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com
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VOLUME 5 ISSUE 6 | April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
o f s o u t h e a s t t e x a s
VIP EXCLUSIVE
Helen
Hunt
amazing home gardens
Flowers you can eat
floral fashion for spring
The BBB’s John Pascall
shangri La’s Joseph Johnson
75
25
ways to
make your
wardrobe
BLOOM
years
with the
Magnolia
Garden Club
on staying
ft, fearing
old age
and fnding
balance
The Perfect Setting for
the Wedding Day
you’ve always dreamed of ….
The Perfect Setting for
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you’ve always dreamed of ….
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Phone: 409.842.5995 • Fax: 409.842.7810
www.holidayinn.com/beaumont-plaza
3950 I-10 South (@Walden Road) • Beaumont, TX 77705
Phone: 409.842.5995 • Fax: 409.842.7810
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4 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
Editorial
Executive Editor
DAVID CONSTANTINE
dconstantine@thevipmag.com
Contributing Writers
CATHLEEN COLE
AmANDA COrbELL
mArgArET b. gArDNEr
LArENA HEAD
grACE mATHIS
JANE mCbrIDE
CHEryL rOSE
Editorial Assistant
TAmArA mENgES
Photography
Contributing Photographers
SCOTT ESLINgEr
SILVIA C. mCCLAIN
rENé SHEppArD
LEE E. STINSON
Graphic Designer
DAVID CONSTANTINE
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on the cover
Academy Award winner Helen Hunt talked exclusively to VIP on her
upcoming flms, how she stays ft, dreads aging and balances work
and family. Hunt will be the guest speaker at the Fifth Annual LiveWell
Women’s Conference on Thursday, May 3 at Ford Park.
Cover photography by Krista Kennell via The Associated Press
c o n t e n t s
vip magazine
08 vip home
08 Create your own
botanical gardens
12 Why every home
should have fresh
fowers
17 vip style
17 Nature-inspired
fashion
22 25 ways to make your
wardrobe bloom
25 vip worthy
25 The Magnolia Garden
Club turns 75
30 Shangri La gardener
Joseph Johnson on
going organic
34 food&drink
34 Edible fowers
38 Dress&Dine: The
Café
40 vip spotlight
40 SE Texas events
44 vipersonality
44 Academy Award
winner Helen Hunt on
life and health
48 Meet new BBB
president John Pascall
51 vip adviser
51 5 great dates in
April
52 Calendar
53 Crossword puzzle
38
54 vip voices
54 Easter day fashion
mixed with a bit of
humiliation
30
inside april
22
REGISTRATIONNOWTHROUGHAPRIL 30
Keynote Speaker – Helen Hunt
Mark your calendar now to enrich yourself both personally and professionally at the fifth
annual CHRISTUS LiveWell Women’s Conference presented by the LiveWell Women’s
Network. The all-day conference includes keynote luncheon, fun and educational workshops,
healthy cooking station, health screenings, and Market Square shopping. Learn more at
www.christushospital.org/conference or call 409-899-7700.
IT’S ALL ABOUT
YOU.
IT’S ALL ABOUT
WOMEN.
2012 LiveWell
Women’s Conference Women

s Network
THURSDAY, MAY 3 FORD PARK / BEAUMONT, TX 7:00 am–4:30 pm
Beautiful 1 year old brick & hardboard siding with 3br/2bth
down and 3br/1bth up, stained concrete floors, carpet
in bedroom’s, kitchen has granite counters, top of the
line appliances, 5 burner Jenn-Air gas stove top, Bosch
Dishwasher, Jenn-Air oven, wine refrigerator, beautiful
landscaped yard, covered patio, fenced yard. $335,000
105 W. CIRCUIT • MLS#149344
Susan Simmons
American Real Estate
409-893-0556
ssarec@hotmail.com
Beautiful brick 4br/3 bath/2 half bath/3 detached garage & porte
cochere, covered front & back porches, open foor plan, formal living
& dining rooms, kitchen is open to large breakfast area and den.
Interior features large rooms, tile & carpet fooring, gas log freplace,
master bath has double sinks, jetted tub & separate shower, large
walk in closet. Kitchen features granite counters, double oven & gas
cook top. Large game room with half bath is located over the garage.
The property is fully landscaped with sprinkler system & lighting.
Back yard looks out to a wooded area instead of someone’s yard.
Great location! $399,900
6560 WINDSOR PARKWAY • MLS#149850
Susan Simmons
American Real Estate
409-893-0556
ssarec@hotmail.com
5220 Fairmont • MLS #151901
New Guseman construction. The extras begin with the brick
patterned walkway and continue throughout the home. All baths
have special granite or stone countertops and surrounds--even
hammered stainless sinks in the master. The master closet is as
beautiful as the rest of the bath with custom hanging areas and
tons of trim moldings. Very open kitchen, den area with furniture
quality cabinetry, full Jenn-Aire appliance package, large eating
bar, and a wine/bar area with sink, wine cooler, and ice maker.
Upstairs game room is “L” shaped to accommodate the interests
of the whole family. All located on a spectacular cul-de-sac lot in
prestigious Montclaire which is large enough to accommodate
pool, entertainment center, and still have plenty of yard. $845,000.
You will not fnd more amenities or quality at this price anywhere.
Mary Jane Mouton
RE/MAX Beaumont
409-860-3200
maryjane@mouton.com
Beachfront
Rental: $2,340 per week
Peaceful Cottage
(409) 684-3377
remaxonthewater@att.net
www.beachbayvacationrentals.com
1035 Thomas Road
Gorgeous custom home on beautifully landscaped .80 acre
lot. Light and lovely, it is a perfect home for entertaining or
family living. Living room w/beautiful built-ins, huge dining
room w/china and silver storage; den has tons of built-ins,
a beautiful wet bar, and overlooks the magnifcent yard and
pool. Over-sized kitchen has granite, glazed cabinets, loads
of storage, a breakfast area overlooking the pool and a cozy
sitting area with freplace. $885,000
Sally Bundy
RE/MAX Beaumont
409-860-3200
sbundy@remaxbeaumont.com
80 Avenue of the Oaks
3/3.5/2. Charming family home on fabulous lot
full of sprawling oak trees features lovely entry,
formal living and dining with hardwood foors,
wonderful study with built-ins, block paneled den,
huge open kitchen with large island work area and
amazing storage . Plus large sunny gameroom with
built-ins and brick foors. Each of the bedrooms has
an adjoining bath. Yard is a dream! $329,000
Sally Bundy
RE/MAX Beaumont
409-860-3200
sbundy@remaxbeaumont.com
Great Beachview
Rental: $1,700 per week
Gulf Winds
(409) 684-3377
remaxonthewater@att.net
www.beachbayvacationrentals.com
8
VIP HOMES
Homes of distinction and
quality to host your lifestyle!
VIP
OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS
To Advertise Your
Real Estate Listing
Call or Email
Jessica Hidalgo
(409) 838-2851
jhidalgo@hearstnp.com
8 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
EDEN
h o m e g a r d e n s
vip home
text by AMANDA corbell
M
any homeowners
throughout Southeast
Texas have opted to
not confine their living
spaces to strictly indoors;
outdoor living spaces
and gardens have breathed new life into
many typical back yards in our area. The
“English garden” has brought romance,
a touch of mystery and plenty of English
charm to many outdoor spaces for local
homeowners, while others have opted to
keep it simple and modern by extending
their plush living spaces to their back
patios. Whether it’s an outdoor fire place,
a multi-colored rose garden or cottage-
style pathways, accents like these can
transform your every day lawn into a little
piece of heaven.
But what goes in to creating these spaces?
There are many factors homeowners must
take into consideration before bringing an
idea to life, and while the Southeast Texas
climate and cost are high on that list, they’re
not the only factors to weigh. How will it
impact the resale value of a home? What are
some roadblocks when planning the creation
of an outdoor space? What about “hidden”
fees?
Rette Browning, co-owner of Down to
Earth Landscaping, has designed outdoor
spaces for a vast number of homes in the
area. He begins every job with a consulta-
tion with the client to assess the garden or
outdoor space, as well as both the client’s
wants and needs.
“We look at the proposed job site, look at
the style of home and talk to the homeowner
about what it is they want,” said Browning.
“We assess all of our abilities for design
to make what they envision work and are
realistic about what it will take to turn the
property into that vision.”
Browning says that outdoor rooms and
spaces are defnitely trendy at the moment
because homes tend to be smaller right
now, therefore yards are smaller and people
want to continue the living space into their
back yard because of that. Sculpted English
gardens, extravagant pool areas and outdoor
living spaces may sound like something only
families in the more afuent income bracket
creating
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 9
can invest in, but homeowners of all income
status’ are fnding that it can be just that…
an investment.
“A lot of clients do want to accentuate
a certain lifestyle; people have beautiful
homes and they want the outside to match,”
said Browning. “Landscaping takes the beau-
ty of a home and adds depth and character
as a fnishing touch to the home. It can also
essentially redesign the outside of a home.”
Sherry Hommel, a realtor with Jerry
Hughes Realty in Orange, has more than
20 years of experience in real estate. When
trying to sell homes, gardens and great
landscaping draw the buyer in and add the
much-desired “curb appeal” to a home. She
says outdoor kitchens and a beautiful land-
scaped back yards will, indeed, add value,
as it is an extension of your home and is a
place to entertain family and friends. But, of
course, the inside should be just as fabulous
as the outside.
“We love to be outside with our friends
and family and most of us are spending more
time at home these days,” said Hommel.
“You want the outdoor space to welcome
you and your guests and allow you all to feel
at home.”
So how do you make an outdoor exten-
sion of your living room or kitchen seem just
as cozy as indoors? Keep it simple. Well, as
simple as outdoor freplaces, stone pathways
and English gardens in the middle of South-
east Texas can be. Gardens, landscaping,
pools and the like require constant upkeep,
whether by the homeowner or by a lawn
care or landscaping company.
“If a home has too much upkeep on the
outside areas, you can lose a buyer,” said
Hommel. “Less is more.”
Browning agrees…kind of.
“Gardens do give curb appeal and will
usually get a return on higher-echelon
homes,” he says. “But it’s a toss of the dice
for homes that are below $100,000. All of
that required maintenance could prove to be
a liability for the seller.”
For many homeowners, creating and
maintaining a garden isn’t a chore, but a pas-
sion. But gardeners aren’t the only people
who spend the cash to have landscaping. For
those who were born with less of a “green
thumb” mentality and have the money to
spend, there are always landscaping >>
10 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
companies to do the mowing,
weeding and all of the preven-
tative work such as mulching,
chemical treatments and more.
Not knowing what all is
entailed when creating an out-
door space of any kind can be
detrimental to the homeowner.
Doing research and talking
to your landscape architect
about possible roadblocks and
unexpected chores is key. Being
practical about the time you
can dedicate to maintenance,
upkeep and the invoice is what
Browning says most homeown-
ers struggle with when creating
their fantasy back yard.
“Making sure they’re being
practical is part of my job,” he
said. “I try to pair the work to
what the customer can support
and tailor the garden to the
homeowner.”
Neighborhood restrictions
can also be a roadblock, and
one that Hommel is familiar
with when selling homes with
gardens or outdoor spaces.
“In some neighborhoods
you now have to have your
landscaping plans approved
and sometimes that can be a
problem, depending on the re-
strictions,” she said. “So don’t
overkill. Simple is better and
it’s beautiful.”
