Quality of Life Progress Report

for Jacksonville and Northeast Florida

Reference Document
Twenty-Sixth Annual Edition, 2010
Jacksonville Community Council Inc.

For over a decade primary support for the Quality of Life Progress Report has been provided by the City of Jacksonville and the United Way of Northeast Florida with the generous support of the Northeast Florida community.

Real, lasting community change is built around knowing where you are, where you want to be, and whether your efforts are making a difference. JCCI’s Quality of Life Progress Report continues to guide us collectively as a community, but more importantly, serves as a call to action for individual citizens, by asking, “What role can I play to make Jacksonville an even better place to live, work and raise a family?”

John Peyton, Mayor City of Jacksonville

As we all continue to tackle critical issues facing our region, JCCI’s 26th Quality of Life Progress Report guides our community’s resources toward the most challenging community concerns and aids in shaping strategies to address those challenges. The United Way of Northeast Florida is proud to support and acknowledge the vital analysis and trend data presented in this report, the nation’s longest running community quality of life indicators program.

Connie Hodges, President United Way of Northeast Florida
Cover Art: The Mosaic is a unique work of art at The Art Center Cooperative Inc. - Sixteen of the member artists each created a 36-inch by 24-inch canvas in their own style. When the
panels are assembled, The Mosaic creates a 16-foot by 6-foot representation of the Downtown skyline as seen from the South bank. The original Mosaic is available for purchase plus it is also available in limited edition prints from The Art Center Cooperative. Inc. For more information about The Mosaic, please visit: http://blogfromthecenter.blogspot.com/2008_04_01_archive.html.

Executive Summary About the Region Quality of Life Indicator Set Achieving Educational Excellence Growing a Vibrant Economy Preserving the Natural Environment Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony Enjoying Arts, Culture and Recreation Sustaining a Healthy Community Maintaining a Responsive Government Moving Around Efficiently and Safely Keeping the Community Safe Indicator Index About JCCI JCCI Model for Community Change Indicator Champion Community First Credit Union Lazzara Family Foundation Marine Science Research Institute Florida Coastal School of Law Haskell St. Vincent’s Health System Rayonier North Florida TPO CSX Transportation

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5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17

The Community Foundation is committed to building a better community through philanthropy. We believe that philanthropy must be based on values and recognize that reliable research makes good decisions possible. The Community Foundation congratulates JCCI for the exceptional and innovative work it does in identifying emerging trends and presenting a clear picture of our community’s progress in this 26th edition of its Quality of Life Progress Report. We are proud to serve as Title Sponsor and to be a partner in this important work, along with the United Way of Northeast Florida, the City of Jacksonville, and the special Champions listed above. Cindy Edelman, Chairwoman The Community Foundation in Jacksonville
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report Page 1

Table of Contents

Introduction to Indicators

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This is the 26th annual edition of the nation’s longest-standing community quality of life indicators report. When JCCI first gathered volunteers together to talk about community indicators, the hope was to create a “yardstick for community improvement” that would provide “community decision makers and leaders with the capacity of further improving what is already a highly attractive quality of life.” No one had done this before. Little did that group know that thousands of communities across the globe would look to this report as a model for sustainable community change, and that the debate on how progress is measured globally would be shaped by this report. For 26 years this report has been used by decision makers in government, private business, nonprofit organizations, and community groups in two primary ways: • • for planning (determining priorities for action, identifying areas to invest resources, developing programs and policies to address needs) for evaluation (assessing results of those decisions and actions.) JCCI is proud to be a part of so many of these efforts, and applauds all those who work so tirelessly to build a better community.

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Introduction to Community Indicators

Simply put, indicators are quantitative measures of the quality of community life. Indicators that are meaningful and useful reflect a combination of idealism (what we would like to measure) and pragmatism (what we are able to measure.) Taken as a set, the Quality of Life Progress Report provides a roadmap for the community, showing where we have been, where we are now, and what critical areas need attention if we are to arrive where we want to go. The community indicators are available in three formats: 1. 2. 3. The Summary Document focuses attention on how the community is performing in relation to its vision in separate elements of the Quality of Life. This Reference Document provides greater detail for each of the indicators, and includes additional indicators in each section as well. This document can be found in PDF version online. The online Community Snapshot provides an interactive, web-based version of the indicators that is updated in real time as information becomes available during the course of the year. This hands-on map allows users to compare a geography over time, in context with progress in other geographic areas. Reports, graphs and charts are customizable at the click of a button. Visit www.jcci.org and click on Indicators to access Community Snapshot.

In addition, JCCI provides an annual Race Relations Progress Report under a charge to produce an annual report card to measure progress and hold the community accountable for eliminating race-based disparities. This report provides community indicators which measure racial and ethnic disparities in the Quality of Life. Community indicators fulfill two critical roles in JCCI’s Model for Community Change. For more information about this Model and how it works both in Jacksonville and in the other communities around the globe that have turned to JCCI for assistance in creating sustainable community change, see the inside back cover of this report. Much of the data in this report is obtained from the records and documents of various public and private organizations. An annual opinion survey provides the remaining data. This random telephone survey was conducted for the project each September from 1985 through 1992 by AT&T American Transtech. Beginning in 1993, the survey was conducted by American Public Dialogue. Each organization generously has donated the survey each year as a service to the community. Additional detail and documentation of the methodology used for the project’s processes and data collection are found in the accompanying Reference Document on the JCCI website. For further information about the Quality of Life Progress Report or specific indicators, mail to JCCI, 2434 Atlantic Boulevard, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida 32207-3564, call (904) 396-3052, e-mail ben@jcci.org or visit www.jcci.org.

The 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report Review Committee was chaired by Hugh Greene, incoming chair of the Jacksonville Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Committee members included:
Thomas Bryant III Kathy Carithers Michael Fleming Bob Harmon Theresa Johnson Circe LeNoble David McInnes Leith Oatman Melanie Patz Laurie Price Cheryl Riddick Robert Schuster Jeff Sheffield Paula Wright JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

The aftermath of the severe worldwide recession continues to take its toll on our community and this can be seen throughout the Report, particularly on economic, social well-being, and arts and culture indicators where funding is increasingly more challenging. By the same token, sustained diligence and focused attention are showing positive results in sectors such as public safety and preservation of the natural environment. Summary results of the 26th Quality of Life Progress Report include: Achieving Educational Excellence: The committee assigned Red Flag priority status to indicators measuring the High School Graduation Rate and Reading Proficiency at the 10th Grade Level. Though the graduation rate increased for the fourth straight year, Duval County still graduates only 2/3 of its students within four years. Worse yet, only one in three tenth graders in Jacksonville public schools is able to read at grade level. On the positive side, school safety incidents dropped significantly and the number of higher education degrees awarded increased for the third straight year, earning Gold Star recognition status. Growing a Vibrant Economy: The recession may have ended more than a year ago, but you wouldn’t know it by looking at most of the indicators in this section. Red Flags were assigned to Jacksonville’s Unemployment Rate, Households Paying More than 30 Percent of their Income on Housing, and Bed Tax and Sales Tax Collection. Two bright spots in an otherwise gloomy economic snapshot were Tonnage Handled by JAXPORT’s Marine Terminals and the percentage of Adults with Bachelor’s Degrees or higher. Preserving the Natural Environment: Continued progress is being made in several important areas, including air quality, water conservation, preservation and conservation of additional acreage of parklands. Average Daily Water Use declined for the third straight year, earning a Gold Star from the Committee. Modest improvement was realized in water quality of St. Johns River tributaries, but more attention is necessary since nearly one fourth of these streams still fail to meet federal clean water standards. Promoting Social Wellbeing: The impact of the sour economy is reflected throughout the indicators in this section, seen particularly on the growing Homeless population (Red Flag) and on Philanthropic Giving. Red Flags were assigned to the percentage of people who Consider Racism a Problem in Duval County. A bright star amid the depressing news in this section is the continued dramatic decline in the number of Children in Foster Care, which is less than half what it was as recently as 2007. The committee recognized this improvement with a Gold Star. Enjoying Arts, Recreation, and Culture: Another sector battered by the recession, all of the Arts, Recreation, and Culture indicators showed declines, though Library Circulation remains historically high and is the one bright spot. Per capita Funding by the City of Jacksonville for Recreation Activities and Maintenance plummeted to its lowest level on record, and Public and Private Funding of the Arts dropped for a second straight year. In addition, Attendance at Cultural and Sports Events dropped across the board. Sustaining a Healthy Community: Improvements in Infant Mortality Rates and sharp declines in rates of SexuallyTransmitted Diseases presented positive news in Health. However, increases in New HIV Cases (Red Flag) and a rise in Suicide Rates, especially among senior citizens, focus attention on needs for improvement in community health. Maintaining Responsive Government: Trend lines reflected erosion in the connection between citizens and local government. The percentage of people who believe they Can Influence Government declined for the fourth straight year, receiving a Red Flag. The number of folks Keeping Up with Local Government News dropped by more than 10 percent. The number of Elected Officials who are People of Color and Women both declined in the aftermath of the November election. The good news in this section is that 83 percent of Jacksonville citizens are either somewhat or very satisfied with Basic City Services. Moving Around Efficiently and Safely: Key transportation indicators remain favorable, highlighted by a fourth consecutive decline in the number of Motor Vehicle Accidents per 1000 people to the lowest level in more than 20 years. More than two thirds of residents have Commute Times of 25 minutes or less, but bus ridership is down, perhaps due in part to declining weekday miles of JTA bus service. Keeping the Community Safe: While continued diligence is mandatory, encouraging news abounds in the Public Safety sector. The Index Crime Rate and Murder Rate both showed significant improvement, though both remain at unacceptably high levels. Still, both non-violent and violent crime rates are at their lowest levels since JCCI began tracking them in 1983. On the downside, there was a 21 percent increase in Youths Adjudicated Delinquent. JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Executive Summary
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While the Quality of Life Progress Report‘s fundamental reason for being is to serve as a “report card” on various aspects of life in Jacksonville, its underlying purpose is to provoke civic and elected leaders and other stakeholders to enact positive change for the betterment of the community. The Report is meant to serve as a catalyst for change that will result in a better future for all Jacksonville citizens. In that sense, the Report should be viewed as a living document that can help guide our progress, and it is our hope that it will be regarded as a valuable tool, frequently referenced.

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Regional Demographics

The indicators presented in this report all occur and change within the context of the physical and demographic characteristics of the five counties of the Jacksonville Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA): Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns, even the indicators that are specific to Jacksonville/Duval County alone. Geography The Jacksonville MSA covers 3,221 square miles in land area. Besides the oceanfront, the major geographic feature of the area is the St. Johns River and its tributaries, which meander through the region. The waterways provide a rich ecological treasure, an important economic engine, and opportunities for recreation, transportation, and military uses. Climate The MSA’s temperatures range each day in the summer from the 70s (Fahrenheit) to 90s. In the winter, temperature ranges vary from the 60s to 80s on some days to the 20s to 40s on a few days. Average annual precipitation is about 53 inches. African American Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns Total 8.6% 10.1% 28.9% 8.6% 5.9% 21.5% Native Hispanic American 1.9% 7.6% 6.5% 3.0% 4.9% 6.2% 0.0% 0.4% 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% 0.3% People The total population of the Jacksonville MSA was 1,367,385 in 2009. By county, population estimates were: Baker 25,899; Clay 185,208; Duval 900,518; Nassau 72,588; and St. Johns 183,572. The racial and ethnic makeup of the region varies by county. The 2009 American Community Survey provided these estimates of the MSA’s population.

Asian 1.1% 3.2% 3.8% 0.9% 2.0% 3.3%

White 86.6% 77.1% 58.5% 85.3% 85.3% 66.9%

Other 1.7% 1.6% 2.0% 1.9% 1.6% 1.9%

Education In 2009-10, public-school enrollment in the Jacksonville MSA was 204,635 students, with 5,050 students in Baker County, 35,998 in Clay County, 122,649 in Duval County, 11,116 in Nassau County, and 29,822 in St. Johns County. In the Jacksonville MSA, 83 percent of students attended public school, 14 percent private school, and three percent were home schooled. Workforce In December 2009, 585,700 people were working in Northeast Florida. Civilian employment in the Jacksonville MSA’s economy was distributed as follows: Professional/business services Retail trade Government Education and health services Finance, insurance, and real estate Leisure and hospitality services Manufacturing Construction Transportation, warehousing, and utilities Wholesale trade Information and telecommunications 2009 14% 12% 13% 14% 9% 11% 5% 6% 5% 5% 2% 2000 16% 12% 12% 11% 10% 9% 7% 6% 6% 5% 3% 1990 9% 14% 15% 10% 10% 9% 8% 6% 6% 5% 3%

In 2009, the counties in Jacksonville’s MSA had both a high youth population and a growing elderly population, according to Florida CHARTS:
Population under 18 Baker Clay Duval Nassau St. Johns Region Total Population 65 and older

25.9% 25.8% 24.7% 22.1% 20.9% 24.2%

11.2% 11.9% 11.3% 16.1% 16.0% 12.2%

In this report, the arrows display the trend direction over the previous year (up, down, or unchanged) Red Arrows mean that the trend was in a negative direction. Green Arrows mean that the trend was in a positive direction. Yellow Arrows mean that the trend was unchanged.

Legend

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Our Vision for Achieving Educational Excellence:

Education institutions in the region achieve excellence in the delivery of learning opportunities, and citizens achieve educational attainment sufficient to enjoy a high quality of life. Citizens young and old have access to a broad range of learning opportunities in pre-K to 12th grade, higher education, and life-long learning, based on their educational needs and desire to learn.

How Are We Doing?
Good News:
High school graduation rates improved modestly and significant gains were made in school safety and the number of higher education degrees awarded. Graduation rates improved for the fourth straight year, as did at least one measure of kindergarten readiness. School safety incidents have dropped 36 percent in the past two years to the lowest levels in 12 years of tracking these results.

Needs Improvement:

Reading test scores continue to reflect disappointing results with very modest or no gains in third and tenth grade reading scores over the past decade. Kindergarten readiness indicators show some improvement but are scored as “incomplete” because state baselines and assessment tools continue to change.

Key Education Indicators
Public High School Graduation Rate
Duval County: 66.6%

Kindergarten Readiness
Duval County: 87.7%

Source: Florida Department of Education

Source: Florida Department of Education

Supporting Indicators
Reading at Grade Level Third Grade Tenth Grade Per Pupil Expenditures School Safety Incidents per 1,000 Students Higher Education Degrees Awarded

Previous 68% 34% $6,674 52 8,059

Latest 69% 33% $6,598 43 9,238

Change + 1% - 1% - $76 -9 + 1,179

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

Aspiring to achieve educational excellence is an investment in the future of our community. We remain dedicated to constantly improving our educational system and promoting lifelong learning throughout the First Coast. - John Hirabayashi, President & C.E.O.
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Achieving Educational Excellence

Challenges in K-12 Education Remain; Gains Made in Higher Education Degrees Awarded

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Public High School Graduation Rate The Florida calculation method is the percentage of students who have graduated within four years of entering ninth grade for the first time, as tracked by student ID numbers. In 2009, Florida began tracking (and reported the previous 5 years) high school graduation using the National Governors Association method, which seeks to standardize graduation rates nationally. This rate excludes GEDs. Students who graduate high school have the skills necessary to find employment and to go on to higher education. High school graduates will have higher levels of employment and economic success compared to those who do not finish high school 1. Students who drop out are more likely to become involved in crime2and have poor health 3. Students who drop out are more likely to use government assistance, which is costly to society. 4 Source Link Florida Department of Education http://data.fldoe.org/fsir/default.cfm

Importance

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%
Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Duval County: NGA calculation 57.4% 59.8% 61.3% 64.5% 66.6%

1

Cataldi, E.F., Laird, J., and KewalRamani, A. (2009). High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 2007 (NCES 2009064). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC. Retrieved [6/21/10] from http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009064.

