BABSC_2011-2012_as_at_29 Nov 2011 | Secondary School | Academic Degree

Nanyang Technological University National Institute of Education 1 Nanyang Walk Singapore 637616 Republic of Singapore Telephone: 67903888 Fax

:68969274
NTU Reg. No. 200604393R

Nov 2011

ENQUIRIES

For enquiries on admission to initial teacher preparation (ITP) programmes offered by NIE, please email to: nieadmtp@nie.edu.sg

You may wish to visit the following NIE homepage for information on the ITP programmes: http://www.nie.edu.sg Because of the large number of candidates seeking admission, we regret that no telephone or personal enquiries will be entertained.

CONTENTS Page General Information  Introduction  Applications  Other Requirements  Matriculation & Registration  Examinations, Assessment of Coursework & Practicum  International Student Exchange Programme Academic Structure of Programmes  The Academic Unit System  BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) Programmes - Curriculum Structure for the BA (Ed) (General) (Primary) Programme - Curriculum Structure for the BA (Ed) (Chinese/Malay Language Specialisation) (Primary) Programme - Curriculum Structure for the BA (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Programme - Curriculum Structure for BA (Ed) (Chinese/Malay Language Specialisation) (Secondary) Programme - Curriculum Structure for the BSc (Ed) (General) (Primary) Programme 44 48 52 56 60 30 2 6 9 17 18 28

Page - Curriculum Structure for BSc (Ed) (Physical Education & Sports Science) (Primary) Programme - Curriculum Structure for the BSc (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Programme - Curriculum Structure for the BSc (Ed) (Physical Education & Sports Science) (Secondary) Programme Education Studies Curriculum Studies Subject Knowledge Academic Subjects Essential Course Language Enhancement and Academic Discourse Skills Practicum General Electives 64 69 73 78 86 160 172 348 349 351 354

The information in this handbook is based on information available at the time of publication. The Institute reserves the right to make alterations without notice.

GENERAL INFORMATION

General Information

INTRODUCTION The National Institute of Education (NIE) was established on 1 July 1991 as an institute of the Nanyang Technological University (NTU).

To be an Institute of Distinction

To excel in teacher education and educational research Degree Programmes offered Student teachers in the bachelor's degree programmes are registered as undergraduates of the Nanyang Technological University. The University offers the following degree programmes at the National Institute of Education: Bachelor of Arts (Education) [BA (Ed)] (full-time) Bachelor of Science (Education) [BSc (Ed)] (full-time) The above programmes include those specialising in Chinese Language & Literature, Malay Language & Literature and Physical Education & Sports Science as part of their academic and curriculum subjects. Bachelor of Education [B Ed] (part-time)

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General Information

All these programmes are administered by the Office of Teacher Education which is committed to developing educational professionals ready to be leaders in the service of learners. All student teachers come under the purview of the Dean, Teacher Education. Aims of the BA (Ed) & BSc (Ed) Programmes The degree programmes are positioned to integrate the best of an academic degree with a good foundation in the field of education to produce graduates with the knowledge and skills to excel in careers both in education and education-related fields and beyond. The curriculum of these programmes is broad-based and flexible with the rigour expected of any internationally recognised undergraduate programme. The best graduates are able to pursue advanced qualifications both in the academic disciplines and in the field of education. The programmes prepare student teachers for primary or secondary teaching. Duration of the BA (Ed) & BSc (Ed) Programmes The programmes extend over a period of four years and lead to the award of the degree of Bachelor of Arts (Education) or Bachelor of Science (Education). Student teachers may be awarded honours degree based on excellent overall performance in the four year programmes. The minimum period of study required for the degree of BA/BSc (Ed) is 3½ years. No candidate is permitted to take more than 6 years to obtain the degree.

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General Information

The Academic Unit System The University adopts the Academic Unit System, that is, academic units are used to measure academic workload per semester and per academic year. The academic year is currently divided into two semesters. The Academic Unit (AU) provides a consistent measure of the student teacher's academic workload related to both class attendance and independent preparation. Used to weight courses in a subject taught for the duration of one semester of 13 teaching weeks, each Academic Unit represents an average workload of one hour per week in the form of lecture/tutorial classes, or three hours per week in the form of laboratory/field work sessions. For example, a typical course with one lecture hour per week and one tutorial hour per week carries 2 AUs. Academic Units are calculated on a course basis, that is, subjects are made up of courses, and each course carries a certain number of AUs.

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General Information Academic Calendar The academic year is made up of two semesters as follows: Academic Year 2011-2012 Programme Dates of Orientation (O+) Teaching Weeks (TW) / Recess (R) / Vacation (V) Semester 1 O : 25 Jul 2011 05 Aug 2011 TW: 08 Aug 2011 02 Dec 2011 R : 24 Sep 2011 02 Oct 2011 V : 03 Dec 2011 08 Jan 2012 Semester 2 TW: 09 Jan 2012 04 May 2012 R : 25 Feb 2012 04 Mar 2012 V : 05 May 2012 05 Aug 2012** Semester 1 TW: 08 Aug 2011 02 Dec 2011 R : 24 Sep 2011 02 Oct 2011 V : 03 Dec 2011 08 Jan 2012 Semester 2 TW: 09 Jan 2012 04/18 May 2012@ R : 25 Feb 2012 04 Mar 2012 V : 05/19 May 2012 05 Aug 2012** Semester 1 TW: 08 Aug 2011 02 Dec 2011 R : 24 Sep 2011 02 Oct 2011 V : 03 Dec 2011 08 Jan 2012 Semester 2 TW: 09 Jan 2012 04 May 2012 R : 25 Feb 2012 04 Mar 2012 V : 05 May 2012 05 Aug 2012** Dates of Revision / Examination Dates of Practicum BA/BSc (Ed) Year 1 Nil 12 Nov 2011 02 Dec 2011 14 Apr 2012 04 May 2012 02 Jul 2012 13 Jul 2012 (2 weeks of School Experience during the vacation before Year 2) BA/BSc (Ed) Year 2 B Ed Year 2 12 Nov 2011 02 Dec 2011 Nil 14 Apr 2012 04 May 2012 25 Jun 2012 27 Jul 2012 (5 weeks of Teaching Assistantship during the vacation before Year 3 for BA/BSc (Ed) only ) BA/BSc (Ed) Year 3 B Ed Year 3 12 Nov 2011 02 Dec 2011 Nil 14 Apr 2012 04 May 2012 25 Jun 2012 27 Jul 2012 (5 weeks of Teaching Practice 1 during the vacation before Year 4 for BA/BSc (Ed) only ) BA/BSc (Ed) Year 4 B Ed Year 4 Semester 1 TW: 08 Aug 2011 02 Dec 2011 R : 24 Sep 2011 02 Oct 2011 V : 03 Dec 2011 08 Jan 2012 Semester 2 TW: 09 Jan 2012 R : 10 Mar 2012 18 May 2012 18 Mar 2012 12 Nov 2011 02 Dec 2011 Nil 14 Apr 2012 04 May 2012 07 May 2012 18 May 2012 (Compulsory Enrichment Programme) 20 Feb 2012 04 May 2012* (10 weeks of Teaching Practice 2 for BA/BSc (Ed) only) * -week break + Orientation includes Registration of Courses ** Practicum starts during vacation period @ Student Teachers taking CS English Language but not doing English as AS will attend CELS sessions from 07 to 18 May 2012 5 .

