. method => 'C' ). rowid from mv . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b XX ROWID -----------------AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAE AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAF AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAG AAAWm+AAEAAAAaMAAH Similarly a materialized view created with REFRESH COMPLETE can be fast refreshed (assuming the materialized view is capable of being fast refreshed. val. In the following example note how. select key.refresh( list => 'MV'. we'll learn more about this later). all its rowids change after the refresh. In row 3 we can see that VAL changed from "c" to "XX" though. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b XX ROWID -----------------AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAA AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAB AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAC AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAD execute dbms_mview. val. drop materialized view mv . rowid from mv . KEY ---------1 2 VAL ----a b ROWID -----------------AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAA AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAB . Defaults The REFRESH FAST clause of the CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW command tells Oracle what type of refresh to perform when no refresh option is specified. create materialized view mv REFRESH COMPLETE as select * from t .refresh( list => 'MV'. val. even though MV was created above with the REFRESH FAST clause. select key. rowid from mv .Still no change in the rowids. method => 'F' ).

refresh( list => 'MV'. Purging Materialized View Logs Oracle automatically purges rows in the materialized view log when they are no longer needed.3 XX 4 AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAC AAAWnBAAEAAAAaMAAD Note how none of the rowids in MV changed.PURGE_LOG can be used. 'e' ) . create materialized view log on t . select count(*) from mlog$_t . COUNT(*) ---------0 DBMS_MVEW. drop materialized view log on t . In the example below note how the log table is empty after the refresh. indicating a fast refresh. commit. create materialized view mv refresh fast as select * from t . COUNT(*) ---------1 execute dbms_mview. commit . Cleanup drop materialized view mv . COUNT(*) ---------0 insert into t values ( 5. select count(*) from mlog$_t . select count(*) from mlog$_t .PURGE_LOG If a materialized view log needs to be purged manually for some reason a procedure called DBMS_MVEW. . update t set val = 'c' where key = 3 . method => 'F' ).

refresh( list => 'MV'. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 5 VAL ----a b c e execute dbms_mview. See the PURGE_LOG manual page for further details.select count(*) from mlog$_t . select * from mv .DBMS_SNAPSHOT". select count(*) from mlog$_t .DBMS_SNAPSHOT". execute dbms_mview. END.refresh( list => 'MV'. select count(*) from mlog$_t . flag => 'delete' ) . Once a materialized view log has been purged any materialized views dependent on the deleted rows cannot be fast refreshed.PURGE_LOG( master => 'T'."T" younger than last refresh ORA-06512: at "SYS.refresh( list => 'MV'. . method => 'F' ). method => 'F' ). BEGIN dbms_mview. COUNT(*) ---------0 The "num" and "flag" parameters can be used to partially purge the log. line 2712 ORA-06512: at line 1 Such materialized views will need to be refreshed completely. select * from mv . * ERROR at line 1: ORA-12034: materialized view log on "SCOTT". COUNT(*) ---------1 execute DBMS_MVIEW. commit. COUNT(*) ---------0 update t set val = 'X' where key = 5 . line 2743 ORA-06512: at "SYS. num => 9999. line 2537 ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT". method => 'C' ). Attempting a fast refresh will raise an error.

drop materialized view log on t . as select * from t2 * ERROR at line 3: ORA-23413: table "SCOTT". 2. REFRESH FAST Categories There are three ways to categorize a materialized view's ability to be fast refreshed. Materialized views based on T cannot therefore be fast refreshed. The third case is a little trickier. drop materialized view mv . obviously.---------10 1 100 20 1 300 30 1 200 40 2 250 . 3.KEY ---------1 2 3 4 5 VAL ----a b c X Cleanup delete from t where key = 5 . It can never be fast refreshed. The next example demonstrates why. create materialized view MV REFRESH FAST as select * from t2 . It can always be fast refreshed. In the example below table T does not have a materialized view log on it. KEY T_KEY AMT ---------. For the first case Oracle will raise an error if you try to create such a materialized view with its refresh method defaulted to REFRESH FAST. commit. If we attempt to create such a materialized view we get an error. select * from t2 . It can be fast refreshed after certain kinds of changes to the base table but not others.---------. 1. and will always be fast refreshed unless a complete refresh is explicitly requested."T2" does not have a materialized view log For the second case materialized views are created without error.

REFRESH command) and the materialized view correctly shows 500 as the maximum value for rows with T_KEY = 2. method => 'F' ). Now let's try deleting a row from the base table. t_key.refresh( list => 'MV'.refresh( list => 'MV'. t_key. max( amt ) amt_max from t2 group by t_key .refresh( list => 'MV'.---------AAAhMzAAEAAAEG8AAA 1 300 AAAhMzAAEAAAEG8AAB 2 500 Again. insert into t2 values ( 5. * ERROR at line 1: ORA-32314: REFRESH FAST of "SCOTT". amt_max from mv . sequence ( t_key.---------.DBMS_SNAPSHOT". create materialized view mv REFRESH FAST as select t_key. amt_max from mv .DBMS_SNAPSHOT"."MV" ORA-06512: at "SYS. select rowid. commit. execute dbms_mview. amt ) including new values . Let's try inserting a row into the base table. it worked as expected.---------. line ORA-06512: at line 1 unsupported after deletes/updates 2255 2461 2430 .DBMS_SNAPSHOT". The view was fast refreshed (the rowid's did not change after the DBMS_MVIEW. We created a materialized view log and created a materialized view with fast refresh as its default refresh method. delete from t2 where key = 5 . ROWID T_KEY AMT_MAX -----------------. select rowid.---------AAAhMzAAEAAAEG8AAA 1 300 AAAhMzAAEAAAEG8AAB 2 250 So far everything works as expected. line ORA-06512: at "SYS. commit. BEGIN dbms_mview. rowid. execute dbms_mview. 500 ). line ORA-06512: at "SYS. END. method => 'F' ). ROWID T_KEY AMT_MAX -----------------. method => 'F' ).50 2 150 create materialized view log on t2 with primary key. 2.

or never? One way would be to learn all the documented restrictions for fast refreshable materialized views. DBMS_MVIEW. not updates or deletes. method => 'C' ). In general materialized views cannot be fast refreshed if the base tables do not have materialized view logs or the defining query: • contains an analytic function • contains non-repeating expressions like SYSDATE or ROWNUM • contains RAW or LONG RAW data types • contains a subquery in the SELECT clause • contains a MODEL clause • contains a HAVING clause • contains nested queries with ANY.EXPLAIN_MVIEW. UNION ALL. amt_max from mv .---------AAAhMzAAEAAAEG8AAC 1 300 AAAhMzAAEAAAEG8AAD 2 250 Restrictions on Fast Refresh So how do we know whether a materialized view can be fast refreshed each time. • There are even more restrictions for materialized views containing joins.This time we received an error when we attempted a fast refresh.FAST Clause General Restrictions on Fast Refresh Restrictions on Fast Refresh on Materialized Views with Joins Only Restrictions on Fast Refresh on Materialized Views with Aggregates Restrictions on Fast Refresh on Materialized Views with UNION ALL Restrictions for Materialized Views with Subqueries . etc. sometimes.---------. select rowid.) To synchronize an insert-only materialized view after a delete we need to do a complete refresh. it is only fast refreshable for inserts and direct loads. subqueries.refresh( list => 'MV'.e. aggregates. ALL. The reason is because this type of materialized view is an "insert-only" materialized view. The following links can help you find them if required though. ROWID T_KEY AMT_MAX -----------------. (We will see why it is an insert-only view in the next topic. • • • • • • CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW . They are documented in various sections of a few different manuals and are too numerous and complex to repeat here. execute dbms_mview. or NOT EXISTS • contains a CONNECT BY clause • references remote tables in different databases • references remote tables in a single database and defaults to the ON COMMIT refresh mode • references other materialized views which are not join or aggregate materialized views. Here are some of them. t_key. i.

EXPLAIN_MVIEW with the table output method typically involves 1. mvowner varchar(30) . via a table or via a varray. seq number ) . documented CREATE TABLE command for MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE can be found on UNIX systems at $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlxmv. predicting whether or not a materialized view is fast refreshable can be complicated. simpler alternative for determining whether a materialized view is fast refreshable or not. It uses the DBMS_MVIEW. create table MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE ( statement_id varchar(30) . related_num number . Here is an abridged version.• • • Restrictions for Materialized Views with Unions Containing Subqueries Restrictions for Using Multitier Materialized Views Restrictions for Materialized Views with Collection Columns Fortunately there is a second. capability_name varchar(30) .EXPLAIN_MVIEW . The full.Basic Materialized Views .sql.EXPLAIN_MVIEW As we saw in the preceding topic. msgtxt varchar(2000) . The DBMS_MVIEW. mvname varchar(30) . It is also available in Oracle's documentation at Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide . VARRAY Output Using DBMS_MVIEW.EXPLAIN_MVIEW utility can simplify this task however. possible character(1) . MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE There are two ways to get the output from DBMS_MVIEW.EXPLAIN_MVIEW utility which we will explore next.EXPLAIN_MVIEW. Cleanup drop materialized view mv .Using MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE (see Gotcha for a related bug). Full details on how the utility works are available at the preceding link. running DBMS_MVIEW. deleting old rows from MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE 2. drop materialized view log on t2 . The material below will help you use the utility effectively. To use the table method the current schema must contain a table called MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE. msgno integer . DBMS_MVIEW. related_text varchar(2000) .

html --. p_include_pct_capabilities in varchar2 default 'N' .capabilities like REFRESH_FAST_PCT are included in the report -N . --o the value 5000 is arbitraty. v_nl constant char(1) := unistr( '\000A' ). REWRITE. -. v_capabilities sys. .com/en/topic-12884. To save time in this tutorial we will use DBMS_MVIEW.capabilities like REFRESH_FAST_PCT are not included in the report --p_linesize -o the maximum size allowed for any line in the report output -o data that is longer than this value will be word wrapped --.3.sqlsnippets. selecting new rows from MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE.ExplainMVArrayType .new line v_previous_possible char(1) := 'X' . -or a materialized view name --p_capability_name_filter -o use either REFRESH.Parameters: --p_mv -o this value is passed to DBMS_MVIEW.Typical Usage: --set long 5000 -select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV_NAME' ) as mv_report from dual . p_linesize in number default 80 ) return clob as -------------------------------------------------------------------------------. or the default --p_include_pct_capabilities -Y .EXPLAIN_MVIEW's "mv" parameter -o it can contain either a query. create or replace function my_mv_capabilities ( p_mv in varchar2 . PCT.EXPLAIN_MVIEW's varray output option instead and supplement it with a custom function called MY_MV_CAPABILITIES. any value big enough to contain the -report output will do -------------------------------------------------------------------------------pragma autonomous_transaction . CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW command text.From http://www. p_capability_name_filter in varchar2 default '%' .

for v_capability in ( select capability_name .possible when 'T' then 'Capable of: when 'Y' then 'Capable of: when 'F' then 'Not Capable when 'N' then 'Not Capable else v_capability.possible . related_text .print section heading -----------------------------------------------------------if v_capability. possible desc .explain_mview( mv => p_mv. seq ) loop ------------------------------------------------------------. msgtxt from table( v_capabilities ) where capability_name like '%' || upper( p_capability_name_filter ) || '%' and not ( capability_name like '%PCT%' and upper(p_include_pct_capabilities) = 'N' ) order by mvowner . mvname .v_output clob . msg_array => v_capabilities ) .possible end || v_nl . possible . v_previous_possible := v_capability. begin dbms_mview.possible <> v_previous_possible then v_output := v_output || v_nl || case v_capability.print section body -----------------------------------------------------------declare ' ' of: ' of: ' || ':' . end if. ------------------------------------------------------------.

-.print capability name indented 2 spaces v_output := v_output || v_nl || ' ' || v_capability.' || v_indented_line_size || '} |. end. begin -.v_indented_line_size varchar2(3) := to_char( p_linesize .related_text || ' ' .msgtxt is not null then v_output := v_output || regexp_replace ( v_capability.' || v_indented_line_size || '})' . '(.5 ). ' \1' || v_nl ) .' || v_indented_line_size || '} |. -.related_text is not null then v_output := v_output || regexp_replace ( v_capability.print message text indented 4 spaces and word wrapped if v_capability. end loop. end.{1. end if. commit .print related text indented 4 spaces and word wrapped if v_capability.' || v_indented_line_size || '})' . return( v_output ).{1.msgtxt || ' ' .capability_name || v_nl . end if.{1. '(.{1. ' \1' || v_nl ) . .

MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE Not Capable of: REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT SCOTT. DBMS_MVIEW. This completes our preparations./ show errors No errors. an existing materialized view.T the detail table does not have a materialized view log REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT is disabled REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML is disabled (Descriptions of each capability name are available at Table 8-7 CAPABILITY_NAME Column Details. set long 5000 select my_mv_capabilities( 'SELECT * FROM T'. 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual .EXPLAIN_VIEW in action. Here is an example that explains a simple query which could appear as the defining query in a CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW command. a defining query 2.EXPLAIN_MVIEW can analyze three different types of materialized view code: 1. Now let's see DBMS_MVIEW.EXPLAIN_MVIEW With a Query DBMS_MVIEW. A list of messages and related text is available at Table 8-8 MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE Column Details. .) The EXPLAIN_MVIEW output above shows that fast refresh is not possible in this case because T has no materialized view log. a CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW command 3.

rewrite. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML This time we see that a materialized view using our simple query could be fast refreshable in all cases. For now we will only examine refresh capabilities.EXPLAIN_MVIEW With Existing Materialized View For our last example we will explain an existing materialized view.EXPLAIN_MVIEW can report on a materialized view's refresh. rowid. DBMS_MVIEW. and partition change tracking (PCT) capabilities. create materialized view log on t . select my_mv_capabilities ( 'CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW MV REFRESH FAST AS SELECT * FROM T' . Rewrite capabilities will be covered in Query Rewrite Restrictions and Capabilities.EXPLAIN_MVIEW With CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW Now let's create a materialized view log on T and then use EXPLAIN_MVIEW to explain the capabilities of an entire CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW command. create materialized view log on t2 with primary key. create materialized view mv refresh fast as select t_key. max( amt ) amt_max from t2 group by t_key . DBMS_MVIEW.Note that DBMS_MVIEW. 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . the insert-only one we saw in the preceding topic REFRESH FAST Categories. amt ) including new values . sequence ( t_key.

delete from mv_capabilities_table . POSSIBLE CHARACTER(1). but not other types of DML.Using MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE state the values in MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE. CREATE TABLE MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE . select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'.sql file and the CREATE TABLE command at Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide . -.. In actual use we can see the values are really "Y" and "N".explain_mview( 'select * from t' ). 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual ..POSSIBLE will either be "T" or "F"..T = capability is possible -.Basic Materialized Views . It does not mean the materialized view is fast refreshable in all cases.F = capability is not possible . Note also that the "REFRESH_FAST" capability will appear whenever at least one of the other REFRESH_FAST_% capabilities is available. execute dbms_mview. commit. column possible format a8 ... MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT Not Capable of: REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML mv uses the MIN or MAX aggregate functions REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML COUNT(*) is not present in the select list REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML is disabled Here we see that fast refresh is available after inserts. Gotcha Both the $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlxmv.

create materialized view log on t2 with primary key. The REFRESH FORCE method does just that. 500 ).EXPLAIN_MVIEW we saw an insert-only materialized view which could be fast refreshed after inserts into the base table but needed a complete refresh after other types of DML. amt_max from mv . It performs a FAST refresh if possible.---------AAAWpLAAEAAAAaMAAA 1 300 AAAWpLAAEAAAAaMAAB 2 250 First let's try an insert and a refresh. otherwise it performs a COMPLETE refresh. With these types of materialized views it is often most convenient to let Oracle decide which refresh method is best. amt ) including new values . commit. POSSIBLE -------Y N The values "T" and "F" are. . insert into t2 values ( 5. rowid. Cleanup set long 80 drop materialized view mv . select rowid. REFRESH FORCE In REFRESH FAST Categories and DBMS_MVIEW.refresh( list => 'MV' ). max( amt ) amt_max from t2 group by t_key .EXPLAIN_MVIEW output is saved to a varray. used when DBMS_MVIEW. drop materialized view log on t2 .---------. sequence ( t_key. 2. create materialized view mv REFRESH FORCE as select t_key. t_key. however. execute dbms_mview. ROWID T_KEY AMT_MAX -----------------. drop materialized view log on t .select distinct POSSIBLE from mv_capabilities_table .

delete from t2 where key = 5 .---------. commit.---------.select rowid. ROWID T_KEY AMT_MAX -----------------. execute dbms_mview. select * from mv . t_key. Instead Oracle performed a COMPLETE refresh (note how the rowids for each row changed).---------AAAWpLAAEAAAAaMAAC 1 300 AAAWpLAAEAAAAaMAAD 2 250 In the REFRESH FAST Categories topic we received an "ORA-32314: REFRESH FAST of "SCOTT". t_key.---------AAAWpLAAEAAAAaMAAA 1 300 AAAWpLAAEAAAAaMAAB 2 500 Since the rowids did not change but the AMT_MAX values did we can tell that a FAST refresh was performed. amt_max from mv . create materialized view mv NEVER REFRESH as select * from t . ROWID T_KEY AMT_MAX -----------------.refresh( list => 'MV' ). Now let's try a delete followed by a refresh. amt_max from mv . Cleanup drop materialized view mv . on our materialized views we can use the NEVER REFRESH method. select rowid. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c Let's see what happens when we update the base table and then attempt a refresh. drop materialized view log on t2 . . This time with REFRESH FORCE we did not. FAST or COMPLETE. NEVER REFRESH If for some reason we need to prevent refresh operations of any sort."MV" unsupported after deletes/updates" error at this point.