2

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2004). Issue Brief: Educational Attainment of High School Drop Outs Eight Years Later, NCES 2005-026. http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005026.pdf. Alliance for Excellent Education. (2006). Healthier and Wealthier: Decreasing Health Care Costs by Increasing Educational Attainment. Washington, DC: Author. Belfield, C. & Levin, H. 2007. “The Economic Losses from High School Dropouts in California”. California Dropout Research Project: Research Reports. No. 1. http://www.lmri.ucsb.edu/dropouts/pubs_reports.htm

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Key Indicator
Indicator Description Kindergarten Readiness The indicator measures the percentage of children screened for kindergarten using the Early Childhood Observation System™ (ECHOS). Children that are considered “Ready for Kindergarten” on ECHOS have scored at the “Demonstrating” or “Emerging/Progressing” levels. Children who start school with basic reading and math knowledge are more likely to succeed later in school. 5 They are also more likely to continue their education and secure employment later in life. 6 Florida Department of Education http://www.fldoe.org/earlyLearning/account.asp

Importance

Source Link

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2006-07

Ready

Not Yet Ready

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

ECHOS :Percent Demonstrating / Emerging-Progressing Year 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Baker 93.4% 92.6% 95.2% Clay 91.8% 91.4% 90.0% Duval 85.0% 84.3% 85.5% 87.7% Nassau 87.6% 90.3% 89.9% St. Johns 90.9% 90.4% 92.1% NE Florida 86.7% 87.5% 88.9% Florida 88.0% 87.9% 88.5%

5

Duncan, G.J., Dowsett, C. J., and Claessens, A. 2007. “School readiness and later achievement.” Developmental Psychology. Vol 43(6). pp. 1428-1446. http://www.apa.org/journals/releases/dev4361428.pdf

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Rouse, C., Brooks-Gunn, J., and McLanahan, S. (2005). “School Readiness: Closing Racial and Ethnic Gaps: Introducing the Issue.” Future of Children 15(1). http://www.princeton.edu/futureofchildren/publications/docs/15_01_FullJo...

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance 3rd Graders Reading at Grade Level The indicator measures the percentage of 3rd graders who achieve at the top three (out of five) levels on the FCAT in reading. Third grade reading comprehension is important, because it is the last year students are taught to read, and starting in fourth grade they will need to read to be able to learn. Reading in third grade is important because students that are not reading at the end of third grade will struggle in future classes. 7, 8 Florida Department of Education http://fcat.fldoe.org/
100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Duval

Source Link

Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Baker 77% 78% 83% 83% 82%

Clay 85% 81% 83% 82% 82%

Duval 72% 66% 70% 68% 69%

Nassau 85% 81% 85% 81% 84%

St. Johns 86% 82% 86% 86% 85%

Northeast Florida 77% 72% 78% 76% 77%

7 8

Torgesen, J.K. (2002). “The Prevention of Reading Difficulties.” Journal of School Psychology, Vol. 40, No. 1, pp. 7-26. Florida Department of Education. (2007) Read to Learn: Critical Information for Parents of Third Graders. fcat.fldoe.org/mediapacket/2007/pdf/pressPacketGR3_page16.pdf

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance 10th Graders Reading at Grade Level The indicator measures the percentage of 10th graders who achieve at the top three (out of five) levels on the FCAT in reading. It is important for students to read at grade level. The tenth grade FCAT is important to students because they need to pass it to get a high school diploma. 9 Students who pass the tenth grade FCAT have a proficient reading level that will help them in future education and employment opportunities. 10 Florida Department of Education http://fcat.fldoe.org/
100% 75% 50% 25% 0%

Source Link

Duval County Northeast Florida

Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Baker 25% 31% 31% 27% 33%

Clay 33% 36% 41% 40% 40%

Duval 32% 31% 33% 34% 33%

Nassau 32% 34% 45% 40% 43%

St. Johns 47% 49% 54% 53% 55%

Northeast Florida 34% 35% 38% 38% 39%

9

Florida Department of Education. “ Frequently Asked Questions About the FCAT.” fcat.fldoe.org/pdf/fcatfaq1.pdf

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Per Pupil Expenditures The indicator measures the amount of money spent on individual students in Duval County. While higher per pupil expenditures do not necessarily guarantee student success, sufficient funding is a prerequisite for learning. Florida Department of Education http://fldoe.org/

$10,000 $8,000 $6,000 $4,000 $2,000 $-

Inflation-…

Year 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

Actual Funds $4,500 $5,011 $5,587 $6,334 $6,668 $6,598

Adjusted for Inflation $5,573 $5,838 $6,089 $6,532 $6,674 $6,598

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description School Safety Incidents per 1,000 Students School Environment Safety Incident Reports (SESIR) are reported annually to the state and use a common definition of violations, including violent acts against persons; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; property crimes; harassment; non-violent incidents (including sexual offenses, trespassing, and other major incidents), fighting, disruption on campus, and weapons possession. Students learn better in an environment free from distractions caused by crime and violence. 11 Communities with higher rates of violence will have schools with higher rates of violence. Communities that provide support to end violence are the most effective at facing school violence. 12 Florida Department of Education http://www. fldoe.org/safeschools/sesir.asp
100 80 60 40 20 0

Importance

Source Link

Year 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

SESIR Total Violations 8,080 8,382 6,401 5,275

SESIR Violations per 1,000 Students 65.3 67.3 52.0 43.0

Florida Department of Education, Office of Safe Schools. “Statewide Report on School Safety and Discipline Data Introduction 20062007” March 2008. 12 National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center. “School Violence Fact Sheet”, www.safeyouth.org
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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Higher Education Academic Degrees Awarded The indicator measures the total number of degrees and vocational-training certificates awarded annually by Edward Waters College, Florida State College at Jacksonville (was Florida Community College at Jacksonville/FCCJ), Jacksonville University, University of North Florida, and the Florida Coastal School of Law. People with college degrees make significantly more than high school graduates. People with higher levels of education are less likely to be unemployed and in poverty. Since college graduates make more money they contribute more to taxes and also are less likely to use government assistance. College graduates also tend to have better health and have lower rates of incarceration. College graduates are also more involved in the community and are more likely to volunteer and vote. 13 Edward Waters College, Florida State College at Jacksonville, Jacksonville University, University of North Florida, and the Florida Coastal School of Law http://www.flbog.org/
10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

Importance

Source Link

Graduate Bachelor Associate

Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Associate 2,860 3,031 3,239 3,211 4,070

Bachelor 3,102 3,548 3,674 3,847 4,106

Graduate 943 1,088 934 1,001 1,062

Total 6,905 7,667 7,847 8,059 9,238

Baum, S., and Payea, K. (2005). Education Pays: The Benefits of Higher Education For Individuals and Society. College Board. www.collegeboard.com .
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Additional Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Students Absent 21 or More Days from School The indicator measures the percentage of students who were absent for 21 or more days of school during the school year. Students who are frequently absent have fewer opportunities to learn the material and are more likely to fall behind academically14. Students who are frequently absent may be more likely to dropout of school, use drugs, and become involved in criminal activities. 15 Florida Department of Education http://www.fldoe.org/eias/eiaspubs/fsir.asp 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

Source Link

Year 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

Absences :Students Absent 21+ days 10.1% 12.1% 10.2% 9.7% 10.1%

14

Epstein, J. L., & Sheldon, S.B. (2002). Present and accounted for: Improving student attendance through family and community involvement. Journal of Educational Research, 95(5),308-318. Baker, M. L., Sigmon, J.N., & Nugent, M.E. (2001). Truancy reduction: Keeping students in school. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Public School Promotions from 1st to 2nd Grade The indicator measures the percentage of 1st graders who are successfully promoted to 2nd grade. First-grade promotions often reflect successful pre-school preparation, and can serve as a proxy measure for effective early child education/school readiness efforts. However, no uniform standard is currently used to determine student promotion. The teacher's judgment is the primary determining factor for student promotion. Florida Department of Education http://www.fldoe.org/eias/eiaspubs/default.asp
100%
NE Florida Duval

Source Link

95%

90%

85%

Year 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

Baker 94.4% 89.5% 90.4% 91.0% 88.6%

Clay 95.0% 95.4% 95.3% 96.2% 94.9%

Duval 90.3% 91.1% 91.6% 92.4% 92.8%

Nassau 93.5% 91.3% 90.6% 92.8% 93.2%

St. Johns 95.9% 95.6% 96.8% 95.9% 96.6%

Northeast Florida 91.8% 92.3% 92.7% 93.4% 93.2%

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link 10th Graders at Grade Level in Math The indicator measures the percentage of 10th graders who achieve at the top three (out of five) levels on the FCAT in math. Students need proficiency in math to be successful in school. Passing this test is a requirement for high school graduation; in addition, good analytical and reasoning skills are important for success in higher education, in the workforce, and in life. Florida Department of Education http://fcat.fldoe.org/
100%

Duval County Northeast Florida

75%

50%

25%

0%

Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Baker 59% 65% 64% 68% 72%

Clay 73% 70% 74% 75% 77%

Duval 69% 64% 63% 64% 66%

Nassau 74% 71% 75% 76% 80%

St. Johns 79% 80% 80% 81% 85%

Northeast Florida 71% 68% 68% 70% 72%

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Public School Dropout Rate The percentage calculated by dividing the number of students in grades 9-12 for whom a dropout withdrawal reason was reported by the year's total enrollment for grades 9-12. District and state rates include students in alternative schools and exceptional education schools. Youth who do not complete high school have a difficult time finding employment or advancing beyond lower-paying jobs. Florida Department of Education http://data.fldoe.org/fsir/default.cfm
15%

Importance Source Link

10%

5%

0%

Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10

Baker 3.7% 2.8% 1.8% 2.0% 3.8%

Clay 1.9% 2.3% 2.0% 1.2% 1.3%

Duval 6.6% 5.2% 3.3% 4.8% 2.2%

Nassau 3.4% 4.2% 3.5% 2.1% 1.3%

St. Johns 2.0% 1.8% 1.3% 1.1% 0.9%

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link High School Graduates Prepared for Florida Colleges The indicator measures the percentage of high school graduates attending Florida public colleges and universities who pass reading/math college placement tests. Effective preparation for higher education is an important predictor of student success. Florida Department of Education http://www.fldoe.org/articulation/perfCPT/default.asp
100%
Math Reading

75%

50%

25%

0%

Reading
Year 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 Baker 76.3% 87.0% 87.0% 75.2% 78.8% Clay 81.7% 77.2% 79.5% 81.5% 81.7% Duval 85.0% 75.3% 75.5% 76.6% 76.4% Nassau 82.8% 77.9% 80.6% 79.1% 80.4% St. Johns 86.8% 82.3% 84.1% 85.9% 85.7% Northeast Florida 84.4% 77.1% 78.2% 79.3% 79.5%

Math
Year 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 Baker 59.4% 68.4% 74.8% 69.5% 77.9% Clay 72.5% 66.8% 71.7% 72.1% 72.6% Duval 74.3% 71.2% 68.6% 68.4% 69.7% Nassau 71.5% 70.2% 66.0% 62.5% 68.5% St. Johns 80.0% 76.7% 80.7% 81.4% 82.4% Northeast Florida 74.5% 71.1% 71.0% 71.1% 72.6%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 5 l

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: Satisfaction with the Quality of Public Education The percentage of people who respond "excellent" or "good" to the survey question: Education is also important for the quality of life. In your opinion, is the quality of education provided by the Duval County Public Schools excellent, good, fair, or poor? Citizen satisfaction is an important criterion for success in the delivery of all public services, including public education. Perception of the quality of public education may influence public support for education. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
100%
Excellent Good

Importance Source Link

80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Excellent 7% 4% 7% 5% 5%

Good 24% 30% 24% 27% 30%

Fair 35% 31% 31% 30% 29%

Poor 19% 22% 25% 23% 21%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 5 m

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Exceptional Education Students Completing High School The indicator measures the percentage of exceptional education students (not including gifted) 14 and older who complete high school and receive a standard diploma through meeting all graduation requirements. One dimension of how well the education system meets community needs is how the system assists exceptional education students in completing high school. Florida Department of Education http://www.fldoe.org/ese/

60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% -10%

Year 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

Baker 15% 24% 29% 56% 36%

Clay 54% 55% 50% 53% 60%

Duval 30% 16% 21% 22% 25%

Nassau 30% 32% 29% 42% 71%

St. Johns 56% 55% 42% 54% 60%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 5 n

Recession Over But Adverse Impact Drags On
Our Vision for Growing a Vibrant Economy:
The regional economy supports a vibrant and diversified mix of economic activities, which combine to provide ample opportunities for productive employment, a strong consumer market, the capacity to fund needed public services, and a high standard of living that is shared widely among all citizens.

Growing a Vibrant Economy
Page 6

How Are We Doing?
Good News: Needs Improvement:
Two bright spots amid otherwise gloomy employment and economic indicators were activity at Jacksonville’s seaport and a significant increase in the percentage of adults with higher education degrees. JAXPORT cargo tonnage, which dropped 13 percent from 2008 to 2009, has recovered most of its pre-recession activity level. For the third year, we record net negative job growth and a double-digit unemployment rate that is the highest in our region. Per capita income has dropped, while the percentage of households paying more than 30 percent for housing has risen sharply with more than half of renters and one third of homeowners proportionally paying more than federal guidelines suggest for housing. Elsewhere, bed and sales tax revenue declines reflect drops in tourism and in consumer spending.