However.General Information APPLICATIONS 1 Entry Requirements Programme for the BA/BSc (Education) 1. a minimum grade of D7 in a second language (Chinese/Malay/Tamil) taken at the GCE 'A' Level Examination. 6 . and c) d) 1. a pass in Mathematics obtained either at the GCE 'O' Level Examination or at least at 'AO' level in the GCE 'A' Level Examination.1 above. b) a minimum grade of C6 in at least five subjects including English as a First Language taken at the GCE 'O' Level Examination.1 For GCE 'A' Level Holders (for Examinations taken up to Year 2006) Applicants who have taken the Singapore-Cambridge GCE Advanced Level Examination or Higher School Certificate Examination must have obtained: a) passes in at least two subjects at 'A' level and two Paper (English) taken at one and the same sitting of the examination.2 Applicants who have taken commercial subjects in the Singapore-Cambridge GCE Advanced Level Examination or equivalent examination must meet the requirements stipulated in paragraph 1. or a minimum grade of D7 in a first language (Higher Chinese/Higher Malay/Higher Tamil) taken at the GCE 'O' Level Examination.

3 For GCE 'A' Level Holders (for Examinations taken from Year 2007 onwards) Applicants who have taken the Singapore-Cambridge GCE Advanced Level Examination must have obtained: a) passes in at least two subjects at H2 level and two subjects at H1 level including a pass in General Paper (or Knowledge and Inquiry at H2 level) taken at one and the same sitting of the examination. 7 . Shorthand and Typing. and d) a pass in Mathematics obtained either at the GCE 'O' Level Examination or at least at H1 level in the GCE 'A' Level Examination. and Office Administration and Shorthand/Typewriting duties are counted as subjects at 'O' level irrespective of the level at which the applicant has passed the examination. a minimum grade of C6 in at least five subjects including English as a First Language b) c) Language (Chinese/Malay/Tamil) taken at the H1 of D7 in a first language (Higher Chinese/Higher Malay/Higher Examination. and Office Administration and Stenography.General Information (a) (b) Office Administration and Principles and Practice of Office Administration are not subjects acceptable for admission to the University. 1. where applicable.

1.General Information 1. b) Same as (b) under paragraph 1.5 For NUS High School Diploma Holders Applicants who have taken the NUS High School Diploma Examination must have obtained: a) Major CAP of 2.0 in English Language.4 For International Baccalaureate Diploma Holders Applicants who have taken the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Examination must have obtained: a) b) c) a good overall IB Diploma score. AND c) Same as (d) under paragraph 1. Pass at least at grade 4 in English and Mathematics done at standard level. a minimum grade of C6 in at least five subjects including English as a First Language 1.1.0 in Mathematics.6 For Polytechnic Diploma Holders: a) Any polytechnic diploma with good results. AND b) Overall CAP of 2.1 8 . and Where applicable.

9 . Art A pass at GCE 'A' Level in Art Or A pass in H2 level in Art Or A pass at Higher level in Art (IB Diploma) Or At least a major CAP of 2. AND Art Focused interview is compulsory for all applicants.0 for NUS High School Diploma in Fine Art Or Art-Related Diploma from recognised colleges and polytechnics Or Diploma) from any discipline with strong art portfolios will be considered.General Information OTHER REQUIREMENTS 1 Special Academic Subject Requirements IMPORTANT NOTE Meeting the minimum requirement for a specific academic subject does not guarantee the allocation of the academic subject. Allocation of academic subject is dependent on ranking based and results (at the discretion of the academic group) as well as the availability of vacancies.

0 for NUS High School Diploma in Chemistry AND an overall CAP of 2. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering or Chemical & Pharmaceutical Technology. 10 .General Information Biology A pass at GCE 'A' Level in Biology Or A pass at H2 level Biology Or A pass at Higher level in Biology (IB Diploma) Or At least a major CAP of 2.5 for NUS High School Diploma in Biology Or A good polytechnic diploma in the approved Biology-related disciplines.0 for NUS High School Diploma in Mathematics Or A good polytechnic diploma in Chemical Process Technology.0 for NUS High School Diploma in Biology Or A good pass at GCE 'O' Level in Biology Or At least an overall CAP of 3. Chemistry A pass at GCE 'A' Level in Chemistry AND GCE 'AO' Level in Mathematics Or A pass at H2 level in Chemistry AND a pass in H1 level in Mathematics Or A pass at Higher level in Chemistry (IB Diploma) AND a pass at standard level in Mathematics (IB Diploma) Or At least a major CAP of 2. Chemical Engineering.

Biotechnology. 11 . Students will be required to pass a group workshop-interview. Biomedical Laboratory Technology. Chinese Language and Chinese Literature A pass at GCE 'A' Level in Higher Chinese or Chinese Language Or A pass at H2 level Chinese Language Or At least a Grade B4 pass at GCE 'AO' Level in Chinese Language Or At least a D grade at H1 level in Chinese Language Or At least a Grade B4 pass at GCE 'O' Level in Higher Chinese Or A pass at Higher level Chinese (IB Diploma) or at least a grade 4 at Standard level Chinese (IB Diploma) Or At least an overall CAP of 3. Students are required to be adventurous.General Information Students may pursue Chemistry as AS2 if they hold a good polytechnic diploma in Applied Food Science & Nutrition. imaginative and spontaneous. Drama No academic pre-requisites. The interview will explore interest in and past experience of Drama.0 for NUS High School Diploma in Higher Chinese Or A pass in the Chinese Qualifying Test conducted by NIE if the above requirements are not met. Materials Science. Biomedical Science. or Medical Technology.

0 for NUS High School Diploma in English Language AND English Literature *ELL AG has the discretion to consider exceptional cases Family and Consumer Sciences Diploma) in any science subject Or 12 .General Information English Language Or A pass in Knowledge & Inquiry at H2 level Or A pass at Standard or Higher Level in English (IB Diploma) Or Language Or At least an overall CAP of 3.0 for NUS High School Diploma in English Language English Literature Literature at H1 or H2 level Or A pass in Knowledge & Inquiry at H2 level AND English Literature at H1 or H2 level Or A pass at Higher level in English (IB Diploma) Or AND English Literature Or At least an overall CAP of 3.

0 for NUS High School Diploma in Malay 13 .5 for NUS High School Diploma in Higher Malay Or At least an overall CAP of 4.0 for NUS High School Diploma in any science subject Or A Polytechnic diploma (in a related Family and Consumer Sciences area) Geography No pre-requisites History No pre-requisites Malay Language and Malay Literature A pass at GCE 'A' Level in Higher Malay or Malay Language Or A pass at H2 level Malay Language Or At least a Grade A2 pass at GCE 'AO' Level in Malay Language Or At least a Grade B pass at H1 level in Malay Language Or At least a Grade B3 pass at GCE 'O' Level in Higher Malay Or At Least a Grade A2 pass at GCE 'O' Level in Malay Language Or A pass at Higher level Malay (IB Diploma) or at least a grade 6 at Standard level Malay (IB Diploma) Or At least an overall CAP of 3.General Information At least a major CAP of 2.

