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The Internet is an arrangement of connected computers, which lets the computer users all over the globe exchange

data. At the present time, approximately 33% of the world population has accessibility to the Internet. The Internet is an extraordinary entertainment and learning tool that may be utilized in a number of modes to increase the ability of a user to collect information. The principal components of the Internet are the World Wide Web (WWW) and e-mail. With the passage of time, the Internet has become the most effective business tool in the contemporary world. It can be described as a global meeting place where people from every corner of the world can come simultaneously.

Content
For more details on this topic, see Content of a business plan. Business plans are decision-making tools. There is no fixed content for a business plan. Rather the content and format of the business plan is determined by the goals and audience. A business plan represents all aspects of business planning process declaring vision and strategy alongside sub-plans to cover marketing, finance, operations, human resources as well as a legal plan, when required. A business plan is a summary of those disciplinary plans. For example, a business plan for a non-profit might discuss the fit between the business plan and the organizations mission. Banks are quite concerned about defaults, so a business plan for a bank loan will build a convincing case for the organizations ability to repay the loan. Venture capitalists are primarily concerned about initial investment, feasibility, and exit valuation. A business plan for a project requiring equity financing will need to explain why current resources, upcoming growth opportunities, and sustainable competitive advantage will lead to a high exit valuation. Preparing a business plan draws on a wide range of knowledge from many different business disciplines: finance, human resource management, intellectual property management, supply chain management, operations management, and marketing, among others.[6] It can be helpful to view the business plan as a collection of sub-plans, one for each of the main business disciplines.[7] "... a good business plan can help to make a good business credible, understandable, and attractive to someone who is unfamiliar with the business. Writing a good business plan cant guarantee success, but it can go a long way toward reducing the odds of failure." [7]

[edit] Presentation formats


The format of a business plan depends on its presentation context. It is not uncommon for businesses, especially start-ups to have three or four formats for the same business plan:

an "elevator pitch" - a three minute summary of the business plan's executive summary. This is often used as a teaser to awaken the interest of potential funders, customers, or strategic partners.

an oral presentation - a hopefully entertaining slide show and oral narrative that is meant to trigger discussion and interest potential investors in reading the written presentation. The content of the presentation is usually limited to the executive summary and a few key graphs showing financial trends and key decision making benchmarks. If a new product is being proposed and time permits, a demonstration of the product may also be included. a written presentation for external stakeholders - a detailed, well written, and pleasingly formatted plan targeted at external stakeholders. an internal operational plan - a detailed plan describing planning details that are needed by management but may not be of interest to external stakeholders. Such plans have a somewhat higher degree of candor and informality than the version targeted at external stakeholders and others.

Typical structure for a business plan for a start up venture[8]


cover page and table of contents executive summary business description business environment analysis industry background competitor analysis market analysis marketing plan operations plan management summary financial plan attachments and milestones

Uses
[edit] Venture capital

Business plan contests - provides a way for venture capitals to find promising projects. Venture capital assessment of business plans - focus on qualitative factors such as team. The better the business plan, the better your chances of landing that big initial investment.

[edit] Within corporations [edit] Fundraising

Fundraising is the primary purpose for many business plans, since they are related to the inherent probable success/failure of the company risk.
[edit] Total quality management For more details on this topic, see Total quality management.

Total quality management (TQM) is a business management strategy aimed at embedding awareness of quality in all organizational processes. TQM has been widely used in manufacturing, education, call centers, government, and service industries, as well as NASA space and science programs.
[edit] Management by objective For more details on this topic, see Management by objectives.

Management by objectives (MBO) is a process of agreeing upon objectives within an organization so that management and employees agree to the objectives and understand what they are in the organization.
[edit] Strategic planning For more details on this topic, see strategic planning.

Strategic planning is an organization's process of defining its strategy, or direction, and making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy, including its capital and people. Various business analysis techniques can be used in strategic planning, including SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) and PEST analysis (Political, Economic, Social, and Technological analysis) or STEER analysis involving Socio-cultural, Technological, Economic, Ecological, and Regulatory factors and EPISTELS (Environment, Political, Informative, Social, Technological, Economic, Legal and Spiritual).
[edit] Education [edit] K-12

Business plans are used in some primary and secondary programs to teach economic principles.[11] Wikiversity has a Lunar Boom Town project where students of all ages can collaborate with designing and revising business models and practice evaluating them to learn practical business planning techniques and methodology.

Expanded business plan outline


Heres an expanded full business plan outline, with details you might want to include in your own business plan. 1.0 Executive Summary 1.1 Objectives 1.2 Mission 1.3 Keys to Success

2.0 Company Summary 2.1 Company Ownership 2.2 Company History (for ongoing companies) or Start-up Plan (for new companies) 2.3 Company Locations and Facilities 3.0 Products and Services 3.1 Product and Service Description 3.2 Competitive Comparison 3.3 Sales Literature 3.4 Sourcing and Fulfillment 3.5 Technology 3.6 Future Products and Services 4.0 Market Analysis Summary 4.1 Market Segmentation 4.2 Target Market Segment Strategy 4.2.1 Market Needs 4.2.2 Market Trends 4.2.3 Market Growth 4.3 Industry Analysis 4.3.1 Industry Participants 4.3.2 Distribution Patterns 4.3.3 Competition and Buying Patterns 4.3.4 Main Competitors 5.0 Strategy and Implementation Summary 5.1 Strategy Pyramids 5.2 Value Proposition 5.3 Competitive Edge 5.4 Marketing Strategy 5.4.1 Positioning Statements 5.4.2 Pricing Strategy 5.4.3 Promotion Strategy 5.4.4 Distribution Patterns 5.4.5 Marketing Programs 5.5 Sales Strategy 5.5.1 Sales Forecast 5.5.2 Sales Programs 5.6 Strategic Alliances 5.7 Milestones 6.0 Web Plan Summary 6.1 Website Marketing Strategy 6.2 Development Requirements

7.0 Management Summary 7.1 Organizational Structure 7.2 Management Team 7.3 Management Team Gaps 7.4 Personnel Plan 8.0 Financial Plan 8.1 Important Assumptions 8.2 Key Financial Indicators 8.3 Break-even Analysis 8.4 Projected Profit and Loss 8.5 Projected Cash Flow 8.6 Projected Balance Sheet 8.7 Business Ratios 8.8 Long-term Plan