Key Employment Indicators
Total Employment & Unemployment Rate
Employed: 436,817 Unemployment Rate: 10.7%

Duval County:$39,973

Per Capita Income

Source: Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Supporting Indicators
Adults with Bachelors Degrees or Higher Household Paying More Than 30 Percent of their Income for Housing Downtown Residents JAXPORT Tonnage (millions) Bed Tax and Sales Tax Collections (millions)

Previous 24.6% 39% 2,662 7.3 $132.3

Latest 27.3% 42% 2,704 8.1 $125.3

Change + 2.7% + 3% + 42 + 0.8 - $7.0

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

Lazzara
Family Foundation

Developing a vibrant economy is the key to sustaining Jacksonville’s citizens and essential in enhancing our quality of life. -Irene and Gaspar Lazzara
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Total Employment The indicator measures the total people employed in December and difference from the total for the previous December. Employment growth is an essential component of a thriving economy. Rapid increases in employment growth may, without concurrent increases in community infrastructure, lead to increased traffic congestion and a decline in the quality of life. Florida Statistical Abstract and Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation http://www.labormarketinfo.com/library/qcew.htm

500,000

Total Employed

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Change in number employed in Duval County (employment growth/loss) 14,858 8,538 -2,804 -11,853 -19,631

Total employed in December in Duval County 462,567 471,105 468,301 456,448 436,817

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 a

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Unemployment Rate The indicator measures the total number of unemployed residents, divided by the total number of people in the workforce. To be self-sufficient and to build a strong family, individuals need employment. The unemployment rate is a measure of the ability of the local economy to provide job opportunities to all who are able to work and wish to do so. Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation http://www.labormarketinfo.com/library/qcew.htm 13% 10% 8% 5% 3% 0%

Duval

NE Florida

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 3.5% 2.9% 3.6% 5.7% 10.3%

Clay 3.4% 3.0% 3.5% 5.3% 9.4%

Duval 4.2% 3.5% 4.1% 6.1% 10.7%

Nassau 3.4% 2.9% 3.4% 5.4% 9.8%

St. Johns 2.9% 2.7% 3.3% 5.1% 8.7%

Northeast Florida 3.9% 3.3% 3.9% 5.8% 10.2%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 b

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Per Capita Income, Inflation-Adjusted This indicator measures the total personal income of county residents divided by the total population, adjusted for inflation. Per capita income measures both the overall economic health of the community and the financial resources of each household. Bureau of Economic Analysis http://www.bea.gov/bea/regional/reis/

$45,000 $40,000 $35,000 $30,000 $25,000 $20,000 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000 $Inflation-Adjusted Actual $$

Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

Actual $$ $ 33,665 $ 35,926 $ 38,805 $ 39,518 $ 39,473

Inflation-Adjusted to 2009 $$ $ 38,220 $ 39,603 $ 41,411 $ 40,711 $ 39,973

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 c

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Percent of Adults 25 and Over with Bachelor’s Degrees or Higher This indicator measures the percentage of adults over age 25 in Northeast Florida who have obtained at least a bachelor's degree from higher education. The American Community Survey is limited in the data available for counties with less than 65,000 population. The percent of the population with college degrees enhances the capacity of the workforce to adapt to a knowledge-driven economy and attract higher-wage employment opportunities. High educational attainment represents a region's investment in human capital and preparation for long-term growth. U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey http://factfinder.census.gov/
40%
Graduate Bachelor

Importance

Source Link

30%

20%

10%

0%

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

HS grad 31.6% 32.6% 31.7% 29.8% 28.0%

Some college 21.9% 21.8% 21.4% 24.8% 24.4%

Associate 8.8% 8.6% 8.9% 8.5% 8.4%

Bachelor 18.0% 16.7% 17.2% 16.2% 18.3%

Graduate 8.2% 8.5% 8.6% 8.4% 9.0%

Percent bachelors or higher 26.2% 25.2% 25.8% 24.6% 27.3%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 d

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Households Paying 30 Percent or More of their Income for Housing This indicator measures total cost of housing (rent or mortgage, plus utilities) as a percentage of the total household income. Families need affordable housing, and housing costs are generally the largest budget item for households. Affordable housing is often a prerequisite for enjoying the quality of life in a community. U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey http://factfinder.census.gov/

60%
Homeowners Renters Total

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Homeowners 29% 26% 31% 33% 34%

Renters 47% 44% 47% 51% 56%

Total 35% 33% 37% 39% 42%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 e

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Number of residents living downtown This indicator measures total number of residents living downtown. Residents play an essential role in cultivating a vibrant, sustainable downtown. Downtowns are a reliable indicator of the economic health of a community. Downtown Residential Communities Downtown Vision, Inc.

Source

3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Downtown Residents 1,815 2,104 2,357 2,662 2,704

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 f

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Gross tonnage handled by JAXPORT's marine terminals The indicator measures the total tons of products and materials shipped in or shipped out of the Jacksonville Port Authority’s (JAXPORT’s) marine terminals. Located at the most western point of the U.S. Atlantic coast, Jacksonville is a major transfer point for water-land transport. Growth in port activity is a way of measuring the increasing importance to the local economy of serving as a logistical hub for transporting goods by sea, rail or truck. Jacksonville Port Authority http://www.jaxport.com/sea/g_stats.cfm
10.0

Source Link

7.5
Tons (millions)

5.0

2.5

0.0

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Tonnage (millions) 8.696 8.309 8.396 7.282 8.100

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 g

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Bed and Sales Tax Collections The indicator measures the total revenues from the Bed Tax received each year, added to the total local option sales tax collections, and the sum adjusted for inflation. Because tourists who stay overnight must pay the Bed Tax, growth in bed-tax revenues demonstrates increasing tourist activity. For a community, increased tourism can serve as an important part of a vibrant economic environment. County Department of Administration and Finance, Florida Department of Revenue http://www.coj.net/departments/administration+and+finance/accounting, http://dor.myflorida.com/dor/taxes/colls_from_7_2003.html
$200,000,000
Sales Tax Bed Tax

$150,000,000

$100,000,000

$50,000,000

$2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Adjusted Local Option Sales Tax $ 147,043,497 $ 144,100,258 $ 133,040,090 $ 118,775,849 $ 111,940,474

Adjusted Bed Tax $ 15,919,177 $ 17,014,857 $ 17,238,357 $ 13,548,402 $ 13,343,408

Sales + Bed Tax $ 162,962,674 $ 161,115,115 $ 150,278,447 $ 132,324,251 $ 125,283,883

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 h

Additional Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Total Taxable Value of Real Property (in billions) The indicator measures the total adjusted assessed value of taxable real property for each year, as determined by the Property Appraiser, after subtraction of exemptions. Strong real estate values generally indicate a strong economy and provide stability for homeowners. They also show local government's ability to raise money to pay for government services. In the absence of a state income tax, the Ad Valorem tax on real property is the most important revenue source available to local government, including school systems. Property Appraiser http://www.coj.net/Departments/Property+Appraiser/default.htm

Source Link

$75

$60

$45

$30
Inflation-Adjusted Actual

$15

$0

Year
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Adjusted value (in $Billions)
$ $ $ $ $ 47.95 52.19 60.08 59.03 58.38 $ $ $ $ $

Taxable value (in $Billions)
45.62 52.46 61.18 61.07 58.38

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 i

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Food Stamp/TANF Recipients The indicator measures the total number of recipients of Food Stamps/TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) cash assistance in Northeast Florida. For some families in crisis, assistance is necessary to help establish the stability required to improve the family's situation. Florida Department of Children and Families http://www.state.fl.us/cf_web/
160,000 140,000
TANF Food Stamps

120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0

Food Stamps:
Year 2006 2007 2008
2009 2010

Baker 2,084 2,289 2,894
3,889 4,704

Clay 7,266 7,455 8,990
12,892 18,624

Duval 66,527 70,530 79,283
102,460 140,422

Nassau 3,371 3,393 3,963
5,662 7,876

St. Johns 4,891 4,867 6,269
8,612 12,618

Northeast Florida 84,139 88,534 101,399
133,515 184,244

TANF
Year 2006 2007 2008
2009 2010

Baker 227 231 197 258 231

Clay 609 571 560 601 686

Duval 5,308 4,791 4,918 5212 6,118

Nassau 277 290 242 265 284

St. Johns 457 429 452 490 482

Northeast Florida 6,878 6,312 6,369 6,826 7,801

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 j

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Typical Monthly Household Costs for JEA Utilities This indicator measures the residential cost of 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity, including the residential basic rate and fuel adjustment charge; and of residential water and sewer services, based on 900 cubic feet of water consumption, adjusted for inflation. Utility costs are an essential part of a household budget and impact disposable income. The costs of basic utilities are an important factor in keeping housing affordable in a community. JEA http://www.jea.com/community/index.asp

$220
Inflation-adjusted Actual $

$200 $180 $160 $140 $120 $100 $80

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Adjusted utility costs $145.86 $147.43 $152.21 $173.79 $172.15

Actual utility costs $132.32 $138.15 $147.75 $171.61 $172.15

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 k

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance New Housing Starts The indicator measures the total single-family and multi-family residential housing units per county for which building permits were issued. New housing starts may be an important indicator of a growing and vibrant economy, as housing grows to meet increasing population demands and provides job opportunities for an important sector of the economy. However, new housing starts may also indicate unmanaged growth or speculative activity. University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research, Building Permit Activity Annual Report http://censtats.census.gov/bldg/bldgprmt.shtml

Source Link

16,000 14,000 Housing units 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 -

Multi-Family

Single Family

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Singlefamily 8,328 6,450 3,299 2,402 1,483

Multifamily 5,179 3,633 2,579 1,363 1,210

Total 13,507 10,083 5,878 3,765 2,693

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 l

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Average Annual Wage The indicator measures the adjusted annual average wage for all people employed in the county. The average annual wage indicates the quality of job creation and the opportunities available in the local workforce. A household's quality of life can be severely impacted if full-time wages are insufficient to meet basic needs. Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation http://www.labormarketinfo.com/library/qcew.htm
$50,000

$40,000

$30,000

$20,000
Inflation-Adjusted Actual $$

$10,000

$-

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Annual Wage $ 40,069 $ 42,251 $ 43,656 $ 43,722 $ 44,033

Adjusted Annual Wage $ 44,170 $ 45,088 $ 44,974 $ 44,276 $ 44,033

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 m

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Unemployment Benefit Claims The indicator measures the total number of unemployment claims filed during each year. Unemployment often creates economic hardship and the inability to meet basic needs, which may quickly result in family stress and crisis. Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation http://www.labormarketinfo.com/library/qcew.htm

125,000 100,000 75,000 50,000 25,000 0

Duval NE Florida

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 501 424 650 1,113 1,826

Clay 2,555 4,218 4,958 8,057 11,969

Duval 34,033 32,814 36,995 53,058 77,619

Nassau 1,530 1,519 1,756 2,998 5,024

St. Johns 2,713 2,785 3,680 6,646 9,684

Northeast Florida 41,332 41,760 48,039 71,872 106,122

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 6 n

Our Vision for Preserving the Natural Environment:

The resources of the region’s natural environment positively enhance the quality of life of citizens, and air, water, and ground pollution is kept below levels harmful to ecosystems, human health, or the quality of life. The built environment is developed in ways that preserve natural ecosystems and is maintained in ways that enhance natural beauty and visual aesthetics.

How Are We Doing?

Good News:

Air quality continues to improve, as does Duval’s water conservation effort. Additional acreage has been added to the inventory of preservation, conservation and parklands set aside for future generations.

Needs Improvement:

While long-term trends show improvement, additional work is needed in bringing St. Johns River tributaries into compliance with federal clean water standards. Residential recycling results remain disappointing. While current air quality is good news, we still face a challenge once stricter federal air quality standards are put in place.

Key Environmental Indicators
Days Air Quality is “Good”
Duval County: 335

Average Daily Water Use
Duval County: 181 Gallons

Source: City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division

Source: JEA

Supporting Indicators

Previous Tributary Compliance with Water Quality Standards Dissolved Oxygen 69% Fecal-Coliform Bacteria 73% Residential Recycling (pounds per person) Acres of Conservation/Preservation Land 53 84,306

Latest 69% 73% 55 84,779

Change 0% 0% +2 + 473

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

The natural environment in the First Coast community is one of great beauty and impacts our prosperity. Our responsibility is to maintain these essential treasures for our future generations. ~ A. Quinton White, Jr., Executive Director
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report Page 7

Preserving the Natural Environment

Environmental Emphasis Paying Dividends

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Days the Air Quality Index is in the "Good" Range Total days that the Air Quality Index (AQI) in Duval County is less than or equal to 50 ( a measure of the concentration of pollutants in the air developed by the EPA.) Clean air is important for a number of health reasons. Failure to meet national air quality standards can result in Federal action to bring communities into compliance. City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division http://www.coj.net

350 300 250 200 150

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Good Range 275 305 309 312 335

Moderate Range 85 59 50 53 29

Unhealthy For Sensitive Groups Range 5 1 6 0 1

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 a

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Average Daily Water Use This indicator measures the total annual cubic feet of potable water billed to JEA residential accounts as consumed, divided by the total annual residential accounts billed, divided by 365 to discover average daily water use. Individual households can have a significant impact on water conservation efforts. Residential water use accounts for nearly half of all potable water consumption. JEA http://www.jea.com/community/index.asp
300 250 200 150 100 50 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Average Residential Water Consumption (Gallons per Day) 221 202 202 187 181

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 b

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Percent of Tributary Streams Meeting Dissolved Oxygen Standards This indicator measures the annual percentage frequency of compliance of water samples from the St. Johns River and tributary streams in Duval County with Class III water standards for dissolved oxygen. Dissolved oxygen is essential for maintaining a healthy aquatic ecosystem and supporting propagation and maintenance of a healthy, well-balanced population of fish and wildlife. City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division http://www.coj.net/Departments/Environmental+and+Compliance/Environmental+Qualit Surface+Water+Quality/Tributary+Program.htm

100%

80%

60%

40% River 20% Streams 0%

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

River 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Streams 70% 58% 64% 69% 69%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 c

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Percent of Tributary Streams Meeting Bacteria Standards The annual percentage frequency of compliance of water samples from the St. Johns River and tributary streams in Duval County with Class III water standards for fecal-coliform bacteria of less than 800 bacteria per 100 ml. Bacteria levels are an indicator of the possible presence of human wastewater and the pathogens found in untreated sewage, which can lead to a variety of human illnesses as well as environmental problems. City of Jacksonville, Air and Water Quality Division http://www.coj.net/Departments/Environmental+and+Compliance/Environmental+Quali ty/Surface+Water+Quality/Tributary+Program.htm
100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Year
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Tributary Compliance
62% 65% 61% 73% 73%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 d

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Pounds of Solid Waste Recycled This indicator measures the total annual pounds of solid waste collected for recycling from residences per person in the total population. Reducing solid waste disposal in landfills decreases the need for new landfills and demonstrates improved stewardship of environmental resources. City of Jacksonville, Department of Solid Waste and Resource Management http://www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/recycling/
70 60 50 40 30 20 10 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Population 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518 899,535

Residential recycling (tons) 27974 28287 27979 23857 24519

Average Recycling (pounds per person) 64 63 62 53 55

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 e

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Acres of Conservation/Preservation Land This indicator measures the total acreage (Federal, State, and local government as well as privately managed) that is set aside for conservation, preservation, and/or parkland purposes. This is a preliminary figure as the indicator seeks to pull together all of the acreage managed by diverse partnerships such as the National Park Service, Preservation Project Jacksonville, Trust for Public Lands, North Florida Land Trust, JEA conservation areas, St. Johns River Water Management District land, and more. Continued efforts to catalogue and map preservation and conservation lands will likely provide opportunities for greater accuracy in future editions of this report. Conserving natural areas for future generations preserves habitats and biodiversity and maintains the quality of life and unique natural resources expected for those who live in Florida. Preservation Project Jacksonville, North Florida Land Trust http://www.coj.net/Departments/Recreation+and+Community+Services/Waterfront+ Management+and+Programming/Preservation+Project/Preservation+-+Map.htm 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0

Importance Source Link

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Total acreage of park and conservation land 82,846.20 84,360.85 84,037.43 84,306.37 84,778.67

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 f

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Gallons of Motor Fuel Sold Per Person This indicator measures the total gallons of motor fuels certified sold in each county by the Florida Department of Revenue, divided by the total population of the county. Increasing use of motor fuels harms air quality and depletes nonrenewable resources of fossil fuels, as well as possibly indicating increased urban sprawl. Florida Department of Revenue http://www.myflorida.com/dor/taxes/fuel_tax.html
700
Duval Northeast Florida

650

600

550

500

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Baker 730.4 787.6 720.6 750.8
756.6

Clay 502.9 464.7 442.1 452.2 459.8

Duval 665.5 657.1 637.0 604.9
591.3

Nassau 558.8 530.0 531.8 587.6 521.8

St. Johns 711.3 686.8 655.5 613.4 622.6

Northeast Florida 645.0 630.3 608.7 587.2 577.4

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 g

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link New Septic-Tank Permits Issued This indicator measures the annual total of permits issued for new septic tanks. Septic-tank failures can cause serious health and environmental problems, and the issuance of new septic-tank permits may indicate unmanaged housing growth that is extending beyond the network of sewer utilities. Duval County Public Health Department, Environmental Engineering Division http://www.dchd.net/environmentalhealth.htm#Onsite%20Sewage%20Program

3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Permits 695 982 754 425 240

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 7 h

Race Relations Remains a Key Challenge; Economy Strains Social Issues
Our Vision for Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony:
Social-service institutions in the region provide services with excellence to those in need, citizens and institutions support philanthropy and volunteerism to enhance the social environment, and citizens share social interactions characterized by equality of opportunity and racial harmony.