General Information A pass in the Malay Qualifying Test conducted by NIE if the above requirements are not met. Evidence of music certification at the higher levels and/or of significant music performing experience will need to be presented:  For those trained in Western Art Music: o Certification from ABRSM. Music All interested applicants will attend an interview and audition. London College of Music (Grade 6) or Australian Music Examination Boards (Grade 5) 14 .0 for NUS High School Diploma in Mathematics Students from the polytechnics will have to pass the Mathematics Qualifying Test. Or At least a major CAP of 3. Mathematics C) Or At least a Grade C at H2 level Mathematics Or At lea Or At least a Grade 5 pass at Higher Level Mathematics for IB holders. Trinity. Guildhall.

Rock. pop organ. percussion or any other instrument Or o Musical experience in Pop. choral groups.0 for NUS High School Diploma in Physics AND an overall CAP of 2. Physics A pass at GCE 'A' Level in Physics AND a pass at GCE 'AO' Level in Mathematics Or A pass at H2 level in Physics AND a pass in H1 level in Mathematics Or A pass in Higher level in Physics (IB Diploma) and a pass at standard level in Mathematics (IB Diploma) Or At least a major CAP of 2. Japanese or any other traditional/folk instruments.0 for NUS High School Diploma in Mathematics Or A good polytechnic diploma in approved Physics-related disciplines 15 . Jazz. Physical Education & Sports Science A pass in the Physical Proficiency Test conducted by NIE. Indian. Symphonic Band.General Information  For those with different training and performing experience: o Performance Certification from Yamaha Technics or Hammond in pop piano. Chinese. Candidates should preferably also have strong CCA/Sports involvement in secondary school/JC/Polytechnic. Malay.

be required to undergo such tests as may be set to assess their suitability for University study and teacher-training and to appear for interviews.1(c) under entry requirements may still submit an application for admission. such applicants will be admitted to the University on a provisional basis. they will be required to meet the requisite minimum language requirements before they are allowed to graduate.General Information 2 Second Language Requirements Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for second language as set out in paragraph 1. 3 Suitability Tests Applicants may. at the discretion of the Singapore Ministry of Education and the University. During their programme of study in the University. If selected. 16 .

A student teacher who drops a course after the deadline. Student teachers are responsible for ensuring that the courses they select do not clash on the class time-table and the examination time-table which are both prepared before the registration exercise. Teacher Education/Heads/Co-ordinators of subjects concerned. Student teachers can register for or drop a course offered in the semester within the first week of that semester. A course that is dropped within the first week of a semester will not appear in the student teacher's official transcript. 'F' will appear on the official transcript and will be used in the computation of Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA). student teachers must register for the practicum course in Semester 1 of the new exercise).General Information MATRICULATION AND REGISTRATION Matriculation will take place two weeks before Semester I. Therefore. 17 . Enrolment Although student teachers usually get to read the subject/courses of their own choice. Registration for courses to be offered in Semesters I and II will normally take place one week before each semester. Teaching Assistantship) at the end of an academic year before the start of a new academic year. the final choice of subjects/courses sometimes has to be determined by the Dean. will be deemed to have sat and failed in the course. Please note that when the practicum is held in the Jun/Jul period (e. registration for that practicum posting is done after it has been completed.g. that is the end of the first week of a semester.

progress ratings and examinations. project work. The grades for a course taken by any student teachers in all attempts are reflected on the official transcript. Credits earned in other approved institutions will be excluded from CGPA computation. Such student teachers and those who fail will be allowed to take the examination in that course on the next occasion when it is conducted. Student teachers are responsible for ensuring that they register for all the courses and examinations necessary to fulfil the requirements of their programme of study.General Information EXAMINATIONS.00 at the end of the final semester of study before qualifying for the award of the degree of BA/BSc (Education). ASSESSMENT OF COURSEWORK & PRACTICUM Different modes of assessment including Continuous Assessment (CA) have been built into coursework. The degree classification will be based on the CGPA student teachers obtain throughout their programme of study as well as performance in Practicum. Student teachers are not allowed to re-take an examination in order to improve on the grades of courses they have passed. Examinations will be held at the end of each semester. These include test/practical test. No special examination will be held for student teachers who are not able to take any paper because of illness or other special reason. There are no supplementary examinations. Student teachers must successfully complete all the prescribed academic unit requirement as set out by the programme curriculum and earn a minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 2. 18 . essay assignments.

General Information The Period of candidature for each programme is as follows: Programme BA(Education) BSc(Education) BA (Education) BSc (Education) Admitted in Year 2 Period of candidature (Years) Normal Minimum Maximum 4 3½ 2 6 5 Grade Point Average (GPA) System The Institute adopts the Grade Point Average (GPA) system with effect from the academic year 2005-2006. 19 .

50 4.50 3.00 4.00 5.50 1. * IP ABS TC DIST/CR/P/F Courses with Pass/Fail grading only In-Progress Leave of absence granted Transfer Credit Distinction/Credit/Pass/Fail (Grading for Practicum only) 3 The Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) represents the grade average of all courses (including failed courses) attempted by a student teacher.00 Academic Unit (AU) AU is earned No AU is earned 2 The following non-letter grades and notations are also used.00 2.00 1. 20 . but will not be counted in computation of CGPA.00 3.50 2.00 0.General Information 1 Grade and grade points are assigned as follows: Letter-Grade A+ A AB+ B BC+ C D+ D F Grade Point 5. The computation of CGPA is as follows: [Grade P [Total AU attempted in all the semesters so far] 4 transcripts.

will be both reflected in the transcript. b) Academic Probation if the CGPA falls below 2. A letter of termination will be issued. b) A minimum CGPA of 2. No AU is earned for courses with 6 7 Student teachers are not allowed to repeat any courses taken except thos The requirements for graduation are as follows: a) Successful completion of the prescribed academic unit requirement as set out by the programme curriculum.00 is required at the end of the final semester of study. 8 The criteria for satisfactory academic standing in any given semester are: a) Maintaining a minimum CGPA of 2. or at the end of the final semester of study. 21 .General Information 5 attained for the subsequent repeat. c) Academic Termination if the CGPA falls below 2. Both grades will also be counted in the computation of CGPA.00 for the following semester.00 for the 3rd consecutive semester.00 for any given semester.00 b) Completing at least 75% of the normal AU workload 9 Student teachers with poor standing will be subjected to the following performance review: a) Academic Warning if the CGPA falls below 2.

22 . But they will be counted toward the academic unit requirement for graduation.General Information Appeal against termination on the grounds of extenuating circumstances may be made. 10 11 A minimum CGPA of 2.00 must be maintained at the end of each semester to qualify for the overloading of courses.normally only one appeal is allowed per candidature. and reflected on the transcript.the appeal must be submitted to NIE by the end of the 1st week of the semester following the termination . Credits for courses taken from approved student exchange programmes will be excluded from the CGPA computation. subject to the following rules: .