So what kind of price tag is
attached to these “simple,” but
luxurious back yards? Obvi-
ously, it depends on what kind
of vision the homeowner has
for the space. Outdoor kitch-
ens, fre pits, gardens with
an assortment of fowers and
pathways will add value to your
home in most cases, but can
cost a pretty penny up front.
Pool areas are a diferent story,
entirely. While they are not
considered an investment, and
are more of a liability, they are
also the most expensive spaces
to create and maintain.
When working with an
architectural designer, such as
Browning, the initial consulta-
tion leads to a design process
which can cost anywhere from
$800 to $3,000, depending on
the client’s needs. The design
process for an average home
in our area is usually $500 to
$1,500. Browning says com-
municating your budget to
the designer in that phase is
critical.
Based on the “needs of
the client,” adding gardens,
landscaping and an outdoor
space usually starts at $10,000
and can easily go up in excess
of $150,000. Pool areas begin
at no lower than $40,000. And
that’s just getting the space
created.
“There are ‘hidden costs’
when it comes to maintenance,
such as mitigation systems,
electricity, drainage and things
of that nature,” said Browning.
“A lot of people don’t start with
an exact budget, but have a
roundabout fgure in their head
that is fexible to cover these
hidden costs.”
And lastly, when planting
plants or designing any out-
door space, Hommel reminds
homeowners to make sure the
fowers, gardens and outdoor
furniture will survive the hot
Southeast Texas summers.
English gardens, for instance,
take a special kind of green
thumb since the plants and
fowers planted are usually
used in England, a climate that
is…well, not Southeast Texas.
“Each outdoor area is dif-
ferent,” said Hommel, “and is
based on preference. Adding an
outdoor space of any kind can
be a big winner, though.”
Rette Browning, left, co-owner of Down to Earth Landscaping, discusses land-
scape plans with a Beaumont home owner.
VIP
Hours:
Mon. – Sat. 9 AM – 7 PM • Sun. 12 PM – 6 PM
Hours:
Mon. – Sat. 9 AM – 7 PM • Sun. 12 PM – 6 PM
Spring is here!
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gardening needs.
3737 Calder, Beaumont, TX
409-839-8473
3737 Calder, Beaumont, TX
409-839-8473
The Kevin Reed Team
www.thekevinreedteam.com
Charles Boren
REALTOR
®
(409) 727-0095
Lauren Mendoza
REALTOR
®
(409) 554-3057
Kevin Reed
REALTOR
®
(409) 728-1814
Diana Hernandez
Marketing
(409) 659-5132
Roy Davis
REALTOR
®
(409) 926-9440
12 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
POWER
flower

I
d
o
n

t
k
n
o
w
a
n
y
b
o
d
y
w
h
o
d
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e
s
n
’t smile
w
h
e
n
t
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a
f
o
w
e
r
.


S
u
s
a
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B
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d
w
e
l
l

F
l
o
w
e
r
s
m
a
k
e
a
h
u
g
e
im
p
act on
o
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e
r
y
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a
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s
.


J
a
m
e
s
P
e
r
r
i
o
f r e s h f l o w e r s
vip home
Y
ou’re only here
for a short visit.
Don’t hurry.
Don’t worry. And
be sure to smell
the flowers along
the way,” said Walter Hagen,
an American golf legend of the
early 20th century. Hagen may
not have known the science
behind his famous statement,
but he probably knew that
stressed out people can benefit
from slowing down and taking a
healthy sniff of fresh blossoms.
In the following century,
science proved him right.
A 2006 behavioral research
study conducted by psychologist
Nancy Etcof of Massachusetts
General Hospital and Harvard
Medical School revealed that
people feel more compassionate
toward others, have less worry
and anxiety and are less de-
pressed when fresh-cut fowers
are in their homes. The Home
Ecology of Flowers Study also
found that fowers at home can
provide a boost of energy, happi-
ness and enthusiasm at work.
“Flowers make a huge impact
on our everyday lives,” James

text by Cathleen Cole
Perrio, owner of Twigs forist in
Beaumont, said. “From general
health and well-being to a better
outlook, fowers can even turn a
very bad day into an ‘I can’t believe
you sent me fowers!’ day. I am fas-
cinated at what an impact fowers
have on everyone.”
Flowers release a natural chemi-
cal that makes you want to smell
the blooms to see where that lovely
fragrance is coming from, Perrio
noted, which explains the reason
why so many people want to be
outdoors. The forist added that
even people who say they don’t
want fowers because they just
die won’t turn them down when
someone sends them a beautiful
arrangement. “This is why people
tend to send fowers regularly,” he
said.
Perrio has several local cli-
ents who pick up fowers or have
them delivered often, including
one customer who sends a fresh
arrangement to his wife at work
every day. Renee’ Hubbell, owner
of Petals Florist in Beaumont, also
has several customers who have
fresh fowers delivered throughout
the week. Both Perrio and Hub-
bell will work within a customer’s
budget. “They are not charged a
delivery fee if they order two or
more arrangements per week,”
Hubbell said. “We can bill them bi-
weekly or charge their credit card,
whichever is preferred.”
Susanne Birdwell, a member of
the Magnolia Garden Club in Beau-
mont, is passionate about fowers.
“I feel like it’s a spiritual thing,”
she said. “God made them.” As a
child, she attended garden shows
with her grandmother, and her
father raised roses. She keeps fresh
fowers in her house continually.
“They’re colorful, and they add
ambience to your home,” she said.
“They make you feel good.”
Birdwell’s fowers come mainly
from her garden, but she praises
the local forists. “All the forists in
Southeast Texas are wonderful,”
she noted. “And they’ll work with
you on what you want to spend.”
She does admit to purchasing an
occasional bunch of blooms from
the grocery store. “There’s nothing
wrong with a $10 bouquet,” she
noted. And she feels strongly about
the healing message fowers relay.
“Every time I have a friend who’s
ill, I send fowers,” she said. “I
don’t know anybody who doesn’t
photography by renÉ sheppard
James Perrio, owner of Twigs Florist in Beaumont,
and some of his fresh fower arrangements.
Fresh blooms can give
you a fresh outlook on life
>>
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 13
14 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
smile when they see a fower.”
She also often sends her three
daughters tulips, which, to her,
represent a free spirit and youth.
Beaumont artist Darrell
Troppy also believes that fowers
make you happy. He incorpo-
rates them into his paintings,
and he is a master gardener who
keeps fresh blooms in his home
daily. They make a diference
in his mood when he takes a
moment to stop and smell the
fowers before rushing out the
door. “I always walk out with a
smile on my face,” he said.
Flowers are sent for all kinds
of occasions – weddings, births,
illnesses and deaths. How can
something that is appropriate
to celebrate the birth of a
child also be acceptable
for a person who is
grieving over the
death of someone
they love? They
are a gift that
shows you
care, Perrio
said, adding,
“Flowers send
a message
without saying
anything.”
Springtime Fresh
To keep fowers fresher longer, Renee’ Hubbell of Petals Florist
in Beaumont offers these tips:
• Change the water daily.
• Keep them in a cool, shady part of the house or offce.
• Add an aspirin, which inhibits bacterial growth in the water, every
two to three days or fower food provided by your forist. VIP
the
team
��������
Each office independently owned and operated.
Each REALTOR
®
works independently.
866.HOME
tarynhebert.com
860.3200 x114
Since infancy, Ian Rashall has been in and out of
hospitals with severe stomach problems. “In
Houston” explained Shara, Ian’s mother, “they
thought he had colic, then food allergies, and then
they just really didn’t believe his problems were as
bad as we were telling them.”
When Ian came to Baptist Beaumont Hospital, the
Rashalls experienced our Partners in Caring
philosophy that promotes an environment of team-
work, opportunity, encouragement, and trust.
“Baptist has something other hospitals don’t,” said
Shara. “Everyone here knows how to treat kids.
They really wanted Ian to feel better; they wanted to
find out what the problem was.”
At Baptist, doctors discovered a well-hidden, plum-
sized pancreatic cyst that made the four-year-old a
candidate for surgery. Child Life Specialist, Sarah
Adams, prepared Ian with plenty of pictures and
hands on experience with some of the equipment he
would be seeing, so surgery would not be so scary.
She even scrubbed up and went to the operating
room with Ian. “Sarah was always finding ways to
get our son’s mind off the bad,” noted Shara. “Ian
really loves her. Kids can tell when you love them,
and Sarah loves Ian like he’s a member of her own
family.”
Since surgery, Ian’s off medicines, out of pain,
eating what he wants, and was well enough to enjoy
trick or treating for the first time. In his words:
“They took my plum out and fixed my tummy.”
In mom’s words: “I put Baptist above all other
hospitals, because they care. They changed my little
boy’s life; they changed our lives.”
www.bhset.net
Baptist Beaumont Hospital is part of a not-for-profit health
system that does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, age, or disability.
16 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
L
i
t
h
u
a
n
i
a
n
L
i
n
e
n
&
M
a
r
y
F
r
a
n
c
e
s
H
a
n
d
b
a
g
s
LA-TEE-DA
4004 Dowlen next to Hobby Lobby
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 17
s p r i n g f a s h i o n
vip style
spring
inspired
A
pril is the time for
bright, beautiful
fowers and fun, fresh
dresses. Our stylists,
Larena Head and
Grace Mathis, looked
to four of their favorite
fowers as a fresh approach to spring
dressing this season. Paired with fower
arrangements by J Scotts AFlorist in Or-
ange, these dresses refect their love of
wearing beautiful garments and drawing
inspiration from the world around them.
text and styling by Grace
Mathis and Larena head
photography by scott esLinGer
fowers by J scotts aFLorist
photo assistant taMara MenGes
Orange silk asymmetrical dress, Diane Von
Furstendburg, S&M Family Outlet, $116; Yel-
low and grey color block wedges, Kensie,
Macy’s, $69; Rhinestone ring, Guess, Macy’s,
$28; Pewter dangle earrings, Alfani, Macy’s,
$28; Hammered bracelet, Macy’s, $28;
Beaded stretch bracelet, Macy’s, $28; Bird
of Paradise arrangement, J Scotts AFlorist
BOLD
The Bird of paradise – strelit-
zia regina – is very bold and
strong, Scott says. “When
I saw the dress I knew the
arrangement could not be
delicate. I wanted to create
somewhat of a scepter feel.”
He gathered and bound the
fowers right below the blooms
and placed a grapevine orb
decorated with purple beads
inside the bottom of the
stems. The dress is inspired
by the bold, exotic geometry
of the bird of paradise. With
a unique, avant-garde shape,
the asymmetrical cut, knotting,
and sheer panels of the dress
refect the one-of-a-kind
shape and look of the fower.
Meet VIP stylist
Grace Mathis
“For as long as I can remember, I
have loved playing dress-up. Jewelry,
makeup, clothes, oh my! All things
feminine and frilly make my heart
beat faster. As a freelance makeup
artist and fashion stylist, I love
helping people fnd their true beauty.
What you wear says something about
you and is often the frst impression.
I am inspired by what I see on the
runways, but even more so by the
bold fashionistas I see on the streets.
Southeast Texas is an amazing place
to be inspired and express yourself
through fashion.”