Promoting Social Wellbeing
Page 8

How Are We Doing?
Good News:
The number of children in foster care declined for the fourth consecutive year to the point that less than half as many children are in foster care as there were as recently as 2007.

Needs Improvement:

The gap between whether blacks and whites perceive racism as a problem in Jacksonville widened by 7 percent this year with 80 percent of blacks now believing it is. Births to single mothers, while down from the previous year, still represent nearly half of all births in Duval County. The homeless count has soared over the past two years as the effects of the recession have become increasingly evident.

Key Indicators of Social Wellbeing
Survey: Is Racism a Problem?
Duval County: 53% Yes
Births to Single Mothers in Duval County: 48.1% Births to Mothers Without High School Degree: 17.0%

Source: American Public Dialogue

Source: Florida Department of Health

Supporting Indicators
Volunteerism Rate Foster Children per 1,000 Children Homeless Survey Count per 100,000 People Philanthropic Giving to Federated Campaigns (millions)

Previous 64% 4.2 356 $26.4

Latest 65% 3.7 435 $25.5

Change + 1% - 0.5 + 79 - $0.9

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

We continue our commitment to the social wellbeing of Jacksonville’s citizens by bridging cultural differences and strengthening our relationships. -C. Peter Goplerud, Dean
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Key Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: Is Racism a Problem? The indicator measures the percentage of Duval County respondents, by race, who answered "yes" to the question: In your opinion during the last year, do you feel that racism is a problem in Jacksonville? When asked about race relations white Americans are likely to respond that black Americans are doing just as well as they are, which contradicts the facts that minorities still have lower average income, less education and less access to health care. Black Americans tend to have a negative view of their circumstances. 1 The difference in opinion continues as a cycle that continues racial issues, 2 because the differing opinions make it harder to understand and identify problems. The opinions also influence the view of how to handle public policies designed to help problems. 3 Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

Importance

Source Link

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Black White

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

White respondents 55% 62% 57% 49% 48%

Black respondents 78% 74% 77% 74% 80%

Total respondents 59% 64% 60% 55% 53%

Morin, R. :Misperceptions Cloud Whites’ View of Blacks.” Washington Post, July 11, 2001, p. A1. McConahay, J.B., Hardee, B.B., and Batts, V. (1981). Has Racism Declined in America? It Depends on Who Is Asking and What is Asked. The Journal of Conflict Resolution. Vol. 25:4. Pp. 563-579. 3 Warner, B. “Project Learnings”
1 2

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 8 a

Key Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Births to Single Mothers The indicator measures the total annual live births to unmarried females as a percentage of total births. Single mothers usually have lower levels of economic status, and limited social support. 4 The number of births outside of marriage has been increasing, and so has the number of births that occur within cohabitating couples. Children born to cohabitating couples are better off economically than children born outside of a union, however, children born to cohabitating couples are at a greater risk than children born to married couples. 5 Children born to single mothers are at a greater risk for poor behavioral and cognitive outcomes than children in a two-parent household. 6 Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Source Link

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Percent Births to Single Mothers 44.3% 45.0% 46.5% 48.2% 48.1%

“Births to Unwed Mothers” (2008). CHARTS Indicator Reference. Florida Department of Health. Mincieli, L., Manlove, J., McGarrett, M., Moore, K., and Ryan, Suzanne. (2007). “The Relationship Context of Births Outside of Marriage: The Rise of Cohabitation.” Child Trends. www.childtrends.org 6 Carlson, M.J., and Corcoran, M.E. (2001). “Family Structure and Children’s Behavioral and Cognitive Outcomes.” Journal of Marriage and Family. Vol. 63;3 pp. 779-792.
4 5

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Key Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Births to mothers with at least 12 years of education The indicator measures the percentage of all births in which the mother had at least 12 years of education. Children of parents with limited education may live in an environment lacking in stimulation for positive development, literacy, and school success. In addition, the education level of the mother is a key influence on the health outcomes of the family and predicts long-term poverty. Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
90%

Source Link

85%

80%

75%

70%

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 79.1% 75.7% 74.4% 79.2% 77.8%

Clay 84.0% 84.9% 83.6% 86.1% 85.7%

Duval 82.2% 82.1% 82.0% 81.7% 83.1%

Nassau 81.5% 82.5% 81.8% 83.8% 82.8%

St. Johns 89.1% 88.6% 88.6% 88.9% 88.6%

Northeast Florida 83.0% 82.9% 82.4% 83.0% 83.8%

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Supporting Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: Do you volunteer? The indicator measures the percentage of Duval County respondents who said "yes" to the question: Some people in our community are contributing their time to causes they consider worthwhile. In the past year have you given your time, without pay, to any charitable, civic, religious, or other volunteer organization? Volunteering is an important part of the way society is organized. Volunteering is important to the community because it benefits nonprofit organizations that help people in need. 7Volunteering also strengthens community ties and reinforces unity. 8 Volunteering may also help older individuals live longer by giving them a sense of purpose. 9 Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

Importance

Source Link
100%

80%

60%

40%

Year 2006

"Yes" Responses 56% 65% 59% 64% 65%

20%

2007 2008

0%

2009 2010

Anheier, H.K., and Salamon, L.M. (1999). “Volunteering in Cross-National Perspective: Initial Comparisons.” Law and Contemporary Problems. Vol. 43. 8 Eckstein, S. (2001). “Community as Gift-Giving: Collectivistic Roots of Volunteerism.” American Sociological Review. Vol. 66, No.6 pp. 829-851. 9 Bygren, L.O., Weissglas, G., Wikstrom, B.M., Konlaan, B.B., Grjibovski, A., Karlsson, A., Andersson, S., and Sjostrom, M. (2009). Psychosomatic Medicine. Vol. 71: 469-473.
7

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Supporting Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Foster children per 1,000 children The indicator measures the total number of foster children per 1,000 children under age 18. Children in foster care tend to have higher rates of behavioral and emotional problems than other children, and are twice as likely to be uninvolved in school. More than half of foster children aged 2 months to two years are at a high risk for developmental impairment. 10 Foster children are twice as likely to drop out of high school. 11 Male foster children are more likely to commit crimes as young adults. Female foster children are more likely to have children as a young adult. More than half of young adults that were foster children live in poverty. 12 Florida Department of Children and Families http://www.state.fl.us/cf_web/
10 8 6 4 2 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
St. Johns 5.5 4.6 3.6 2.5 3.7 Northeast Florida 7.9 7.7 5.4 4.1 3.6
Northeast Florida Duval

Source Link

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Baker 0.2 8.4 5.5 5.5 2.2

Clay 7.0 6.7 5.8 4.7 4.2

Duval 8.1 7.9 5.6 4.2 3.7

Nassau 15.3 14.0 4.9 3.4 1.8

Vandivere, S., Chalk, R., and Moore, K.A. (2003) “Children in Foster Homes: How are They Faring?” Child Trends. www.childtrends.org Lifting the Veil. “A Critical Look At The Foster Care System:
 Foster Care Outcomes.” http://www.liftingtheveil.org/foster14.htm 12 RTI International. (2008). “Adolescents Involved with Child Welfare: A Transition to Adulthood.”
10 11

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Supporting Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Homeless Survey Count per 100,000 People The indicator measures the total homeless individuals identified in an annual survey, per 100,000 population. People become homeless for many reasons including foreclosure, poverty, decreases in work opportunities, the decline in public assistance, lack of affordable housing, and other factors including lack of affordable health care, domestic violence, mental illness, and addiction to drugs and alcohol. 13 Lacking housing can be a serious impediment to obtaining employment and stabilizing a person's life. 14 Source Link The State of Homelessness in Jacksonville, Florida, Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition of Jacksonville; State of Florida's Annual Report on Homeless Conditions in Florida http://www.dcf.state.fl.us/homelessness/pubs.shtml
500 400 300 200 100 0

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Homeless Count 2,877 2,613 2,681 3,244 3,910

Population 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518 899,535

Homeless per 100,000 327 291 296 360 435

13 14

National Coalition for the Homeless (2009). http://www.nationalhomeless.org/factsheets/why.html Milligan, T.A., Will, J.A., and Cheney, T. (2009). “2009 Report of Duval, Clay, and Nassau Counties’ Homeless Population” Northeast Florida Center for Community Initiatives. University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL.

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Supporting Indicators
Indicator Description Philanthropy Given to Federal Campaigns The indicator measures the sum of annual giving to the following federated charitable fundraising efforts in Northeast Florida: United Way of Northeast Florida, United Way of St. Johns County, Combined Federal Campaign, and Florida State Employees Charitable Campaign. These campaigns serve differing geographic areas within Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. Philanthropic giving is important to the community because it supports nonprofit organizations that help vulnerable populations in the community. It is important to the survival of the nonprofit sector, which is an important economic source in the community. 15 16 United Way of Northeast Florida; United Way of St. Johns County

Importance

Source

$30

$20

$10

InflationAdjusted Actual $$

$0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Raw total (millions) $ 25.17 $ 26.37 $ 27.52 $ 26.03 $ 25.53

Inflation-Adjusted (millions) $ $ $ $ $ 27.75 28.14 28.35 26.36 25.53

15 16

http://learningtogive.org/papers/paper231.html , Ferris State University, Grand Rapids Campus. Anheier, H.K., and Salamon, L.M. (1999). “Volunteering in Cross-National Perspective: Initial Comparisons.” Law and Contemporary Problems. Vol. 43.

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: Have you personally experienced racism? The indicator measures the percentage of Duval County respondents, by race, who answered "yes" to the question: Thinking about your own possible experience with racism, do you believe that you have personally experiences racism during the past year while shopping, while at work, or while renting or buying housing in Jacksonville? Experiencing racism is a direct assault on one's quality of life. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Importance Source Link

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent responding yes to at least one of the three questions 29% 21% 19% 19% 19%

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: Do you volunteer more than seven hours a week? The indicator measures the percentage of Duval County respondents who said responded with over seven hours a week to the question: If you volunteered during the past year, about how many total hours do you think you have volunteered, on average, per week (1-3, 4-7, 8-10, 11-15, more than 15)? People who volunteer for significant amounts of time are an incredibly valuable resource for the community. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Importance Source Link

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

More than 7 hours 32% 26% 23% 25% 23%

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Births to Teen Mothers per 1,000 Teen Girls The indicator measures the total annual live births to females under 18 per 1,000 females ages 10-17. Teen pregnancies often result in health problems for both the mother and baby, and parenting problems can create potentially serious social and economic hardship. The teen birth rate therefore can serve as a leading indicator of educational disruption, maternal and child health problems, and economic need. Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
25 Duval 20 15 10 5 0 NE Florida

Source Link

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 13.1 17.6 10.9 13.8 13.0

Clay 5.8 5.3 6.6 5.7 5.5

Duval 9.8 9.8 9.9 8.9 8.3

Nassau 10.4 9.2 10.6 9.4 5.2

St. Johns 6.1 5.8 3.7 3.8 5.2

Northeast Florida 8.8 8.7 8.7 7.9 7.4

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Subsequent Births to Teen Mothers The indicator measures the total number of births to mothers under age 20 in which the mother had a previous child as a percentage of births to mothers under age 20. Subsequent births to teen mothers illustrate ongoing needs not met by previous community prevention or intervention efforts. Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx

30% 25% 20% 15% 10%

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 25.8% 30.3% 18.0% 21.7% 11.5%

Clay 12.0% 14.9% 9.9% 13.4% 16.4%

Duval 19.5% 18.4% 20.2% 18.0% 19.3%

Nassau 18.0% 20.2% 18.2% 17.4% 20.0%

St. Johns 18.4% 16.8% 16.5% 15.9% 13.0%

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Children of Divorcing Parents The indicator measures the total number of children under 18 whose parents become divorced during the year. Children are often severely negatively affected by divorce of their parents. Office of Vital Statistics, Florida Department of Health http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx

8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 82 89 74 118 97

Clay 614 699 688 671 574

Duval 3,035 3,123 3,131 2,637 2,636

Nassau 284 243 239 242 238

St. Johns 520 501 517 553 524

Northeast Florida 4,535 4,655 4,649 4,221 4,069

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Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Length of stay in foster care The indicator measures the percentage of children in Northeast Florida in foster care who, if reunited, are reunited with their families within 12 months or, if adopted, adopted within 24 months. Children are more likely to develop positively when they live in a home with a permanent family. Florida Department of Children and Families http://www.state.fl.us/cf_web/
100%
Adopted Reunited

75%

50%

25%

0% 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Adopted within 24 months 54.7% 63.7% 62.7% 68.5% 53.9%

Reunited within 12 months 69.0% 74.0% 75.7% 70.9% 71.7%

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Interactive Indicators
For the most up-to-date information on Social Wellbeing and all Community Indicators, please visit the interactive Community Snapshot application on JCCI’s web site.

www.jcci.org

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

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Our Vision for Enjoying Arts, Recreation, and Culture:

Citizens desire, support, have access to, and actively patronize a great diversity of opportunities in the region for cultural and artistic enrichment and for recreational, leisure, and entertainment activities.

How Are We Doing?
Good News:
Use of Jacksonville Public Library system by residents, while down slightly, is still very high and stands out as the one positive indicator among otherwise downward trends in recreation, leisure and entertainment activities.

Needs Improvement:

All indicators in this section declined, led by the second year of declining public/private support of the arts, as well as declines in performance offerings and attendance at sporting and cultural events, musical performances, the zoo and our local museums. Per capita funding for recreation activities and maintenance dropped 35 percent in the last year and by more than 50 percent since 2004, to the lowest levels recorded in more than 20 years.