99 3.00 5.99 Minimum Final Practicum Grade * Credit Pass Pass Pass Pass * The final Practicum Grade is based on the grade obtained at the first attempt for Teaching Practice 2.General Information 12 The cut-off for BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) classification is as follows: Class of Award First Class Honours Second Class Upper Honours Second Class Lower Honours Third Class Honours Pass CGPA Range 4.00 3.50 3.50 4.00 4. A student teacher who fails at the first attempt for Teaching Practice 2 but subsequently passes it is only eligible for the Pass Award for the Degree regardless of the grade obtained for repeat Teaching Practice 2 and the CGPA obtained.49 3.49 2. 23 .00 2.

Year 2. Year 3 and Year 4 student teachers according to the number of academic units earned as shown below: BA (Ed)(Primary ) / BSc (Ed)(Primary) Programme Number of Academic Units Earned Year 1 Year 2 Arts (Ed) (General) Arts (Ed) (Ch Lang) 0 0 16 17 18 19 20 21 16 17 17 18 Year 3 Year 4 47 48 85 86 & above 52 53 54 55 45 46 50 51 90 91 & above 92 93 & above 81 82 & above 86 87 & above Arts (Ed) (Malay Lang) 0 Sc (Ed) (General) Sc (Ed) (PESS) 0 0 BA (Ed)(Secondary) / BSc (Ed)(Secondary) Programme Number of Academic Units Earned Year 1 Arts (Ed) (General) Arts (Ed) (Ch Lang) 0 0 25 18 20 25 26 Year 2 26 19 21 26 27 24 Year 3 60 55 56 60 66 94 90 91 94 Year 4 95 & above 91 & above 92 & above 95 & above 59 54 55 59 65 Arts (Ed) (Malay Lang) 0 Sc (Ed) (General) Sc (Ed) (PESS) 0 0 100 101 & above .General Information Classification of Student Teachers Student teachers are classified as Year 1.

GESL seeks to empower student teachers with the skills of conducting service-learning projects while getting in touch with the community around us. and to enhance their language and communication skills so that they can serve as good models of spoken and written English. teamwork. second and third years of the degree programme. Service and learning objectives are determined before the group starts on their project. decisionmaking. project management skills. Certificate in English Language Studies (CELS) BA/BSc (Ed) (Primary) student teachers doing English Language as a Curriculum Studies (CS) but not studying English as an Academic Studies (AS) subject are required by the Ministry of Education to do language enhancement courses leading to the Certificate in English Language Studies (CELS). CELS courses are designed to benefit student teachers in two ways: to equip them with the content knowledge for teaching English confidently. and learnt more about the community around us.General Information Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) is a servicelearning community engagement project which all student teachers will complete. empathy. Student teachers work in groups of about 20 on a service-learning project they craft together with a partner organization or organizations. It is hoped that through the experience of conducting a service-learning project. Each group has a staff facilitator who mentors and guides the group. Spread over the first. among other things. each student teacher would have developed social-emotional learning competencies and practiced. 25 . and eventually assesses the group on their project. needs analysis.

26 . With the aid of informal dialogue with both veteran teachers and school students. to share their personal aspirations with their peers and to express their opinions in an open and creative environment. These activities form an integral part of the degree programme. student teachers are expected to study diligently and participate actively in talks. At the end of the programme. it gives student teachers the opportunity to listen to firsthand experiences of teachers and the perspectives of student learners. Student teachers should not plagiarize or acknowledging or crediting the source from which the ideas are taken. Workshops and Other Activities During the period of training.General Information The Meranti Project The Meranti Project is an MOE-funded personal and professional development programme specially tailored for student teachers. seminars. the programme helps student teachers experience the core competencies of social emotional learning. workshops and other activities organised for them. such as the National Education programme and the Induction Seminar. Seminars. Plagiarism and Copyright The Institute advises all student teachers to respect all copyrighted works and encourages the purchase of original textbooks and/or other copyrighted materials that are required for your programmes. Through experiential learning pedagogies. Talks. student teachers will have a better grasp of the innovative approaches to National Education and be better equipped when they begin their teaching journey upon graduation.

General Information The Institute takes a serious view of any form of plagiarism and infringement of copyright by student teachers. 27 . Cheating. plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty are considered serious offences for which disciplinary penalties will be imposed. A contravention of the provisions of the Copyright Act is deemed to be a breach disciplinary action.

Those interested should speak to the Sub-Dean for Degree Programmes. The programme is open to all undergraduates. student teachers will enjoy a tuition fee waiver while studying there. However. the total number of credits transferred from other universities must not exceed 35% of the total number of academic units required for the degree. 28 .General Information INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAMME The International Student Exchange Programme allows student teachers to spend one or two semesters in an overseas university to read courses which may be counted towards their programme requirements in the Nanyang Technological University. This means that each student teacher will only have to pay for travel. Marks obtained for the credits earned in other institutions do not count towards the total for the award of Honours or Pass with Merit. accommodation and living expenses. For foreign universities which have signed memoranda of understanding (MOU) with NTU.

ACADEMIC STRUCTURE OF PROGRAMMES .

Minimum academic unit requirements for completing the degree programmes are shown in Tables 1 to 4. Electives that form a certain field of specialisation in a particular subject. They add to the depth and/or breadth of knowledge and skills to be acquired by student teachers. student teachers in the Secondary track must also offer 3 AUs of general electives which can be chosen from subjects offered. on the approval of the Dean meant only for those in the Secondary track.Academic Structure THE ACADEMIC UNIT SYSTEM Core Courses. 30 . whether within or outside the Institute. Prescribed Electives: General Electives : Each course is assigned academic units. Electives which may be chosen from a broad list of courses offered by the University. Note that in addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. Prescribed Electives & General Electives There are three categories of subject courses in the degree programmes: Core Courses : Compulsory courses that must be passed to fulfil degree programme requirements (inclusive of the ONE Essential Course).

Prescribed Electives & Practicum 22 34 39 31# / 33 126 / 128 BA (Ed) (CL.Academic Structure Table 1: Academic Unit Requirements of BA (Ed) (Primary) Programme Programme Specialisation Year of Study No. Primary) 1 2 3 4 31 . of Academic Units (AUs) Core Courses. AS: Music and CS3: Music Total BA (Ed) (General. Primary) 1 2 3 4 BA (Ed) (ML. Primary) 1 2 3 4 25 37 38 25 125 28 36 38 23 125 # For student teachers offering AS: Art and CS3: Art.

Secondary) 1 2 3 4 25 39 36 22 28 37 36 24 3 128 3 125 General Elective Total BA (Ed) (General. Secondary) 1 2 3 4 BA (Ed) (ML. of Academic Units (AUs) Core Courses. Secondary) 1 2 3 4 3 32 . Prescribed Electives & Practicum 34 31 36 27 131 BA (Ed) (CL.Academic Structure Table 2: Academic Unit Requirements of BA (Ed) (Secondary) Programme Programme Specialisation Year of Study No.

of Academic Units (AUs) BSc (Ed) (General. Prescribed Electives & Practicum 22 32* / 34 37+ / 39 31# / 33 Total 126 / 128 BSc (Ed) (PESS. Primary) 1 2 3 4 24 35 37 32 128 * For student teachers offering AS: Physics and CS3: Science + For student teachers offering AS: Biology and CS3: Science # For student teachers offering AS: Mathematics 33 .Academic Structure Table 3: Academic Unit Requirements of BSc (Ed) (Primary) Programme Programme Specialisation Year of Study No. Primary) 1 2 3 4 Core Courses.