FEMININE
Pincushion Protea come in red, orange
and coral. Scott says, “It looks like the
pincushion of your grandmother’s sewing
box – it’s delicate and yet grounded with
strength at its origin with the stem.” After
seeing the dress, he created the funky
monobotanic necklace showing off the
bloom with a little bit of wirework. “I cre-
ated a ‘purse’ by wrapping a pavé of the
pincushion with galax leaves and bullion
wire all around, and adding the purse
handle.” The dress, like the fower, is bold
yet feminine. Delicate yet memorable, the
dress highlights all the feminine features
– legs, arms, collarbone, curves. Embrace
your femininity – don’t be scared of it.
Coral rouched dress, Nicole Miller, S&M Family
Outlet, $132; Nude round-toe patent pumps,
Jessica Simpson, Macy’s, $79; Floral bracelet,
Betsy Johnson, Macy’s, $155; Gold starburst ear-
rings, Macy’s, $42; Nude fshnets, Macy’s, $14;
Pincushion purse and necklace, J Scotts AFlorist
18 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
PLAYFUL
Craspedia is a small yellow fower
also known as Billy Balls. Scott says,
“To me, a craspedia is a fower that
should be growing in Whoville, it
should be a Dr. Seuss fower.” Scott
wanted something that could be
draped over the arms, and used gold
bullion wire as the mechanic for the
draping. As he was creating it, he
decided to strengthen the design of
the draping by adding the fowers like
they had fallen at the feet.
This vintage-inspired dress is strongly
infuenced by the bright color of
the craspedia. As well, the cheerful
and cheeky nature of the fower is
refected through the lace, color, and
texture of the dress.
Meet VIP stylist
Larena Head
“Fashion is my favorite art form
in which I express myself. I dress
according to my mood and I draw
inspiration from vintage elements.
My creative eye allows me to style
with a unique perspective. I am
a graduate of Lamar University
with a bachelor degree in Fashion
Merchandising. I consider myself
a wardrobe stylist and jewelry
designer. I love to coordinate fash-
ion shows and currently curate a
vintage boutique, Stellar Treasure. I
do what I love.”
Yellow pleated lace dress, Eva Franco, Posh
& Co., $380; Nude peep-toe pump, Nine
West, Macy’s, $89; Yellow fower ring, Posh
& Co., $35; Multi-colored dangle earrings,
Posh & Co., $35; Muted green tights,
Macy’s, $14; Craspedia strung on gold bul-
lion, J Scotts AFlorist
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 19
20 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
CLASSIC
The hydrangea comes in many colors –
white, blue, lavender, purple, pink, red
and green. It is a classic, timeless fower,
and Scott refected that in his classic
design – a European hand-tied gathered
hydrangea. “We all know of our grand-
mothers and great grandmothers that
had hydrangeas,” he reminisces. “…It’s
forever.” Our green hydrangea-inspired
dress has a classic Southern spring feel –
fresh, colorful and clean with frilly accents.
Southern trademarks of scalloped edges
and eyelet in the perfect shade of spring
green are accessorized with timeless
touches of pearl earrings, bracelets and a
simple white belt. To bring it into the pres-
ent day, add a fun pair of bold pumps.
Lime green eyelet dress, Donna Morgan, S&M
Family Outlet, $81; Fuschia pumps, Jessica
Simpson, Macy’s, $79; Large pearl bracelets (4),
Charter Club, Macy’s, $24 each ; Medium pearl
bracelets (2), Charter Club, Macy’s, $18 each;
Small pearl bracelet, charter Club, Macy’s, $26;
Pearl earrings, Alfani, Macy’s, $28; Pearl fower
ring, Guess, Macy’s, $22; White patent belt, Style
&Co, Macy’s, $20; Green hydrangeas, J Scott
AFlorist
Meet forist
Scott Hasty
“We’re not in the fower business; we are
in the emotion business. We go from a very
happy occasion to a just because occasion
to sympathy fowers. My heartbeat is to
bridge the gap between unprofessional and
professional by having a mentor and being
a mentor, be open-minded, and always do
things differently than we’ve done before.
We’re just not making our grandmother’s
corsages anymore. Try foral jewelry: a single
ring, something on your wrist, a necklace.
Come to the store and let us make your
custom wearable foral jewelry.”
J Scotts AFlorist, 130 Strickland Drive
Orange, TX 77630, 409-883-7555
www.jscottsaforist.com
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
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SPR NG B
s p r i n g f a s h i o n
vip style
25 foral pieces
to make your
wardrobe bloom
24
14
6
7
4
20
2
18
9
8
10
21
13
by larena head photography by silvia
c. mcclain and provided by retailers
22 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 23
LOSSOMS!
From Dillards: 1. T-strap platform wedge sandals, Gianni Bini, $80; 2. Peep-toe platform pumps, Steve Madden, $80; 3. Multi fower statement necklace, Betsey Johnson, $165; 4. ‘Natalia’ One-
shoulder dress, Gianni Bini, $158; 5. Botanica fower stretch ring, Jessica Simpson, $30; 6. Rose pendant necklace, Betsey Johnson, $48 Available online: 7. Guadeloupe fower tote, Mar Y Sol,
shopmarysol.com, $98; 8. Saffano Iphone 4 case, Diane Von Furstenberg, Dvf.com, $48; 9. Maja Two dress, Diane Von Furstenberg, Dvf.com, $445; 10. Tropical printed clutch, Proenza Schouler, Net-
a-porter.com, $925; 11. Printed silk-chiffon shirt dress, Tory Burch, Net-a-porter.com, $325; 12. African Tulip new hanky blouse, Diana Von Furstenberg, Neimanmarcus.com, $210; 13. Chrysanthe-
mum sprigs scarf, Anthropologie.com, $58; From Ella + Scott: 14. Floral gypsy top, Glam, $64; 15. Open shoulder dress, Charlie Jade, $149; 16. Rhinestone fower ring, $16; 17. Mosaic-style
earrings, $12 From Posh & Co.: 18. Rose trellis bracelet, $81; 19. Lilac art glass ring, $40; 20. Orange fower ring, $35; 21. Rose dangle earrings, $35; 22. Saratoga dress, Garden of Eden, Eva
Franco, $290; 23. Climbing vines top, Free People, $148; 24. Embroidered clutch, Moyna, $120 From YaYa Club: 25. ‘Mandy’ High waist foral print jeans, Citizens of Humanity, $189
25
3
17
11
15
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5535 Drexel
Beautiful home on quiet street with lake access. Kitchen
features red oak custom cabinets, decorative counter
tops and vent-a-hood, dbl oven and island. Dining area
has french doors leading to offce and oversized utility.
Spacious living room has laminate wood fooring, stacked
ceiling. Master accesses private patio through french
doors. Bath features whirlpool tub w/porcelain tile and
Roman faucet.
DORI MELANCON
(409) 656-9105
dorimelancon@gmail.com
Keller Williams Realty
Cobb Real Estate
Crystal Beach, Texas 77650
409.684.3790 offce
409.684.2622 fax
http://www.cobbrealestate.com/
2788 Gulfview Lane
Beautiful new 2nd row home with awesome beachfront views from
every room! Living room has 18 ft. Cathedral ceiling and gorgeous
ship lap wood walls. Soothing coastal colors throughout. This home
features 3 Bedrooms/3 Baths, with Master Bedroom, Master Bathroom
on downstairs main level. Ceramic tile in living, kitchen, dining, and
baths, with wood-look Laminate in bedrooms. The fabulous kitchen
has granite counter tops with glass tile back splash and stainless
appliances. $385,000
For Rent or For Sale! $1,565 Winter Week / $2,465 Summer
Week (Changes in Attitudes)
811 S. 5th ½ St.
Beautiful well maintained 5/3/2 on quiet street in NISD.
Two master suites, Bose surround sound, sprinkler system,
12 x 24 storage building and 14 x 16 workshop are just some
of the amenities of this home. Post IKE roof. A MUST SEE!!
$230,000
FRANCES NATIONS
AMERICAN REAL ESTATE
(409) 656-6454
frand@americanrealestate.com
1769 Pompano
Sandy Beach This is a great deal! Three bedrooms 2 baths,
over 1500 sq. ft. 3rd row with wonderful views of the gulf.
Open living, dining and kitchen area. Lots of space to entertain
or just relax. Extras include shutters, fence, downstairs shower
and fsh cleaning station. Would be a great rental investment or
weekend getaway. $289,000
Swede’s Real Estate
(800) 624-0071
christy@swedesrealestate.com
869 Melody
Excellent views at this beautiful 1464 sq. ft. home located in the
Crenshaw area. Wood fooring, granite counters, tankless water heater,
tile shower and jacuzzi tub. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets,
stone back splash, stainless appliances and oversized pantry. Too many
extras too list. Huge master bedroom has own access to wraparound
deck - over 950 sq. ft. Crown moulding throughout, surround sound
system, impact doors/windows, vaulted ceilings. Wired for alarm
and surround sound. Downstairs complete with shower, picnic table
& garage. $325,000
Swede’s Real Estate
(800) 624-0071
christy@swedesrealestate.com
5020 Oakmont Custom built gorgeous family home on almost
an acre on a quiet cul-de-sac lot. This home has 5 bedrooms, 4.5
baths, 4 car garage boasts a mother-in-law apartment. There is a
huge master bedroomsuite downstairs (closet 20x21) and separate
offce plus an upstairs game room. Park like backyard has a lagoon
pool, a covered outdoors living area (19x27) with corner freplace,
T.V., granite bar, viking grill, and an ice machine $850,000
Hester Bell
RE/MAX Beaumont
409-860-3200
hestershomes@aol.com
Dori
Melancon
2012 PRESIDENT BEAUMONT BOARD OF REALTORS
®
2012 DIRECTOR TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS
®
“Doing Business by the golden rule”
dorimelancon@gmail.com
www.justlistedinbeaumonttx.com
409.656.9105
8
VIP HOMES
Homes of distinction and
quality to host your lifestyle!
VIP
OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS
To Advertise Your
Real Estate Listing
Call or Email
Jessica Hidalgo
(409) 838-2851
jhidalgo@hearstnp.com
GARDENING
withgrace
m a g n o l i a g a r d e n c l u b
vip worthy
The ladies of the Magnolia Garden
Club have been beautifying Southeast
Texas landscapes for 75 years
E
ven in the era when ladies wore prim hats
and white gloves on outings, the founding
members of the Magnolia Garden Club
were never afraid to get their hands dirty.
“These ladies got down in the dirt to dig,
prune and fertilize,” said Ellen Rienstra,
a local writer/historian and affiliate member of the
club. “They were very in tune with their gardens.
Some were extremely knowledgeable.”
text by Cheryl roSe
Above, some of the original members of the Magnolia Garden Club, pictured in 1937, and below, current members pictured this year.
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 25
26 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
Seventy-fve years later, though the
dress style is much more casual, the
ladies of the Magnolia Garden Club,
many of them descendents of the found-
ing members, are still working hard to
conserve nature and beautify the earth.
“Through the years, there are new
faces, styles and manners, but the club’s
purpose and traditions remain consis-
tent,” Rienstra said. “We have changed
with the times as needed, but the club is
still standing for beauty, conservation,
horticulture, and the science and art of
growing things as it did in 1937.”
Heirlooms
The Magnolia Garden Club was
founded on March 2, 1937 with 47
charter members. In 1949, the club
was invited to join the Garden Club of
America (GCA), an honor that entails
abiding by stringent standards. Today,
there are only fve cities with GCA
members in Texas – Dallas, Houston
(2), San Antonio, Tyler and Beaumont.