Key Arts, Recreation, and Culture Indicators
Public and Private Support for the Arts
Duval County: $30.52 per person

Public Performances and Events
Duval County: 436

Source: Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville

Source: Dept. of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment; Florida Theatre; SMG

Supporting Indicators
Recreation Funding per Person Attendance at Sporting Events per 1,000 People

Previous $16.47 1,271

Latest $16.28 1,237

Change - $0.19 - 34

Attendance at Cultural Activities per 1,000 People Museums 392 364 - 28 Musical Performances 275 195 - 80 Zoo 779 751 - 28 Library Circulation per Person 10.17 10.10 - 0.07 More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

Art, culture and recreational opportunities not only make the First Coast an attractive place to call home, but they enhance citizens’ lives and impact our community’s ability to grow and thrive. -Dave Balz, Senior Vice President
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report Page 9

Enjoying Arts, Recreation & Culture

Library Support Remains High Amid Otherwise Disappointing Results

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Public and Private Support for the Arts Per Person The indicator measures the total public and private funding (including earned income) of arts organizations receiving Cultural Services Grants, divided by the total Duval County population. Most art programs depend on public and private funding to offer art and cultural services to the community 1. Support of the arts is important because the arts are important to community life, and contribute to building community. 2 The arts and culture also add to the local economy. 3 Measuring the financial support for the arts can show the healthiness of the arts community. 4 Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville http://www.culturalcouncil.org/ $50 $40 $30 $20 $10 $0 Inflation-Adjusted Actual $$

Source Link

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2009 dollars $ 35.10 $ 36.24 $ 36.73 $ 33.16 $ 30.52

Actual dollars $ 31.84 $ 33.96 $ 35.65 $ 32.75 $ 30.52

National Endowment for the Arts. (2007). “How the United States Funds the Arts.” Jackson, M., Herranz, J, and Kabwasa-Green, F. (2003). “Art and Culture in Communities: Unpacking Participation.” Policy Brief No.2 of the Culture, Creativity, and Communities Program. The Urban Institute, Washington DC. 3 Florida Division of Cultural Affairs. “About the Division” http://www.florida-arts.org/about/ 4 National Endowment for the Arts. (2007). “How the United States Funds the Arts.”
1 2

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Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Public Performances/Events at Selected Facilities The indicator measures the sum of the total events/performances open to the public each year at Metropolitan Park, the Florida Theatre, and the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts. Opportunities for entertainment and cultural enrichment are essential ingredients in the quality of life of a community. 5 Increased numbers of performances and events is a measure of strength and variety in the performing arts. People who attend more cultural events tend to be healthier than those who do not. 6 Jacksonville Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment; Florida Theatre, Inc.; and SMG Facilities Management Worldwide http://experiencejax.com/

Source Link

800 600 400 200 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Florida Theatre 209 220 211 206 176

Metro Park 27 22 26 30 31

Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts 250 359 306 265 229

Total 486 601 543 501 436

Jackson, M., Herranz, J, and Kabwasa-Green, F. (2003). “Art and Culture in Communities: Unpacking Participation.” Policy Brief No.2 of the Culture, Creativity, and Communities Program. The Urban Institute, Washington DC. 6 Konlaan, B.B., Bjorby, N., Bygren, L.O., Weissglas, G., Karlsson, L.G, and Widmark, M. (2000). “Attendance at cultural events and physical exercise and health: a randomized controlled study.” Public Health Vol. 114 pp. 316-319.
5

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Musical Performances Attendance Per 1,000 Population The indicator measures the total annual attendance at the Jacksonville Symphony series, The Artist Series, and the Jazz Festival performances, per 1,000 people in the Duval County population. The indicator measures paid attendance at performances of all Symphony series and special concerts, all FCCJ Artist Series performances, and the annual Jazz Festival. Performances are important to community life, and contribute to building community. 7 Music can be therapeutic for many people in the community. 8 Attendance at performing arts events is a measure of the strength of the performing arts community. 9 Jacksonville Symphony, The Artist Series (was FCCJ Artist Series), WJCT/City of Jacksonville (for the Jazz Festival) http://experiencejax.com/

Importance Source Link

500 400 300 200 100 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Attendance per 1,000 people 223 343 246 275 195

Jacksonville Symphony 85,492 85,796 92,374 77,441 78,861

The Artist Series 94,362 200,879 116,109 164,717 95,805

Jazz Festival 12,500 15,000 12,500 6,392 950

Population 861,150 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518

Jackson, M., Herranz, J, and Kabwasa-Green, F. (2003). “Art and Culture in Communities: Unpacking Participation.” Policy Brief No.2 of the Culture, Creativity, and Communities Program. The Urban Institute, Washington DC. 8 American Music Therapy Association. “Frequently Asked Questions About Music Therapy.” http://www.musictherapy.org/faqs.htm 9 Jackson, M. R., Kabwasa-Green, F., Herranz, J. (2006). “Cultural Vitality in Communities: Interpretation and Indicators.” The Urban Institute.
7

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Museum Attendance per 1,000 Population The indicator measures the total attendance at the Museum of Science and History, the Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, per 1,000 people in the total Duval County population. Attendance figures include both regular paid attendance and museum attendance by school children as part of services contracted with the Duval County School Board. Museum attendance is a reflection of the community’s support for cultural institutions. Museums are an expression of society’s cultural identity. The main goals of museums are to be educational, and accessible. 10 Museums also can promote unity in society by educating people and creating a better understanding of other cultures. 11 Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens, Museum of Contemporary Art - Jacksonville, and Museum of Science and History http://experiencejax.com/
500 400 300 200 100 0

Importance

Source Link

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Cummer 123,235 134,938 160,000 128,844 107,000

MOCA 68,000 63,406 51,600 58,133 58,100

MOSH 176,038 151,197 174,603 168,000 163,137

Total 367,273 349,541 386,203 354,977 328,237

Population 861,150 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518

Attendance per 1,000 Population 426 398 431 392 364

10 11

Hein, G.E. (2005). “The Role of Museums in Society: Educational and Social Action.” Seminar for Museum Educators: Jyvaskyla, Finland. Arinze, E.N. (1999). “The Role of the Museum in Society.” Public Lecture at the National Museum, Georgetown, Guyana.

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Zoo Attendance Per 1,000 Population The indicator measures the total annual attendance at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens per 1,000 people in the Duval County population. The zoo is an important source of recreation in the community12. Zoos are a benefit to the community by offering educational programs, and teaching the public about conservation 13. The zoo also offers the interaction between people and animals that can be therapeutic for individuals. 14 Jacksonville Zoo http://www.jacksonvillezoo.org/
1,000

Source Link

750

500

250

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Jacksonville Zoo attendance 603,312 647,023 662,897 705,007 676,185

Population 861,150 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518

Attendance per 1,000 Population 701 736 739 779 751

National Center on Physical Activity and Disability.(2005). “Introduction to Benefits of a Zoo.” http://www.ncpad.org/fun/fact_sheet.php?sheet=76&view=all 13 World Association of Zoos and Aquariums. www.waza.org 14 National Center on Physical Activity and Disability.(2005). “Introduction to Benefits of a Zoo.” http://www.ncpad.org/fun/fact_sheet.php?sheet=76&view=all
12

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Sports Attendance Per 1,000 Population The indicator measures the total annual attendance at major sports events at Everbank Field (was Jacksonville Municipal Stadium), The Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville (was Wolfson Park), and the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena (was Coliseum), per 1,000 people in the Duval County population. Attendance at sporting events is important to the community because it can create a shared sense of community among fans 15. At sporting events people are also exposed to specific beliefs and values of the community. 16 Attendance is also a measure of the breadth of recreational opportunities available in the community. SMG Facilities Management Worldwide, Jacksonville Jaguars http://experiencejax.com/

Importance

Source Link

2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Attendance per 1,000 people 1,378 1,405 1,445 1,271 1,237

Everbank Field (except Jaguars) 206,236 201,955 274,584 219,411 189,814

Jaguars 650,187 662,100 653,158 650,619 479,333

Baseball Grounds 214,001 249,868 258,733 243,074 394,878

Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena 116,157 121,093 109,283 37,007 50,016

Population 861,150 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518

Wann, D.L., and Grieve, F.G. (2005). “Biased Evaluations of In-Group and Out-Group Spectator Behavior at Sporting Events: The Importance of Team Identification and Threats to Social Identity.” 16 Corbett, D.R., and Patterson, W. (2002).“The Social Significance of Sport and its Implications for Race and Baseball.” Howard University. Presented at: The Cooperstown Symposium on Baseball and Society. http://www.gs.howard.edu/staffs-webpage/waynepage/The%20Social%20Significance%20of%20Sport.htm
15

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Recreation Funding for Activities and Maintenance Per Capita The indicator measures the total annual adjusted City of Jacksonville operating expenditures for recreation activities and park maintenance, divided by the total Duval County population. Recreation funding allows for activities and maintenance to continue, and shows the commitment to quality17. Recreation funding is important to the community because parks and recreational activities can attract new residents to the community.18 Parks offer many social benefits including strengthening communities, promoting social bonds, and supporting youth. They also offer a place for individuals to be physically active which can lead to better health and wellness. 19 Jacksonville Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment; Florida Theatre, Inc.; and SMG Facilities Management Worldwide www.coj.net
$40

Source Link

$30

$20

$10

Inflation-Adjusted

Actual $$

$0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

InflationAdjusted $ 31.70 $ 27.05 $ 26.83 $ 16.45 $ 16.28

Actual Dollars $ 27.16 $ 24.37 $ 25.41 $ 16.45 $16.28

Walls, M. (2009).“Parks and Recreation in the United States: Local Park Systems” Resources for the Future. Backman, K.F., and Backman, S.J. (1997). “The Importance of Recreation and Parks.” Journal of Applied Recreation Research. 19 State of California Resources Agency. (2005). “The Health and Social Benefits of Recreation.” California State Parks. www.parks.ca.gov/planning
17 18

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Public Library Circulation Per Capita The indicator measures the total resources circulated by public libraries, divided by the total population. Local public libraries offer a variety of materials, and services to the community. 20 Public libraries provide information to the general public, and allow the opportunity for selfeducation, life-long learning, and self-improvement. 21 Library circulation is also related to the economy because when the economy is slow library circulation and use increases. 22 City of Jacksonville Public Library and Florida Department of State http://dlis.dos.state.fl.us/bld/research_office/BLD_Research_index.html

Source Link

12.5 10.0 7.5 5.0 2.5 0.0

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Circulation per person 9.04 9.34 9.75 10.17 10.10

Circulation 7,948,860 8,378,103 8,824,972 9,156,597 9,086,727

Population 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518 899,535

Jacksonville Public Library. http://jaxpubliclibrary.org/lib/services.html Campaign for Wisconsin Libraries. “The Value and Importance of Libraries.” http://www.wisconsinlibraries.org/research/value.asp 22 Lynch, M.J. (2002). “Economic Hard Times and Public Library Use Revisited.” American Libraries. pp. 62-63.
20 21

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Prognosis Improving But Still Critical
Our Vision for Sustaining a Healthy Community:
Health-care institutions in the region provide medical and preventive health-care services with excellence, all citizens have access to these services, regardless of financial means, and citizens generally experience a high level of physical and mental health.

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Sustaining a Healthy Community

How Are We Doing?
Good News:
2009 saw improvements in the infant mortality rates (but an increase in the disparity) and sharp reductions in the rate of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). Cancer death rates also declined.

Needs Improvement:

Even though STD rates declined, new HIV cases increased, and the racial disparity in new HIV cases widened. Suicide rates, especially for senior citizens, also increased.

Key Health Indicators
Black: 13.6

Infant Mortality Rates

White: 5.5

People Without Health Insurance
Duval County: 17%

Supporting Indicators
Cancer Death Rate New HIV Cases White Black STD Rates

Source: Florida Department of Health

Source: American Communities Survey

Previous 181.3 379 89 264 976.3 13.0 2.4

Latest 180.5 434 91 313 815.5 17.6 2.5

Change - 0.8 + 55 + 2 + 49 - 160.8 + 4.6 + 0.1

Suicide Rates: Seniors (65 and over) Youth (10-19)

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

The health of all First Coast citizens impacts the enjoyment of every facet of life. Our community’s vision must be one of excellent, compassionate health care for all citizens. -Moody Chisholm, President & CEO
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Infant Mortality Rate This indicator measures the total annual infant deaths divided by the total annual infant births, multiplied by 1,000. Infant deaths serve as a sentinel indicator of community health. The infant mortality rate reflects the health status of the mother and the quality of health care received by mothers and infants, including prenatal, postnatal, and interconceptional health care. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com
25 20 15 10 5 0 Black White

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 19.0 15.2 7.0 2.5 18.5

Clay 6.7 4.7 4.5 8.8 4.1

Duval 11.6 9.5 9.0 9.7 8.4

Nassau 9.9 4.9 7.6 3.7 10.3

St. Johns 5.1 2.8 5.4 6.2 5.6

Northeast Florida 10.4 8.2 8.0 8.9 8.0

Duval County:
Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 White Infant Death Rate 7.9 7.2 6.7 7.1 5.5 Black Infant Death Rate 17.5 12.7 13.1 13.9 13.6

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Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link People Without Health Insurance This indicator measures the percentage of people in Duval County, by age group, estimated to be without health insurance. Individuals and families lacking health insurance coverage are vulnerable to a dangerous combination of health and financial crises. U.S. Census, American Community Survey www.census.gov

2009
30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Total population
Total population 17.0% 17.2%

Under 18

18-64

65 and Over

Year 2008 2009

Under 18 12.7% 11.2%

18-64 21.3% 25.1%

65 and Over 1.4% 0.4%

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Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Deaths Due to Cancer This indicator measures the total annual number of resident deaths due to all forms of cancer per 100,000 people in the population. Cancer is a leading cause of death throughout the nation. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
250
Duval NE Florida

200

150

100

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 171.0 210.2 229.0 235.6 227.8

Clay 168.3 175.5 183.1 193.3 192.8

Duval 186.3 177.6 175.0 181.3 180.5

Nassau 257.5 228.7 182.8 212.8 210.8

St. Johns 212.4 212.5 204.5 216.9 210.3

Northeast Florida 190.5 185.0 181.3 190.3 188.6

Florida 223.8 217.4 213.0 215.6 217.7

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 c

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link New HIV Cases This indicator measures the number of newly-diagnosed HIV cases, in the total population and broken out by race. HIV/AIDS has disproportionately impacted racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. The disparity in the incidence of new HIV cases points to the effectiveness of prevention and education programs in reaching all of a community's residents. Duval County Health Department, AIDS Surveillance Program http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/facts/afam.htm

400

Black

White

300

200

100

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Black 200 208 240 264 313

White 59 82 94 89 91

Other 17 17 29 26 10

Total 276 307 363 379 434

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 d

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Sexually Transmitted Disease Reports This indicator measures the number of individuals per 100,000 people who have been diagnosed with gonorrhea, syphilis, or chlamydia (referred to as sexually transmitted diseases or STDs.) Individuals who contract a sexually transmitted disease may suffer severe medical problems. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx

1,000

Duval

NE Florida

800

600

400

200

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 479.6 388.6 597.9 394.0 510.6