Prescribed Electives & Practicum 34 31 36 27 131 BSc (Ed) (PESS. of Academic Units (AUs) Core Subjects.Academic Structure Table 4: Academic Unit Requirements of BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Programme Programme Specialisation Year of Study No. Secondary) 1 2 3 4 36 37 33 26 135 3 General Elective Total BSc (Ed) (General. Secondary) 1 2 3 4 3 34 .

BA (ED)/BSc (Ed) PROGRAMMES .

a) Education Studies Student teachers will learn the key concepts and principles of education that are necessary for effective teaching and reflective practice in schools. They will also have the opportunity for in-depth study of some significant aspects of education. The choice of Curriculum Studies (CS) subjects depends on the track and strand to which the student teacher belongs. 36 . b) Curriculum Studies BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) student teachers will specialise in the methodology for teaching at either the primary or secondary school level. These are designed to give student teachers the pedagogical skills in teaching specific subjects in Singapore schools.BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) STRUCTURE OF PROGRAMMES The BA (Education)/BSc (Education) programmes comprise 9 areas of study.

BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) Primary Track General Any 3 CS subjects from o Art o English o Mathematics o Music o Science o Social Studies CS1: Chinese Language CS2: Moral Education (Chinese) CS1: Malay Language CS2: Moral Education (Malay) Chinese specialisation Malay specialisation Physical Education and CS1: PESS Sports Science (PESS) CS2: English Language or Mathematics specialisation CS3: any one below (if not selected for CS2) o Art o English o Mathematics o Music o Science o Social Studies Secondary Track General Student teachers will offer 2 CS subjects which are aligned with the choice of Academic Subjects (AS) chosen. For a full list of AS subjects. CS1: Chinese Language CS2: Chinese Literature CS1: Malay Language CS2: Malay Literature Chinese specialisation Malay specialisation Physical Education and CS1: PESS Sports Science (PESS) CS2: aligned with AS2 specialisation 37 . CS1 will align with AS1 and CS2 will be aligned with AS2. see section on Academic Subjects.

student teachers will offer SK subjects aligned with the CS2 and CS3 subjects and will read 3 SK courses per subject. Student teachers in the primary track must offer Subject Knowledge subjects aligned with their choice of CS subjects. Those in the Secondary track will not be reading SK courses as it is assumed that they would have obtained this knowledge from the 2 AS subjects offered. d) Essential Course There will only be 1 essential course that introduces student teachers to the implications of living in a diverse 38 . For PESS specialisation in the primary track.BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) c) Subject Knowledge This group of courses helps to reinforce subject content mastery for primary school teaching.

manage pupils and to do some guided teaching. They will also be given the practical experience of helping their CTs plan lessons. TP 2 allows for a more holistic school attachment experience which could include e life. Besides focusing on independent teaching. such as. Teaching Assistantship (TA): This comprises 5 weeks and its purpose is to provide student teachers opportunities to observe their Cooperating Teachers (CTs) teach and to reflect on the roles and responsibilities of a teacher. (iv) Teaching Practice 2 (TP 2): This is the final component and it lasts for 10 weeks. 10 week blocks so that they can develop teaching competencies in a variety of contexts and at different levels. 5. (ii) (iii) Teaching Practice 1 (TP 1): This is 5 weeks long and its purpose is to help student teachers to begin to teach independently. prepare resources. 5.BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) e) Practicum Student teachers will be attached to schools for 2. They will learn to plan their own lessons to teach. prepare relevant resources and to manage pupils independently while still being able to consult their CTs and to observe their CTs teach. The purpose for this is to provide student teachers opportunities to observe lessons in the primary and secondary classrooms. the management of CCAs. 39 . (i) School Experience (SE): This is 2 weeks long. with 1 week in a primary school and 1 in a secondary school.

empathy. needs analysis. Service and learning objectives are determined before the group starts on their project. student teachers will be from experienced teachers in the schools about the schooling process. project management skills. 40 . It is hoped that through the experience of conducting a service-learning project. teamwork. as well as for successfully engaging in academic writing of assignments and theses. and learnt more about the community around us. decision-making.BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) For all teaching attachments. They will use the knowledge and skills obtained from the Education Studies and Curriculum Studies courses to integrate theory with practice. each student teacher would have practiced. f) Language Enhancement and Academic Skills (LEADS) Discourse The courses in this component equip student teachers with the basic language and voice skills that they require for teaching. Each group has a staff facilitator who mentors and guides the group. g) Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) is a service-learning community engagement project which all student teachers will complete. among other things. and eventually assesses the group on their project. GESL seeks to empower student teachers with the skills of conducting service-learning projects while getting in touch with the community around us. Student teachers work in groups of about 20 on a service-learning project they craft together with a partner organization or organizations. Communication Skills for Teachers (CST) and Academic Discourse Skills (ADS). BA/BSc (Ed) student teachers will have to offer 2 compulsory courses.

41 . All BA (Ed) (Secondary) student teachers must read an arts subject as Academic Subject 1 but can choose an Arts or Science subject as Academic Subject 2. The lists of subjects for the different programmes are shown below.BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) h) Academic Subjects This area of study covers knowledge of the content and fundamental concepts and principles of either one or two subjects depending on the programme enrolled for. the subject combinations allowed will have to be necessarily limited and may vary for different intakes. all BSc (Ed) (Secondary) student teachers must choose a Science subject as Academic Subject 1 but can choose an Arts or Science subject as Academic Subject 2. the Academic Subject must be a Science Subject. Similarly. However. In the case of a BA (Ed) (Primary) student. due to the nature of workload for some subjects. the choice of the first Academic Subject must be an Arts subject while in the case of a BSc (Ed) (Primary) student teacher.

In the secondary specialisation. Malay Language and Malay Literature must be offered as AS1 and AS2 together and not with another Academic Subject in the primary specialisation. However. Malay Language must be offered as AS1 and Malay Literature as AS2. ** 42 . student teachers can opt to offer Malay Language as AS1 and any other Arts subject as AS2 but they will then not be considered as specialising in Malay Language.BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) BA (Ed) (Primary/Secondary): Academic Subjects ACADEMIC SUBJECT BA (Ed) (Primary) AS Art Biology Chemistry Chinese Language* Chinese Literature* Drama English Language English Literature Geography History Malay Language** Malay Literature** Mathematics Music Physics * BA (Ed) (Secondary) AS1 X X X X AS2 X X X X X X X X X X X Chinese Language and Chinese Literature must be offered as AS1 and AS2 together and not with another Academic Subject in both the primary and secondary specialisations.

a full listing of which can be found in the section under .BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) BSc (Ed) (Primary/Secondary): Academic Subjects ACADEMIC SUBJECT BSc (Ed) (Primary) AS X BSc (Ed) (Secondary) AS1 X AS2 Art Biology Chemistry Drama English Language English Literature Family & Consumer Sciences Geography History Mathematics Music PE and Sports Science Physics X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X i) General Electives Only BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) student teachers in the Secondary track have the option of taking 3 AUs of General Electives. 43 .