END. To refresh ON DEMAND materialized views we explicitly call one of the following procedures. drop materialized view mv .DBMS_SNAPSHOT". is equivalent to this. BEGIN dbms_mview. commit . (If you know of any please let me know using the Comments link below. * ERROR at line 1: ORA-23538: cannot explicitly refresh a NEVER REFRESH materialized view ("MV") ORA-06512: at "SYS. In other words this create materialized view mv as select * from t . Cleanup drop materialized view mv . create materialized view mv REFRESH ON DEMAND as select * from t .refresh( 'MV' ). ON DEMAND Up to this point in the tutorial we have always refreshed our materialized views manually with the DBMS_MVIEW. execute dbms_mview.) NEVER REFRESH can come in handy though when refresh operations on a materialized view need to be prevented temporarily during maintenance or debugging operations. line 2537 ORA-06512: at "SYS. line 2712 ORA-06512: at line 1 Oracle prevented the refresh by raising an error. I cannot see a practical reason for having a materialized view with NEVER REFRESH set at all times.refresh( 'MV' ). .REFRESH command.DBMS_SNAPSHOT". This is know as ON DEMAND refreshing and it is the default refresh mode when none is specified in the CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW command. line 2743 ORA-06512: at "SYS.update t set val = upper(val) . commit .DBMS_SNAPSHOT". In this case the materialized view's refresh mode can be changed to NEVER REFRESH using the ALTER MATERIALIZED VIEW command. update t set val = lower(val) .

REFRESH DBMS_MVIEW. select * from mv where key = 5 . delete from t where key = 5 . KEY VAL ---------. ON COMMIT In some situations it would be convenient to have Oracle refresh a materialized view automatically whenever changes to the base table are committed. insert into t values ( 5. select rowid. 'e' ). key.• • • DBMS_MVIEW.REFRESH_ALL_MVIEWS DBMS_MVIEW. select * from mv where key = 5 .---------.REFRESH( 'MV' ).REFRESH. ROWID KEY VAL -----------------. 'e' ). insert into t values ( 5. val from mv . commit. . commit.----5 e Cleanup drop materialized view mv . no rows selected execute DBMS_MVIEW. This is possible using the ON COMMIT refresh mode. create materialized view mv REFRESH FAST ON COMMIT as select * from t . Here is an example.REFRESH_DEPENDENT Here is an example that uses DBMS_MVIEW. create materialized view log on t .----AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAA 1 a AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAB 2 b AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAC 3 c AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAD 4 Let's see what happens to the view in the course of an insert operation.

key.this materialized view is not fast refreshable -. The base tables will never have any distributed transactions applied to them.select rowid. sys_xmlgen( val ) as val_xml from t . . No call to DBMS_MVIEW. -. val. Attempting a distributed transaction on its base table. In the following example materialized view MV (created at the top of this page) was created with REFRESH FAST.because the materialized view contains an Oracle-supplied type create materialized view mv2 REFRESH FAST ON COMMIT as select key.---------. commit. key. T.----AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAA 1 a AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAB 2 b AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAC 3 c AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAD 4 Nothing happend yet. as select key. 1. Restrictions Materialized views can only refresh ON COMMIT in certain situations. The materialized view cannot contain object types or Oracle-supplied types. Let's issue a COMMIT. val. select rowid. val from mv . 2.REFRESH was required. will therefore raise an error. ROWID KEY VAL -----------------. ROWID KEY VAL -----------------.----AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAA 1 a AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAB 2 b AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAC 3 c AAAXNGAAEAAAAasAAD 4 AAAXNGAAEAAAAatAAA 5 e Note how the materialized view was automatically fast refreshed after the COMMIT command. sys_xmlgen( val ) as val_xml from t * ERROR at line 3: ORA-12054: cannot set the ON COMMIT refresh attribute for the materialized view The second case generates an error when a distributed transaction is attempted on the base table. val from mv . The first case produces an error during the CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW command.---------.

Oracle® Database SQL Language Reference: CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW When I first read this I assumed it meant that "REFRESH COMPLETE ON COMMIT" is not allowed.5632 rolled back. val from T@REMOTE . I also assumed that specifying "REFRESH ON COMMIT" is equivalent to specifying "REFRESH FAST ON COMMIT". Gotcha The SQL Language Reference manual says this about the ON COMMIT clause.21. commit . insert into t select key+10. val from t . commit. select * from t . some remote DBs may be in-doubt ORA-02051: another session in same transaction failed (REMOTE is a database link which loops back to the current account. as the following snippet demonstrates. The following examples prove neither is correct however. commit * ERROR at line 1: ORA-02050: transaction 5." -. create materialized view mv2 REFRESH COMPLETE ON COMMIT as select key. .cleanup test data in preparation for next section delete from t where key >= 5 . KEY ---------1 2 3 4 5 11 12 13 14 15 VAL ----a b c e a b c e -. commit. alter materialized view mv refresh ON DEMAND .insert into t select key+10.) ON DEMAND materialized views have no such restriction. val from T@REMOTE . "Specify ON COMMIT to indicate that a fast refresh is to occur whenever the database commits a transaction that operates on a master table of the materialized view.

because it has no materialized view log drop materialized view mv2 . select rowid. ROWID KEY VAL -----------------. The next example examines the behavior of "REFRESH ON COMMIT" without a specified refresh method. when no REFRESH method is specified the default behaviour is "REFRESH FORCE" regardless of whether ON COMMIT is used or not. ROWID KEY VAL -----------------. 'e' ). drop materialized view log on t .----AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAE 1 a AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAF 2 b AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAG 3 c AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAH 4 AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAI 5 e The fact that all the rowid's in MV2 changed after the INSERT transaction committed confirms that a complete refresh took place during the commit. In fact. commit . Given these observations I can only conclude the documentation is either in error or misleading when it says "specify ON COMMIT to indicate that a fast refresh is to occur".----AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAA 1 a AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAB 2 b AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAC 3 c AAAXNMAAEAAAAakAAD 4 insert into t values ( 5. key. delete from t where key >= 5 . select rowid. commit . drop materialized view mv2 . -. was specified with ON COMMIT. "REFRESH ON COMMIT" is not therefore equivalent to "REFRESH FAST ON COMMIT". val from mv2 . Cleanup drop materialized view mv .---------. create materialized view mv2 REFRESH ON COMMIT as select key.---------. val from mv2 .fast refreshable materialized views on T can no longer be created on T -. not FAST. val from t . key. .As we can see the CREATE MATERIALZIED view command succeeded even though COMPLETE.

not to be confused with a base table). constraint_type. column constraint_name format a20 column constraint_type format a15 column index_name format a15 select constraint_name. create materialized view mv refresh fast on commit as select t_key. count(*) row_count from t2 group by t_key .Constraints System Generated Constraints When a materialized view is created Oracle may add system generated constraints to its underlying table (i. CONSTRAINT_NAME CONSTRAINT_TYPE INDEX_NAME -------------------. constraint_type.--------------. drop materialized view mv . create materialized view mv as select key. In the following example note how Oracle automatically adds a primary key constraint to the table called "MV". amt ) including new values .e. val from t . index_name from user_constraints where TABLE_NAME = 'MV' . column search_condition format a30 select constraint_name. which is part of the materialized view also called "MV". sequence ( t_key. the table containing the results of the query. rowid.--------------SYS_C0019948 P SYS_C0019948 In the next example Oracle automatically adds a check constraint. search_condition . describe t2 Name ------------------------------------------------------------------------KEY T_KEY AMT Null? Type -------NOT NULL NUMBER NOT NULL NUMBER NOT NULL NUMBER create materialized view log on t2 with primary key.

Implementing them using triggers can be difficult if not impossible. select constraint_name. commit.--------------. We will learn more about this powerful multirow validation approach in a .from where user_constraints table_name = 'MV' . constraint_type. With materialized views they are declared using a few lines of code and are virtually bullet proof when applied correctly. commit * ERROR at line 1: ORA-12008: error in materialized view refresh path ORA-02290: check constraint (SCOTT.---------10 1 100 20 1 300 30 1 200 40 2 250 50 2 150 alter table mv -. CONSTRAINT_NAME CONSTRAINT_TYPE SEARCH_CONDITION -------------------.MY_CONSTRAINT) violated Implementing multirow validation rules such as this one properly is not possible using check constraints on regular tables.-----------------------------C "T_KEY" IS NOT NULL C ROW_COUNT <= 3 Now any attempt to create more than 3 rows per group in table T2 will generate an error at commit time. 1.note we used "alter table" here add CONSTRAINT MY_CONSTRAINT CHECK ( ROW_COUNT <= 3 ) DEFERRABLE .-----------------------------SYS_C0019949 C "T_KEY" IS NOT NULL Adding Your Own Constraints If necessary we can create our own constraints on materialized view tables in addition to the ones Oracle may add. search_condition from user_constraints where table_name = 'MV' . CONSTRAINT_NAME -------------------SYS_C0019949 MY_CONSTRAINT CONSTRAINT_TYPE SEARCH_CONDITION --------------. insert into T2 values ( 5. When the materialized view is in ON COMMIT mode these constraints effectively constrain the materialized view's base tables. select * from t2 . 500 ). KEY T_KEY AMT ---------. Let's see this in action by creating a check constraint on MV.---------.

val from t . constraint_type.-----------------------------C "T_KEY" IS NOT NULL C ROW_COUNT <= 3 C row_count < 4 The Oracle manual page for ALTER MATERIALIZED VIEW however does not indicate that constraints can be added this way.e. Curiously enough an ALTER MATERIALIZED VIEW command would have worked too. drop materialized view log on t2 . create materialized view mv as select key. Indexes When a materialized view is created Oracle may add system generated indexes to its underlying table (i. search_condition from user_constraints where table_name = 'MV' . Constraints. In the following example note how Oracle automatically adds an index to implement the system generated primary key we saw in the preceding topic. column index_name format a15 column column_name format a15 select index_name . i.uniqueness . not to be confused with a base table). Until the documentation says this is legal it is best to use ALTER TABLE. ALTER MATERIALIZED VIEW mv add constraint my_second_constraint check ( row_count < 4 ) deferrable . select constraint_name. Gotcha When we created MY_CONSTRAINT above we use an ALTER TABLE command. Cleanup drop materialized view mv . CONSTRAINT_NAME -------------------SYS_C0019949 MY_CONSTRAINT MY_SECOND_CONSTRAINT CONSTRAINT_TYPE SEARCH_CONDITION --------------.column_name from user_indexes i inner join user_ind_columns ic . ic.future SQL Snippets tutorial so stay tuned! In the mean time Ask Tom "Declarative Integrity" has some good information on the subject. the table containing the results of the query.

column_name .--------------.column_expression from user_indexes i inner join user_ind_columns ic left outer join user_ind_expressions ie using ( index_name ) using ( index_name ) where ic.table_name = 'MV' .--------------SYS_C0019959 UNIQUE KEY In the next example Oracle automatically generates a function based index. In the following example we will add an index on the T_KEY column.using ( index_name ) where i. rowid.--------. amt ) including new values .table_name = 'MV' .--------. ie.uniqueness . sequence ( t_key. COUNT(*) ROW_COUNT from t2 group by t_key .----------------------------------I_SNAP$_MV UNIQUE SYS_NC00003$ SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL("T_KEY") (Note that SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL is an undocumented Oracle function. column column_expression format a35 select index_name . drop materialized view mv . Do not attempt to use it in your own code.) Adding Your Own Indexes We can add out own indexes to MV just as we would a regular table. ic. INDEX_NAME UNIQUENES COLUMN_NAME COLUMN_EXPRESSION --------------. create materialized view log on t2 with primary key. i. . create materialized view mv refresh fast on commit as select t_key. See Nulls and Equality: SQL Only for additional info. INDEX_NAME UNIQUENES COLUMN_NAME --------------.

create index MY_INDEX on mv ( T_KEY ) . i. T_KEY ROW_COUNT ---------.column_name from user_indexes i inner join user_ind_columns ic using ( index_name ) where i. ic.---------2 2 Execution Plan ---------------------------------------------------------Plan hash value: 2793437614 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time | -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 1 | 26 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 | | 1 | MAT_VIEW ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| MV | 1 | 26 | 2 (0)| 00:00:01 | |* 2 | INDEX RANGE SCAN | MY_INDEX | 1 | | 1 (0)| 00:00:01 | -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Predicate Information (identified by operation id): --------------------------------------------------2 .access("T_KEY"=2) . INDEX_NAME --------------I_SNAP$_MV MY_INDEX UNIQUENES --------UNIQUE NONUNIQUE COLUMN_NAME --------------SYS_NC00003$ T_KEY To confirm that Oracle uses our index in queries let's turn SQL*Plus's Autotrace feature on and execute a query.uniqueness .table_name = 'MV' . select index_name . set autotrace on explain set linesize 95 select * from mv where t_key = 2 .

amt_max FROM MV order by t_key . amt ) including new values .dynamic sampling used for this statement Note how the optimizer chose an INDEX RANGE SCAN from MY_INDEX in step 2.---------1 300 2 250 . Cleanup drop materialized view mv . create materialized view mv refresh fast on commit as select t_key. T_KEY AMT_MAX ---------. MAX( AMT ) AMT_MAX from t2 group by t_key . ENABLE QUERY REWRITE Materialized views can be useful for pre-calculating and storing derived values such as AMT_MAX in the following snippet. select t_key. Such materialized views make queries like this select t_key. T_KEY AMT_MAX ---------. sequence ( t_key.---------1 300 2 250 faster than its equivalent query. create materialized view log on t2 with primary key.Note ----. max( amt ) as amt_max FROM T2 group by t_key order by t_key . drop materialized view log on t2 . rowid.