Clay 246.0 268.8 356.9 396.9 364.1

Duval 810.3 846.4 934.7 976.5 815.5

Nassau 225.7 329.1 266.3 401.9 268.5

St. Johns 108.1 172.5 175.1 207.0 211.1

Northeast Florida 612.2 647.5 717.4 755.1 644.0

Florida 357.0 399.2 439.0 505.2 503.9

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 e

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link 30
Senior Suicide Rate Total Suicide Rate Youth Suicide Rate

Suicide Rates per 100,000 People This indicator measures the total number of suicides per 100,000 people, in the total population and among youth (10-19) and seniors (65 and older). One measure of depression and mental health concerns is the suicide rate. Deaths by suicide are potentially preventable and, as such, represent a significant concern in the overall capacity of the community to care for all its members. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx

25 20 15 10 5 0

Year

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Total Suicide Rate 14.1 12.6 12.1 14.9 16.0

Senior Suicide Rate 14.6 17.1 18.6 13.0 17.6

Youth Suicide Rate 4.1 4.1 0.8 2.4 2.5

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 f

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Mothers Receiving Early Prenatal Care This indicator measures the total annual number of mothers who began prenatal care within the first three months of their pregnancies, as a percentage of the total number of births in the county. Early, high-quality prenatal care is critical to reducing risks for complications of pregnancy or birth and improving birth outcomes. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com
100% 90%
Duval NE Florida

80% 70% 60% 50%

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 79.0% 77.9% 73.2% 72.8% 72.7%

Clay 81.3% 77.1% 75.5% 75.3% 77.5%

Duval 77.5% 75.2% 73.6% 71.2% 72.2%

Nassau 86.6% 83.3% 80.9% 83.6% 83.4%

St. Johns 86.8% 84.8% 84.5% 83.0% 84.9%

Northeast Florida 79.3% 76.7% 75.1% 73.3% 74.6%

Florida 78.5% 76.8% 75.9% 76.9% 78.3%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 g

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Newborns with Birth Weights of 5.5 Pounds and Over This indicator measures the total annual number of newborns with birth weights of 5.5 pounds and over, divided by the total number of newborns. Low birth weight is a leading predictor of neonatal death. Low birth-weight infants are also more likely than normal birth-weight infants to experience long-term developmental and neurological disabilities. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
100%
Duval NE Florida

95%

90%

85%

80%

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 90.5% 89.6% 91.4% 92.5% 91.5%

Clay 92.5% 91.9% 93.2% 92.2% 91.5%

Duval 90.4% 90.5% 90.3% 90.7% 90.2%

Nassau 92.5% 90.5% 92.6% 92.9% 90.2%

St. Johns 93.1% 92.9% 92.8% 93.7% 93.4%

Northeast Florida 91.0% 90.9% 91.2% 91.3% 90.7%

Florida 91.2% 91.3% 91.3% 91.2% 91.3%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 h

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Percent of Seniors Who Feel Safe in Their Neighborhood The indicator measures the percentage of respondents 65 and over who answered "yes" to the question: Do you feel safe walking alone at night in your neighborhood? The perception of safety, which may or may not correlate with actual safety or the reported crime rate, is critical to one's quality of life in the community, especially for senior citizens. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent answering "yes" 48% 42% 36% 55% 52%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 i

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link HIV/AIDS-related Deaths This indicator measures the total annual number of HIV/AIDS-related deaths per 100,000 people in the total population. HIV/AIDS is a serious though preventable disease. Although there is no cure for AIDS, new treatments are helping people with HIV live longer. Still, these treatment regimens are complex, cause serious side effects, and become ineffective as HIV mutates. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
40

30

20

10

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Deaths per 100,000 13.2 11.8 11.8 10.8 11.0

Deaths 117 106 108 99 100

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 j

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Packs of cigarettes sold per person This indicator measures the total annual number of packs of cigarettes sold per person in the total population. Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. Florida Department of Business Regulation, Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Tobacco/tobacco_home.html
150

125

100

75

50

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Packs sold per person 81 81 72 74 74

Packs sold 69,499,131 71,006,581 64,456,022 66,971,546 67,605,592

Duval County Population 861,150 879,235 897,008 904,971 911,235

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 k

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Deaths Due to Lung Cancer This indicator measures the total annual number of resident deaths due to lung cancer per 100,000 people in the population. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States for men and women. Studies show that smoking tobacco products in any form is the major cause of lung cancer. Environmental or second-hand tobacco smoke is also implicated in causing lung cancer. Other risk factors for lung cancer include asbestos and radon exposure. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
80
Duval Northeast Florida

Source Link

60

40

20

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 50.0 63.5 66.2 61.7 88.3

Clay 46.8 49.7 59.1 62.1 68.4

Duval 56.0 54.4 52.3 57.1 51.5

Nassau 107.5 71.4 57.4 70.6 59.7

St. Johns 55.3 64.5 58.7 64.8 56.4

Northeast Florida 57.2 56.1 54.6 59.6 56.1

Florida 66.8 64.8 62.2 63.2 63.1

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 l

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Deaths Due to Heart Disease This indicator measures the total annual number of resident deaths due to heart disease per 100,000 people in the population. Heart disease is a leading cause of death throughout the country. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx
350
Duval Northeast Florida

300

250

200

150

100

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 158.5 142.8 132.3 173.6 142.0

Clay 175.9 144.8 150.5 138.9 151.9

Duval 188.3 169.1 173.0 172.5 173.5

Nassau 174.2 176.2 177.8 181.3 210.2

St. Johns 165.9 159.9 144.7 147.2 133.8

Northeast Florida 182.6 164.5 165.7 165.1 168.1

Florida 255.2 238.4 224.0 222.9 218.9

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 m

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Survey: People Rating Health Care "Good" or "Excellent" This indicator measures the percentage of survey respondents who answer "good" or "excellent" to the question: In your opinion, is the health and medical care available in Jacksonville excellent, good, fair, or poor? Perceptions of the quality of the health and medical care available may reflect the quality of care, accessibility, and affordability of health care. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

100%
Excellent Good

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Excellent 32% 34% 34% 36% 33%

Good 34% 39% 37% 38% 43%

Total 66% 73% 71% 74% 76%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 10 n

Our Vision for Maintaining a Responsive Government:

Local governmental bodies in the region are led by competent, representative, and responsive elected and appointed officials, they provide public services effectively and equitably to citizens, and citizens are well informed about public affairs and actively participate in civic activities.

How Are We Doing?
Good News:
Satisfaction levels with basic city services remain high despite reductions in some services caused by budget reductions. The number of active neighborhood organizations reached a new high with more than 600 recorded in the city of Jacksonville.

Needs Improvement:

Offsetting positive news regarding satisfaction with city services are declines in the percentage of people who feel they can influence local government, and in the percentage of people reporting they are keeping up with local government news.

Key Governance Indicators
Duval County: 53%

Voter Turnout

Satisfaction with City Services
Duval County: 436

Source: Supervisor of Elections

Source: American Public Dialogue

Supporting Indicators
Diverse and Representative Government Elected Officials: People of Color Elected Officials: Women Neighborhood Organizations Survey: Can You Influence Government? People Keeping Up with Local Government News

Previous 26% 26% 591 25% 62%

Latest 21% 19% 602 24% 55%

Change - 5% - 7% + 11 - 1% - 7%

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

A responsive government effectively serves the needs of its constituents. Members of our community should stay well-informed and actively participate in the democratic process. -Charles Hood, Vice President, Public Affairs
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report Page 11

Maintaining Responsive Government

Continued Disconnect between Citizens and Local Government

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Voter Turnout The total number of votes cast in scheduled general elections, divided by the total number of registered voters. General elections include the alternating November presidential and congressional/state elections in even-numbered years and the local unitary primary election held in April of every fourth odd-numbered year (most recently in 2007). Registering to vote is one step in civic participation, but voter turnout demonstrates a higher level of civic involvement. Supervisor of Elections http://election.dos.state.fl.us/

Importance Source Link

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Presidential

State

Local

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Turnout 42.3% 19.1% 77.8% 53.0%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 a

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Survey: Satisfaction with Basic City Services The percentage of Duval County survey respondents who answered "somewhat satisfied" or "very satisfied" to the question: As you think about the effectiveness of public services provided by the City of Jacksonville, how satisfied are you with basic public services such as streets, parks, libraries, and trash removal? Would you say that you are very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, not very satisfied, or not at all satisfied? Citizen satisfaction is an important measure of the public perception of the quality of services provided by local government. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

Importance Source Link

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Very satisfied

Somewhat satisfied

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Somewhat satisfied 44% 50% 49% 50% 48%

Very satisfied 38% 35% 33% 33% 35%

Combined total 82% 85% 82% 83% 83%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 b

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Percent of Elected Officials Who Are People of Color The indicator measures the percentage of elected officials who are people of color. Officials included in the indicator are: members of the Jacksonville City Council and Duval County School Board, Mayor of Jacksonville, Duval County Sheriff, Duval County Property Appraiser, Duval County Tax Collector, Duval County Supervisor of Elections, Florida State Senators from Districts 1, 5, and 8, and State Representatives from Districts 12 through 19. Civil Service Board members were included until 1996 when these positions became appointive. In a representative democracy, the diversity of elected officials is one indicator of the openness of the political system for all to participate, either by running for office or to feel that their voices are being heard. City of Jacksonville, Duval County Public Schools, Duval State Legislative Delegation www.coj.net
100%

Importance Source Link

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent People of color 29% 29% 29% 26% 19%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 c

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Percent of Elected Officials Who Are Female The indicator measures the percentage of elected officials who are female. Officials included in the indicator are: members of the Jacksonville City Council and Duval County School Board, Mayor of Jacksonville, Duval County Sheriff, Duval County Property Appraiser, Duval County Tax Collector, Duval County Supervisor of Elections, Florida State Senators from Districts 7, 8, and 9 (Districts 2, 6, and 8 after reapportionment in 1994; Districts 1, 5, and 8 after reapportionment in 2004), and State Representatives from Districts 13 through 20 (Districts 12 through 19 after reapportionment in 1994, unchanged in 2004). Civil Service Board members were included until 1996 when these positions became appointive. In a representative democracy, the diversity of elected officials is one indicator of the openness of the political system for all to participate, either by running for office or to feel that their voices are being heard. City of Jacksonville, Duval County Public Schools, Duval State Legislative Delegation www.coj.net
100%

Importance Source Link

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent Female 38% 26% 24% 26% 21%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 d

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Neighborhood Organizations The total number of active neighborhood organizations in Jacksonville, as identified by the City of Jacksonville Neighborhood Services Division. One early introduction into civic participation and getting involved in the health of the community is through organizing or participating in a neighborhood organization. City of Jacksonville Neighborhood Services Division http://www.coj.net/Departments/Housing+and+Neighborhoods/Community+Developme nt/Directory+of+Neighborhood+Organizations.htm
750 600 450 300 150 0

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Neighborhood Organizations 517 539 597 591 602

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 e

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Survey: Can You Influence Local Government? The percentage of people who respond "great influence" or "moderate influence" to the survey question: Our governmental system values citizen input and involvement. As a citizen of Jacksonville and Duval County, how would you describe your ability to influence local-government decision making? Would you say that you have great influence, moderate influence, a little influence, or no influence at all? Citizen perceptions of their personal power and ability to participate effectively in local government can demonstrate the civic capacity of a community to face difficult issues. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Great Moderate

Importance Source Link

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Moderate 27% 25% 23% 23% 21%

Great 6% 2% 3% 2% 3%

Combined 32% 27% 26% 25% 24%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 f

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Survey: People Keeping Up with Local Government News The percentage of Duval County survey respondents who answered "frequently" to the question: People generally obtain local government news from television, radio, newspapers, the Internet, or from other people. How often do you keep up with news from any source about City Council, the Mayor, the School Board, or other local-government bodies? Would you say frequently, sometimes, seldom, or never? Civic participation is enhanced when the community has an informed citizenry. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

Importance Source Link

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent who respond "frequently" 52% 52% 58% 62% 55%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 g

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Voter Registration The total number of registered voters, divided by the total population 18 and over. During years with a general election, the number of registered voters is measured when the roll is closed before that election. During a year without a general election, the number is measured on the last day of the year. Registering to vote is one of the first steps in civic participation. Supervisor of Elections http://election.dos.state.fl.us/
100%

Importance Source Link

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent Registered to Vote 81.3% 81.3% 78.9% 78.9% 77.6%

People registered to vote 537,462 546,733 536,588 535,431 527,079

Population 18 and over 661,007 672,193 679,737 678,233 679,226

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 h

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: Satisfaction with Public Safety Services The percentage of Duval County survey respondents who answered "somewhat satisfied" or "very satisfied" to the question: As you think about the effectiveness of public services provided by the City of Jacksonville, how satisfied are you with public-safety services such as rescue, fire, and police? Would you say that you are very satisfied, somewhat satisfied, not very satisfied, or not at all satisfied? In public safety, important goals are to reduce the fear of crime and to increase security and confidence in fire and rescue services. Public satisfaction is a measure of the perceived quality of the services provided and the community's trust in those services. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
Very satisfied Somewhat satisfied

Importance Source Link

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Somewhat satisfied 40% 45% 47% 46% 44%

Very satisfied 45% 43% 39% 42% 45%

Combined total 85% 87% 86% 88% 89%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 i

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Duval County survey: Can you name two City Council members? The percentage of Duval County survey respondents who could name two City Council members in response to the question: Can you name two members of the Jacksonville City Council? (Responses are checked for at least last-name accuracy.) Civic engagement is enhanced to the extent that citizens know which local elected officials are making decisions on their behalf. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Importance Source Link

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Named two Council members 13% 15% 27% 33% 21%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 j

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: Elected Leadership is "Good" or "Excellent" The percentage of people who respond "excellent" or "good" to the survey question: First, we would like you to turn your attention to the government of Jacksonville. In your opinion, is the quality of leadership in our local government excellent, good, fair, or poor? The effectiveness of local government often relies on the quality of elected leadership. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
100%
Excellent Good

Importance Source Link

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Excellent 9% 4% 6% 3% 2%

Good 45% 37% 38% 34% 30%

Combined 54% 41% 44% 37% 32%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 k

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Survey: School Board Leadership is "Good" or "Excellent" The percentage of people who respond "excellent" or "good" to the survey question: In your opinion, is the quality of elected leadership on the Duval County School Board excellent, good, fair, or poor? The effectiveness of the public education system often relies on the quality of its leadership. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/
100%
Excellent Good

Importance Source Link

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Good 28% 21% 28% 28% 25%

Excellent 4% 2% 3% 2% 4%

Combined 32% 23% 31% 30% 29%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 11 l

Commuting Times Remain Favorable And Driving Is Becoming Safer
Our Vision for Moving Around Efficiently and Safely:
Citizens in the region have access to affordable, convenient, and accessible transportation services with the capacity to convey them around the community and around the world to their chosen destinations at their chosen times.

Moving Around Efficiently & Safely
Page 12

How Are We Doing?
Good News: Needs Improvement:
More than 2/3 of daily commuters have commute times of 25 minutes or less, and the number of motor vehicle accidents per 1000 people, which declined for the fourth consecutive year, is at its lowest level in more than 20 years. Average weekday miles of JTA bus service has been declining for the past three years, dipping by more than 10 percent in 2009. Bus ridership was down and is below pre-recession levels, and passengers using Jacksonville International Airport declined for a second straight year.