The Magnolia Garden Club is an ofcial
501c3 nonproft, with the members
organizing fundraising eforts to support
their service projects. Retired landscape
architect Betty Leaf has been active in
the club for 50 years. She remembers
when Mamie Ward or Helen Grifths
would host an estate sale in their garage
as a club fundraiser. The early members
did a lot of conservation work for their
time, though the club’s activities are on a
bigger scale now, she said.
A past club president, member Viv-
ian Todd emphasizes that throughout
its history, the club has had a serious
purpose far beyond a social club. “It’s a
lot more than ladies in hats working in
gardens and fower arranging,” she said.
Rienstra concurs. “The members
have always been in the forefront of
the conservation and environmental
movement, a long time before it even
had a name,” she said. “We perpetuate
knowledge and learning. We get things
done.”
Horticultural Hearts
Providing the expertise, labor and
often the needed plants or trees, the
ladies have numerous projects afoot
throughout Southeast Texas, from the
Big Thicket to High Island. The results
of many of their projects, however, are
growing right in Beaumont.
The next time you drive down Phelan
Boulevard, notice the long row of Nat-
chez Crepe Myrtles stretching from 23rd
Street almost to Dowlen Road. Karen
McCormick, the current club president,
said the club selected this tree project in
honor of the GCA’s 100th anniversary,
approaching in 2013. Planting 50 trees
a year, the Magnolia Garden Club has
provided 150 trees to the City of Beau-
mont thus far, with plans for the fnal 35
next winter, a “Plant Beaumont Green”
project.
“We’ve been planting trees for almost 75 years. There is no telling what we will be
historical images courtesy of Tyrrell HisTorical library
As in collaborations past, the City
provides the labor and heavy equip-
ment necessary to plant the 20-gallon
trees donated by the club. “We’ve had
a great partnership with them over the
years,” said Ryan Slott, the director of
Parks and Recreation for the City of
Beaumont. “The Magnolia Garden Club
has some wonderful expertise and we
have the manpower. Together, we’ve
been able to move the beautifcation of
Beaumont forward.”
Their eforts can also be witnessed at
the Beaumont Botanical Gardens. The
club helped replant a section christened
“Grandmother’s Garden” using old va-
rieties of plants, McCormick explained.
This year, the club planted seeds in the
greenhouse to be transplanted in the
gardens.
Another partnership is with Christus
Hospital – St. Elizabeth in Beaumont.
Christus received ownership of the
Phelan Mansion in a bequest. At some
point, the East Garden was dug out for a
pool. The area was in disuse and needed
a new purpose. “In talking with some of
the ladies of the Magnolia Garden Club,
we determined this would be a good ft
to partner,” said Ivy Pate, regional vice
president of Christus Health South. The
mansion was signifcant to the garden
club because the original homeowner,
Johanna Phelan, was also one of their
founding members. “Today the Magno-
lia Garden Club, so important to Mrs.
Phelan, has come to restore the East
Garden of the home to its historical
beauty,” Pate said.
However, there is a twist. “As
president, my focus has been
on promoting organic garden-
ing,” McCormick said. What
more logical place to encour-
age organic techniques over
chemicals than a hospital cam-
pus? McCormick said the club
began work last spring to bring
the garden back to life through organic
methods of soil preparation, fertilizing
and mulching.
Biennial Flowers
Every other year, the club hosts a
den
wner,
their
Magno-
Mrs.
East
planting in the next 75 years, but we will be planting.”
present day images courtesy of magnolia garden club members
>>
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 27
28 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
GCA-standards fower show competition
open to the public. Susanne Birdwell led
this year’s “Black Gold” event which ft-
tingly took place in the Phelan Mansion
last month.
The club views the fower show not
only as an opportunity to showcase their
local talent, but as an educational oppor-
tunity to teach the public about horticul-
ture, according to McCormick.
Rienstra said the standards for host-
ing, entering and judging are extremely
high and fercely competitive. “We have
had some incredible talent through
the years, members who won national
competitions,” she said. “You wouldn’t
believe some of the arrangements – the
high level of skill and artistry.”
Companion Plantings
A GCA regulation allows for no more
than 60 active members at a time. This
makes for a tight-knit group, bonded by
purpose and friendship. “It’s not just
a collection of our best friends,” Todd
said. “There are all sorts of people who
bring diferent gifts to the table. There
are a lot of mothers and daughters/
daughters-in-law. There are descen-
dents of our founding members still in
the club.”
Every January, the club honors the
members who have died in the past year
by planting a memorial tree. In 2012,
they planted fve Teddy Bear Magnolias
as memorials at the Beaumont Botanical
Gardens. To extend this love of horticul-
ture to the next generation, daughters
and granddaughters participate in junior
gardener lessons.
Involvement with the club has had a
life-changing impact on some members.
“It’s been one of the biggest parts of my
life – I’ve made so many friends,” said
Leaf. For McCormick, she has stretched
herself in unexpected ways. “I am a gar-
dener at heart and have thrived in this
club,” she said.“I have also done things
I never would have done like fower ar-
ranging and public speaking.”
Everblooming
The Magnolia Garden Club continues
to leave a lasting legacy in Southeast
Texas. In 1939, the club donated 100
magnolia trees to be planted along High-
way 69. “This was the frst step toward
their goal of planting trees along every
highway leading into Beaumont,” Mc-
Cormick said. “We’ve been planting trees
for almost 75 years. There is no telling
what we will be planting in the next 75
years, but we will be planting.”
Conservation Operations
Magnolia Garden Club’s service projects have ranged across the breadth of Southeast
Texas. This month they are beginning a new “Partners in Plants” project in conjunction with the
Houston Audubon Society for habitat restoration, native plantings and coastal prairie restoration
at Boy Scouts Woods (Louis B. Smith Bird Sanctuary) at High Island.
In January, club members, along with volunteers from Houston’s two GCA clubs, planted
5,400 longleaf pine seedlings in the Big Thicket National Preserve to help the park’s reforesta-
tion work post-hurricanes. In 1959, the club donated land they had received in a bequest to
the park to become the Winifred Turner Nature Sanctuary, a mature forest area along the south
bank of Village Creek, which the club still maintains. In 2002, in another “Partners for Plants”
project, the club worked to re-introduce two endangered native plants, the Texas Trailing Phlox
and the White Firewheel, within the Big Thicket.
In the south, the club has been active at Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, creating a but-
terfy garden and transplanting native grasses to re-establish a coastal prairie in 2003.
VIP
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 29
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j o s e p h j o h n s o n
vip worthy
A
t the en-
trance to
Shangri La
Botanical
Gardens & Nature
Center in Orange, a
sign reads: Be kind
to your world. Joseph
Johnson, director of
horticulture for Shan-
gri La and the Nelda
C. & H. J. Lutcher
Stark Foundation,
takes those words to
heart.
“What makes
Shangri La unique is
Shangri La
Botanical
Gardens’
Joseph
Johnson
is on a
mission
for Mother
Nature
text by cathLeeN coLe photography by SiLvia c. MccLaiN
CONSTANT
GARDENER
the
30 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 31
how environmentally conscious
we are with native ecology,”
Johnson said. “And I want to
keep it that way.”
Before coming to Shan-
gri La in the spring of 2010,
Johnson worked at the Univer-
sity of Texas M. D. Anderson
Cancer Center in Houston.
While there, he developed an
organic program for the 400
rose bushes used in a patient-
care program where fowers
are cut, arranged and placed in
patients’ rooms. He expanded
the project from 400 to 600
bushes while utilizing organic
and sustainable-care tech-
niques.
His organic idea germinated
when the hospital’s roses were
being attacked by a black-spot
fungus and were losing their
leaves. Johnson and his crew
would spray fungicide on the
bushes after dark, and one
night it hit him. He was stand-
ing outside a cancer center
wearing a protective suit and
a respirator while spraying a
toxic solution on roses that
would end up in patients’
rooms. “What are we doing?”
he asked himself.
He started researching and
developing an organic program
for the roses that included
organic fertilizers, organic
weed killers and benefcial
insects such as lace wings and
ladybugs that attack aphids. He
changed the irrigation from a
spray system to a drip system,
which helped the leaves stay
dry and avoid fungus. He start-
ed mulching with pine straw,
which lowers the pH balance of
the soil, limits splash from rain
and also provides good nutri-
ents when it breaks down.
At Shangri La and other
Stark Foundation proper-
ties, Johnson strives to be
kind to the world by being
environmentally conscious
with the maintenance of the
approximately 265 acres that
are in his charge. “This year
we have aggressively executed
the organic program at Shan-
gri La by utilizing organic and
sustainable practices,” he said.
“We are becoming responsible
stewards.”
The horticulturist and his
team exclusively use organic-
based products and benefcial
insects — those cute, little
lacewings and ladybugs. They
make their own “compost tea”
by running water through com-
post and using the nutrient-
flled brew to water the plants.
They stay away from herbicides
such as Roundup and instead
use very strong vinegar on >>
weeds and do a lot of pulling by
hand.
According to Johnson, there is
a trend toward making the horti-
culture business a truly “green”
industry using organic products
and services. “There is a move-
ment,” he said. “It is happening.”
He tries to encourage growers to
go green – starting with using
organic-based fertilizers and en-
vironmentally friendly contain-
ers such as peat pots instead of
plastic receptacles. (Shangri La
staf members recycle or reuse
their plastic pots.)
Even though he’s the “big
picture” guy who orchestrates
the horticultural activities, he
doesn’t mind rolling up his
sleeves and getting his hands
dirty. He likes to explain to his
staf why things should be done a
certain way. “I’m always educat-
ing,” he said. His favorite aspect
of his job is designing. “I’m more
of a visionary,” he explained. “I
like to think ahead. What’s this
going to look like in 10 years?”
For him, it’s exciting to be at the
ground level. “The gardens are
so new and so young,” he said.
Michael Hoke, managing
director of Shangri La, is glad to
have Johnson on board. “Overall,
the Stark Foundation, together
with Shangri La’s staf, is looking
forward to continued growth
and improvement of our gardens
toward the eventual development
of a truly world-class botanical
garden and nature center,” he
said. “Joseph Johnson is leading
the horticulture efort towards
this goal.” Hoke noted that John-
son arrived while Shangri La was
still coping with the afterefects
of Hurricane Ike. “To compound
the problems that he faced, we
also had a historical drought,” he
said. “Working with his team of
gardeners, Joseph is continually
improving the gardens, making
them a beautiful addition to the
Golden Triangle.”
For Johnson, the land has
always been important. He was
a city boy from Houston, but
his paternal grandparents had a
ranch near San Antonio where
they raised cattle and corn. “I
had a love of agriculture and the
land itself,” he said. He attended
Texas A&M University, at frst
pursuing a business degree at his
parents’ request. But a summer
job at a bank changed his mind.
He switched his major to agri-
culture and narrowed his feld to
horticulture.
Throughout his career,
Johnson has taken the path that
leads him to do what is best for
Mother Nature. He encourages
others to follow him down that
path. “Be environmentally con-
scious,” he implores. “Take care
of the world.”
gar
The dirt on good gardening
Joseph Johnson, director of horticulture for Shangri La Botanical Gardens &
Nature Center, believes good gardening starts from the ground up. “It all starts
with the soil,” he said. “Pay attention to the soil. Take care of it.”