execute dbms_stats. T_KEY AMT_MAX ---------. Finally we can confirm Oracle will use the materialized view in queries by turning SQL*Plus's Autotrace feature on. To see it in action we first need to make the materialized view available to Query Rewrite like this. max( amt ) as amt_max FROM T2 group by t_key order by t_key . (See Gotcha . set autotrace on explain set linesize 95 select t_key.gather_table_stats( user.ORA-00439 below if you encounter an ORA-00439 error at this step. Next we collect statistics on the materialized view to help Oracle optimize the query rewrite process.---------1 300 2 250 Execution Plan ---------------------------------------------------------Plan hash value: 446852971 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time | ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 2 | 14 | 4 (25)| 00:00:01 | | 1 | SORT ORDER BY | | 2 | 14 | 4 (25)| 00:00:01 | | 2 | MAT_VIEW REWRITE ACCESS FULL| MV | 2 | 14 | 3 (0)| 00:00:01 | ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- .Wouldn't it be nice if Oracle could use the information in MV to resolve this last query too? If your database has a feature called Query Rewrite available and enabled this happens automatically. alter materialized view mv ENABLE QUERY REWRITE .) Note that materialized views which do not include the ENABLE QUERY REWRITE clause will have Query Rewrite disabled by default. 'MV' ) .

count(amt) as amt_count from t2 group by t_key .Note how the optimizer chose to access MV for its pre-calculated MAX(AMT) values in line 2 even though the query itself made no mention of MV.dynamic sampling used for this statement Note how the optimizer chose to access T2 this time. count(*) as row_count . Without the Query Rewrite feature the execution plan would look like this.ORA-00439 The materialized view query rewrite feature is not available in Oracle XE and some other Oracle configurations.---------1 300 2 250 Execution Plan ---------------------------------------------------------Plan hash value: 50962384 --------------------------------------------------------------------------| Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time | --------------------------------------------------------------------------| 0 | SELECT STATEMENT | | 5 | 130 | 4 (25)| 00:00:01 | | 1 | SORT GROUP BY | | 5 | 130 | 4 (25)| 00:00:01 | | 2 | TABLE ACCESS FULL| T2 | 5 | 130 | 3 (0)| 00:00:01 | --------------------------------------------------------------------------Note ----. Gotcha . max( amt ) as amt_max FROM T2 group by t_key order by t_key . T_KEY AMT_MAX ---------. select t_key. If you attempt to use ENABLE QUERY REWITE in an Oracle database where the feature is not enabled you will receive an ORA-00439 error. alter session set QUERY_REWRITE_ENABLED = FALSE . a more expensive approach than simply selecting pre-calculated column values from MV is. . Each time this query is executed it has to recalculate MAX(VAL) from the information in T2 for each group. create materialized view mv2 refresh fast on commit ENABLE QUERY REWRITE as select t_key .

drop materialized view log on t2 . In EXPLAIN_MVIEW we used a utility called MY_MV_CAPABILITIES to explore a materialized view's refresh capabilities. val. USER from t * ERROR at line 3: ORA-30353: expression not supported for query rewrite Capabilities A few different materialized view query rewrite capabilities exist. single table materialized view with query rewrite disabled. create materialized view mv ENABLE QUERY REWRITE as select key. val from t .g. In the snippets below we will use this same utility to explore rewrite capabilities. First lets look at a simple. MV_REPORT . val. set long 5000 select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'.from t2 * ERROR at line 9: ORA-00439: feature not enabled: Materialized view rewrite Cleanup alter session set query_rewrite_enabled = true . e. Attempting to violate these restrictions results in an error. Query Rewrite Restrictions and Capabilities Restrictions Materialized views with the following characteristics cannot have query rewrite enabled: • the defining query references functions which are not DETERMINISTIC • an expression in the defining query is not repeatable. create materialized view mv DISABLE QUERY REWRITE as select key. an expression containing the USER pseudo column or the SYSTIMESTAMP function. set autotrace off drop materialized view mv . 'REWRITE' ) as mv_report from dual . USER from t . as select key.

MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- . alter materialized view mv ENABLE QUERY REWRITE . create materialized view mv enable query rewrite as select key. select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'. (Descriptions of each capability name are available at Table 8-7 CAPABILITY_NAME Column Details. but not others. val from T@REMOTE . 'REWRITE' ) as mv_report from dual . If the materialized view happened to referenced a remote table then some rewrite capabilities would be available. select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'. 'REWRITE' ) as mv_report from dual . MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REWRITE REWRITE_FULL_TEXT_MATCH REWRITE_PARTIAL_TEXT_MATCH REWRITE_GENERAL Now all rewrite capabilities are available.------------------------------------------------------------------------------Not Capable of: REWRITE REWRITE_FULL_TEXT_MATCH query rewrite is disabled on the materialized view REWRITE_PARTIAL_TEXT_MATCH query rewrite is disabled on the materialized view REWRITE_GENERAL query rewrite is disabled on the materialized view This materialized view obviously has no rewrite capabilities available to it.) Enabling query rewrite on the materialized view changes this. drop materialized view mv .

t2 where t. Materialized views can also be created on multi-table queries to store the pre-calculated results of expensive join operations. Here is a simple example. Join Queries So far in this tutorial we have only seen materialized views based on a single table. t2.---------.key t_key . . t2.key t2_key . select * from t .---------10 1 100 20 1 300 30 1 200 40 2 250 50 2 150 create materialized view mv as select t.amt t2_amt from t.key = t2.val t_val .t_key . t. KEY T_KEY AMT ---------. KEY ---------1 2 3 4 VAL ----a b c select * from t2 .Capable of: REWRITE REWRITE_PARTIAL_TEXT_MATCH REWRITE_GENERAL Not Capable of: REWRITE_FULL_TEXT_MATCH T mv references a remote table or view in the FROM list Cleanup drop materialized view mv .

---------. create materialized view log on t2 with rowid.from Restrictions on Fast Refresh on Materialized Views with Joins Only In addition to these restrictions there are some recommended practices for using join queries. t2_key. Oracle Database needs the statistics generated by this package to optimize query rewrite. you must collect statistics on it using the DBMS_STATS package. sequence . T_KEY ---------1 1 1 2 2 T_VAL T2_KEY T2_AMT ----. then having an index on each of the join column rowids in the detail table will enhance refresh performance greatly. t_val." -. -. unions.from CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW. subqueries. drop materialized view mv . create materialized view log on t with rowid. create materialized view mv . sequence . t2_amt from mv . because this type of materialized view tends to be much larger than materialized views containing aggregates." -.select t_key. The Prototype Applying these restrictions and recommendations to our test case above yields the following prototypical materialized view with joins.) to be fast refreshable certain restrictions beyond the General Restrictions on Fast Refresh must be met. Whenever I need to create this type of materialized view in an application I use the code below as a starting point to remind me of the requirements. etc.---------a 10 100 a 20 300 a 30 200 b 40 250 b 50 150 REFRESH FAST For a materialized view with only joins (no aggregates. "If a materialized view contains joins but no aggregates. They are as follows.from Refreshing Materialized Views: Tips for Refreshing Materialized Views Without Aggregates "After you create the materialized view. These additional restrictions are: • materialized view logs with rowids must exist for all of the defining query's base tables • the SELECT clause cannot contain object type columns • the defining query cannot have a GROUP BY clause or aggregates • rowid columns for each table instance in the FROM clause must appear in the SELECT clause.

key = t2.refresh fast on commit enable query rewrite as select t.t_key . Whenever we create a fast refreshable view we should use our EXPLAIN_MVIEW utility. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML Now let's test drive our new MV.---------a 10 100 a 20 300 a 30 200 b 40 250 . select t_key.rowid t_row_id t2. MY_MV_CAPABILITIES. . First. .---------. here are MV's initial contents.key t_key t.key t2_key t2.rowid t2_row_id from t. 'MV' ) . 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . create index mv_i1 on mv ( t_row_id ) . . execute dbms_stats. T_KEY ---------1 1 1 2 T_VAL T2_KEY T2_AMT ----. to confirm it can be refreshed in all required situations. set long 5000 select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'. create index mv_i2 on mv ( t2_row_id ) . t2_amt from mv . t_val.val t_val t2. . t2 where t. t2_key.amt t2_amt t.gather_table_stats( user. .

select t_key.---------. update t set val = upper(val) . T_KEY ---------1 1 1 2 2 3 T_VAL T2_KEY T2_AMT ----. 3. t_val. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REWRITE REWRITE_FULL_TEXT_MATCH REWRITE_PARTIAL_TEXT_MATCH REWRITE_GENERAL Gotcha .2 b 50 150 Now let's do some DML on both base tables and see the effect on MV. t2_key. insert into t2 values ( 60. create materialized view mv2 refresh fast as . as expected. select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'. Query Rewrite Materialized views containing joins can be used by the query rewrite facility (see ENABLE QUERY REWRITE).---------A 10 100 A 20 300 A 30 200 B 40 250 B 50 150 C 60 300 Both changes are reflected in MV. t2_amt from mv . commit. 300 ) .ANSI Join Syntax When we attempt to create a materialized view with the ANSI join syntax equivalent of the defining query used above we are surprisingly rewarded with an ORA error. 'REWRITE' ) as mv_report from dual .

val t_val t2. . t. select t.KEY = T2. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Not Capable of: REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT inline view or subquery in FROM list not supported for this type MV REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT inline view or subquery in FROM list not supported for this type MV REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT view or subquery in from list . ( T.1 explains that it is really an undocumented limitation of fast refresh materialized views. .KEY = T2. select my_mv_capabilities ( 'create materialized view mv2 refresh fast as select t.amt t2_amt t. .val t_val . t2.key t_key . 'REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT' ) as mv_report from dual .T_KEY ) * ERROR at line 12: ORA-12015: cannot create a fast refresh materialized view from a complex query While this behaviour appears to be a bug at first glance. t2.rowid t2_row_id from T INNER JOIN T2 ON .T_KEY ) T INNER JOIN T2 ON ( T.T_KEY )' .key t_key t.amt t2_amt .rowid t_row_id .rowid t2_row_id from T INNER JOIN T2 ON ( T.KEY = T2. t2. .key t2_key .rowid t_row_id t2. t.key t2_key t2.. Metalink note 420856. An examination of the EXPLAIN_MVIEW results for this case points to some behind-the-scenes transformations with ANSI syntax which may be causing the limitation.

materialized views containing aggregate functions are also possible. Aggregate Queries In addition to materialized views based on join queries.---------1 600 2 400 REFRESH FAST For a materialized view with only aggregates (no joins. drop materialized view log on t2 .---------.Cleanup drop materialized view mv . delete t . T_KEY AMT_SUM ---------. insert into t select * from t_backup . These . select * from mv order by t_key . subqueries.---------10 1 100 20 1 300 30 1 200 40 2 250 50 2 150 create materialized view mv as select t_key t_key . delete t2 . SUM(AMT) AMT_SUM from t2 group by t_key . Here is a simple example. etc. commit. unions.) to be fast refreshable certain restrictions beyond the General Restrictions on Fast Refresh must be met. insert into t2 select * from t2_backup . drop materialized view log on t . KEY T_KEY AMT ---------. select * from t2 order by key .

additional restrictions are fully documented at Restrictions on Fast Refresh on Materialized Views with Aggregates." o "Specify with ROWID and INCLUDING NEW VALUES. MIN. or MAX • the defining query's SELECT clause must contain all the columns listed in the GROUP BY clause In addition to these restrictions some additional columns may be required in the defining query to allow it to be fast refreshable in all cases. STDDEV. For our current test case the most significant restrictions are these. VARIANCE. COUNT. Materialized Views with Aggregates: Requirements for Refresh Fast After Any DML Aggregate COUNT(expr) MIN(expr) MAX(expr) SUM(expr) SUM(col) AVG(expr) Additional Aggregates Required COUNT(*) COUNT(*) COUNT(*) COUNT(*) COUNT(expr) COUNT(*) SUM(expr) SUM(expr*expr) SUM(expr*expr) "col" must have a NOT NULL constraint Optional Aggregates Note defining query must have no WHERE clause defining query must have no WHERE clause COUNT(*) COUNT(expr) COUNT(*) STDDEV(expr) COUNT(expr) SUM(expr) COUNT(*) VARIANCE(expr) COUNT(expr) SUM(expr) (For insert-only materialized views see Table 8-2 Requirements for Materialized Views with Aggregates." o "Specify the SEQUENCE clause if the table is expected to have a mix of inserts/direct-loads. The table below summarized these requirements. • all base tables must have materialized view logs that: o "Contain all columns from the table referenced in the materialized view. Recommendations . deletes. AVG. and updates." • aggregates in the defining query must be either SUM.) Oracle recommends including the Optional Aggregates expressions to obtain the most efficient and accurate fast refresh of the materialized view.

The Prototype Applying these restrictions and recommendations to our test case above yields the following prototypical materialized view with aggregates. to confirm it can be refreshed in all required situations. Oracle Database needs the statistics generated by this package to optimize query rewrite. 'MV' ) . Additionally we also expect that our GROUP BY columns will often be specified in WHERE or JOIN clauses. 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . set long 5000 select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'. To improve the performance of such queries we will therefore add indexes to our materialized view's GROUP BY columns. Whenever we create a fast refreshable view we should use our EXPLAIN_MVIEW utility. count(*) as row_count .The recommendation about gathering statistics that we saw in the Join Queries topic also applies to materialized views with aggregates. count(amt) as amt_count from t2 group by t_key . Whenever I need to create this type of materialized view in an application I use the code below as a starting point to remind me of the requirements." -.from CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW. create materialized view log on t2 with rowid. amt ) including new values . "After you create the materialized view. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: . sequence ( t_key. create materialized view mv refresh fast on commit enable query rewrite as select t_key . you must collect statistics on it using the DBMS_STATS package. sum(amt) as amt_sum . MY_MV_CAPABILITIES.gather_table_stats( user. create index mv_i1 on mv ( t_key ) . execute dbms_stats. drop materialized view mv .

Query Rewrite Materialized views containing aggregates can be used by the query rewrite facility (see ENABLE QUERY REWRITE). update t2 set amt = 0 where t_key = 2 . 300 ) . 'REWRITE' ) as mv_report from dual . alter materialized view mv enable query rewrite . select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV'.---------1 600 3 3 2 0 2 2 3 300 1 1 Both changes are reflected in MV. insert into t2 values ( 60. commit.REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML Now let's test drive our new MV. select * from mv order by t_key . select * from mv order by t_key .---------. 3. T_KEY AMT_SUM ROW_COUNT AMT_COUNT ---------. First. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- .---------. here are MV's initial contents.---------. as expected.---------1 600 3 3 2 400 2 2 Now let's do some DML on the base table and see the effect on MV. T_KEY AMT_SUM ROW_COUNT AMT_COUNT ---------.---------.

insert into t2 values ( 70. but what happens if we do not include these columns? Let's find out. must be included in our materialized views for them to be fast refreshable in all cases. 3. T_KEY AMT_SUM ---------. -count(amt) as amt_count from t2 group by t_key .Insert-Only Materialized Views On Commit We know that COUNT(*).---------1 600 2 0 3 300 Let's try an INSERT.Capable of: REWRITE REWRITE_FULL_TEXT_MATCH REWRITE_PARTIAL_TEXT_MATCH REWRITE_GENERAL Gotcha . create materialized view mv2 refresh fast on commit enable query rewrite as select t_key . select * from mv2 order by t_key . commit . and sometimes COUNT(expr). 900 ) . sum(amt) as amt_sum -count(*) as row_count . select * from mv2 order by t_key . T_KEY AMT_SUM ---------.---------1 600 2 0 3 1200 .

until I re-read the page a third time and followed up on this seemingly inconsequential little comment. So we've confirmed we have another insert-only materialized view. In topic REFRESH FAST Categories we saw how an insert-only ON DEMAND materialized view similar to this one raised an error when we attempted to fast refresh it manually after a DELETE transaction. all the rows for T_KEY = 1 were deleted from T2 but the group still appears in MV2. The view was fast refreshed after the transaction committed. T_KEY AMT_SUM ---------.REFRESH( 'MV2'. 'c' ) select * from mv2 order by t_key . Let's try synchronizing MV2 manually using DBMS_MVIEW. The manual page for CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW did not mention insert-only materialized views so I had no clue to their existence. Commit complete. delete from t2 where t_key = 1 .---------2 0 3 1200 That's a little better. T_KEY AMT_SUM ---------. After all. select * from mv2 order by t_key . Let's see how our ON COMMIT version behaves after a DELETE.---------1 600 2 0 3 1200 Oops. except this time we won't get any warnings or errors if a commit fails to trigger a fast refresh.Looks good. when one creates a materialized view specifying that it should REFRESH FAST ON COMMIT it seems reasonable to assume it will always refresh fast on commit. 3 rows deleted. The materialized view did not refresh on commit and no errors were generated. When I first learned materialized views I stumbled across this behaviour by accident and found it puzzling. commit.REFRESH. execute DBMS_MVIEW. .