English Language. and Music Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. History.BA (Ed) (General) (Primary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR BA (ED) (GENERAL) (PRIMARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BA (Ed) (General) (Primary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 5 below: Table 5: Curriculum Structure for BA (Ed) (General) (Primary) Programme Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101. of AUs 2 3 2 12 3 0 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching AED107 ICT for Meaningful Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT (Select 1 subject area) * AS1 Arts Subject * LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience * AS1 : Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art. Geography. 44 . Drama.

English Language. Drama.BA (Ed) (General) (Primary) Year 2 Category/ Course Title Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT (Select 1 subject area) * AS 1 Arts Subject * CURRICULUM STUDIES (Select any 3 Curriculum Studies areas) Art ACA201 Artistic Processes I (includes Subject ACA202 Knowledge) Implications for Teaching English Language ACE201 Teaching Reading and Writing 1 Mathematics ACM201 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics I Music ACI201 Music Curriculum I Science ACS201 Curriculum and Pedagogy for Primary Science Social Studies ACL201 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom I SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE (Aligned with Curriculum Studies Subjects) English Language ASE201 Grammar Mathematics ASM201 Number Topics ASM202 Fundamental Principles of Primary Mathematics I Music ASI201 General Musicianship I Science ASK201 Topics in Physical Science for Primary Science Teaching Social Studies ASL202 Identity and Community LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers PRACTICUM APR202 Teaching Assistantship * AS1 : Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art. Description of CELS is available in page 25. student teachers are required by Ministry of Education to undertake a compulsory Certificate in English Language Studies (CELS). and Music No. Geography. History. of AUs 2 12 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. 45 .

History. Drama. and Music 46 . of AUs EDUCATION STUDIES AED303 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Primary Level 3 ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS 1 Arts Subject * 12 CURRICULUM STUDIES (Further studies in selected Curriculum Studies subjects in Year 2) Art ACA301 Artistic Processes II 2 (includes SK) ACA302 Concepts and Practices in Art Education 3 English Language ACE301 Teaching Reading and Writing 2 3 Mathematics ACM301 The Teaching and Learning of Primary 3 Mathematics II Music ACI301 Music Curriculum II 3 Science ACS301 Assessment Modes and Resource 3 Management in Primary Science Social Studies ACL301 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary 3 Classroom II SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE (Further studies in selected Subject Knowledge areas aligned to 3 selected Curriculum Studies subjects) English Language ASE302 Exploring Language in Texts 2 Mathematics ASM301 Geometry Topics 2 ASM302 Fundamental Principles of Primary 2 Mathematics II Music ASI301 General Musicianship II 2 Science ASK301 Topics in Biological Science for Primary 2 Science Teaching Social Studies ASL302 Singapore: Challenges and Responses 2 ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 PRACTICUM APR302 * Teaching Practice 1 6 Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences 3 AS1 : Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art.BA (Ed) (General) (Primary) Year 3 Category/ Subject Course Code Title No. English Language. Geography.

BA (Ed) (General) (Primary) Year 4 Category/ Course No. and Music 47 . Geography. History. of Title Subject Code AUs ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS 1 Arts Subject * 3 CURRICULUM STUDIES (Further studies in selected Curriculum Studies subjects in Year 2) Art Visual Arts Education in Museums and 2 ACA402 (includes SK) Galleries English Language 2 ACE401 Teaching Oral Communication Mathematics The Teaching and Learning of Primary 2 ACM401 Mathematics III Music Music Curriculum III 2 ACI401 Science Innovations in Design and Practices for 2 ACS401 Primary Science Social Studies Managing Diversity in the Social Studies 2 ACL401 Classroom ELECTIVES SET Art 2 ACA401 Visual Arts and New Media Technologies 2 ACA403 Systems English Language Teaching the Language Skills in the Upper 2 ACE402 Primary Current Trends in Language Education in the 2 ASE401 Upper Primary School Mathematics The Teaching and Learning of Primary 2 ACM402 Mathematics IV 2 ASM401 Further Mathematics Topics Music Music Curriculum IV 2 ACI402 General Musicianship III 2 ASI401 Science Current Trends. English Language. Drama. Issues and Challenges in 2 ACS402 Primary Science Further Topics for Primary Science Teaching 2 ASK401 Social Studies Teaching Social Studies to Upper Primary 2 ACL402 Level School Children Asian Civilizations: Origins and Legacies 2 ASL402 PRACTICUM APR402 * Teaching Practice 2 12 AS1 : Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art.

of AUs 2 3 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching AED107 ICT for Meaningful Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 (Chinese Literature or Malay Literature) AS 2 Chinese Literature AS 2 Malay Literature LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience 2 9 9 6 9 3 0 Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives.BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Primary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR BA (ED) (CHINESE/MALAY LANGUAGE SPECIALISATION) (PRIMARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BA (Ed) (Chinese/Malay Language Specialisation) (Primary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 6 below: Table 6: Curriculum Structure for BA (Ed) (Chinese/Malay Language Specialisation) (Primary) Programme Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101. 48 .

BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Primary) Year 2 Category/ Course Title Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 (Chinese Literature or Malay Literature) AS 2 Chinese Literature AS 2 Malay Literature CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) CS 1 ACC201 Teaching of Chinese Language 1 ACC202 Teaching of Chinese Language 2 CS 1 ACD201 The Teaching of Malay Language 1 (Pri) CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 (Chinese or Malay Civics and Moral Education) CS 2 ACZ201 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese CME) (Chinese) 1 LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers PRACTICUM APR202 Teaching Assistantship 3 No. of AUs 2 12 12 6 12 4 4 5 4 2 49 .

BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Primary) Year 3 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED303 Title No. of AUs 3 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Primary Level ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 AS 2 Chinese Literature CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) CS 1 ACC301 Teaching of Chinese Language 3 ACC302 Teaching of Chinese Language 4 CS 1 ACD301 The Teaching of Malay Language 2 (Pri) ACD302 The Teaching of Malay Language 3 (Pri) CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 (Chinese or Malay Civics and Moral Education) CS 2 ACZ301 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese CME) (Chinese) 2 CS 2 ACV301 The Teaching of Moral Education (Malay) 1 (Pri) (Malay CME) ACV302 The Teaching of Moral Education (Malay) 2 (Pri) ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 PRACTICUM APR302 Teaching Practice 1 Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences 9 12 9 1 5 5 3 2 3 3 3 6 50 .

of AUs 3 3 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 12 51 .BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Primary) Year 4 Category/ Course Title Subject Code ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 AS 2 Chinese Literature CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) CS 1 ACC401 Teaching of Chinese Language 5 ACC402 Teaching of Chinese Language 6 CS 1 ACD401 The Teaching of Malay Language 4 (Pri) ACD402 The Teaching of Malay Language 5 (Pri) CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 (Chinese or Malay Civics and Moral Education) CS 2 ACZ401 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese CME) (Chinese) 3 CS 2 ACV401 The Teaching of Moral Education (Malay) 3 (Pri) (Malay CME) PRACTICUM APR402 Teaching Practice 2 No.