The horticulturist always recommends organic products including fertilizers,
compost, mulch and benefcial insects. And for best results, he advises planting
native species. “Mimic what Mother Nature does,” he said.
VIP
32 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 33
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e d i b l e f l o w e r s
food dining
the incredible
edible fower
O
ne of nature’s most
colorful offerings can
be more than a feast for
the eyes. Edible flowers
add vibrant hues,
subtle taste and fragrance to dishes,
creating a multi-sensory dining
experience.
Bird Mangles is one of Southeast
Texas’ most knowledgeable propo-
nents of edible fowers in cuisine. She
began growing her own herbs and
fowers as a teenager. For decades, she
attended forums and read voraciously
about herbs and edible fowers, as
well as completing a university study
on horticulture. She became a Master
Gardener in 1993 and quickly became a
“If I take fowers fresh and fne, with
pleasant thoughts, I then dine.” — Bird Mangles
text by Jane McBride
34 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
favorite speaker on the circuit.
Bird, who divides her time be-
tween Beaumont and Fredericksburg,
is an excellent cook whose quick
breads and cakes are crowd pleasers.
“No one has ever turned away
from my rose petal cake. It’s beyond
wonderful. You can also use the
batter for cupcakes and garnish with
fresh roses.”
Always choose a variety of rose
that is fragrant, Bird says. The more
scent, the better the favor.
She uses organic fowers and
herbs only, growing her own or order-
ing from her friend, Bill Barney of
Urban Herbal in Fredericksburg. Bird
also asks local grocers to order fow-
ers for her.
Bird’s favorite edible fowers
Pansy, dianthus, lavender, roses,
calendula, chives, pineapple sage,
nasturtiums, arugula and borage.
If an herb is edible, its fowers
are as well, and the blossoms make
lovely, fragrant additions to salads,
soups and pastries.
How to harvest fowers
Select unbruised fowers at their
peak and harvest during the cool of
the day. Rinse fowers gently in cool,
lightly salted water. Drain and rinse
in another bowl of plain, cool water.
Bird often adds an ice cube when
rinsing roses. Drain well, then check
for any tiny critters hiding in petal
folds.
To be sure, put the fowers on a
cutting board or the kitchen counter
and invert a paper bag over them.
Leave it untouched for a half hour or
so. Any insects will think it’s night
and come out. You will be able to spot
them on the petals or counter. Place
clean, drained fowers in the fridge
and keep cool until use.
Crystallized fowers are beauti-
ful on cakes, cupcakes or atop other
pastries – and they are easy to make.
Violas, pansies and nasturtiums are
especially colorful.
Fine dining
Some of Southeast Texas’ fnest
chefs use edible fowers to add to
the presentation of their best dishes,
from appetizers to salads and des-
serts.
Beaumont Chef Terry Bell of The
Grill loves to dress up salads, cheeses
and desert with edible fowers. His
favorite blossom is the exotic orchid,
because of the bloom’s vibrant color
and longevity. On Valentine’s Day,
he featured edible fowers to create a
stunning visual feast.
One his signature dishes is a
Seared Duck Salad made with baby
lettuces, wild mushrooms, crisp pro-
sciutto and sliced duck, tossed with a
champagne vinaigrette.
Chef Monica Cobb, whose always
sold-out Renegade Dinners are reach-
ing cult status in Beaumont among
foodies, recently created an Asian-
French Fusion menu that include a
Hibiscus, Meyer-Lemon, Rosemary
Flowers, Wild Violet & Sweet Olive
Gin Tonic cocktail and Lemon-Ginger
Cupcakes with Honey-Cream cheese
Frosting.
Katharine Carmichael of Katharine
and Co. uses pansies, nasturtiums,
violas and begonias to add color
to salads. She garnishes sandwich
loaves, pates and cheesecakes with
rose petals. One of her signature
dishes is an appetizer that begins
with squash blossoms.
From top left clockwise: A fowering citrus salad; an Asian Tuna Salad from Finch Hutton in Nederland; a puree of carrot and orange soup garnished with sage
fowers; and a seared duck salad from The Grill in Beaumont.
F
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c
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t
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o
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o
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a
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.
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a
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.
>>
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 35
36 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
Stuffed squash
blossoms
Recipe courtesy of Katharine
Carmichael of Katharine & Co.
Ingredients
2 T fnely chopped mixed herbs -
chives, tarragon and thyme
1 T minced shallot
12 squash blossoms
2 oz cream cheese
4 oz goat cheese
2 eggs
¼ cup milk
½ cup four
½ cup masa harina
Salt and pepper to taste
Vegetable oil for frying
Directions
1. Mix herbs, shallots and cheese; insert a teaspoonful of cheese mixture into each
blossom and gently twist ends together.
2. Beat eggs with milk. In a separate bowl, mix four, masa harina, salt and pepper.
Dip each blossom into the egg mixture, then into the four mixture; refrigerate for
10 minutes.
3. Heat 1 inch of oil to 350 degrees; fry the blossoms in batches until they begin to
turn light brown, turning once; drain on paper towels and serve hot.
Candied fowers
Recipe courtesy of Bird Mangles
Ingredients
Flower blossoms (don’t use fow-
ers sprayed with pesticides)
Powdered egg whites (equal
to 1 or 2 egg whites)
Superfne granulated sugar,
(½ to 1 cup)
Directions
1. Wash each fower.
2. Dry on paper towels.
3. In a small bowl, combine
powdered egg whites with water,
as directed on the package.
4. Place sugar in a separate small
bowl.
5. Completely coat the fower with
a thin layer of wash, using a small
artist paintbrush.
6. Sprinkle fower on both sides with sugar. Gently shake off any excess.
7. Dry completely on wire rack.
Chef Rich Cooper of Finch Hutton in Nederland prepares an Asian Tuna Salad
garnished with edible fowers.
VIP
2111 W. Park
|
Orange, Texas
|
409.670.9113
|
shangrilagardens.org
Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center is a programof the Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher
Stark Foundation. ©2012 Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher Stark Foundation. All Rights Reserved.
Earth Week 2012
Event Highlights
In honor of Earth Day on April 22,
Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in
Orange, Texas, will have daily activities from
April 17 through April 22. All ages are welcome.
Saturday, April 21, 2012 (9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.)
Eco-Fest - Take part in an educational family event that
combines learning and fun for children of all ages. During the
festival, there will be opportunities for children and adults to
take part in activities and learn more about the Earth and earth-
friendly products and practices. Booths will have eco-friendly
information, and children will delight in crafts and games.
Sunday, April 22, 2012 (2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.)
Earth Week Butterfy Release - As part of the Earth Week
celebration, visitors can enjoy free admission beginning at
12:00 p.m. and have the opportunity to participate in the release
of native butterfies at Shangri La.
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 37
www.drwilgers.com
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̴̱̯ ƜȽɅȺȳȼ ƚȳȯɃȻȽȼɂ˴ ƬȳɆȯɁ ̶̶̶̵̯ ̸̷̵̛̳̯̯̚˹̷̳̯̯
ȶȳȯɀɂ˛ȳȺȲȲȳɁȷȵȼɁ˲ȵȻȯȷȺ˷ȱȽȻ͒ɅɅɅ˷ȶȳȯɀɂ˛ȳȺȲȲȳɁȷȵȼɁ˷ȱȽȻ
ƥȽȼȲȯɇ˹ƫȯɂɃɀȲȯɇ ̰̯ȯȻ˹̵ȾȻ ͒ ̄Ƥȷȹȳ̅ ɃɁ Ƚȼ ƞƙƛƝƚƧƧƣ˻
Ưȳ ȯɀȳ ȻȽɀȳ ɂȶȯȼ ȯ
ƢȳɅȳȺɀɇ ƫɂȽɀȳ
̗ Ưȳ Ƨˎȳɀ ̗
͌ƝɆȱȺɃɁȷɄȳ ƚɀȯȼȲɁ
͌ƭȼȷȿɃȳ ƟȷȴɂɁ
͌ơȼɁȾȷɀȯɂȷȽȼȯȺ ƜȳȱȽɀ
͌ƟȯɀȲȳȼ ƫɂȯȹȳɁ
͌ƫɂȯȱȹȯȰȺȳ ƪȷȼȵɁ
͌ƬɀȯɄȳȺ ƚȯȵɁ
VIP magazine is looking for male and female
models to shoot for future covers and fashion
spreads. If you want to work with some of the best
photographers in Southeast Texas while
building your portfolio and gaining important
modeling experience, send a photo of yourself and
contact information to vipnews@thevipmag.com.
?
Dine
The Café on Liberty is a business lunch go-to, known
for its fresh favorful fare that can satisfy both a
meat eater and those with a lighter inclination. The
undeniably classic interior meets iconic touches
of the 21st century in an airy, comfortable setting.
Favorites such as spaghetti and meatball Thursdays
or seafood gumbo on Fridays should entice even the
most distinctive Southeast Texas palates.
The Café, 730 Liberty St, Beaumont, (409) 835-9652,
Open Monday to Friday, 7 to 10 a.m. for breakfast and 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. for lunch.
38 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
Dress
This business-friendly ensemble speaks of classic
meets now. Don’t be afraid to mix textures in a subtle
shade, particularly fresh navy. Bold accents in sunset
colors show personality with a feminine touch. An
intentionally placed brooch, combined with a sunny
necklace and layered bracelets provide just the right
amount of spring diversion. The lunch crowd will appre-
ciate a buttoned-up, professional look and shoes
that state, “I know what I’m saying.”