insert into t2 select * from t2_backup . drop materialized view mv2 .from CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW This eventually lead me to learn about insert-only refreshing and how indispensable the DBMS_MVIEW. This is how to recognize an insert-only materialized view. refer to Oracle Database Advanced Replication and Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide. 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . . Cleanup drop materialized view mv . delete t2 . drop materialized view log on t2 .EXPLAIN_MVIEW has to say about MV2. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT Not Capable of: REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML AMT_SUM SUM(expr) without COUNT(expr) REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML COUNT(*) is not present in the select list REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML is disabled The report tells us MV2 is fast refreshable after insert." -. For instructions on actually implementing the refresh."(The REFRESH clause) only sets the default refresh options. commit. So the lesson here is do not assume materialized views created with REFRESH FAST ON COMMIT will always refresh fast on commit. but not after other types of DML. Let's see what DBMS_MVIEW.EXPLAIN_MVIEW to see whether or not it is an "insert-only" materialized view. select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV2'.EXPLAIN_MVIEW utility is when working with fast refreshable materialized views. as we saw earlier. Always check it with DBMS_MVEW.

sequence ( key.---------. amt. given this base table select t_key.Nested Materialized Views Sometimes a single materialized view will not meet our requirements. amt ) including new values . set long 5000 select .----------------1 300 20 2 250 40 (T2_KEY_OF_AMT_MAX identifies the KEY value associated with the highest AMT value in each group. select t_key t_key . max(amt) amt_max . For example. T_KEY AMT KEY ---------. t_key.---------. amt. key from t2 order by t_key. create materialized view log on t2 with rowid .) As always the first step is to create a materialized view log on T2. key .EXPLAIN_MVIEW) tells us about our query. max(key) keep ( dense_rank last order by amt ) as t2_key_of_amt_max from t2 group by t_key . T_KEY AMT_MAX T2_KEY_OF_AMT_MAX ---------.---------1 100 10 1 200 30 1 300 20 2 150 50 2 250 40 say we wanted a fast refreshable materialized view defined with the following query. Now let's see what the MY_MV_CAPABILITIES utility (created in topic DBMS_MVIEW.

t2. VARIANCE.my_mv_capabilities( 'select t_key t_key . select my_mv_capabilities( 'select t_key t_key . it turns out our query is not fast refreshable because the LAST aggregate function which we used to implement T2_KEY_OF_AMT_MAX is not one of the fast refreshable aggregates SUM. max(key) keep ( dense_rank LAST order by amt ) as t2_key_of_amt_max from t2 group by t_key' . max(amt) amt_max . max(key) as t2_key_of_amt_max from t2 where ( t_key. COUNT.amt ) in ( select t_key. 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . Let's try writing the query using a subquery instead of LAST. max(amt) from t2 group by t_key . AVG. max(amt) amt_max . STDDEV. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE Not Capable of: REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT aggregate function nested within an expression REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT is disabled REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML mv uses the MIN or MAX aggregate functions REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML is disabled Though not entirely obvious from the report. MIN and MAX (see Restrictions on Fast Refresh on Materialized Views with Aggregates).

MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE . 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . last_value( key ) over ( partition by t_key order by amt range between unbounded preceding and unbounded following ) as t2_key_of_amt_max from t2' . MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE Not Capable of: REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT subquery in mv REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT is disabled REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML mv uses the MIN or MAX aggregate functions REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML is disabled It looks like a subquery will not work either. Perhaps an analytic approach will work? select my_mv_capabilities( 'select distinct t_key t_key . max( amt ) over ( partition by t_key ) as amt_max .) group by t_key' .

• The base materialized views must contain joins or aggregates. However the materialized view for step 3. regardless of whether they are tables or materialized views. • All base objects. Note that all base objects in a nested materialized view. join the results of steps (1) and (2) together on the AMT column perhaps three separate materialized views would work? The materialized views for steps 1 and 2. Since deriving the desired result set is conceptually a three step process 1. must each have materialized view logs. Materialized views like MV3 are called "Nested Materialized Views". find the highest KEY value per AMT 3.Not Capable of: REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT DISTINCT clause in select list in mv REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT DISTINCT clause in select list in mv REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT window function in mv REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT is disabled REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML is disabled This last approach did not work either. • The defining query must contain joins or aggregates. find the highest AMT value 2. before creating a type of materialized view we have not tried before we must be aware of its restrictions. will need to be based on MV1 and MV2 and will need to refresh after they do. • If REFRESH FAST is specified then all materialized views in any chain related to the materialized view must also specify REFRESH FAST. . which we will call MV3. are treated as tables. Fortunately Oracle allows for a materialized view like MV3 and automatically manages the refresh order when all three views are refreshable on commit. We need to rethink our approach. For nested materialized views they are these. Restrictions and Recommendations As always. which is a bit of a relief actually since the technique is rather crass. which we will call MV1 and MV2. even though they could be thought of as being "nested" within MV3. Note the term "Nested Materialized View" does not refer to MV1 and MV2. whether they are tables or materialized views. can be based on table T2 and can be refreshed independently of each other.

count(*) row_count from t2 group by t_key . amt . 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV1'. amt_max. create materialized view log on mv2 with rowid . amt . create materialized view log on mv1 with rowid . max(key) max_key_per_amt . create materialized view MV1 refresh fast on commit as select t_key . amt_count. sequence ( t_key. count(*) row_count from t2 group by t_key. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML create materialized view MV2 refresh fast on commit as select t_key . row_count ) including new values . count(amt) amt_count .We are now ready to craft our three step solution. max(amt) amt_max . sequence .

rowid mv1_rowid .( t_key. MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML create materialized view MV3 refresh fast on commit as select mv1. mv1.t_key . mv1.amt_max .amt_max = mv2.amt . MV_REPORT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Capable of: REFRESH_COMPLETE REFRESH_FAST REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML . max_key_per_amt.rowid mv2_rowid from mv1.t_key = mv2. 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . row_count ) including new values .max_key_per_amt as t2_key_of_amt_max .t_key and mv1. mv2. select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV2'. 'REFRESH' ) as mv_report from dual . select my_mv_capabilities( 'MV3'. mv2 where mv1. mv2.

Cleanup . commit. commit. contains the correct results. insert into t2 values ( 70.---------.---------1 100 10 1 300 20 1 300 30 2 150 50 2 250 40 3 650 60 Now we check MV3 to see if it contains the correct info. update t2 set amt = 300 where key = 30 . t2_key_of_amt_max from mv3 order by t_key .---------. the nested one. amt. T_KEY AMT KEY ---------. Mission accomplished. delete from t2 where key = 70 . select t_key.----------------1 300 20 2 250 40 Good. key from t2 order by t_key. It matches the results returned by the first query we tried which used the LAST function. amt.---------. t2_key_of_amt_max from mv3 order by t_key . Let's confirm that MV3. key . amt_max. Now let's put all three materialized views through their paces. T_KEY AMT_MAX T2_KEY_OF_AMT_MAX ---------. update t2 set amt = 650 where key = 60 . 3. amt_max. select t_key. First we perform a few mixed DML transactions.We finally have a fast refreshable materialized view solution. insert into t2 values ( 60.----------------1 300 30 2 250 40 3 650 60 It does. select t_key. 450 ). 3. T_KEY AMT_MAX T2_KEY_OF_AMT_MAX ---------. 550 ).

Cleanup . t_key number . ). create table t2_backup as select * from t2 . amt number ) . data. insert insert insert insert commit. 1. .drop materialized view mv1 . insert into insert into insert into insert into insert into commit. delete t2 . 50. ). drop materialized view log on t2 . 2. 100 300 200 250 150 ) ) ) ) ) . . 1. Setup Run the code on this page in SQL*Plus to create the sample tables. 4. create table t_backup as select * from t . val varchar2(5) ) . etc. create table t ( key number . drop materialized view mv3 . ). t2 t2 t2 t2 t2 into into into into t t t t values values values values primary key ( ( ( ( 1. drop materialized view mv2 . 'a' 'b' 'c' null ). used by the examples in this section. 1. . commit. 2. 2. 3. 30. insert into t2 select * from t2_backup . 40. primary key not null references t not null values values values values values ( ( ( ( ( 10. . 20. create table t2 ( key number .

To clear session state changes (e. do not drop it from your schema -. drop table t_backup . and VARIABLE commands) exit your SQL*Plus session after running these cleanup commands. drop function my_mv_capabilities . those made by SET.Run the code on this page to drop the sample tables. exit .MV_CAPABILITIES_TABLE is an Oracle table. drop table t2 . drop table t2_backup .g.unless you specifically created it for this tutorial and no longer wish to -. COLUMN. procedures. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------.use it ------------------------------------------------------------------------------drop table mv_capabilities_table . created in earlier parts of this section.WARNING!! --. drop table t . etc.

Introduced in Oracle 10g. num_val[ 'Total 2 . num_val[ 'Total 4 .MODEL Clause This section presents tutorials on the MODEL clause of the SELECT command. create a report containing ad-hoc totals like this. 'n/a' ) as group_1 . group_1 . It also adds procedural features to SQL previously available only through PL/SQL calls.A + C'.A + a2'. with MODEL you can take a simple table like this KEY -----1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 GROUP_1 ---------A A A B B B C C GROUP_2 ---------a1 a2 a3 a1 a2 a3 a1 a2 a1 a2 DATE_VAL NUM_VAL ---------.'C'). null ] = sum(num_val)[any. num_val[ 'Total 3 . 'n/a' ) as group_2 ) measures( num_val ) rules ( num_val[ 'Total 1 . nvl( group_2. null.a1 + a3'.any] . null.'A'. the MODEL clause is a powerful feature that gives you the ability to change any cell in the query's result set using data from any other cell (similar to the way a spreadsheet works).'a2'] .group_1 <> 'A'. null ] = sum(num_val)[any.any] .any] + sum(num_val)[any. set null "" select case when key like 'Total%' then key else null end as total .'n/a'. null.group_1 in ('A'. null ] = . null ] = sum(num_val)[any. nvl( group_1. with a single command. group_2 . For example.n/a'.------2005-01-01 100 2005-06-12 200 300 2006-02-01 2006-06-12 300 2005-01-01 100 2006-06-12 100 2005-02-01 2005-02-01 200 800 and. num_val from t model dimension by ( cast(key as varchar2(20)) as key . null.

------a1 100 a2 200 a3 300 a1 a2 300 a3 100 a1 100 a2 a1 200 a2 800 700 1700 1000 800 You can also use MODEL'S procedural features to produce results that are difficult.) . 2 ) as string from t where num_val is not null model return updated rows partition by ( group_1 ) dimension by ( row_number() over (partition by group_1 order by num_val) as position ) measures ( cast( num_val as varchar2(65) ) as string ) -. total nulls first .group_2 in ('a1'.A + C Total 2 . TOTAL GROUP_1 -------------------.' || string[iteration_number+1] ) order by group_1 .0) = 0 ) ( string[0] = string[0] || '. set null "(null)" column string format a40 select group_1. Here is an example.300 100.'a3')] ) order by group_1 .sum(num_val)[any.---------A A A B B B C C n/a n/a Total 1 .200.1.n/a Total 4 .A + a2 Total 3 . group_2 .a1 + a3 GROUP_2 NUM_VAL ---------. GROUP_1 ---------A B C (null) STRING ---------------------------------------100. inefficient. substr( string.300 100 200.any.Note 1 rules upsert iterate( 6 ) until ( presentv(string[iteration_number+2].800 (This last technique is explained fully in another section of SQL Snippets at Rows to String: MODEL Method 1. or impossible to do with a non-MODEL SELECT command.

Though powerful, the MODEL clause is also somewhat complex and this can be intimidating when you read about it for the first time. The tutorials to follow will therefore present very simple MODEL examples to help you quickly become comfortable with its many features. Before continuing it is important to know that everything in the MODEL clause is evaluated after all other clauses in the query, except for SELECT DISTINCT and ORDER BY. Knowing this will help you better understand the examples in this section's tutorials.

DIMENSION BY
In this tutorial we learn about the DIMENSION BY component of the MODEL clause. DIMENSION BY specifies which columns in a SELECT statement are dimension columns, which for our purposes can be thought of as any column that serves to identify each row in the result of a SELECT statement. By default, the dimension columns in a MODEL clause must produce a unique key for the result set. See the Oracle® Database Data Warehousing Guide 10g Release 2 (10.2) - Glossary for a formal definition. Before we begin please note that, on its own, DIMENSION BY has little visible effect on the output of the SELECT statement. Most of the examples below would produce the same result as one with no MODEL clause at all. This is because we are not trying to manipulate the results just yet. We are simply seeing how to specify our dimension columns, which is a precursor for learning to manipulate results in subsequent pages. Consider the following table.
select key, key_2, group_1, group_2, num_val from t order by key ; KEY -----1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 KEY_2 ----T-1 T-2 T-3 T-4 T-5 T-6 T-7 T-8 T-9 T-10 GROUP_1 ---------A A A B B B C C GROUP_2 NUM_VAL ---------- ------a1 100 a2 200 a3 300 a1 a2 300 a3 100 a1 100 a2 a1 200 a2 800

We see that KEY, KEY_2, and (GROUP_1, GROUP_2) all uniquely identify each row in the table. They are therefore dimension column candidates. To let Oracle know which column(s) we plan to use as dimensions we compose a MODEL clause like this. (Ignore the MEASURES and RULES clauses for now. We will explore those later.)

select key, num_val from t model DIMENSION BY ( KEY ) measures ( num_val ) rules () order by key ; KEY NUM_VAL ------ ------1 100 2 200 3 300 4 5 300 6 100 7 100 8 9 200 10 800

Multiple Dimensions If needed, you can define more than one dimension column, as this example shows.
select group_1, group_2, num_val from t model DIMENSION BY ( GROUP_1, GROUP_2 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () order by group_1, group_2 ; GROUP_1 ---------A A A B B B C C GROUP_2 NUM_VAL ---------- ------a1 100 a2 200 a3 300 a1 a2 300 a3 100 a1 100 a2 a1 200 a2 800

You can even include columns in the DIMENSION BY clause which are not required to uniquely identify each result row.
select key, date_val, num_val from t model DIMENSION BY ( KEY, DATE_VAL ) -- date_val not required to uniquely identify row measures ( num_val ) rules () order by key ; KEY -----1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 DATE_VAL NUM_VAL ---------- ------2005-01-01 100 2005-06-12 200 300 2006-02-01 2006-06-12 300 2005-01-01 100 2006-06-12 100 2005-02-01 2005-02-01 200 800

Aliasing You cannot use SELECT clause aliases in DIMENSION BY. Here are some examples of aliases that will cause errors.
select KEY AS KEY_3, num_val from t model dimension by ( KEY_3 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () ; dimension by ( KEY_3 ) * ERROR at line 7: ORA-00904: "KEY_3": invalid identifier

select KEY * 10 AS KEY_3, num_val from t model

num_val . dimension by ( KEY_3 ) * ERROR at line 7: ORA-00904: "KEY_3": invalid identifier You can however alias such expressions directly in DIMENSION BY. KEY_3 NUM_VAL ---------. num_val from t model dimension by ( KEY_3 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () .------1 100 2 200 3 300 4 5 300 6 100 7 100 8 9 200 10 800 select KEY_3. num_val from t model DIMENSION BY ( KEY AS KEY_3 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () order by key_3 .. dimension by ( KEY_3 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () dimension by ( KEY_3 ) * ERROR at line 7: ORA-00904: "KEY_3": invalid identifier select ROWNUM AS KEY_3. select KEY_3.