Key Transportation Indicators
Commute Times of 25 Minutes or Less
Duval County: 68%

Bus Ridership per 1,000 People
Duval County: 38

Supporting Indicators
Airport Passengers (millions)

Source: American Public Dialogue

Source: Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA)

Previous 6.0 23.8 33,019 16.3

Latest 5.6 24.2 29,632 15.7

Change - 0.4 + 0.4 - 3,387 - 0.6

Serious Bicycle Accidents per 100,000 People JTA Miles of Service Motor Vehicle Accidents per 1,000 People

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

Tracking our progess in providing efficient transportation is critical as our community focuses on smart growth, and expanding roles as a regional, national and worldwide logistics hub. -Jeff Sheffield, Executive Director
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Percent Commute Times of 25 minutes or Less The indicator measures the number of people surveyed reporting a commuting time of 25 minutes or less, divided by the total number of working people surveyed, to report the percentage of working people surveyed with commute times of 25 minutes or less. Commuting times affect personal well-being, employment growth, public-safety services, and motor-fuel consumption. Time lost in commuting is not available for activities to enhance one's quality of life, and extended commute times can be emotionally stressful. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

16 to 25 min. 0 to 15 min.

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

0 to 15 min. 42% 41% 35% 38% 38%

16 to 25 min. 26% 28% 32% 29% 29%

Total (0 to 25 minutes) 68% 69% 67% 67% 68%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12a

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Average weekday JTA bus ridership per 1,000 people The indicator measures the annual average number of Jacksonville Transportation Authority bus riders on weekdays per 1,000 people in the Duval County population. Mass transit serves at least two important functions in a community: a more ecologically efficient form of transportation for those that choose to use it, and a necessary form of transportation for those who do not own a personal vehicle. The quality of the mass transit system in a community adds to its ability to support a thriving population and attract/retain an employment base. Jacksonville Transportation Authority www.jtaonthemove.com

Source Link

80 60 40 20 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Avg. Weekday Ridership 37,999 39,708 33,680 37,863 35,068

Population 861,150 884,004 897,008 904,971 911,236

Avg. Ridership per 1,000 Population 44 45 38 42 38

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12b

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Total passengers flying in or out of Jacksonville International Airport The indicator measures the total number of passengers who enplaned on or deplaned from a commercial airline flight at the Jacksonville International Airport during each year. A key measure of the functionality of the air transportation system is not just its connectedness (destinations served) or capacity (seats available) but its use. The total passenger traffic shows how the air transportation is used. Jacksonville Airport Authority http://www.jaa.aero/General/Default.aspx 8

6 (millions)

4

2

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Total Passengers (in millions) 5.7 5.9 6.3 6.0 5.6

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12c

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Serious Bicycle Accidents per 100,000 People The indicator measures the total number of bicycle accidents involving either a bicycle fatality or bicycle injury, per 100,000 people in the population. Bicycles are an increasingly important option for environmentally-friendly and healthy personal transportation. However, a critical factor limiting the use of bicycles as a transportation option is the safety of the bicyclist. Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles annual report on Florida Traffic Crash Facts http://www.hsmv.state.fl.us/reports/crash_facts.html

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Serious Bicycle Accidents per 100,000

Year

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

26.0 24.5 25.0 23.8 24.2

Injury 221 208 214 211 214

Fatality 3 7 10 4 4

Population 861,150 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12d

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Average weekday miles of JTA bus service

Description The indicator measures the total JTA bus miles during all weekdays in the year, divided by the total weekdays in the year, to report the average weekday miles of JTA bus service. Importance Effective mass transit takes people from where they are to where they want to go. In communities that are geographically spread out, increased miles of bus service may point to increased availability of bus service options. Jacksonville Transportation Authority www.jtaonthemove.com

Source Link

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Average Weekday Miles of JTA Bus Service 34,041 34,366 33,680 33,019 29,632

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12e

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Motor Vehicle Accidents per 1,000 People The indicator measures the total annual motor-vehicle accidents per 1,000 people in the population. Getting around safely is an important part of the quality of life. Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles annual report on Florida Traffic Crash Facts http://www.hsmv.state.fl.us/reports/crash_facts.html

25

20

15

10

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Accidents per 1,000 people in Duval County 18.3 17.6 17.1 16.3 15.7

Total Accidents 15,761 15,440 15,348 14,771 14,102

Duval County population 861,150 879,235 897,008 904,971 900,518

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12f

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Percent of JTA Bus Headways within 30 Minutes during Peak Hours/60 minutes during NonPeak Hours. The indicator measures the percentage of Jacksonville Transportation Authority bus headways that are within 30 minutes for peak-hour routes and 60 minutes for nonpeak hour routes. Peak hours are from 6:45 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. Headway is the number of minutes between the time buses come by a scheduled route. Effective mass transit is available for people at the times that they need to travel. Reducing bus headways increases the responsiveness of the system to the travel needs of the riders. Jacksonville Transportation Authority www.jtaonthemove.com

Importance Source Link

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

60 minutes

30 minutes

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Headways Within 30 Minutes 63% 62% 60% 63% 58%

Headways Within 60 Minutes 93% 93% 92% 92% 90%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12g

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Average weekday ridership on the Skyway The indicator measures the total annual number of weekday riders on the Skyway, divided by the total weekdays in the year. The Skyway (previously known as the Automated Skyway Express or ASE) is a raised, automated, 2.5 mile monorail system that operates small transit vehicles on routes that center on downtown Jacksonville and reach out to the edges of the downtown area. The Skyway was intended to provide an opportunity for downtown commuters to get where they need to be while reducing the need for downtown parking. Jacksonville Transportation Authority www.jtaonthemove.com

Importance Source Link

5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Skyway Weekday Ridership 2,423 2,474 2,277 1,978 1,763

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12h

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Destinations served by nonstop flights from JIA The indicator measures the total nonstop destinations served by scheduled commercial flights to and from Jacksonville International Airport during May each year. The number of nonstop destinations available provides accessibility in air travel destinations and enhances the attractiveness of the city for business growth. Jacksonville Airport Authority http://www.jaa.aero/General/Default.aspx
50 40 30 20 10 0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Destinations served by direct flight (one-stop or non-stop) 71 57 61 59 53

Destinations served by nonstop flights (displayed on chart) 26 26 31 33 28

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12i

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Average seats on flights through Jacksonville International Airport The indicator measures the total number of seats available to be sold each day on all departures of scheduled commercial flights from JIA during May each year. The number of seats on arriving flights is the same. The number of seats available for air transportation is a measure of the capacity of the air transit system to meet the needs of the community for business travel, tourism, and the personal needs of residents. Jacksonville Airport Authority http://www.jaa.aero/General/Default.aspx
15,000

13,000

11,000

9,000

7,000

5,000

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Available seats 11,096 11,910 11,919 10,335 10,492

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 12j

Our Vision for Keeping the Community Safe:

Public-safety agencies in the region provide rescue, fire, and law-enforcement services with excellence, and citizens generally experience a low level of crime and a high level of personal safety.

How Are We Doing?
Good News:
More people are feeling safe in their neighborhoods as the murder and crime rates decline in Duval County. Both violent and non-violent crime rates are at their lowest since JCCI began tracking them in 1983. Verified child abuse report rates are lower.

Needs Improvement:

The positive trends must be continued. Despite progress, Jacksonville’s murder rate remains at double the state murder rate. There was a 21 percent increase in youths adjudicated delinquent, as well as an increase in the percentage of people reporting being a victim of crime. Public safety must remain a top community priority.

Key Safety Indicators
People Feel Safe in Their Neighborhoods
Duval County: 62% Yes Duval County: 5,814

Index Crime Rate

Source: American Public Dialogue

Source: Florida Department of Law Enforcement

Supporting Indicators
People Reporting Being Victims of Crime Youth Adjudicated Delinquent per 1,000 Youth Murder Rate Verified Child Abuse Reports per 1,000 Children

Previous 17% 4.7 12.8 7.6

Latest 20% 5.7 11.2 6.7

Change + 3% + 1.0 - 1.6 - 0.9

More details on these and other indicators can be found at www.jcci.org.

We as a community must be dedicated to achieving a vision where all citizens live with the peace of mind that their neighborhoods, workplaces, streets and schools are safe and their families secure. -Michael Ward, Chairman, President & CEO
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report Page 13

Keeping the Community Safe

Record Low Crime Rates – But Not Low Enough

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Percent Who Feel Safe in Their Neighborhood The indicator measures the percentage of respondents who answered "yes" to the question: Do you feel safe walking alone at night in your neighborhood? The perception of safety, which may or may not correlate with actual safety or the reported crime rate, is critical to one's quality of life in the community. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent answering "yes" 58% 58% 50% 60% 62%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13a

Key Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Total Index Crime Rate The indicator measures the total reported Index Crimes per 100,000 people in the county. Crime directly impacts the quality of life of those who are victims and their family members, as well as those who witness the crime. Crime also affects the entire community, at both a neighborhood level and as a region, by impacting the desirability of the community as a place to live, the suitability as a place to locate business and employment centers, the value of housing, and the physical health of people living in the area. Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Division of Criminal Justice Information Systems, Uniform Crime Reports http://www.fdle.state.fl.us
Nonviolent Violent

Source Link

12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 -

2,500 2,250 2,000 1,750 1,500 1,250 1,000 750 500 250 -

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Violent crime rate 808 805 956 927 801

Nonviolent crime rate 5,390 5,277 5,458 5,509 5,013

Total index crime rate 6,198 6,082 6,413 6,436 5,814

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13b

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Percent Reporting Being Crime Victims The indicator measures the percentage of respondents who answered "yes" to the question: During the last year, have you had money or property stolen, property vandalized, home broken into, car stolen, or personal assault or attack? Crime directly impacts the quality of life of those who are victims and their family members, as well as those who witness the crime. Crime also affects the entire community, at both a neighborhood level and as a region, by impacting the desirability of the community as a place to live, the suitability as a place to locate business and employment centers, the value of housing, and the physical health of people living in the area. Telephone survey by American Public Dialogue http://www.publicdialogue.com/

Importance

Source Link

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

Percent answering "yes" 20% 18% 19% 17% 20%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13c

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Youth Adjudicated Delinquent per 1,000 Youth The indicator measures the number of youth adjudicated delinquent per 1,000 youth ages 10 to 17. Juvenile delinquents are youths adjudicated to have committed a delinquent act. This is equivalent to adults being found guilty or criminal acts. People who commit crimes while young are at higher risk for criminal activity as adults, impacting their quality of life, that of their families, and that of the whole community. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice http://www.djj.state.fl.us/Research/Delinquency_Profile/index.html
10
Duval NE Florida

8

6

4

2

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 2.8 3.2 3.4 2.4 1.4

Clay 3.3 2.1 2.0 2.7 3.0

Duval 7.9 6.7 5.5 4.7 5.7

Nassau 7.7 7.6 7.6 6.4 6.4

St. Johns 2.1 2.9 2.3 1.7 2.0

Northeast Florida 6.4 5.5 4.6 4.1 4.7

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13d

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Murder Rate The indicator measures the total murders per 100,000 people in the county. Murder impacts the individual as well as the individual’s family and friends, with longterm serious consequences. The murder rate represents the most serious impacts of crime in a community. Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Division of Criminal Justice Information Systems, Uniform Crime Reports http://www.fdle.state.fl.us

30.0 25.0 20.0 15.0 10.0 5.0 0.0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Murders 96 115 125 116 101

Population 861,150 879,235 897,597 904,971 900,518

Jacksonville Murder Rate 11.1 13.1 13.9 12.8 11.2

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13e

Supporting Indicator
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Verified Child Abuse Reports per 1,000 Children The indicator measures the total annual Northeast Florida verified reports to the Department of Children and Families of child abuse or neglect per 1,000 children under 18. Children who have been abused or neglected may experience long-term psychological, emotional and behavioral consequences. Victims of abuse are also at higher risk of abusing their own children when they become parents. Florida Department of Children and Families http://www.state.fl.us/cf_web/

12

8

4

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 15.7 21.6 11.5 11.1 16.0

Clay 11.5 14.1 12.9 10.9 11.3

Duval 8.4 8.2 8.3 7.2 6.7

Nassau 9.0 8.6 7.0 8.0 7.9

St. Johns 10.3 9.4 7.0 5.0 5.8

Northeast Florida 9.4 9.5 8.8 7.6 7.5

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13f

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Average Police-Call Response Times The indicator measures the average response time for "priority-one" police calls in Duval County. Definition: A "Priority One" call is used only when life threatening or serious personal injury has occurred or the threat of life threatening or serious personal injury exists. This call requires the presence of a police officer at the scene as quickly as possible. Any situation or event that has placed individuals in imminent physical danger is dispatched as a Priority One call. (Emergency/Life Threatening) The speed at which the police respond to a priority-one call may save a life. City of Jacksonville, Office of the Sheriff http://www.coj.net/Departments/Sheriffs+Office/Default.htm
10 8 Minutes 6 4 2 0 1 2 3 4 Zones Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Zone 1 5.73 5.40 5.32 5.30 5.23 5.43 Zone 2 7.13 7.23 6.98 6.87 7.01 5.43 Zone 3 7.45 7.62 7.62 7.54 6.96 5.43 Zone 4 7.76 8.29 7.83 7.72 7.69 5.43 Zone 5 6.91 7.54 7.17 6.64 6.49 5.43 Zone 6 7.61 7.41 7.49 7.44 7.50 5.43 Citywide 7.13 7.34 7.14 6.99 6.85 5.43 5 6 Citywide 2004 2007 2005 2008 2006 2009

Importance Source Link

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13g

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Rescue-Call Response Times Under 4 Minutes The indicator measures the percentage of rescue responses that arrive in under four minutes. Response times in Jacksonville are affected by the large geographic area of the county. Response times in outlying, rural areas tend to be longer than those in more densely populated areas. Rescue-call response times vary among the Planning Districts in Duval County, primarily because of differing densities of population and development. This indicator includes Atlantic Beach, Baldwin, Jacksonville Beach, and Neptune Beach. Response time is defined as the number of minutes from the time adequate information has been received and given to the dispatcher to the time when the first piece of equipment arrives on the scene. The speed at which a rescue team arrives may be critical to save a life. City of Jacksonville, Fire and Rescue Department http://www.coj.net/Departments/Fire+and+Rescue/default.htm
100%

Importance Source Link

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Greater Arlington (2) 30.9% 28.0% 26.2% 27.0%

North (6) 28.0% 25.3% 24.1% 25.0%

Northwest (5) 47.2% 42.6% 41.9% 42.0%

Southeast (3) 35.2% 34.3% 32.5% 35.0%

Southwest (4) 34.7% 33.7% 31.6%
34.0%

Urban Core (1) 82.6% 79.8% 77.1% 70.0%

Duval County 43.8% 43.7% 39.8% 39.4% 38.0%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13h