From Talbots: Queens oxford button-up, $73, Heritage chambray
pants, $109, Ellington collarless striped jacket, $169, Navy
reversible belt, $40; From Yaya Club: Orange accent peep toe
pump, $37, Yellow jewel necklace and earring (not shown) set,
$30, Multi-colored brooch, $18, Nepali hand-crocheted bead
bracelets, $16 each
text and styling by GRACE MATHIS
photography by RENÉ SHEPPARD
model LINDSAY BRIGGS of Beaumont
photo assistant TAMARA MENGES
t h e c a f e
dress dine
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 39
40 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
s e t x e v e n t s
vip spotlights
Mr. Habitat
2012
Boomtown Film
and Music Festival
Chris and Sherry McCollum
Caleb Marshall, Kalyn Layton Jody Nolan, Misty Roland and Judd Robertson
Craig and Kelly Kinsel
Kayla Koch, Blue Broussard, C.E. Dickens and Traci Coleman
Kendall McDonald, Kim McDonald, Kodi Noonkester and Maci Noonkester
Isaac Fenter, Grace Redwine and Dana, Hannah and Kelsey Hollier Carlo Busceme IV, Larena Head, Grace Mathis, Kevin Forrest Clark
Thomas Hall, Nellie Kimbrough, Danna McCurry, Katie Bonura
Uliana Trylowsky, Jennifer Condon Teresa and Art Simpson
Kevin Clay, Chris Garcia, Desmond Wilkins
Courtney Lachausse , Ryan Elizondo
silvia c. mcclain
lee e. stinson
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 41
Quilt Show
Lamar Distinguished
Alumni Awards Dinner
Myla Ramsey and Sue Welton
Diane Fournet, Ethel Granger, Linda Dubose
Carolyn Slack and Laverne Mathews
Oney and Cheryl Black-Fitzpatrick
Patricia Adams and Tom Granger
Jeffery Haven, Betty Lou Allison, Rush Wood
Laurie House Ritchel, Grace Davis England, Bill England and Janice Trammell
Patsy, Remick and Roy Moore
Jason Henderson, Taylor Miller
rene sheppard lee e. stinson
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Junior League social
Julia Matheny, Laura Harris and Emily Wheeler Gina Crenshaw, Kim Hearn and Jessica Prince
Tara Folsom, Nicole Clark Stephanie Vanskike, Kathryn Fuller, Melinda McWherter Rachel Grove, Laura Harris
Angie Herrin, Ronda Harkey Cindy Partin, Devyn Mitchell and Julie Weldy
Alea Greer, Jennifer Byrd, Kristie Young Randi Claybar, Mandy Mazzola Shelly Vitanza, Lauren Martin
The Moulin
Rouge Ballet
Tiffany Martin, Ashley Gaston
Leah Stark and Dawn Stout
Susan Dimaline, Sondra Von Gyllenband
Emily and Elizabeth Jackson
renÉ sheppard
lee e. stinson
www.paintingwithatwist.com/beaumont
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 43
Ubi Caritas Mardi Gras Dinner
Taste of the Triangle
Mardi Gras
Sara Brooke Adams, Amy Renick and Amy Mayo Sandra Hathaway and Sally Bundy Leslie and Julian Lightfoot
Sandy and Joseph Fertitta
The Rev. Nancy DeForest, Harold and Gayle Meyer James Grant, Thad Heartfeld
David and Lindsay Sims Patsy Mason, Robert Sanders, Carol Barranco James Grant, Angela Dodson Christi Berger
James and Angela Fountain and Sherlyon and JD Burns
Blake and Jennifer LeBlanc, Blue Ytuarte, Lisa and Darren Savoy
Lindsey Kovacevich, Marcus Powers Lee and Anna Sheek
Glen Lyles Mary Ann and Ty Becker Curtis May, Lynn Drawhorn Jennifer and Joe Connors
Harry and Mary Carter
silvia c. mcclain
lee e. stinson
renÉ sheppard
C
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44 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
h e l e n h u n t
vipersonality
text by JANE MCBRIDE
I
n an industry where
wearing a bikini can
intimidate women of
any age, 48-year-old
actress and Los Angeles
native Helen Hunt seems
refreshingly at ease.
“Soul Surfer,” the 2011
flm based on the true
story of surfer Bethany
Hamilton, provides lots of screen time
for the Oscar-winning actress to show
of a beautifully toned body, sending
the same men who fell for her unas-
suming beauty in 1996’s “Twister”
tumbling yet again.
“If you think you saw my body in
Soul Surfer, wait till you see The Sur-
rogate,” she teased about her upcoming
movie opposite John Hawkes and Wil-
liam H. Macy.
“The Surrogate” is the story of a
man confned to an iron lung, who,
aided by his priest and therapist,
contacts a professional sex surrogate
to help him lose his virginity. Hunt
plays the surrogate, “a regular soccer
mom with a house, a mortgage and a
husband.”
Hunt calls it “a beautiful flm,” one
of which she is immensely proud. She
bares her body in one of the frst scenes
in the movie, she told Vanity Fair
recently, leaving actor John Hawkes
slightly taken aback.
“She’s here. She’s naked. She’s
touching me.”
The flm snagged not only the Audi-
ence Award and the jury prize for Best
Ensemble at the 2012 Sundance Film
Festival, but broke a record when it was
picked up for $6 million by indie giant
Fox Searchlight.
Hunt fans have much to look for-
ward to this year. She has three flms in
various stages of production for 2012:
“Serpent Girl,” “Relative Insanity” and
“Decoding Annie Parker.”
Hunt has been acting since child-
hood, appearing on television, in flms
and on the stage. She is one of only two
actresses to win the three most coveted
and prestigious awards in the same
year — the Golden Globe, Oscar and
the Emmy (1998). While she doesn’t
dismiss her talent, she suggests it takes
more to achieve such recognition.
“It’s luck. Truly. But the talent
part that you mentioned has only to do
with work. So many hours of work.
So many hours and failed attempts,
working on parts I couldn’t get right
and trying again and classes and hour
after hour. Little plays, bad plays, more
classes, and just tons and tons of work.
Enjoying the work, not just the wish for
the result, was a big part of it, too.”
It’s not surprising that such a down-
to-earth woman who shuns many Hol-
lywood clichés would choose a sensible
path to health. To help stay in shape,
Hunt opts for moderate measures such
as practicing yoga and taking brisk
walks.
“I made a decision that I had to love
my body…right now…as it is. I gave up
on punishing exercise and dieting for-
ever (Please God). All of that helped,”
she said.
While the lovely Hunt doesn’t seem
compelled to banish the fne lines that
mark a woman’s journey through life,
she admits she doesn’t enjoy aging, but
not for the reason one might imagine.
“I am terrifed of aging — but more
because aging has an annoying way of
leading to dying. I’m scared of time
“I made a decision that I had to love my body … right
now … as it is. I gave up on punishing exercise and
dieting forever (Please God). All of that helped.”
The HUNT
for health
>>
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 45
and how it gobbles up all in its
path and won’t be stopped no
matter what you do. In terms of
lines on my face, I try to fnd mir-
rors near good light.”
Trying to pin down Hunt’s
appeal is like trying to grasp the
wind in “Twister,” one of her
most successful flms. No matter
how strong the character’s role,
she consistently manages to
reveal a disarming vulnerability
when facing hurt or disappoint-
ment.
During speaking engagements,
such as her upcoming appear-
ance at the LiveWell Women’s
Conference, Hunt often talks
about aspects of her personality
that are refected in the parts she
chooses.
“I think any interesting char-
acter, or human being for that
matter, is both strong and vul-
nerable, again and again — and
often at the same time. I know
I’m both of those things — so it
makes sense I’d look for roles
that refect that.”
Hunt credits her father, well-
known director and acting teach-
er Gordon Hunt, with being the
force behind her development,
but even “more importantly, a
supportive, loving parent who
cheered me on from day one.”
During her interview with
VIP, Hunt politely declined
to share any stories about her
daughter, 7-year-old Makena Lei.
She’s saving those for the confer-
ence. But she did ofer a glimpse
into her daughter’s personality.
“I can tell you she has an
incredible ability to feel what she
feels — and articulate it at the
same time. Sometimes I think
that’s all we can hope for. We
can’t avoid pain in our lives, but
if we can speak about it, share it,
spit it out and look at it —well,
that’s something.”
Hunt doesn’t let her watch
TV — ever — and worries about
outside infuences, knowing that
“life is beginning to land on her,
beginning to intrude,” and she’ll
have less and less control over
what she experiences.
Keeping private those parts of
her life she deems private “does
the trick,” Hunt said about deal-
ing with pain in her personal life,
like the breakup of her 1999 mar-
riage to actor Hank Azaria.
She once remarked that
“When I remind myself that I
am fall-to-my-knees lucky and
should be fall-to-my-knees grate-
ful,” the negatives don’t seem
quite as bad.
When Hunt does open up, it’s
often to encourage and inspire
others, as she will in Beaumont
this month.
“I hope the women (who at-
tend) feel less alone and nour-
ished by the fellowship. When
I gather with women in my own
life, I’m always better for it.”
Fifth Annual LiveWell Women’s Conference
Presented by Christus LiveWell Women’s Network
When: 7 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Thursday, May 3
Where: Ford Park, 5115 Interstate 10 South, Beaumont
How Much: $50 if registered by April 27; $75 after
Contact: www.christushospital.org/conference or (409) 899-7700
Details: Continental breakfast; “I’ll Bring the Chocolate” presentation by Christian
speaker, Karen Porter; free health screenings and healthy cooking demonstrations
by Golden Triangle Chefs Association
TV series
“Mad About You” (1992) Jamie Buch-
man
Movies
“Soul Surfer” (2011)
“Every Day” (2011)
“Then She Found Me” (2007)
“What Women Want” (2000)
“Dr. T and the Women (2000)
“Castaway” (2000)
“Pay it Forward” (2000)
“As Good as it Gets” (1997)
“Twister” (1996)
Awards
Academy Award for Best Actress in
“As Good as it Gets”
Four Emmy Awards
Four Golden Globe Awards (three as
Lead Actress and one as Producer for
Best Comedy)
Screen Actors Guild Award
Four American Comedy Awards
How we know her
VIP
46 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 47
Vertical Blinds
Graber Vertical blinds easily transform the blank canvas of
an uncovered window or patio door into a captivating work
of art. Fabric or vinyl louvers create just the right visual
effect for any decorating style. Graber blinds are available
exclusively at The Blind Factory.
7396 College St. Beaumont, TX 77707 409.866.4055 Toll Free 877.281.9717
The Blind Factory
TRISUN Healthcare
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and individualized medical rehabilitation.
Beaumont Orange
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Call Becca at Call Lori at
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Port Arthur
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7200 9th Ave. 4225 Lake Arthur Dr.
Call Lluvia at Call Christina at
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Call for more information or
stop by today for a tour!
Living in Orange, Texas has reached newheights.
Living in Orange, Texas has reached newheights.
Contact our Remax Realtor for more information
on pricing and scheduling a tour today!
O: 409.738.3000
C: 409.460.0484
www.cypresswoodvillage.com
Tifany Lemoine, Associate Broker
315 Texas Avenue
Bridge City, TX 77611
j o h n p a s c a l l
vipersonality
The
Boss of
Buyers
Beware
text by Cheryl rose
G
ot a problem
with your
roof? Have an
appliance on
the fritz? If you’re familiar
with the Latin phrase caveat
emptor, John Pascall hopes
you didn’t learn its meaning
the hard way.
When purchasing a prod-
uct or service, one assurance
that you’ve made a trustwor-
thy choice is the Better Busi-
ness Bureau seal of approval,
a logo that 90 percent of con-
sumers recognize according
to Pascall, the new president/
CEO of the Better Business
Bureau in Southeast Texas.
“Our mission is to foster eth-
ics in the marketplace,” he
explained. “We are trying to
create an environment where
consumers and vendors can
trust each other.”
Pascall arrived in Beau-
mont last winter, relocating
from Fort Worth where he
had worked as operations
manager for the local BBB.
A measured and thought-
ful man, he is passionate
photography by sCott eslinger
48 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
not only about his work,
but about people in general,
said Dan Bell of MCT Credit
Union in Port Neches, who
serves on the BBB board.
“He’s extremely consistent
and compassionate,” Bell
said.
As Pascall settles into
Southeast Texas, several of
the mementos that he has
placed around his new ofce
space ofer insight into his
history and values.
First is a framed photo of
his late father, Pat Paschall,
in his state trooper uniform,
a job he performed for 30
years. His father and Tom
Landry, former coach of the
Dallas Cowboys, were Pas-
call’s childhood idols. “Both
were quiet men of strength,
who seemed to always be in
control of the situation and
their emotions, and who were
also caring and compassion-
ate,” Pascall said. “They were
very humble men.”
Though born in San Anto-
nio, Pascall spent most of his
boyhood in nearby Kirbyville.
He earned his bachelor’s
degree in business from State
University of New York, Re-
gents College through an on-
line program while running
a defense driving business
in Jasper with his father. He
then earned a master’s degree
in divinity at Brite Divinity
School at Texas Christian
University, becoming an
ordained Methodist minister.