KEY_3 NUM_VAL ---------. select group_2. if your DIMENSION BY columns do not give you a unique key for your result set you will get an error.from t model DIMENSION BY ( KEY * 10 AS KEY_3 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () order by key_3 .------10 100 20 200 30 300 40 50 300 60 100 70 100 80 90 200 100 800 select KEY_3. num_val from . num_val from t model DIMENSION BY ( ROWNUM AS KEY_3 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () order by key_3 .------1 100 2 200 3 300 4 5 300 6 100 7 100 8 9 200 10 800 Uniqueness By default. KEY_3 NUM_VAL ---------.

t model DIMENSION BY ( GROUP_2 ) -. MEASURES In this tutorial we learn about the MEASURES component of the MODEL clause. See the Oracle® Database Data Warehousing Guide 10g Release 2 (10. MEASURES specifies which columns in a SELECT are measure columns. which for our purposes can be thought of as any column containing a measurable quantity like a price or a length.group_2 is not unique measures ( num_val ) rules () order by group_2 .group_2 is not unique Note that UNIQUE SINGLE REFERENCE affects the types of RULES you can define.Glossary for a formal definition.2) . . t * ERROR at line 5: ORA-32638: Non unique addressing in MODEL dimensions This rule can be relaxed somewhat by specifying UNIQUE SINGLE REFERENCE. select group_2. num_val from t model UNIQUE SINGLE REFERENCE dimension by ( group_2 ) measures ( num_val ) rules () order by group_2 .------a1 100 a1 100 a1 200 a1 a2 800 a2 200 a2 300 a2 a3 300 a3 100 -. GROUP_2 NUM_VAL ---------. This is explained further in Expressions and Cell References.

To let Oracle know we want to use the NUM_VAL column as our measure we can compose a MODEL clause like this. KEY NUM_VAL -----. MEASURES has little visible effect on the output of the SELECT statement. Before we see MEASURES in action first consider the following table.------1 100 2 200 3 300 4 5 300 6 100 . We will see how to actually manipulate our output when we explore the RULES clause in subsequent tutorials. num_val from t order by key . num_val from t model dimension by ( key ) MEASURES ( NUM_VAL ) rules () order by key . date_val. KEY -----1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 GROUP_1 ---------A A A B B B C C GROUP_2 ---------a1 a2 a3 a1 a2 a3 a1 a2 a1 a2 DATE_VAL NUM_VAL ---------.------2005-01-01 100 2005-06-12 200 300 2006-02-01 2006-06-12 300 2005-01-01 100 2006-06-12 100 2005-02-01 2005-02-01 200 800 If we decide to use KEY as our sole dimension column. group_2. select key. Most of the examples below would produce the same result as one with no MODEL clause at all. select key. group_1. which is a precursor to manipulating the results.Before we begin please note that. on its own. then all other columns are available for use as measure columns. This is because we are not trying to manipulate the results just yet. We are simply seeing how to specify our measure columns.

'A BRIEF NOTE' AS NOTE ) rules( ) order by key . like this. select key.---------. note from t model dimension by ( key ) MEASURES ( num_val .------2005-01-01 100 2005-06-12 200 300 2006-02-01 2006-06-12 300 2005-01-01 100 2006-06-12 100 2005-02-01 2005-02-01 200 800 You can define measures using constants and expressions instead of simple column names. num_val_2. NUM_VAL * 10 AS NUM_VAL_2 . KEY -----1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 DATE_VAL NUM_VAL ---------. num_val from t model dimension by ( key ) MEASURES ( DATE_VAL. num_val. NUM_VAL ) rules () order by key . date_val_2.---------. SYSDATE AS DATE_VAL_2 .7 8 9 10 100 200 800 If we want to include more measure columns we do it like this. KEY NUM_VAL NUM_VAL_2 DATE_VAL_2 NOTE -----. select key. date_val.------------ .------.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 100 200 300 300 100 100 200 800 1000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 2000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 3000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 3000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 1000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 1000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 2000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF 8000 2007-02-28 A BRIEF NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE .

This means that.---------.Nulls Nulls and Aggregate Functions This tutorial demonstrates how aggregate functions deal with null values. count_all_rows . and COUNT will return values that for the most part ignore nulls. but returns either a number or zero. You can use the NVL function in the argument to an aggregate function to substitute a value for a null. like these. MAX( VAL ) MIN( VAL ) COUNT( * ) COUNT( VAL ) COUNT( DISTINCT VAL ) from t1 group by group_key order by group_key .-----------------Group-1 (null) (null) 2 0 0 . max_val . then the function returns null. select group_key . count_val . COUNT never returns null.---------. MIN . given a table with values like this GROUP_KEY ---------Group-1 Group-1 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-3 Group-3 Group-3 VAL ---------(null) (null) a a z z (null) A A Z aggregate functions like MAX . Ignoring Nulls According to the SQL Reference Manual section on Aggregate Functions: All aggregate functions except COUNT(*) and GROUPING ignore nulls.-------------. Techniques for generating results that ignore nulls and results that include nulls are highlighted. min_val . For all the remaining aggregate functions. or contains only rows with nulls as arguments to the aggregate function. if the data set contains no rows. count_distinct_val GROUP_KEY MAX_VAL MIN_VAL COUNT_ALL_ROWS COUNT_VAL COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL ---------.---------.

Group-2 Group-3 z Z a A 5 3 4 3 2 2 Note how MAX_VAL contains the same results for Group-2 and Group-3. MIN( VAL ) KEEP ( DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY VAL ) min_val from t1 group by group_key order by group_key . and SUM including nulls in the calculation is of little practical use. The other two versions of COUNT() ignored null values.) however. we sometimes need results that take nulls into account. For example... which we can use as follows to give us MAX and MIN results that include nulls. Note also that only COUNT_ALL_ROWS returned a count that included null values. Fortunately for us there are aggregate functions in addition to COUNT(*) and GROUPING which do not ignore nulls. select group_key. For aggregate functions like MAX. using the same test data as above GROUP_KEY ---------Group-1 Group-1 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-3 Group-3 Group-3 VAL ---------(null) (null) a a z z (null) A A Z we may wish to produce results like these. MAX( VAL ) KEEP ( DENSE_RANK LAST ORDER BY VAL ) max_val . GROUP_KEY MAX_VAL MIN_VAL . GROUP_KEY ---------Group-1 Group-2 Group-3 MAX_VAL ---------(null) (null) Z MIN_VAL COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL_1 ---------.-------------------(null) 1 a 3 A 2 For the MAX and MIN cases it helps to take the statement "all aggregate functions except COUNT(*) and GROUPING ignore nulls" with a grain of salt. Two of them are the FIRST and LAST functions. MIN. MEDIAN. even though Group-2 contains null VAL values and Group-3 does not. and COUNT(DISTINCT . Including Nulls For mathematical aggregate functions like AVG.

For example.-------------.-------------------. Fortunately. If the VAL column contained values whose DUMP output is truncated then the results can be incorrect. select group_key. as with FIRST and LAST.---------Group-1 Group-2 Group-3 ---------(null) (null) Z ---------(null) a A For the COUNT( DISTINCT VAL ) case two possible approaches for including nulls are demonstrated below.---------(null) 1 1 (null) 1 1 a a z z (null) A A Z 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 5 1 1 3 The following results show how the aggregate versions of DENSE_RANK and RANK do not ignore nulls.1) ) count_distinct_val_2 from t1 group by group_key order by group_key . DENSE_RANK and RANK Two more aggregate functions where including nulls in the calculation may be necessary are the DENSE_RANK and RANK functions. . COUNT( DISTINCT DUMP(VAL) ) count_distinct_val_1 .0. COUNT( DISTINCT VAL ) + MAX( NVL2(VAL. select group_key .-------------------Group-1 1 1 Group-2 3 3 Group-3 2 2 Be careful with the DUMP approach though since DUMP's output is truncated at 4000 characters. DENSE_RANK and RANK include nulls by default. GROUP_KEY COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL_1 COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL_2 ---------. given test data like this (analytic value rankings are included for clarity) GROUP_KEY ---------Group-1 Group-1 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-2 Group-3 Group-3 Group-3 VAL VAL_DENSE_RANK VAL_RANK ---------.

'z' ) ) max_val . GROUP_KEY NULL_DENSE_RANK_WITHIN_GROUP NULL_RANK_WITHIN_GROUP ---------.-----------------z 1 a 2 A 2 Note how none of the columns above contain the desired results which. max( NVL( VAL. NULL. '~' ) ). Taking the NVL idea a little further programmers sometimes employ more complex solutions such as this one. RANK( NULL ) WITHIN GROUP ( ORDER BY VAL ) null_rank_within_group from t1 group by group_key order by group_key . DECODE( MAX( NVL( VAL.DENSE_RANK( NULL ) WITHIN GROUP ( ORDER BY VAL ) null_dense_rank_within_group . For example. as you will recall.---------------------------. may infer that aggregate functions can be made to treat null values the same way they treat nonnull values by simply using NVL to substitute nulls with some non-null value. 'z' ) ) count_distinct_val from t1 group by group_key order by group_key . min( NVL( VAL. . are these. GROUP_KEY ---------Group-1 Group-2 Group-3 MAX_VAL ---------z z Z MIN_VAL COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL ---------. GROUP_KEY ---------Group-1 Group-2 Group-3 MAX_VAL ---------(null) (null) Z MIN_VAL COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL_1 ---------. You can use the NVL function in the argument to an aggregate function to substitute a value for a null. count( distinct NVL( VAL. select group_key . say we choose to substitute all null values with a 'z'. 'z' ) ) min_val .-------------------(null) 1 a 3 A 2 A simple application of NVL clearly will not do then. A simple application of this logic can lead to trouble however. select group_key . like this. MAX( VAL ) ) max_val .---------------------Group-1 1 1 Group-2 3 5 Group-3 3 4 Gotchas Some people reading these two sentences from the manual All aggregate functions except COUNT(*) and GROUPING ignore nulls. '~'.

GROUP_KEY ---------Group-4 Group-5 MAX_VAL ---------(null) ~~~ MIN_VAL COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL ---------. given this data insert into t1 values ( 10. 'Group-4'. . select group_key . min( val ) ) min_val . insert into t1 values ( 10. count( distinct nvl( val. MIN( VAL ) ) min_val . '~'. For example. incorrect results. 'Group-5'. decode( max( nvl(val. COUNT( distinct NVL( VAL. '~' ). '~'. '~~~' ).-----------------(null) 1 a 3 A 2 Without some mechanism to ensure '~' and strings that sort higher than '~' never appear in VAL however. '~' ) ). GROUP_KEY ---------Group-1 Group-2 Group-3 MAX_VAL ---------(null) (null) Z MIN_VAL COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL ---------. '~' ) ) count_distinct_val from t1 group by group_key order by group_key . '~' ) ). insert into t1 values ( 10. the results should be GROUP_KEY ---------Group-4 Group-5 MAX_VAL ---------(null) (null) MIN_VAL COUNT_DISTINCT_VAL_1 ---------. null. 'Group-5' ) group by group_key order by group_key . these solutions will fail if such values are ever inserted into the table. ). '~' ) ) count_distinct_val from t1 where group_key in ( 'Group-4'.-----------------(null) 1 (null) 2 To avoid these gotchas simply use the non-NVL alternatives presented under "Including Nulls" above. 'Group-4'.-------------------~ 2 ~~~ 2 but using the NVL approach gives us these. 'Group-5'. '~' ) ).DECODE( MIN( NVL( VAL. null ). '~'. null insert into t1 values ( 10. max( val ) ) max_val . decode( min( nvl(val. NULL. null.

SQL + PL/SQL These techniques work in both SQL and PL/SQL.---------1 A A Row 4 is not returned because.---------. Consider a table where two of its columns can contain null values. If this is the behavior you need. a null is not considered to be equal to or unequal to any value (including another null). in SQL. However. C1 --1 4 C2 ---------A (null) C3 ---------A (null) begin for r in ( select * from t ) loop . C1 C2 C3 --. C1 --1 2 3 4 C2 ---------A A (null) (null) C3 ---------A B A (null) If we attempt a SELECT statement like the following we will only get row 1. then read no further.Nulls and Equality In SQL you should always consider the effect of null values when comparing two values for equality (or any type of comparison for that matter). this basic solution is the easiest to understand and implement. select * from t where c2 = c3 . select * from t. if you need a query that returns row 1 and row 4 then try one of the solutions in the subtopics to follow. OR with IS NULL While a bit cumbersome. select * from t where ( C2 = C3 OR ( C2 IS NULL AND C3 IS NULL ) ).

select * from t where nvl( c2.c1 || ' contains matching values. end loop. If we look at the table definition for T desc t Name Null? Type ---------------------------------------------. / Row 1 contains matching values. select * from t where nvl( c2.C2 = R. 'x' ) .' ).C3 IS NULL ) ) then dbms_output. or whatever value you choose to use. 'x' ) = nvl( c3.if ( R.put_line( 'Row ' || r. end if. like this. 'x' ) . This would cause a SELECT statement that has been working properly until that day to all of a sudden start returning the wrong answer. 'x' ) = nvl( c3.-------------------------------------C1 NUMBER C2 VARCHAR2(10) . commit. 'x'. end. Row 4 contains matching values. might be inserted into columns C2 or C3 some day. null ). insert into t values( 5.C2 IS NULL AND R. NVL The following NVL approach is a popular one. C1 --1 4 C2 ---------A (null) C3 ---------A (null) One problem with this solution is that the replacement value "x". C1 --1 4 5 C2 ---------A (null) x C3 ---------A (null) (null) The trick to making this solution bullet proof is to choose a replacement value that can never appear in either of the columns being compared. .C3 OR ( R.

.C2. '12345678901' ) .' ).C3 ) = 'Y' then dbms_output. C1 --1 4 C2 ---------A (null) C3 ---------A (null) Custom Function If you do these comparisons frequently you may wish to create a custom database function like this one. Any replacement value larger than 10 characters is therefore guaranteed to never appear in either column (assuming the sizes of C2 or C3 are never expanded). / select * from t where SAME( C2.put_line( 'Row ' || r. C1 --1 4 C2 ---------A (null) C3 ---------A (null) begin for r in ( select * from t ) loop if SAME( R. end if. R. p_2 in varchar2 ) return varchar2 is begin return ( case when p_1 is null and p_2 is null then 'Y' when p_1 = p_2 then 'Y' else 'N' end ). C3 ) = 'Y' . end loop. end.C3 VARCHAR2(10) we see that values in C2 and C3 can be at most 10 characters long.c1 || ' contains matching values. '12345678901' ) = nvl( c3. create function SAME( p_1 in varchar2. select * from t where nvl( c2. . end.

DECODE One approach uses the DECODE function. while more compact than the solutions presented in SQL + PL/SQL . If the values being compared produce truncated DUMP output then the comparison can produce false positives. RESULT -------------------------------------Oops! This row should not be returned. 4000 ) ) ./ Row 1 contains matching values.' as result from dual where DUMP( LPAD( 'A'. 'N' ) = 'Y' . One. etc. 4000) ) = DUMP( LPAD( 'B'. C1 --1 4 C2 ---------A (null) C3 ---------A (null) DUMP Another approach uses the DUMP function. C1 --1 4 C2 ---------A (null) C3 ---------A (null) This approach has a couple of limitations however. Here is an example. To return rows where two columns contain the same value we can therefore use a command like the following. DECODE treats two nulls as equivalent. unfortunately only work in SQL commands. With this approach however one function is required for comparing NUMBER values. Row 4 contains matching values. the output of the DUMP function is truncated at 4000 characters. select * from t where DUMP(C2) = DUMP(C3) . one for VARCHAR2 values. select * from t where DECODE( C2. one for DATE values. 'Y'. . Unlike the "=" operator. not PL/SQL commands. select 'Oops! This row should not be returned. SQL Only The following techniques. C3.