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Fire-Call Response Times Under 4 Minutes The indicator measures the percentage of fire-call responses that arrive in under four minutes. Response times in Jacksonville are affected by the large geographic area of the city. Fire-call response times vary among the Planning Districts in Duval County, primarily because of differing densities of population and development. Response times in outlying, rural areas tend to be longer than those in more densely populated areas. Response time is defined as the number of minutes from the time adequate information has been received and given to the dispatcher to the time when the first piece of equipment arrives on the scene. The indicator excludes Jacksonville Beach, but includes Atlantic Beach, Baldwin, and Neptune Beach. The speed at which a fire response team arrives may affect the damage a fire causes. City of Jacksonville, Fire and Rescue Department http://www.coj.net/Departments/Fire+and+Rescue/default.htm
100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Importance Source Link

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Greater Arlington (2) 31.1% 30.7% 27.3% 25%

North (6) 28.4% 26.7% 24.2% 23%

Northwes t (5) 47.0% 44.0% 41.1% 39%

Southeas t (3) 33.1% 31.3% 31.5% 26%

Southwest (4) 34.0% 33.3% 30.2% 33%

Urban Core (1) 82.6% 81.5% 76.6% 66%

Duval County 41.2% 41.4% 39.0% 37.2% 33%

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13i

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Juvenile Alcohol/Drug Arrests per 1,000 Youth The indicator measures the total number of arrests of juveniles on drug or alcohol charges per 1,000 youth ages 10 through 17. Substance abuse, including alcohol abuse, is illegal for youth. It contributes to increased physical and mental-health risks that may prevent youth from reaching their full potential, and can have adverse impacts on the neighborhoods and communities they live in. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice http://www.djj.state.fl.us/Research/Delinquency_Profile/index.html
16
Duval NE Florida

Source Link

12

8

4

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 9.5 7.0 7.5 2.4 3.7

Clay 6.3 7.6 6.8 8.0 3.7

Duval 6.8 6.1 5.3 5.8 5.1

Nassau 10.4 8.2 5.4 6.4 8.6

St. Johns 5.0 7.6 5.7 6.1 5.1

Northeast Florida 6.7 6.6 5.7 6.1 5.0

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13j

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Domestic Violence Crime Reports The indicator measures the total number of reports of domestic-violence-related crimes in Northeast Florida. Domestic violence hurts both victims and their families. The long-term effects of experiencing or witnessing domestic violence may include serious and permanent emotional and psychological damage, negatively impacting an individual's health, education, employment, and overall quality of life. Florida Department of Law Enforcement http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/Content/FSAC/Data---Statistics-(1)/UCR-OffenseData/County-Profiles.aspx

Source Link

14,000

12,000

10,000

8,000

6,000

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 111 73 84 72 42

Clay 1,197 1,156 1,176 1,207 1,267

Duval 6,961 6,832 7,151 7,170 7,879

Nassau 388 223 373 376 449

St. Johns 1,004 772 655 690 674

Northeast Florida 9,661 9,056 9,439 9,515 10,311

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13k

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Domestic Violence-related Homicides The indicator measures the total number of homicides related to domestic violence. Domestic violence hurts both victims and their families. The long-term disruptive effects of domestic-violence-related homicide may be felt for generations. Florida Department of Law Enforcement http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/CitResCtr/Domestic_Violence/index.html
20

15

10

5

0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Deaths 11 14 10 8 8

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13l

Additional Indicators
Indicator Description Importance Source Link Violent Deaths per 10,000 Youth The indicator measures the total annual number of youth 10 through 19 years old who die as a result of homicide, suicide, or accident, per 10,000 youth. When youth die from violent causes, many of them motor-vehicle accidents, they may be victims of the community's failure to offer needed assistance when youth are in crisis. Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Statistics http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/chart.aspx

8.0

Duval NE Florida

6.0

4.0

2.0

0.0

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Baker 5.6 13.5 8.1 8.2

Clay 3.6 2.1 1.4 2.4 2.8

Duval 4.0 3.2 3.1 3.2 2.7

Nassau 4.3 2.1 6.4 4.2 2.1

St. Johns 3.7 2.2 3.4 2.9 2.5

Northeast Florida 3.9 2.8 3.3 3.2 2.8

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13m

Interactive Indicators
For the most up-to-date information on Social Wellbeing and all Community Indicators, please visit the interactive Community Snapshot application on JCCI’s web site.

www.jcci.org

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Page 13n

The Quality of Life Prog
Indicator (Year) Data Trend Indicator (Year) Data Trend

2010 Indicator Index
Page 14

Achieving Educational Excellence
Key Indicators:
Public high school graduation rate (2009-10) Kindergarten readiness (2009-10) 66.6% 87.7%

Preserving the Natural Environment
Key Indicators:
Days the Air Quality Index is “good” (2009) 335 Average daily water consumption (gallons) (2009) 181

Supporting Indicators:
Third graders reading at grade level (2008-09) 69% Tenth graders reading at grade level (2008-09) 33% Per pupil expenditures (2008-09) $6,598 School safety incidents per 1,000 students (2009-10) 43 Higher education degrees awarded (2009-10) 9,238

Supporting Indicators:
Streams meeting dissolved oxygen standard (2009) 69% Streams meeting bacteria standard (2009) 73% Residential recycling (pounds per person) (2010) 55 Acres of conservation/preservation land (2009) 84,779

Additional Indicators:
Students absent 21+ days (2008-09) Public school first grade promotions (2008-09) Tenth graders at grade level in math (2009-10) Public high school dropout rate (2009-10) HS graduates ready for college: Reading (2008-09) HS graduates ready for college: Math (2008-09) Satisfaction with public education (2010) Exceptional students receive diplomas (2008-09) 10.1% 92.8% 66% 2.2% 76.4% 69.7% 35% 25%

Additional Indicators:
Gallons of motor fuels sold per person (2010) New septic-tank permits issued (2009) 605 240

Promoting Social Wellbeing and Harmony
Key Indicators:
Is racism a local problem? (2010) 53% Births to single mothers (2009) 48.1% Birth to mothers without high school degree (2009) 17.0%

Supporting Indicators:
Do you volunteer? (2010) Foster children per 1,000 children (2010) Homeless count per 100,000 people (2010) Philanthropy given to federated campaigns (2009) 65% 3.7 435 $25.5 19% 23% 8.3 19.0% 2,636 71.7% 53.9%

Growing a Vibrant Economy
Key Indicators:
Total employment (2009) Unemployment rate (2009) Per capita income (2008) 436,817 10.7% $39,973 27.3% 42% 2,704 8.1 $125.3

Additional Indicators:
Have you personally experienced racism? (2010) Volunteer more than 7 hours per week? (2010) Births to teen mothers per 1,000 teens (2009) Subsequent births to teen mothers (2009) Children of divorcing parents (2009) Foster care children reunited <12 months (2010) Foster care children adopted < 24 months (2010)

Supporting Indicators:
Adults with bachelor’s degrees or higher (2009) Households paying >30% for housing (2009) Downtown residents JAXPORT tonnage (millions) (2010) Bed tax and sales tax collections (millions) (2009)

Additional Indicators:
Total taxable value of real property (2009) $58.38 Recipients of public assistance: TANF (2010) 6,118 Recipients of public assistance: Food Stamps (2010) 140,422 Average monthly JEA utilities costs (2009) $172.15 New housing starts (2009) 2,693 Average annual wage (2009) $44,033 Unemployment benefit claims (2009) 77,619

Enjoying Arts, Recreation, Culture
Key Indicators:
Public and private arts support per person (2009) $30.52 Public performances and events (2009) 436

Supporting Indicators:
Musical performances attendance per 1,000 (2009) 195 Museum attendance per 1,000 people (2009) 364 Zoo attendance per 1,000 people (2009) 751 Attendance at sports events per 100,000 (2009) 1,237 Park expenditures for activities/maintenance (2009) $16.28 Library circulation per person (2010) 10.10

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

Indicator (Year)

Data Trend

Indicator (Year)

Data

Trend

Sustaining a Healthy Community
Key Indicators:
Infant mortality rate per 1,000 (2009) White (2009) Black (2009) People without health insurance (2009) 8.4 5.5 13.6 17% 180.5 434 91 313 815.5 16.0 17.6 2.5 72.3% 90.2% 52% 11.0 74 51.5 173.5 77%

Moving Around Efficiently and Safely
Key Indicators:
Commute times of 25 minutes or less (2010) 68% Average weekday JTA bus ridership per 1,000 (2009) 38

Supporting Indicators:
Total JIA passengers (millions) (2009) Serious bicycle accidents per 100,000 (2009) Average weekday miles of JTA bus service (2009) Motor vehicle accidents per 1,000 people (2009) 5.6 24.2 29,632 15.7 58%/90% 1,763 28 10,492

Supporting Indicators:
Cancer deaths per 100,000 people (2009) New HIV cases (2009) White (2009) Black (2009) STD reports per 100,000 people (2009) Suicide rates per 100,000 people (2009) Seniors (65 and older) (2009) Youth (10-19) (2009)

Additional Indicators:
JTA bus headways within 30/60 minutes (2009) Average weekday Skyway ridership (2009) Nonstop flights destinations at JIA (2009) Average available seats on airplane flights (2010)

Additional Indicators:
Early prenatal care (2009) Newborns with healthy birthweights (2009) Seniors feel safe in their neighborhoods (2010) HIV/AIDS-related deaths per 100,000 (2009) Packs of cigarettes sold per person (2009) Lung cancer deaths per 100,000 people (2009) Heart disease deaths per 100,000 people (2009) Local health care seen as good or excellent (2010)

Keeping the Community Safe
Key Indicators:
People feel safe in their neighborhood (2010) Index crimes per 100,000 people (2009) 62% 5,814 20% 5.7 11.2 6.7

Supporting Indicators:
People report being victims of a crime (2010) Juvenile delinquents per 1,000 youth (2009) Murder rate (2009) Child abuse reports per 1,000 children (2009)

Maintaining Responsive Government
Key Indicators:
Voter turnout (2010) Satisfaction with basic city services (2010) 53% 83% 21% 19% 602 24% 55% 78% 89% 21% 32% 28%

Additional Indicators:
Police-call response times (2009) 7.19 Rescue-call response times < four minutes (2009) 38% Fire-call response times < four minutes (2009) 33% Juvenile alcohol/drug arrests per 1,000 youth (2009) 5.1 Domestic violence crime reports (2009) 7,879 Domestic-violence-related homicides (2009) 8 Violent deaths per 10,000 youth (2008) 2.7

Supporting Indicators:
Racial diversity of elected officials (2010) Gender diversity of elected officials (2010) Neighborhood organizations (2010) Can you influence local government? (2010) Keeping up with local government news (2010)

Additional Indicators:
Voter registration (2010) Satisfaction with public-safety services (2010) Can you name two City Council members? (2010) Elected leadership rated high quality (2010) School Board leadership rated high quality (2010)

Legend
The arrows display the trend direction over the previous year (up, down, or unchanged) Red Arrows mean that the trend was in a negative direction. Green Arrows mean that the trend was in a positive direction. Yellow Arrows mean that the trend was unchanged.

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

2010 Indicator Index
Page 15

ress Report at a Glance

Page 16

About JCCI

2010-11 JCCI Board of Directors
President William C. Mason President-Elect John Hirabayashi Secretary/Treasurer Allison Korman Shelton Immediate Past President Christine Arab Vice Presidents Dorcas G. Tanner Juliette Mason Stephen Lee Rena Coughlin Lisa V. Moore JCCI Forward Development Officer Crystal Jones Board of Directors Jeanne M. Miller Lee R. Brown III JF Bryan IV Moody L. Chisholm Jr. Adrienne Conrad Wyman R. Duggan Micheal Edwards Allan T. Geiger Nathaniel Glover Rocelia Gonzalez Broderick Green Matthew Kane Joshua B. Lief Suzanne Montgomery Elexia Coleman-Moss Ronald E. Natherson Jr. Stephen Pollan Wade Rice Mario Rubio Derrick Smith Susan B. Towler Board Interns Leah Donelan Gary Goldberg

JCCI Staff
Demetrius Jenkins Administrative Coordinator Charles R. “Skip” Cramer Executive Director Ben Warner Deputy Director Amanda Mousa Communications & JCCI Forward Coordinator Steve Rankin Director of Implementations & Special Projects Katie Ross Community Planner Michelle Simkulet Finance Director & Director JCCI Forward Molly Wahl Director of Development & Community Outreach

Jacksonville Community Council Inc. (JCCI) was created in 1975 with the goal of improving the quality of life in Jacksonville through informed citizen participation in public affairs. JCCI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, broadbased civic organization. It involves citizens in community issues through open dialogue, impartial research, consensus building, and leadership development. JCCI has been called Jacksonville’s “citizen think-and-do tank.” This is the place where community-minded people get together to explore issues of community importance, identify problems, discover solutions, and advocate for positive change. All are welcome to participate – every voice is needed and every thought matters. JCCI receives funding from United Way of Northeast Florida, the City of Jacksonville, grants, corporations, and individual members. JCCI membership is open to all interested in building a better community. For more information about JCCI and how you can get involved or to donate to JCCI, visit www.jcci.org.
JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

The JCCI Model for Community Change begins with working with the community to understand and articulate a shared vision for the future, based on the values and priorities of the people who live, work, and play in the area. Change must be driven by a vision of both what needs to improve and what needs to be preserved; the vision serves as a destination for the road map to follow. The vision provides a destination, but no more. We need to know where we are in relation to that vision. For that purpose, JCCI engages the community to develop and review community indicators every year that measure our progress toward our vision. We publish these reports annually as the Quality of Life Progress Report and the Race Relations Progress Report, as well as in the continuallyupdated Community Snapshot on our website www.jcci.org. With the knowledge we gain from the indicators, we can determine our priorities for action. The indicators by themselves don’t tell us what to do; they are descriptive, not prescriptive. They inform our planning processes through our community studies, where we can determine how we as a community need to move forward to address the issues identified by the indicators where we fall short of our vision. The community study process engages the community to develop solutions, by consensus, to get us moving in the right direction. The recommendations from our studies gain their power for change from the volunteers who work tirelessly to turn reports into action through our implementation advocacy process. JCCI reports never stay on a shelf; to continue our travel analogy further, our volunteers are the pleasing voice of the GPS unit helping our civic institutions with a cheerful “turn here.” It is because of this action component that JCCI is often described as a “think-and-do tank.” The actions get results. Recommendations are implemented. Policies change. Programs develop and respond. But that is not enough. JCCI monitors the results and outcomes of its study and implementation efforts and assesses results. You can read the assessments in the final implementation reports on our website. Beyond those reports, however, we are interested in lasting, sustainable community change. The community indicators reports serve as the final piece in the community change model, keeping us focused on measuring progress toward the vision. They serve as the ultimate evaluation tool to ensure that our efforts are making a real difference for the community. Community Works is the consulting arm of JCCI. We have over 35 years of experience in engaging residents to build better communities, and have been working with individuals and organizations around the world for the past two decades to replicate our success. In order to better serve you, we’ve launched a website to share the transformative power of people coming together to create a better future. Please visit www.communityworks.us.com to see how our Consulting, Community Engagement, or Indicators work might be part of your model for sustainable change.

JCCI 2010 Quality of Life Progress Report

JCCI Model for Community Change
Page 17

Title Sponsor

Champions

Lazzara
Family Foundation

In-Kind Printing Sponsor:

Primary funding for this report was provided by United Way of Northeast Florida and the City of Jacksonville, with the generous support of our Title Sponsor and Champions and the Northeast Florida community.

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