Though he ultimately decid-
ed a career in the church was
not a ft, his ministry training
made a deep impression. “It
has helped me tremendously
with how I see and work
with people,” he said. “Every
interaction I have is fltered
through that seminary expe-
rience and my faith.”
One expression of this
faith in his ofce is his “wall
of gratitude,” a simple sheet
of paper listing the mentors,
colleagues, family and friends
who have positively infu-
enced Pascall’s life.
On his desk is a model of a
UPS package truck. Pas-
call worked for UPS in the
Dallas-Fort Worth area for 11
years, starting as a part-time
package handler and end-
ing as a human-resources
executive. “UPS played a big
part in developing my work
ethic,” Pascall recalled. “It is
a company that works hard
and is very customer-service
oriented. It’s part of my
nature to be non-stop. I don’t
take breaks, don’t take lunch,
and I start early.”
Pascall admits that he
might trend toward a worka-
holic if it weren’t for the
people in another special
photo in his ofce – his wife,
Beth, and his 8-year-old
daughter, Hope. Out of the
ofce, Pascall enjoys spend-
ing time with his family, the
occasional game of golf, read-
ing and country music. If he’s
watching TV, it will almost
certainly be a sports game,
particularly if a Texas team is
playing.
The last memento is a
metal water hand pump.
Pascall lists Zig Ziglar, a
nationally known motiva-
tional speaker and business
leader, as a big infuence. The
hand pump represents one of
Ziglar’s best-known analogies
about success in life, start-
ing with priming the pump.
Pascall describes his own
leadership style as a “servant
leader,” who seeks to infu-
ence through relationships.
Tim Sudela of Beaumont’s
American Valve and Hydrant
served as the Search Commit-
tee chairman for the BBB’s
hiring process that resulted
in bringing Pascall to South-
east Texas. “John is bringing
a lot of fresh ideas,” Sudela
said. “The best compliment
I’ve heard about John de-
scribed him as a ‘gentleman.’
If you said the same of me
when you bury me, I’d die a
happy man.”
The BBB’s
real value
The BBB is an
accrediting organiza-
tion that, by invitation
only, gives a stamp of
approval to businesses
that agree to meet their
ethical standards. The
organization serves
as a resource for consumers, offering
assistance in fnding an accredited busi-
ness, tips and alerts regarding frauds/
scams, and mediation and arbitration
services. Unlike online resources such as
Angie’s List, the BBB’s services are free
to consumers and specialize in the local
community’s businesses (though with
national resources), offering face-to-face
interactions.
The BBB is embracing technology,
utilizing social networking, apps and QR
codes to make business reviews readily
available, explained Dan Bell of MCT
Credit Union in Port Neches, who serves
on the BBB board. “With the advent of the
internet, the use of the BBB’s services has
increased phenomenally,” he said. “Now,
more than ever, with the speed that fraud
can occur through the internet, the BBB is
needed to help consumers avoid scams
and fnd businesses they can trust.”
Though online consumer reviews are
proliferating, one of the BBB’s key roles is
to help both the consumer and the vendor
fnd resolution to a negative experience,
providing a satisfactory outcome beyond
posting a nasty review.
Small businessman Brent Christopher
of Brent Christopher Photography is a
member of the BBB. At one point, he had
dropped his membership, until he realized
how often he checked the BBB listings
when he needed to hire work done. “I saw
the value and rejoined,” he said.
In his opinion, the BBB offers a great
resource to consumers. “It’s a good way
to protect yourself,” he said, pointing
out that some trades and professions
don’t have to be licensed, so reviews and
complaints can be an important gauge of
competency and reliability. Using his own
profession as an example, he described
many frantic brides who have contacted
him at the last minute because the pho-
tographer they hired let them down.
Membership in the BBB is not a
rubber stamp. “Even though we pay our
dues each year, they will still note any
complaints and they will kick us out if
we don’t live up to a certain standard,”
Christopher said.
Dispute resolution director Jay Sheppard, left, and new BBB president John Paschall discuss a case.
VIP
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 49
Kizmet Studio
4343 Lincoln Ave
Groves 408.962.9300
“Murano Glass is only made in Murano”
All Alan K. Designs jewelry, uses only Authentic Murano
Glass from the island of Murano. It cannot be called
Murano Glass if it’s not made in Murano. Beware of
imitations and fakes! Make sure to look for the ‘Vetro
Artistico Murano’ seal. Exclusively at Kizmet Studio.
Nickolina’s
1257 W. Lucas
Beaumont, TX • 409.896.2543
www.nickolinas.com
Nickolina’s is now
offering articles of
faith. An entire section
of our store is devoted
to rosaries, crosses,
religious articles, quote
blocks, and more.
Make your child’s
frst communion one
to remember with
our communion
keepsakes. Sterling
silver necklaces from
our Creed line come in a
variety of designs.
Come by the Ashton
House to check out
Guy Harvey wear.
Guy’s unique art is
replicated on a wide
variety of products.
Partnership with some of
the world’s top merchants
and skilled manufacturers
provides quality
merchandise at affordable
prices. From apparel to
sportswear to gift items,
there is something for
everyone.
Ashton House
6250 Phelan - The Colonnade Shopping Center
Beaumont • 409-860-7233
3939 Dowlen Rd #7
(409)347-3500 www.wbu.com/beaumont
Your Nature Connection
Fred A. Simon’s Tae Kwon Do
3965 Phelan Plaza, Suite 107
Beaumont, TX 409.212.9669
Southeast Texas’ highest ranking Black Belt, 9th degree
Grand Master Fred A. Simon, is now offering classes
in his new studio. Study martial arts under a Texas
Legends Hall of Fame and Texas Martial Arts Hall of
Fame Member. Call now to reserve a spot for you or your
child! Classes are conveniently offered at noon and at
night.
*Member of the BBB
6
fabulous finds
Retailers we love and their
merchandise we love to have!
Cat5 is available to check out every Thursaday
in the Beaumont Enterprise and it is distributed
to the top locations in the
Golden Triangle.
thecat5.com
The best spot to fnd out what is going on with the
latest trends in dining, night life, music, art, events,
and fashion in the Southeast Texas and Southwest
Louisiana areas.
Thursday Thursday
great dates in april
Champagne &Ribs
April 12
Julie Rogers “Gift of Life beneft,
7 p.m., Cowboy Harley Davidson,
Beaumont. Tickets $100 per person.
(409) 833-3663.
Christus Golden
Anniversary Gala
April 21
6 p.m., Beaumont Civic Center,
Beaumont. Harry Connick Jr. headlines
the black-tie event. Cocktails 7
p.m., dinner 8 p.m., show 9:30 p.m.
Register at www.christushospital.org
or call (409) 899-7555.
Neches River Festival
April 17, 19, 20 - 22, 27-28
Events include the arrival of King
Neches and the King’s Casino
Party, April 17; Citizen of the Year
presentation, April 19; Knight’s
Assembly and King’s Dinner,
April 20; parade, 10 a.m. April
21 downtown Beaumont; Milady
Garden Club Flower Show, April
22 at the Garden Center at Tyrrell
Park; Neches River Festival Art
Exhibit, April 22 at the Beaumont
Art League, 2675 Gulf St.; bridge
lunch, noon and bridge tournament,
April 27, Beaumont Bridge Studio;
Premier Party, 7:30 p.m. April
27, Jefferson Theatre; queen’s
coronation, 7 p.m. April 28, Julie
Rogers Theatre and the coronation
ball, 9 p.m. April 28, Beaumont Civic
Center. (409) 835-4223.
Lobsterfest
April 13
Dinner, entertainment, silent
auction, 6-10 p.m., Beaumont Civic
Center, Beaumont. Golf tournament
April 16 sold out. Dinner tickets
$75; reserved tables for 10 $1,000.
(409) 838-6581 Ext. 117.
Gulf Coast Gala
April 28
Frankie
Avalon is the
headliner,
Carl A. Parker
Multipurpose
Center,
Port Arthur.
Reception 6
p.m., dinner 7 p.m. Tickets $125.
Proceeds beneft the Museum of the
Gulf Coast. (409) 984-6101.
Event Submissions
Do you have an event you would like to promote? Do it with VIP for FREE! Please send us details—dates,
times, location, contact phone, web address and a brief description—to dconstantine@thevipmag.com.
Information should arrive at least 60 days in advance of the event.
{ April }
APRIL 1
YMBL South Texas State Fair
Ford Park, Beaumont. www.ymbl.org.
APRIL 6
Rapper Rick Ross
8 p.m., Beaumont Civic Center,
Beaumont. Reserved seats $75 and $80.
(800) 745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.
com.
APRIL 6 - APRIL 26
“Curious Creatures: Art by Ursula
Vernon”
Reception 7-9 p.m. April 6, Dishman
Art Museum at Lamar University,
Beaumont. Free. (409) 880-8959, (409)
880-8141 or www.lamar.edu/dishman.
APRIL 8
Easter day
APRIL 10
Justice is Served Dinner
6 p.m., MCM Elegante Hotel,
Beaumont. Sister Emily Bordages,
OP, and volunteers advocates will
be honored. Jeferson County judges
serve as waiters. Tickets $75. Proceeds
beneft CASA of Southeast Texas, Inc.
www.casasetx.org.
APRIL 12
Leadership Beaumont 40th
Anniversary Celebration
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Holiday Inn and
Suites, Beaumont. Tickets $25.
Reservation deadline April 10. (409)
838-6581.
APRIL 12 - 13
Spring Dance Concert
7:30 p.m., University Theatre at Lamar
University, Beaumont. Tickets $15.
(409) 880-2250 or www.lamar.edu/
theatre
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 51
52 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
APRIL 13
“Beaumont Neighborhoods and
Communities”
Lecture by Richard Gachot, 10 a.m.,
McFaddin-Ward House Visitor Center
Lecture Hall, Beaumont. Free. (409)
832-2134 or www.mcfaddin-ward.org.
“Our Town: Preserving the Past”
Neighborhood tour, 4-6:30 p.m., starts
at the McFaddin-Ward House Visitor
Center, Beaumont. (409) 832-2134 or
www.mcfaddin-ward.org.
APRIL 13 - 14
“A View From the Bridge”
Presented by the Beaumont
Community Players, Betty Greenberg
Center for the Performing Arts,
Beaumont. (409) 833-4664 or www.
beaumontcommunityplayers.com
“The Fox on the Fairway”
Dinner theater, Silsbee Little Theater,
Silsbee. Social hour 6:30 p.m., dinner
7 p.m., show 8 p.m. Adults only.
Tickets $30. Jackets required for men.
(409) 385-4466 or (409) 385-5562.
APRIL 13 - 15
“Love, Sex and the IRS”
Port Arthur Little Theatre Playhouse,
Port Arthur. For reservations, call
(409) 727-7258 or www.palt.org.
APRIL 14
Preservation Celebration
9 a.m.-noon, McFaddin-Ward House
Visitor Center, Beaumont. (409) 832-
2134 or www.mcfaddin-ward.org.
Little Cypress Mauriceville Car Show
9 a.m.-4 p.m., Little Cypress
Mauriceville High School, Orange.
Food, entertainment, a silent auction
and more. (409) 454-0608.
Wildcatter Weekend: High-Flyin’ Fun!
Kite festival with crafts, family
activities, 1-4 p.m., Spindletop/Gladys
City Boomtown Museum, Beaumont.
Adults free with children’s paid
admission of $2. (409) 880-1750 or
www.spindletop.org.