The "typ=" part of the DUMP output for both terms differs because column C2 is datatype 1. begin for r in ( select * from t ) loop . select 'Oops! This row should be returned. VARCHAR2. SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL does not work in PL/SQL. but it is not. and the literal 'A' is datatype 96. CHAR. dump( 'A' ) as char_val from t where c1 = 1 . select * from t where SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( C2 ) = SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( C3 ) . Comparing compatible datatypes such as VARCHAR2 and CHAR will fail to match any rows. C1 --1 4 C2 ---------A (null) C3 ---------A (null) As with the other solutions on this page.Two. C2 and C3 must be the exact same datatype for the comparison to work. VARCHAR2_VAL -----------------------------CHAR_VAL -----------------------------Typ=1 Len=1: 65 Typ=96 Len=1: 65 SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL Another approach that some have proposed uses the undocumented function SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL. no rows selected Examining the output of DUMP shows why this occurs. column varchar2_val format a30 column char_val format a30 fold_before select dump( c2 ) as varchar2_val .' as result from t where dump( c2 ) = dump( 'A' ) .

3. . end. insert insert insert insert into into into into t t t t values( values( values( values( 1.if ( SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( R. column 10: PLS-00201: identifier 'SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL' must be declared ORA-06550: line 6.c1 || ' contains matching values.put_line( 'Row ' || r. . data. 'A' 'A' null null . used by the examples in this section.C2 ) = SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( R. etc.C3 ) ) then dbms_output. . ). . select * from dual where SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( LPAD( 'A'.C2 ) = SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( R. c3 varchar2(10) ). Be sure to read Using SQL Snippets ™ before executing any of these setup steps. They also make support and maintenance harder for others who need to work with your code and are not familiar with the feature. column 5: PL/SQL: Statement ignored It also has a length limitation. 4. 4000 ) ) = SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( LPAD( 'B'. end loop. end if. 2.C3 ) ) * ERROR at line 6: ORA-06550: line 6. Setup Run the code on this page in SQL*Plus to create the sample tables. their behavior or availability can change at any time making them a risky thing to include in your code. select * * ERROR at line 1: ORA-01706: user function result value was too large While undocumented features such as this one are compelling. 'A' 'B' 'A' null ). . / if ( SYS_OP_MAP_NONNULL( R.' ). 4000 ) ) . create table t ( c1 number . c2 varchar2(10) . ). ).

commit. those made by SET. Be sure to read Using SQL Snippets ™ before executing any of these setup steps. COLUMN. and VARIABLE commands) exit your SQL*Plus session after running these cleanup commands. drop function same . exit . etc.g. procedures. set null '(null)' set numformat 99 set serveroutput on Cleanup Run the code on this page to drop the sample tables. created in earlier parts of this section. To clear session state changes (e. drop table t .

val from days_of_the_week d left outer join t using ( day_of_week ) order by day_of_week . t. DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------.---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6 If you expect to write lots of queries that use the same series of integers and they are based on real world phenomena then creating a table like DAYS_OF_THE_WEEK can be the best solution.Integer Series Generators Sometimes. For example. having a way to create a series of integers greatly simplifies certain queries.---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6 It would be useful to have a table with the numbers 0 to 6 in it so you could write an outer join query like this. .---------1 100 3 300 4 400 5 500 and you want a report that looks like this DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------. if your data looks like this: select * from t . select day_of_week. DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------.

for adhoc reports. You can create such a table like this. Fortunately there are flexible. commit. In these cases it may be impractical or impossible to create a dedicated table that meets your needs. create table integers ( integer_value integer primary key ) organization index . The feature graph below will help you decide which method is best for you. One of the most straightforward ways to generate a series of integers is by adding a generic integer table to your application.. end. end loop. 10 loop insert into integers values ( i ). Integer Table Method This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series of integers using a generic integer table. Other techniques are discussed in the topics listed in the menu to the left. generic techniques for generating integers. Feature Intege MOD r Table EL Y N ROWNUM Type CONNECT CUB Pipelined + a Big Construct BY LEVEL E Function Table or Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Pure SQL solution.Small Numbers and Performance Comparison .Large Numbers pages.Occassionally however. Table created. The tutorials in this section demonstrate a few of them. or for a system you do not have CREATE TABLE privileges on. no custom objects N required Works in versions Y prior to 10g Performance comparison charts for all these methods are available at the end of the section on the Performance Comparison . / PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. Since this table only has a single indexed column we specified organization index to make this an Index-Organized table and save storage space. you may need a different set of integers just for one specific query. . begin for i in -5 . To load the table a simple loop like the following will do the trick.

DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------.integer_value = t. select i. In practice you would choose limits that anticipate the smallest and largest integers you will ever need.integer_value . INTEGER_VALUE -------------5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Later.val from integers i left outer join t on ( i.day_of_week ) where i. t. (You can learn more about MODEL at SQL Features Tutorials: MODEL .integer_value between 0 and 6 order by i.We used -5 and 10 as the limits of our series in this example. select * from integers .integer_value as day_of_week . when you need a specific series of integers you can use the INTEGERS table like this.---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6 MODEL Method This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series of integers using the MODEL clause of the SELECT command.

Clause.) This technique only works with Oracle versions starting at 10g. Other techniques are discussed in the tutorials listed in the menu to the left. With this technique you can generate a series of integers starting at "1" using a query like this.
select integer_value from dual where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 1 to 10 increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ; INTEGER_VALUE ------------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Chaning the INCREMENT value lets us control the difference between successive values in the series.
select integer_value from dual where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 2 to 10 INCREMENT 2 ] = cv(key) ) ; INTEGER_VALUE ------------2 4 6 8 10

We can use bind variables to make the solution more generic.
variable v_first_key variable v_last_key variable v_increment execute :V_FIRST_KEY execute :V_LAST_KEY execute :V_INCREMENT number number number := 1 := 5 := 2

select key, integer_value from dual where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from :V_FIRST_KEY to :V_LAST_KEY increment 1 ] = nvl2( integer_value[cv()-1], integer_value[cv()-1] + :V_INCREMENT, cv(key) ) ) ; KEY INTEGER_VALUE ---------- ------------1 1 2 3 3 5 4 7 5 9

When v_last_key is NULL or less than v_first_key no rows are returned.
execute :v_first_key := 1 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. execute :v_last_key := null

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. / no rows selected execute :v_last_key := 0 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. / no rows selected execute :v_last_key := -5 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. / no rows selected

Day of the Week Case Study

We can apply this technique to the day of the week scenario presented at the start of this chapter as follows.
select day_of_week , t.val from ( select day_of_week from dual where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as day_of_week ) rules upsert ( day_of_week[ for key from 0 to 6 increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ) i left outer join t using ( day_of_week ) order by day_of_week ; DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------- ---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6

Gotchas

Descending Series
If you need a descending series of integers this attempt will not work.
select integer_value from dual where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key FROM 3 TO 1 increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ; no rows selected

Instead, do it this way
select integer_value from dual

where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 3 to 1 DECREMENT 1 ] = cv(key) ) ORDER BY INTEGER_VALUE DESC ; INTEGER_VALUE ------------3 2 1

or this way.
select integer_value from dual where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 1 TO 3 INCREMENT 1 ] = cv(key) ) ORDER BY INTEGER_VALUE DESC ; INTEGER_VALUE ------------3 2 1

WHERE 1=2
It is important to note that everything in the MODEL clause is evaluated after all other clauses in the query, except for SELECT DISTINCT and ORDER BY. Using the WHERE 1=2 clause ensures the query starts with an empty result set when MODEL rules are first applied to the rows returned by the SELECT ... FROM ... WHERE portion of the query. While it would be possible to omit the WHERE 1=2 clause using an approach like this
select integer_value from dual model dimension by ( 1 as key ) measures ( 1 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 1 to 10 increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ; INTEGER_VALUE ------------1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

this query causes the result set to always contain at least one row both before and after the MODEL rules are applied. This is not a problem for queries that always return one or more rows like this one,
select key, integer_value from dual model dimension by ( 4 as key ) measures ( 4 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 4 to 8 increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ; KEY INTEGER_VALUE ---------- ------------4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8

but if the code is later parameterized and the TO bound is ever null or less than the FROM bound then the query will incorrectly return 1 row instead of the required zero rows for these cases.
variable v_first_key variable v_last_key number number

execute :v_first_key := 3 execute :v_last_key := 0 select key, integer_value from dual model dimension by ( :v_first_key as key ) measures ( :v_first_key as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from :v_first_key to :v_last_key increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ; KEY INTEGER_VALUE ---------- ------------3 3

RETURN UPDATED ROWS

An alternative to using WHERE 1=2 would be to instead include a RETURN UPDATED ROWS clause, like this
select integer_value from dual model RETURN UPDATED ROWS dimension by ( 1 as key ) measures ( 1 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 1 TO 3 increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ; INTEGER_VALUE ------------1 2 3 select integer_value from dual model RETURN UPDATED ROWS dimension by ( 1 as key ) measures ( 1 as integer_value ) rules upsert ( integer_value[ for key from 3 TO 0 increment 1 ] = cv(key) ) ; no rows selected

but using WHERE 1=2 to ensure the query always starts with an empty set seems like a cleaner way to work than starting with one row and then relying on RETURN UPDATED ROWS to return that row in some cases but not others.

INCREMENT and Bind Variables
Unlike the FROM and TO bounds, we cannot use a variable in the INCREMENT value (as tested in 10g).
variable v_first_key variable v_last_key variable v_increment execute :v_first_key execute :v_last_key execute :v_increment number number number := 1 := 9 := 2

select key, integer_value from dual where 1=2 model dimension by ( 0 as key ) measures ( 0 as integer_value ) rules upsert

1 as day_of_week .val from ( select rownum . t. Other techniques are discussed in the tutorials listed in the menu to the left. like this. ROWNUM ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 We can apply this technique to our day of the week scenario as follows. select day_of_week . Prerequisites Before using this solution you need to find a table with at least as many rows in it as the number of integers you need to generate. The data dictionary view ALL_OBJECTS is a popular choice for this method. ( integer_value[ for key from :v_first_key to :v_last_key INCREMENT :v_increment ] ERROR at line 8: ORA-32626: illegal bounds or increment in MODEL FOR loop * ROWNUM + a Big Table Method This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series of integers using the ROWNUM pseudocolumn and any available table with as many rows in it as the number of integers required. if you need a series of 10 integers then you need to find a table or view that will always have at least 10 rows in it.e. I. select rownum from all_objects where rownum <= 10 .( integer_value[ for key from :v_first_key to :v_last_key INCREMENT :v_increment ] = cv(key) ) . The Solution Once you have identified a table with a sufficient number of rows simply select ROWNUM from it to generate the required integer series.

---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6 CONNECT BY LEVEL Method This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series of integers using a novel application of the CONNECT BY clause first posted by Mikito Harakiri at Ask Tom "how to display selective record twice in the query?". With this technique you can generate a series of integers starting at "1" using a query like this. LEVEL ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Queries Without PRIOR The query above is a special case of a more general type of query. yields some insight into how such queries work. "a" and "b". Other techniques are discussed in the tutorials listed in the menu to the left. select level from dual connect by level <= 10 . DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------. Applying the technique to a table with two rows.from all_objects where rownum <= 7 ) i left outer join t using ( day_of_week ) order by day_of_week . those that do not use the PRIOR operator. break on level duplicates skip 1 column path format a10 .

Note there is some debate about whether queries without PRIOR in the CONNECT BY clause are legal or not. See Multiple Integer Series: CONNECT BY LEVEL Method for more details and an example. It always generates at least one row in these cases. This is discussed further in the "Gotchas" section below. Variables The original syntax for this technique works fine when the number of rows is hardcoded to a value greater than or equal to 1. or null however. path . . negative. This effect may be useful where an exponentially increasing number of output rows is required. The effect also proves useful in situations where more than one integer series is required from a single query. key t4 level <= 3 level. '/' ) as path. clear breaks variable v_total_rows number execute :v_total_rows := 0 select level from dual connect by level <= :v_total_rows . sys_connect_by_path( key. If the number of rows is set with a bind variable whose value can be 0.select from connect by order by LEVEL ---------1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 level. the technique may not work as expected. PATH ---------/a /b /a/a /a/b /b/a /b/b /a/a/a /a/a/b /a/b/a /a/b/b /b/a/a /b/a/b /b/b/a /b/b/b KEY --a b a b a b a b a b a b a b Without a CONNECT BY condition that uses PRIOR it appears Oracle returns all possible hierarchy permutations.

select from WHERE connect level dual :V_TOTAL_ROWS >= 1 by level <= :v_total_rows . / LEVEL ---------1 1 row selected. / no rows selected execute :v_total_rows := null .LEVEL ---------1 execute :v_total_rows := -5 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. no rows selected execute :v_total_rows := -5 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. execute :v_total_rows := 0 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. / LEVEL ---------1 1 row selected. A simple WHERE clause fixes this behaviour. execute :v_total_rows := null PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

t.---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6 Gotchas To Use PRIOR or Not to Use PRIOR. select day_of_week .val from ( select level . DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------. That is the Question .1 as day_of_week from dual connect by level <= 7 ) i left outer join t using( day_of_week ) order by day_of_week .PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. / LEVEL ---------1 2 3 3 rows selected. Day of the Week Case Study In the next snippet we apply the technique to the day of the week scenario we examined in prior tutorials. / no rows selected execute :v_total_rows := 3 PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

" -. do not produce the desired 10 rows of output (as tested in Oracle 10g). seemingly equivalent to the CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 10 solution. Note that the following queries. select level from dual connect by level <= 10 and PRIOR DBMS_RANDOM.VALUE IS NOT NULL .2) Others argue that this statement is a documentation bug. LEVEL ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 . The fact the CONNECT BY clause works without error in Oracle 10g and some 9i versions somewhat supports this view. one expression in condition must be qualified with the PRIOR operator to refer to the parent row. ERROR: ORA-01436: CONNECT BY loop in user data select level from dual connect by level <= 10 AND PRIOR 1 = 1 . as dictated by this statement in the SQL Reference Manual "in a hierarchical query.Laurent Schneider argues in his blog post Bible of Oracle that a clause like CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 10 is an illegal construct since it has no expressions qualified with the PRIOR operator.Oracle® Database SQL Reference 10g Release 2 (10.Volder). but the PL/SQL call it contains makes it perform worse (from Re: Creating N Copies of a Row using "CONNECT BY CONNECT_BY_ROOT" . ERROR: ORA-01436: CONNECT BY loop in user data The following variation may be more legal than the original solution since it includes a PRIOR condition and does not produce a CONNECT BY loop. select level from dual connect by level <= 10 AND PRIOR DUMMY = DUMMY .

Issues Issues with this technique. I have not tested these myself but here are some posts that describe problems. be aware there is a risk the technique may not work in future versions. or variations of it. LEVEL ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 rows selected. • • Ask Tom "how to display selective record twice in the query?" Ask Tom "Can there be an infinite DUAL?" .7 8 9 10 The jury is still out on using CONNECT BY LEVEL to generate integers. LEVEL ---------1 putting the query in an inline view.minor simplification CONNECT BY Generator Rules | Ask Mr. Laurent Schneider and other posters at these threads.Weird results Ask Tom "Can there be an infinite DUAL?" . Tom Kyte.Weird Results (bug?) Ask Tom "how to display selective record twice in the query?". if you try the CONNECT BY LEVEL technique and get a single row when expecting muliple rows. like this select level from dual connect by level < 10 . Acknowledgements Mikito Harakiri. Ed In Oracle 9i. • • • • Ask Tom "Can there be an infinite DUAL?" . select * from (select level from dual connect by level < 10) . have been reported in Oracle versions earlier than 10. Until there is a definitive answer. as in this snippet.2. may help (I have not tested this).