Geography. student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101. Mathematics. Geography. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. Drama. English Literature. English Language. of AUs 2 3 AED107 ACADEMIC SUBJECTS AS1 AS2 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching ICT for Meaningful Learning Arts Subject * Arts or Science Subject # 2 12 12 3 0 LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience * AS1: Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art. Drama.BA (Ed) (General) (Secondary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR BA (ED) (GENERAL) (SECONDARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BA (Ed) (General) (Secondary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 7 below: Table 7: Curriculum Structure for BA (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Programme Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. Physics # AS2: Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. Chemistry. History. Music Select 1 from the following list: Art. English Literature. Malay Language. Biology. History. 52 . Music. English Language.

English Literature. Mathematics. of AUs 2 12 12 2 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning Arts Subject * Arts or Science Subject # AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS Communication Skills for Teachers Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art. Music Select 1 from the following list: Art. Drama. English Literature. History. History.BA (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Year 2 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 ACADEMIC SUBJECTS AS1 AS2 LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT ALK201 GENERAL ELECTIVES@ 3 PRACTICUM APR202 * AS1: Teaching Assistantship 3 Title No. Physics # AS2: @ Student teachers are required to select 1 General Elective worth 3 AUs 53 . Drama. English Language. Geography. Biology. Music. Chemistry. Geography. Malay Language. English Language.

Music # For CS: Malay. Geography. of AUs 3 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Secondary Level Arts Subject * 12 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CURRICULUM STUDIES (CS1 align with AS1. see section under Malay Specialisation (Secondary track) 54 . English Literature. English Language. History. Drama. Malay Language.BA (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Year 3 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED323 ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS1 Title No. CS2 align with AS2) # Art ACA321 The Development of Adolescent Art & Its Implications for Teaching ACA322 Concepts and Practices in Art Education Biology ACB321 Teaching of Biology I ACB322 Teaching of Biology II Chemistry ACY321 The Teaching of Chemistry I ACY322 The Teaching of Chemistry II Drama ACU321 Elements of Drama ACU322 Drama and Theatre in Education English Language ACE321 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Oral Communication ACE322 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Reading English Literature ACR321 Teaching Prose ACR322 Teaching Poetry Geography ACG321 Planning for Geography Teaching ACG322 Classroom-based Teaching Methods History ACH321 Teaching and Learning of Secondary History and Social Studies I ACH322 Teaching for Historical Understanding Mathematics ACM321 Teaching and Learning Mathematics I ACM322 Teaching and Learning Mathematics II Music ACI321 General Musicianship I ACI322 General Musicianship II Physics ACP321 Teaching of Physics I ACP322 Teaching of Physics II ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 PRACTICUM APR302 * AS1: Teaching Practice 1 Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences 6 Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art.

Malay Language. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 AS1: Select 1 from the following list of Arts Subjects: Art. English Language. Geography. CS2 align with AS2) # Art ACA421 Creativity. Thinking Skills and the Visual Arts ACA422 Visual Arts Education in Museums and Galleries Biology ACB421 Teaching of Biology III ACB422 Teaching of Biology IV Chemistry ACY421 The Teaching of Chemistry III ACY422 The Teaching of Chemistry IV Drama ACU421 Theatre for Young People ACU422 Process Drama English Language ACE421 Teaching Grammar at the Secondary Level ACE422 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Writing English Literature ACR421 Teaching Drama ACR422 Literature Assessment Geography ACG421 Field-based Teaching Strategies and Assessment in Teaching Geography ACG422 Teaching Social Studies to Secondary School Students History ACH421 Teaching and Learning of Secondary History and Social Studies II ACH422 Assessment and Evaluation in Secondary History and Social Studies Mathematics ACM421 Teaching and Learning Mathematics III ACM422 Teaching and Learning Mathematics IV Music ACI421 General Musicianship III ACI422 The Secondary School Music Syllabus Physics ACP421 Teaching of Physics III ACP422 Teaching of Physics IV PRACTICUM APR402 * # Teaching Practice 2 12 No. English Literature.BA (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Year 4 Category/ Course Title Subject Code ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS1 Arts Subject * CURRICULUM STUDIES (CS1 align with AS1. History. see section under Malay Specialisation (Secondary track) 55 . Music For CS: Malay. Drama.

However. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. 56 . Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101.BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Secondary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR BA (ED) (CHINESE/MALAY LANGUAGE SPECIALISATION) (SECONDARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BA (Ed) (Chinese/Malay Language Specialisation) (Secondary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 8 below: Table 8: Curriculum Structure for the BA (Ed) (Chinese/ Malay Language Specialisation) (Secondary) Programme * Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. of AUs 2 3 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching AED107 ICT for Meaningful Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) * AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 (Chinese Literature or Malay Literature) AS 2 Chinese Literature AS 2 Malay Literature LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience 2 9 9 6 9 3 0 * In the secondary specialisation for Malay Language. Malay Language must be offered as AS1 and Malay Literature as AS2. student teachers can opt to offer Malay Language as AS1 and any other Arts subject as AS2 but they will then not be considered as specialising in Malay Language.

of AUs 2 12 12 6 15 4 3 3 2 5 2 57 .BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Secondary) Year 2 Category/ Course Title Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 (Chinese Literature or Malay Literature) AS 2 Chinese Literature AS 2 Malay Literature CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) CS 1 ACC221 Teaching of Chinese Language 1 CS 1 ACC222 Teaching of Chinese Language 2 CS 1 ACD221 The Teaching of Malay Language 1 (Sec) CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 CS 2 ACJ221 CS 2 ACJ222 LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT ALK201 PRACTICUM APR202 Teaching Assistantship 3 Teaching of Chinese Literature 1 Teaching of Chinese Literature 2 AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS Communication Skills for Teachers No.

BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Secondary) Year 3 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED323 Title No. of AUs 3 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Secondary Level ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 AS 2 Chinese Literature 9 12 9 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) CS 1 ACC321 Teaching of Chinese Language 3 CS 1 ACD321 The Teaching of Malay Language 2 (Sec) CS 1 ACD322 The Teaching of Malay Language 3 (Sec) CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 (Chinese Literature or Malay Literature) CS 2 ACJ321 Teaching of Chinese Literature 3: IT and Project Work CS 2 ACF321 The Teaching of Malay Literature 1 CS 2 ACF322 The Teaching of Malay Literature 2 ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences PRACTICUM APR302 Teaching Practice 1 6 58 .

BA (Ed) (CL/ML) (Secondary) Year 4 Category/ Course Title Subject Code ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) AS 1 Chinese Language AS 1 Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT 2 AS 2 Chinese Literature No. of AUs 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 PRACTICUM APR402 @ Teaching Practice 2 12 CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Chinese Language or Malay Language) CS 1 ACC421 Teaching of Chinese Language 4 CS 1 ACC422 Teaching of Chinese Language 5 CS 1 ACD421 The Teaching of Malay Language 4 CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 CS 2 ACF421 CS 2 ACF422 GENERAL ELECTIVES@ The Teaching of Malay Literature 3 The Teaching of Malay Literature 4 Student teachers are required to select 1 General Elective worth 3 AUs 59 .