Thyme for Herbs Society Herb Fest
8 a.m.-noon, Beaumont Botanical
Gardens in Tyrrell Park, Beaumont.
(409) 842-3135 or (409) 866-6441.
Symphony of Southeast Texas
7:30 p.m., Julie Rogers Theatre,
Beaumont. (409) 892-2257 or www.
sost.org.
APRIL 14 - 15
Exotic Bird Fair and Expo
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Robert A. “Bob” Bowers
Civic Center, Port Arthur. (409) 626-
1081.
APRIL 16
Industrial Carillon Concert: An
Evening with Rodney Rogers
7:30 p.m., Mobil Oil Federal Credit
Union, Beaumont. Free. (409) 880-
8144.
APRIL 17
Lamar Civic Orchestra
7:30 p.m., Lamar State College-Port
Arthur Performing Arts Center, Port
Arthur. Free. (409) 880-8144.
Chevelle
Special guests Dead Sara and New
Medicine, 8 p.m., Ford Exhibit Hall,
Beaumont. Advance tickets $27.50;
$30 day of show. (409) 951-5400 or
www.fordpark.com.
APRIL 17 - 22
Earth Week
Shangri La Botanical Gardens and
Nature Center, Orange. Activities
include outpost tours, birding, family
evening hike and more. The event ends
on Earth Day, April 22, with a butterfy
release. RSVP required for most
events. For a schedule, go to www.
shangrilagardens.org. (409) 670-9799
or (409) 670-9113.
APRIL 19
Gladys City Nights: Spindletop Slam
Celebrates National Poetry Month,
6-9 p.m., Spindletop/Gladys City
Boomtown Museum, Beaumont.
Entertainment, food, cash bar and few
surprises. Free museum admission.
(409) 880-1750 or www.spindletop.org.
APRIL 19 - 21
Village Creek Festival
Lumberton Middle School, Lumberton.
Arts and crafts, food, carnival rides
and games, bands and more. (409)
755-0554.
APRIL 19 - 22
“Camelot”
7:37 p.m. April 19-21, 2:37 p.m. April
22, Orange Community Playhouse,
Orange. (409) 882-9137.
“The Fox on the Fairway”
See previous listing.
APRIL 20
Lamar Band Concert
7 p.m., University Theatre at Lamar
University, Beaumont. Free. (409)
880-8144.
Ted Nugent
Guests artists Folk Family Revival
and the Charlie Lucas Band, Nutty
Jerry’s, Winnie. Tickets $25, $35, $50,
$60, $75. (877) 643-7508 or www.
nuttyjerrys.com.
Art reception
“Contemporary American Marine
Art: 15th Annual Exhibition of the
American Society of Marine Artists”,
6-8 p.m., Art Museum of Southeast
Texas, Beaumont. Runs through June
17. (409) 832-3432 or www.amset.org.
APRIL 20 - 21
Magnolia Festival
Magnolia Park, Kirbyville. Music, food,
arts and crafts and more. (409) 423-
6500 or (409) 423-5827.
“A View From the Bridge”
See previous listing.
APRIL 20 - 22
Mauriceville Crawfsh Festival
Festival grounds, Orange. Music
and entertainment, crafts, food and
carnival rides. (409) 782-3488.
“Love, Sex and the IRS”
See previous listing.
APRIL 21
March of Dimes March for Babies
10 a.m., Lamar University, Beaumont.
(409) 835-7606, (409) 656-7944 or
www.marchforbabies.org
Harbor Hospice Butterfy Release —
A Celebration of Life
11 a.m.-2 p.m., Beaumont Botanical
Gardens in Tyrrell Park. Beaumont.
Live music, children’s activities, food,
science experiments by Wacki Science.
Free. (409) 840-5640.
APRIL 22
Milady Garden Club Flower Show
Noon to 5 p.m., Beaumont Botanical
Gardens, Beaumont. (409) 842-3135.
APRIL 23 - 24
“A Menacing Night at the Modern
Museum”
Dinner theater, 6:30 p.m., St. Mary’s
parish hall, Orange. Dinner, door
prizes, silent auction, entertainment.
Tickets $25. Proceeds beneft
Southeast Texas Hospice. For
reservations, call (800) 749-3497 or
(409) 886-0622.
APRIL 24
Godsmack, Staind and Halestorm
6:30 p.m., Ford Pavilion, Beaumont.
Tickets $45 and $35. www.
ticketmaster.com or (800) 745-3000.
APRIL 26
Lamarissimo! Cardinal Singers and
Lamar Dance Company
7:30 p.m., Julie Rogers Theatre,
Beaumont. Adults $18, students K-12
$12, free to Lamar University students
with ID. (409) 880-8144 or www.
lamar.edu/music
APRIL 26 - 28
“A View From the Bridge”
See previous listing.
“The Fox on the Fairway”
See previous listing.
“Camelot”
See previous listing.
APRIL 26 - 29
“Twenty-Fifth Annual Putnam County
Spelling Bee”
7:30 p.m. April 26 and 28, 1 and
7:30 p.m. April 27, and 2 p.m. April
29, University Theatre at Lamar
University, Beaumont. Tickets $15,
seniors students and LU faculty/staf
$10, Lamar University students $7.
(409) 880-2250 or www.lamar.edu/
theatre
APRIL 27
Arc of Greater Beaumont Celebrity
Style Show and Dinner
6:30 p.m., Holiday Inn and Suites,
Beaumont. For tickets, call (409) 659-
5400 or (409) 784-5556.
APRIL 27 - 29
“Love, Sex and the IRS”
See previous listing.
APRIL 28
Gulf Coast Gala
Frankie Avalon is the headliner, Carl
A. Parker Multipurpose Center, Port
Arthur. Reception 6 p.m., dinner 7
p.m. Tickets $125. Proceeds beneft
the Museum of the Gulf Coast. (409)
984-6101.
APRIL 30
St. Catherine’s Drawdown Fundraiser
10 a.m., St. Catherine of Sienna
School, Port Arthur. (409) 962-3011.
Jim Gilligan Golf Tournament
Brentwood Country Club, Beaumont.
Registration and lunch, 11 a.m., tee-
time at noon. (409) 840-9089.
theVIPmag.com | April 2012 53
ACROSS
1 “Batman” star, frst name
4 Rocker, ___Bon Jovi
7 He sacrifced his NFL career to fght
for his country, Pat ____
9 “Stairway to Heaven” singers, frst
name
11 “Sum of all fears” star, frst name
13 Shakespearean king
15 New York airport letters
17 Gentleman
18 “Diary” singer, frst name
19 All-__ game
21 This moment
22 Vampire slayer
25 She played Lily Truscott in “Hannah
Montana”: _____ Osment
27 Had a meal
28 __ In Black
29 Sylvester Stallone played this
character in a series of movies
30 “The Texas Chain __ Massacre”
DOWN
1 ____ Blanchett
2 Go on __: start playing badly at
poker
3 “A nightmare on ___ street”
4 “Along came Polly” star, frst name
5 “The Prince of Tides” star
6 One of the greatest tennis players
of all time
8 “Today” hostess frst name
10 Football org.
12 Superbowl winning quarterback,
frst name
14 “There you are!”
15 Bad guy in “Star Wars”, ___ the
Hutt
16 The star in “24”, ____ Sutherland
19 Several
20 Ashley and Mary Kate
21 “Finding ___,” a flm about a lost
fsh
23 The Jazz play basketball in this
state, for short
24 “Tasty!”
26 Wood used to make archery bows
Find answers on page 4
c r o s s w o r d
vip magazine
54 April 2012 | theVIPmag.com
text by margaret battistelli gardner
I
t’s 1972. My mother
and I are on a crowded
Philadelphia bus on a
chilly April day, and my
face is pressed against the
glass.
The street is lined with
tables where stooped and craggy old
men are arranging produce. Beyond
them is a row of storefronts, many
of them with their goods displayed
outside in bins and barrels. And
in between is a throng of shoppers
haggling to get the best price on
everything from apples to zucchini,
eggplant to eggs.
To a 10-year-old girl, it’s as un-
nerving as it is exciting. Trafc is all
but standing still, and I’m watching
an impossibly old man shake a bunch
of celery at a large woman in a brown
coat with a fur collar. He’s yelling
“Yiminey! Yiminey” at the woman,
who’s inspecting the vegetable with
the kind of precision you might
expect from diamond buyers or drug
dealers. (Years later I would fnd out
that what he’s yelling is “How many?
How many?”) Behind them, a woman
is wrapping up fresh fsh for a man
holding the hand of a child who’s
petting a live lamb in a pen, merci-
fully oblivious to the freshly skinned
carcasses hanging upside down in the
display window of the butcher shop
next door.
As the potential buyer is trying
to inspect the stalks of celery in the
Yiminey Man’s hands, a wall of fre
shoots up in front of my face in a
fash that I’m certain is going to ignite
the whole bus. Amid the fame and
litany of Italian curse words bounc-
ing against the side of the bus, it
feels like Armageddon. But in reality
someone had put too much cardboard
into one of the rusty, dented barrels
that house smoldering fres meant to
keep the vendors warm on this unsea-
sonably cold spring day. The fre dies
down, and so does the yelling, but
even through the thick panes of the
bus windows I still hear the sounds of
bartering, bitching, laughter and the
everyday hum of life in a busy shop-
ping hub.
The bus shudders to a halt at the
corner, and I beg my mother to not
make me get of. But underneath
the fear of the fre, the slaughtered
animals, the chickens squawking in
cages piled fve and six high outside
the poultry shop, and the barrels full
of squid and eels for sale at the fsh-
monger’s lies the excitement of what
this day holds.
It’s the week before Easter, and
it’s the day of our annual excursion to
the Italian Market in South Philadel-
phia to choose my new outft from
the racks in the “chubby” section
of Mort’s Big and Tall Girls Fashion
Outlet. (Or something like that. It
would take me years to see the humor
in buying an Easter dress from a Jew
on an Italian market.)
My mother was famous for my an-
nual Easter outfts. One year I looked
like a biker’s kid in one that was
topped of with a blue “leatherette”
cap with matching purse and shoes.
Another was a sunny yellow dress
with brown accents, under a coat that
looked like a brick wall.
But my hands-down favorite was a
purple-and-white mini-skirt ensem-
ble with white stockings and go-go
boots, topped with a crushed-velvet,
lilac-colored cape and huge matching
hat with a brim so wide that a rogue
breeze could make my face disappear
completely (which, given the circum-
stances, might not have been a bad
thing).
I look at photos of me in those
outfts today and laugh. No matter
the clothes or how goofy I looked
in them, I was out there rocking a
supermodel ‘tude during my dad’s an-
nual Easter photo shoot at the nearby
park.
But before all that and the hours-
long, multi-course feast that followed,
we managed to get to church and
remember what the holiday was all
about.
My journey in faith since then
has changed, evolved and, admit-
tedly, like my Easter outfts, taken
some wrong turns. And just as with
the Yiminey Man, it would take a
while for me to really fgure out the
signifcance of that fgure on the cross
and what He was saying. But no mat-
ter where life has taken me, whether
you’re talking fashion or faith, this
remains my favorite holiday. Here’s
wishing you and yours a blessed and
beautiful Easter.
g u e s t c o l u m n
vip voices
Tales of
Easter fashion
VIP
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heroic savings on your next auto loan!
...to be continued at nechesfcu.org!
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