3 ) ) . Here are some examples that generate a series of integers using CUBE. To return 4 rows (2^2): select rownum from ( select 1 from dual group by cube( 1. 3. 4 ) 10 ) . ROWNUM ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 To return 16 rows (2^4): ROWNUM ---------1 2 3 4 select rownum 5 from 6 ( 7 select 1 8 from dual 9 group by cube( 1. Other techniques are discussed in the tutorials listed in the menu to the left. ROWNUM ---------1 2 3 4 To return 8 rows (2^3): select rownum from ( select 1 from dual group by cube( 1. 2.CUBE Method This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series of integers using the CUBE clause of the SELECT statement. 2 ) ) . 2. 11 12 13 14 15 16 To return 9 rows: select rownum from ( select 1 ROWNUM ---------1 2 .

DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------. with days_of_the_week as ( select rownum . 2. as in this example which attempts to generate 7 integers but only succeeds in generating 4.1 as day_of_week from ( select 1 from dual group by cube( 1. 4 ) ) where rownum <= 9 . 2 ) -.will only generate 2^2 rows . 3 ) ) where rownum <= 7 ) select day_of_week . otherwise you will not get the correct number of rows. Gotchas Number of Arguments in CUBE Ensure the numeric literal in the WHERE clause is less than or equal to 2^(number of CUBE arguments). 3. t. 2.from dual group by cube( 1.val from days_of_the_week left outer join t using ( day_of_week ) order by day_of_week . select rownum as integer_value from ( select 1 from t2 group by cube ( 1.---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6 For more details about how this method works see CUBE . 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 We can apply this technique to our day of the week scenario with this query.Explained.

INTEGER_VALUE ------------1 2 3 4 Inline View Attempting to use rownum without the inline view will cause errors or incorrect results. 6.---------x y 42 C1 C2 SUM_C3 -----. C1 C2 C3 -----. and then turn it into an integer series generator for the values 1 to 4.Explained To understand how the integer series generator described in the CUBE Method tutorial works we will start with a simple query.-----. 2. (Read the Oracle manual page on the CUBE grouping operation first if you are not already familiar with this feature.. 3.. not 5. select c1.-----. 2 ) .) where rownum <= 7 -. sum( c3 ) as sum_c3 from t2 GROUP BY C1. select rownum * ERROR at line 1: ORA-00979: not a GROUP BY expression select rownum from t2 group by rownum. 7. c2.---------x y 42 . or 1 in this query. C2 . cube( 1. select rownum from t2 group by cube( 1. . 2 ) . transform it into a query that uses CUBE the traditional way. ROWNUM ---------1 1 1 1 CUBE Method . .) set null "(null)" select * from t2 .can only be <= 4.

'b' and still get the same number of rows. four literals will give you sixteen rows (2^4). select rownum as integer_value from ( select 1 from t2 group by cube ( 1.----------(null) 1 y 1 (null) 1 y 1 select c1. etc.2.4. c2 ) . 1 or 'a'.select c1. 1 ---------1 1 1 1 1 select 1 ---------from t2 1 group by CUBE ( 1. sum( c3 ) as sum_c3 from t2 group by CUBE( c1. The important part is how many literals you include. SELECT 1 from t2 group by cube ( c1. three literals will give you eight rows (2^3).3.6. c2. 1 1 select ROWNUM AS INTEGER_VALUE from ( select 1 from t2 group by cube ( 1. 2 ) -.---------(null) 42 y 42 (null) 42 y 42 C2 ANY_LITERAL -----. You could use arguments like 1.5. INTEGER_VALUE ------------1 2 3 4 INTEGER_VALUE ------------1 2 3 Note 1: In this technique it does not matter what literals you use in the arguments to CUBE. 2 ) ) where ROWNUM <= 3 . Two literals will give you four rows (2^2). 1 AS ANY_LITERAL from t2 group by cube( c1.7 because it is . c2. C1 -----(null) (null) x x C1 -----(null) (null) x x C2 SUM_C3 -----. 2 ) ). c2 ). c2 ).see Note 1 1 . I like to use arguments like 1.

8.1. Other techniques are discussed in the tutorials listed in the menu to the left.3. COLUMN_VALUE -----------1 1 4 4 . select column_value from table( integer_table_type( 1. Prerequisites This solution requires a nested table type or varry type. like 10 or 20.5.1.1.1.4. select column_value from table( integer_table_type( 1.1.6. COLUMN_VALUE -----------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 This method is unique from the others in this section in that it lends itself well to creating sets of non-sequential integers as well as sequential series. you can use a simple query like this one.Note 1.1.2.4. desc integer_table_type integer_table_type TABLE OF NUMBER(38) The Solution If you need a manageable number of integers.easier to tell there are 7 arguments (which produce 2^7 rows) with this approach than with an argument list like 1. We will use one called INTEGER_TABLE_TYPE created in the Setup topic for this section.1.4.7.9.10 ) ) . If you do not have privileges to create a type like this see Setup .10 ) ) . Type Constructor Expression Method This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series or set of integers using Type Constructor Expressions for collection types.8.4.

4 8 10

Applying the technique to our day of the week scenario yields this query.
select i.column_value as day_of_week , t.val from table( integer_table_type( 0,1,2,3,4,5,6 ) ) i left outer join t on ( i.column_value = t.day_of_week ) order by i.column_value ; DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------- ---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6

If you require more integers than you care to list in a type constructor expression see the Type Constructor + Cartesian Product tutorial for a variation of this technique. Gotchas If we specify more than 999 arguments in a type constructor it will generate a ORA-00939: too many arguments for function error (as tested in Oracle 10g).

Type Constructor + Cartesian Product Method
This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series of integers using Type Constructor Expressions for collection types and Cartesian Products. Other techniques are discussed in the tutorials listed in the menu to the left. Prerequisites This solution requires a nested table type or varry type. We will use one called INTEGER_TABLE_TYPE created in the Setup topic for this section. If you do not have privileges to create a type like this see Setup - Note 1.
desc integer_table_type integer_table_type TABLE OF NUMBER(38)

The Solution

If you require a large number of integers then listing them all in a type constructor expression, like the solutions in the Type Constructor Expression Method tutorial, may be difficult or impossible. In this case you can use a Cartesian product with your type constructor expressions to generate a large number of rows with a small amount of code. Here are some examples. This query returns 9 rows (3x3).
ROWNUM ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

select rownum from table( integer_table_type( 1,2,3 ) ) i1, table( integer_table_type( 1,2,3 ) ) i2 ;

This query returns 12 rows (3x4).
ROWNUM ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

select rownum from table( integer_table_type( 1,2,3 ) ) i1, table( integer_table_type( 1,2,3,4 ) ) i2 ;

A query like this can return up to 10,000 rows (10^4), though we won't prove this by diplaying them all here. Listing 15 of them should suffice.
ROWNUM ---------1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

with i as ( select * from table ( integer_table_type( 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 ) ) ) select rownum from i,i,i,i where rownum <= 15 ;

How Cartesian Products Work When you do not specify a join between tables Oracle combines each row of one table with each row in the other to produce every possible row combination. This produces a result set with
(number of rows in Table 1) x (number of rows in Table 2)

rows in it. The following query illustrates this.
select rownum , i1.column_value i1_column_value, i2.column_value i2_column_value from table( integer_table_type( 1,2 ) ) i1, table( integer_table_type( 10,20,30 ) ) i2 ; ROWNUM I1_COLUMN_VALUE I2_COLUMN_VALUE ---------- --------------- --------------1 1 10 2 1 20 3 1 30 4 2 10 5 2 20 6 2 30

Pipelined Function Method
This tutorial demonstrates how to generate a series of integers using a Pipelined Function. Other techniques are discussed in the tutorials listed in the menu to the left. Prerequisites This solution requires a nested table type or varry type. We will use one called INTEGER_TABLE_TYPE created in the Setup topic for this section. If you do not have privileges to create a type like this see Setup - Note 1.
desc integer_table_type integer_table_type TABLE OF NUMBER(38)

You will also need the following custom database function.
create function integer_series ( p_lower_bound in number, p_upper_bound in number ) return integer_table_type pipelined as begin

for i in p_lower_bound .. p_upper_bound

end.val from table( integer_series(0. select * from table( integer_series(-5.---------0 1 100 2 3 300 4 400 5 500 6 .column_value as day_of_week . COLUMN_VALUE ------------5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We can apply this technique to our day of the week scenario with this query.column_value .7) ) .day_of_week ) order by i. t.column_value = t. here is how you use the INTEGER_SERIES function. select i. / The Solution Now that we have our prerequisites in place. DAY_OF_WEEK VAL ----------. end loop.loop pipe row(i). return.6) ) i left outer join t on ( i.

680 redo size 2.640 2.071 2.536 131.072 196.144 262.684 2. Statistics The following table shows database statistics where values for one method differ by more than 100 from another method.608 65.684 2.144 262.684 2. See the log file from these tests for more details.684 2.-----------.464 65.-----------.Small Numbers The following tables show performance metrics for one run each of the eight integer series generation techniques described in the preceeding tutorials.-----------.608 65.072 131.744 2.Performance Comparison .680 session pga memory 196.144 262.199 2.144 327.144 262.072 2. .464 See Statistics Descriptions for a description of each metric. • Integer Table Method • MODEL Method • ROWNUM + a Big Table Method • CONNECT BY LEVEL Method • CUBE Method • Type Constructor Expression Method • Type Constructor + Cartesian Product Method • Pipelined Function Method Each run generated a series of integers from 1 to 100.072 327. Latch Gets The following table shows total latch gets for each method.464 65.-----------.536 131.684 2.071 2.----------------------.081 2.071 2.144 262.144 262.-----------------------------Elapsed Time (1/100 sec) 3 3 3 2 5 262 3 4 session pga memory max 262.071 2.684 sorts (rows) 2. Integer ROWNUM CONNECT BY Type Type Constructor Pipelined METRIC_NAME Table MODEL + Big Table LEVEL CUBE Constructor + Cartesian Product Function ---------------------------------------.076 session uga memory 0 0 0 0 0 65.

208 181 249 row cache objects 136 96 129 87 84 135 114 171 library cache 92 77 86 80 77 113 89 179 shared pool 70 25 26 24 25 85 29 45 session idle bit 56 55 56 55 55 56 55 57 library cache pin 50 43 48 43 43 57 45 89 library cache lock 26 20 28 20 20 40 25 72 enqueues 23 16 17 16 16 26 16 20 enqueue hash chains 22 16 16 16 16 26 16 18 shared pool simulator 12 9 7 9 9 16 10 17 object queue header operation 8 12 12 12 12 305 12 15 redo allocation 8 8 8 8 8 18 8 8 cache buffers lru chain 7 6 6 6 6 396 6 7 SQL memory manager workarea list latch 6 10 6 6 6 73 6 6 session allocation 6 2 4 3 2 2 2 6 sort extent pool 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 session switching 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 kks stats 4 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 simulator hash latch 4 0 10 0 0 134 0 1 simulator lru latch 4 0 10 0 0 130 0 1 PL/SQL warning settings 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 compile environment latch 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 3 object stats modification 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 library cache lock allocation 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 .-----------.-----------.-----------------------------cache buffers chains 206 163 221 163 163 1.-----------.----------------------.Integer ROWNUM CONNECT BY Type Type Constructor Pipelined METRIC_NAME Table MODEL + Big Table LEVEL CUBE Constructor + Cartesian Product Function ---------------------------------------.-----------.

o list latch 0 1 0 0 OS process 0 3 0 0 messages 0 1 0 40 channel operations parent latch 0 1 0 18 channel handle pool latch 0 1 0 0 OS process allocation 0 1 0 0 process allocation 0 1 0 0 process group creation 0 1 0 0 checkpoint queue latch 0 0 0 269 redo writing 0 0 0 13 active checkpoint queue latch 0 0 0 13 loader state object freelist 0 0 0 12 virtual circuit buffers 0 0 0 9 virtual circuit queues 0 0 0 7 parallel query alloc buffer 0 0 0 4 user lock 0 0 0 4 session timer 0 0 0 3 library cache load lock 0 0 0 2 virtual circuits 0 0 0 2 active service list 0 0 0 2 library cache pin allocation 0 0 0 1 resmgr:actses active list 0 0 0 1 XDB unused session pool 0 0 0 1 KMG MMAN ready and startup request latch 0 0 0 1 resmgr:free threads list 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 -----------.-----------.-----------.-----------------------------sum 757 575 709 575 559 3.-----------.----------------------.242 632 986 .dml lock allocation 1 1 1 1 FOB s.

Statistics The following table shows database statistics where values for one method differ by more than 100 from another method.128 262.----------------------.616 262.984 261. See the log file from these tests for more details.-----------Elapsed Time (1/100 sec) 59 349 68 67 57 544 session pga memory max 262.964 session pga memory 196. Integer ROWNUM CONNECT BY Type Constructor Pipelined METRIC_NAME Table MODEL Table LEVEL + Cartesian Product Function ---------------------------------------.964 4.-----------. The CUBE Method technique was excluded from this test because it failed to complete in under 10 minutes. Results will even differ from one set of test runs to the next on the same machine.016.------------------.608 65. Warning: Results on your own systems with your own data will differ from these results.680 session uga memory max 261. Run your own tests and average the results from multiple runs before making performance decisions.680 session logical reads 6.533.888 6 39 72 + Big .-----------.Techniques that use a small number of latches scale better than techniques that use a large number of latches.784.144 327.072 0 262.879 45 6.927 45 78 111 consistent gets 6.144 4.000.536 131.840 6 6.964 261.144 327.031.144 2. • Integer Table Method • MODEL Method • ROWNUM + a Big Table Method • CONNECT BY LEVEL Method • Type Constructor + Cartesian Product Method • Pipelined Function Method Each run generated a series of integers from 1 to 100. Note that the Type Constructor Expression Method technique was excluded from this comparison because it can only be used to generate up to 999 different values.252 261.964 2. Performance Comparison .Large Numbers The following tables show performance metrics for one run each of six integer series generation techniques described in the preceeding tutorials.

860 0 0 buffer is not pinned count 0 0 22 DB time 27 37 22 CPU used when call started 27 35 22 CPU used by this session 27 35 21 session uga memory 0 0 65.417 shared pool 47 20 18 17 45 49 library cache lock 30 24 30 22 34 79 enqueues 21 96 17 16 16 100 + Big .375 13.376 13. Latch Gets The following table shows total latch gets for each method.172 object queue header operation 79 365 12 12 15 18 checkpoint queue latch 55 237 0 0 11 43 library cache pin 50 49 48 43 54 13.946 836 13.927 163 196 258 session idle bit 13.377 simulator lru latch 424 172 461 0 0 1 simulator hash latch 424 172 461 0 0 1 row cache objects 139 96 129 87 132 171 cache buffers lru chain 106 522 6 6 6 7 library cache 92 83 85 79 119 20. Integer ROWNUM CONNECT BY Type Constructor Pipelined METRIC_NAME Table MODEL Table LEVEL + Cartesian Product Function ---------------------------------------.----------------------.consistent read gets 6.-----------cache buffers chains 13.376 13.464 37 34 34 34 65.375 13.658 29 29 29 0 6 0 0 311 309 309 0 See Statistics Descriptions for a description of each metric.-----------.consistent gets from cache 6.464 6.888 6 39 no work .840 72 6.822 5 6.------------------.375 13.-----------.

enqueue hash chains 16 16 16 messages 4 0 8 shared pool simulator 6 9 16 redo allocation 8 8 8 SQL memory manager workarea list latch 6 6 6 channel operations parent latch 0 0 6 session allocation 4 2 2 session switching 4 4 4 sort extent pool 4 4 4 kks stats 2 2 2 PL/SQL warning settings 3 3 3 redo writing 0 0 1 active checkpoint queue latch 0 0 1 compile environment latch 2 1 1 object stats modification 1 2 1 library cache lock allocation 1 1 1 dml lock allocation 1 1 1 session timer 0 0 1 KMG MMAN ready and startup request latch 0 0 1 object queue header heap 0 0 0 JS queue state obj latch 0 0 0 active service list 0 0 0 qmn task queue latch 0 0 0 In memory undo latch 0 0 0 OS process allocation 1 0 0 resmgr:actses active list 0 0 0 resmgr:schema config 0 0 0 kwqbsn:qsga 0 0 0 99 48 17 12 140 29 6 4 4 2 3 8 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 0 36 10 0 2 2 1 1 0 20 10 10 9 6 6 6 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 28 9 12 144 22 2 4 4 2 3 7 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 36 10 4 2 1 1 1 1 .

879 14. Warning: Results on your own systems with your own data will differ from these results. Run your own tests and average the results from multiple runs before making performance decisions. Results will even differ from one set of test runs to the next on the same machine.136 Techniques that use a small number of latches scale better than techniques that use a large number of latches.633 13.Shared B-Tree 0 0 library cache load lock 0 0 library cache pin allocation 0 0 mostly latch-free SCN 0 0 undo global data 0 0 lgwr LWN SCN 0 0 Consistent RBA 0 0 FOB s. .o list latch 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 -----------.-----------sum 28.-----------.------------------.089 48.----------------------.883 16.447 28.

3". Join Method Many of the single series solutions presented earlier can be easily adapted to generate multiple series with a simple join.---------a (null) b 0 c 1 d 2 e 3 we sometimes need queries that generate results like these KEY QTY INTEGER_VALUE --. ). given a data table like this KEY QTY --. The subtopics in this section demonstrate various ways to accomplish this. integers integers integers integers integers values values values values values ( ( ( ( ( 1 2 3 4 5 ).------------a (null) (null) b c d d e e e 0 (null) 1 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 2 3 where a row like the one where KEY='d' needs the integer series "1.---------.2" but the row where KEY='e' needs the series "1. Sometimes many different integer series are required in the same query. ). ). ). insert into insert into insert into insert into insert into commit. create table integers ( integer_value integer primary key ) organization index .2. For example.Multiple Integer Series The preceding topics showed how to generate a single series of integers. . Here is an example of how this is done using the Integer Table Method technique.

qty ) order by key.3. qty. KEY QTY INTEGER_VALUE --.------------a (null) (null) b c d d e e e 0 (null) 1 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 2 3 With the Type Constructor Expression Method technique it would look like this. KEY QTY INTEGER_VALUE --. select key. integer_value .5) ) integers on ( integers.column_value <= t3. integer_value from t3 left outer join integers on ( integers.integer_value <= t3.qty ) order by key.2. qty. column_value as integer_value from t3 left outer join table( integer_table_type(1.---------.4.------------a (null) (null) b c d d e e e 0 (null) 1 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 2 3 In both queries note that we first generate more integers than required and then filter out the excess values via a join condition. integer_value .set null "(null)" break on key duplicates skip 1 select key. .---------.

We can generate multiple series by applying a FOR loop to each row in the base table with the aid of a PARTITION BY clause.MODEL Method With MODEL queries there is no need to use the join technique described in Join Method.---------. key2. cast( null as integer ) as integer_value ) rules ( integer_value[ FOR KEY2 FROM 1 TO QTY[1] INCREMENT 1 ] = cv(key2) ) order by key. set null "(null)" break on key duplicates skip 1 select key. KEY KEY2 QTY INTEGER_VALUE --. Multiple integer series can be created using a query like this one (the PATH column is included to illustrate how the query works) set null "(null)" break on key duplicates skip 1 column path format a10 . integer_value .---------. integer_value from t3 model PARTITION BY ( KEY ) dimension by ( 1 as key2 ) measures ( qty.------------a 1 (null) (null) b c d d e e e 1 1 1 2 (null) 1 2 (null) 3 (null) 0 (null) 1 2 3 1 1 2 1 2 3 CONNECT BY LEVEL Method With the CONNECT BY LEVEL approach there is also no need to use the Join Method. qty.

sys_connect_by_path( key.---------. integer_value .---------c 1 1 /c d d e e e 2 2 3 3 3 1 /d 2 /d/d 1 /e 2 /e/e 3 /e/e/e or this approach (only possible on version 10g or greater) select key. qty. like the rows with KEY in ( 'a'. KEY QTY INTEGER_VALUE PATH --.---------c 1 1 /c d d e e e 2 2 3 3 3 1 /d 2 /d/d 1 /e 2 /e/e 3 /e/e/e Note these approaches will not work for rows where no integer series is required. '/' ) as path from t3 where qty >= 1 connect by KEY = CONNECT_BY_ROOT KEY and level <= t3. level as integer_value. integer_value .---------. KEY QTY INTEGER_VALUE PATH --.------------.select key. '/' ) as path from t3 where qty >= 1 connect by KEY = PRIOR KEY and prior dbms_random. sys_connect_by_path( key. Gotchas .------------. 'b' ). qty.qty order by key.value is not null and level <= t3. level as integer_value.qty order by key.

On my system the following variation of the CONNECT_BY_ROOT query raised some rather severe ORA errors casting further doubt on the technique's reliability (do not run this query on your own systems)." The fact that the query above contradicts the documentation yet works without error in 10g suggests a bug in either the documentation or the SQL engine. "You cannot specify (CONNECT_BY_ROOT) in the START WITH condition or the CONNECT BY condition." 2. "In a hierarchical query. one expression in the CONNECT BY condition must be qualified by the PRIOR operator. integer_value .The CONNECT_BY_ROOT technique may not work without error in all cases and it may not work in Oracle versions beyond 10g. select key. level as integer_value from t3 start with qty >= 1 connect by KEY = CONNECT_BY_ROOT KEY and level <= t3.trc file: ORA-07445: exception encountered: core dump [ACCESS_VIOLATION] [__VInfreq__msqopnws+2740] [PC:0x30E2580] [ADDR:0x2C] [UNABLE_TO_READ] [] .qty order by key. ERROR at line 1: ORA-03113: end-of-file on communication channel ERROR: ORA-03114: not connected to ORACLE From the . This is because it violates two restrictions documented at Hierarchical Query Operators: 1. qty.

Bulk Collect Executing sql statements in plsql programs causes a context switch between the plsql engine and the sql engine. insert. Too many context switches may degrade performance dramatically. open it. ---replicated a couple of times SQL> select count(*) from t_all_objects. Table created. Fetch c1 into r1. End loop. Rec1 c1%rowtype. SQL> insert into t_all_objects select * from t_all_objects. 2 3 rec1 c1%rowtype. COUNT(*) ---------213248 SQL> declare cursor c1 is select object_name from t_all_objects. Exit when c1%notfound. 4 begin 5 open c1. --process rows. One of the things i usuallly come accross is that developers usually tend to use cursor for loops to process data. Bulk binding is available for select.. Here is a simple test case to compare the performance of fetching row by row and using bulk collect to fetch all rows into a collection. Loop. Bulk collect is the bulk binding syntax for select statements.. delete and update statements. fetch from it row by row in a loop and process the row they fetch. Begin Open c1. SQL> create table t_all_objects as select * from all_objects. End. In order to reduce the number of these context switches we can use a feature named bulk binding. 3332 rows created. Bulk binding lets us to transfer rows between the sql engine and the plsql engine as collections. Declare Cursor c1 is select column_list from table_name>. They declare a cursor. 6 loop . SQL> r 1* insert into t_all_objects select * from t_all_objects 6664 rows created.

When there are many rows to process. process those rows and fetch again.rec1. 9 10 11 end. 13 end loop. 11 end loop. 3 type c1_type is table of c1%rowtype. null.32 As can be clearly seen. Elapsed: 00:00:44. end loop. 5 begin 6 open c1. Elapsed: 00:00:04. Elapsed: 00:00:05. Otherwise process memory gets bigger and bigger as you fetch the rows. 9 for i in 1. end. 14 15 16 end. 7 8 fetch c1 bulk collect into rec1. 3 type c1_type is table of c1%rowtype. 17 / PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. SQL> declare 2 cursor c1 is select object_name from t_all_objects. bulk collecting the rows shows a huge performance improvement over fetching row by row. 7 loop 8 fetch c1 bulk collect into rec1 limit 200. exit when c1%notfound.07 ..75 SQL> declare 2 cursor c1 is select object_name from t_all_objects. 4 rec1 c1_type. 4 rec1 c1_type.count loop 10 null. 12 / PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. we can limit the number of rows to bulk collect. 12 exit when c1%notfound.7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 fetch c1 into rec1. 5 begin 6 open c1. The above method (which fetched all the rows) may not be applicable to all cases. / PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

you can test your code both with and without bulk binds.000 rows from a cursor or performs that many similar UPDATE statements will most likely benefit from bulk binds. The discussion of the TKPROF reports will help you see how to interpret TKPROF output in order to assess the impact of bulk binds on your application.45 0 0 1 rows -------0 1 0 -------1 .currency_code).-------. END. We'll look at TKPROF reports that demonstrate the impact bulk binds can have.-------10. END LOOP. The same goes for a program that issues five or six UPDATE statements. A PL/SQL program that reads a dozen rows from a cursor will probably see no noticeable benefit from bulk binds. No universal rule exists to dictate when bulk binds are worthwhile and when they are not.order_id. so you need to ask yourself if the improved runtime performance will justify the expense.-------0.04 0 0 1 10. UPDATE open_orders /* no bulk bind */ SET amount_usd = v_amount_usd WHERE order_id = r.05 0. a program that reads 1.60 11.00 0 0 0 -------. If you have the luxury of time. However.-----total 2 cpu elapsed disk query current -------.55 11. currency_code. v_amount_usd NUMBER. amount_local /* no bulk bind */ FROM open_orders. r.---------. COMMIT.Deciding When to Use Bulk Binds PL/SQL code that uses bulk binds will be slightly more complicated and somewhat more prone to programmer bugs than code without bulk binds.-----Parse 1 Execute 1 Fetch 0 ------. A Simple Program With and Without Bulk Binds In this section we will look at a simple program written both with and without bulk binds.-------. Running both versions of the code through SQL trace and TKPROF will yield reports from which you may derive a wealth of information.-------.amount_local.40 0 0 0 0. the cost of adding a few lines of code is so slight that I would lean toward using bulk binds when in doubt.---------. Consider the following excerpts from a TKPROF report: ************************************************************************ DECLARE CURSOR c_orders IS SELECT order_id.-------. However.00 0. BEGIN FOR r IN c_orders LOOP v_amount_usd := currency_convert (r. call count ------.

08 CPU seconds. v_amounts_usd t_num_array.-------.00 0. LOOP FETCH c_orders BULK COLLECT INTO v_order_ids. currency_code.-------.-------1.-------.---------.---------. this is a very simple program that does not use bulk binds.00 0.-------.-----Parse 1 Execute 1 Fetch 30287 ------.00 0 0 0 -------.00 0 0 0 1. v_order_ids t_num_array. amount_local /* bulk bind */ FROM open_orders. using 7.287 fetch calls against the cursor.---------.-------. requiring 30.) The PL/SQL engine used 10.-----total 30287 cpu elapsed disk query current -------.-------0. please recognize it is for illustrative purposes only.19 7.00 0. TYPE t_char_array IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(10) INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER.-----total 30289 cpu elapsed disk query current -------.32 1 60576 31022 0.10 0 30393 0 -------.393 logical reads and 1.55 CPU seconds to run this code (this figure does not include CPU time used by the SQL engine).-------7.-------0.10 0 30393 0 rows -------0 0 30286 -------30286 ************************************************************************ UPDATE open_orders /* no bulk bind */ SET amount_usd = :b2 WHERE order_id = :b1 call count ------. currency_code.-------.-----Parse 1 Execute 30286 Fetch 0 ------. The UPDATE statement was executed 30. Now consider the following excerpts from another TKPROF report: ************************************************************************ DECLARE CURSOR c_orders IS SELECT order_id. v_amounts_local LIMIT 100. amount_local /* no bulk bind */ FROM open_orders call count ------.-------.************************************************************************ SELECT order_id. v_amounts_local t_num_array.00 0.33 1 60576 31022 rows -------0 30286 0 -------30286 As you can see.---------.286 times. BEGIN OPEN c_orders.08 1. .00 0 0 0 0.00 0 0 0 7.-------. v_currency_codes t_char_array.08 1.19 CPU seconds. TYPE t_num_array IS TABLE OF NUMBER INDEX BY BINARY_INTEGER. There were 30. v_currency_codes. (The code borders on being silly. v_row_count NUMBER := 0.19 7. EXIT WHEN v_row_count = c_orders%ROWCOUNT.

-------.-------.-----total 2 cpu elapsed disk query current -------. We can see that CPU time used by the PL/SQL engine has reduced from 10.00 0 0 0 3. .75 8. v_currency_codes(i)).287. END LOOP.60 seconds.75 8.-----Parse 1 Execute 1 Fetch 0 ------.---------. currency_code. reducing CPU time from 7.-------.-------0.63 0.08 seconds to 0.-----total 304 cpu elapsed disk query current -------.00 0.55 seconds to 0.00 0.-------.60 0.00 0 0 0 0. amount_local /* bulk bind */ FROM open_orders call count ------.59 0 4815 0 -------.48 seconds. COMMIT.38 0 30895 31021 rows -------0 30286 0 -------30286 This code uses bulk binds to do the same thing as the first code sample.---------. END.---------.---------.19 seconds to 3.-----total 305 cpu elapsed disk query current -------.393 to 4.03 0.-------0.38 0 30895 31021 0. FORALL i IN 1.-----Parse 1 Execute 1 Fetch 303 ------.-------.00 0.59 0 4815 0 rows -------0 0 30286 -------30286 ************************************************************************ UPDATE open_orders /* bulk bind */ SET amount_usd = :b1 WHERE order_id = :b2 call count ------.-------.00 0 0 0 -------. bringing logical reads down from 30.-------0. FOR i IN 1. call count ------.-------.-------0.count UPDATE open_orders /* bulk bind */ SET amount_usd = v_amounts_usd(i) WHERE order_id = v_order_ids(i).00 0.00 0.v_row_count := c_orders%ROWCOUNT.-----Parse 1 Execute 303 Fetch 0 ------.66 0 0 0 rows -------0 1 0 -------1 ************************************************************************ SELECT order_id..---------. END LOOP.00 0 0 0 -------.-------0.---------.-------.-------3.-------. The UPDATE statement was executed only 303 times instead of 30. but works with data 100 rows at a time instead of one row at a time.286.-------.48 0..00 0 0 0 0.48 0.62 0 0 0 0. CLOSE c_orders.count LOOP v_amounts_usd(i) := currency_convert (v_amounts_local(i).815 and CPU time down from 1.-------.v_order_ids.-------.v_order_ids. There were only 303 fetch calls against the cursor instead of 30.03 0 0 0 0.75 seconds.

The SQL trace facility imparts an overhead that is proportional to the number of parse. elapsed time by 50%. While these TKPROF reports suggest that in this example bulk binds shaved about 50% off of the elapsed time. Conclusion Bulk binds allow PL/SQL programs to interact more efficiently with the SQL engine built into Oracle. Just remember that SQL trace can inflate the perceived benefit. PL/SQL bulk binds are not hard to implement. and logical reads by 50%. the savings were about 25% when SQL trace was not enabled.In this example it would appear that bulk binds were definitely worthwhile – CPU time was reduced by about 75%. The Oracle Call Interface has supported array processing for 15 years or more. execute. Since bulk binds reduce the number of SQL calls. enabling your PL/SQL programs to use less CPU time and run faster. and fetch calls to the SQL engine. This is still a significant savings. Thus using bulk binds in your PL/SQL programs can certainly be worth the effort. and the increased efficiency it brings is well understood. the benefit is not truly as rosy as it appears in these TKPROF reports. and can offer significant performance improvements for certain types of programs. It is nice to see this benefit available to PL/SQL programmers as well. Although bulk binds are indeed beneficial here. . SQL trace adds much less overhead to code that uses bulk binds.

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