Mathematics. of AUs 2 3 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching AED107 ICT for Meaningful Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT (Select 1 subject area) * AS 1 Science Subject * LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience * AS1: Select 1 from the following list of Science Subjects: Biology. and Physics 2 12 3 0 Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. Table 9: Curriculum Structure for BSc (Ed) (General) (Primary) Programme Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101.BSc (Ed) (General) (Primary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR THE BSC (ED) (GENERAL) (PRIMARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BSc (Ed) (General) (Primary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 9 below. 60 . Chemistry.

Description of CELS is available on page 25. student teachers are required by Ministry of Education to undertake a compulsory Certificate in English Language Studies (CELS). 61 . Mathematics. and Physics Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives.BSc (Ed) (General) (Primary) Year 2 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 Title No. of AUs 2 12 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECT (Select 1 subject area) * AS 1 Science Subject * CURRICULUM STUDIES (Select any 3 Curriculum Studies areas) Art ACA201 Artistic Processes I (includes SK) ACA202 Implications for Teaching English Language ACE201 Teaching Reading and Writing 1 Mathematics ACM201 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics I Music ACI201 Music Curriculum I Science ACS201 Curriculum and Pedagogy for Primary Science Social Studies ACL201 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom I SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE (Aligned with Curriculum Studies subjects) English Language ASE201 Grammar Mathematics ASM201 Number Topics ASM202 Fundamental Principles of Primary Mathematics I Music ASI201 General Musicianship I Science ASK201 Topics in Physical Science for Primary Science Teaching Social Studies ASL202 Identity and Community LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers PRACTICUM APR202 * AS1: Teaching Assistantship 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 Select 1 from the following list of Science Subjects: Biology. Chemistry.

Mathematics.BSc (Ed) (General) (Primary) Year 3 Category/ Subject Course Code Title No. and Physics 62 . of AUs 3 EDUCATION STUDIES AED303 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Primary Level ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS 1 Science Subject * 12 CURRICULUM STUDIES (Further studies in selected Curriculum Studies subjects in Year 2) Art ACA301 Artistic Processes II 2 (includes SK) ACA302 Concepts and Practices in Art Education 3 English Language ACE301 Teaching Reading and Writing 2 3 Mathematics ACM301 The Teaching and Learning of Primary 3 Mathematics II Music ACI301 Music Curriculum II 3 Science ACS301 Assessment Modes and Resource 3 Management in Primary Science Social Studies ACL301 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary 3 Classroom II SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE (Further studies in selected Subject Knowledge areas aligned to 3 selected Curriculum Studies subjects) English Language ASE302 Exploring Language in Texts 2 Mathematics ASM301 Geometry Topics 2 ASM302 Fundamental Principles of Primary 2 Mathematics II Music ASI301 General Musicianship II 2 Science ASK301 Topics in Biological Science for Primary 2 Science Teaching Social Studies ASL302 Singapore: Challenges and Responses 2 ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 PRACTICUM APR302 * AS1: Teaching Practice 1 6 Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences 3 Select 1 from the following list of Science Subjects: Biology. Chemistry.

and Physics 63 . Issues and Challenges in 2 Primary Science ASK401 Further Topics for Primary Science Teaching 2 Social Studies ACL402 Teaching Social Studies to Upper Primary 2 Level school children ASL402 Asian Civilizations: Origins and Legacies 2 PRACTICUM APR402 * AS1: Teaching Practice 2 12 Select 1 from the following list of Science Subjects: Biology. Chemistry. Mathematics. of Subject Code AUs ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS 1 3 Science Subject * CURRICULUM STUDIES (Further studies in selected Curriculum Studies subjects in Year 2) Art ACA402 Visual Arts Education in Museums and 2 (includes SK) Galleries English Language ACE401 Teaching Oral Communication 2 Mathematics ACM401 The Teaching and Learning of Primary 2 Mathematics III Music ACI401 Music Curriculum III 2 Science ACS401 Innovations in Design and Practices for 2 Primary Science Social Studies ACL401 Managing Diversity in the Social Studies 2 Classroom ELECTIVES SET Art ACA401 Visual Arts and New Media Technologies 2 ACA403 2 Systems English Language ACE402 Teaching the Language Skills in the Upper 2 Primary ASE401 Current Trends in Language Education in the 2 Upper Primary School Mathematics ACM402 The Teaching and Learning of Primary 2 Mathematics IV ASM401 Further Mathematics Topics 2 Music ACI402 Music Curriculum IV 2 ASI401 General Musicianship III 2 Science ACS402 Current Trends.BSc (Ed) (General) (Primary) Year 4 Category/ Course Title No.

student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101.BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Primary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR BSC (ED) (PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS SCIENCE) (PRIMARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BSc (Ed) (Physical Education and Sports Science) (Primary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 10 below: Table 10: Curriculum Structure for the BSc (Ed) (Physical Education & Sports Science) (Primary) Programme Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. of AUs 2 3 AED107 ACADEMIC SUBJECT AS 1 CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC101 Science APC102 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching ICT for Meaningful Learning PE & Sports Science 2 9 2 1 2 Principles of Games Outdoor Residential Camp CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Select 1 from this grouping) PE & Sports APC130 Badminton Science APC131 Volleyball LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience 3 0 Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. 64 .

of AUs 2 11 1 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning PE & Sports Science CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC201 Fitness & Conditioning Science CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Select 1 from each grouping) PE & Sports APC230 Soccer Science APC231 Netball APC234 Hockey APC232 Basketball APC233 Rugby APC235 Softball APC236 Tennis CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 & 3 (Select 2 Curriculum Studies subjects) Art ACA201 Artistic Processes I (includes ACA202 Subject Implications for Teaching Knowledge) English ACE201 Teaching Reading and Writing 1 Language Mathematics ACM201 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics I Music ACI201 Music Curriculum I Science ACS201 Curriculum and Pedagogy for Primary Science Social Studies ACL201 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom I 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 65 .BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Primary) Year 2 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 ACADEMIC SUBJECT AS 1 Title No.

For student teachers of BSc (Ed) (Physical Education Specialisation). CS2.BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Primary) Year 2 Category/ Course Title No. of Subject Code AUs SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE (2 Subject Knowledge areas aligned to CS2 & CS3) * English ASE201 Grammar 2 Language Mathematics ASM201 Number Topics 2 Music ASI201 General Musicianship I 2 Science ASK201 Topics in Physical Science for Primary 2 Science Teaching Social Studies ASL202 Identity and Community 2 LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers 2 PRACTICUM APR202 Teaching Assistantship 3 * Student teachers have to offer two (2) Subject Knowledge (SK) areas which correspond to their choice of Curriculum Studies (CS) subjects to be offered in Year 2. and CS3 subjects will remain in Year 3 and 4. student teachers are required by Ministry of Education to undertake a compulsory Certificate in English Language Studies (CELS). This selection of CS1. CS3 can be chosen from any of the CS subjects other than those of CS1 and CS2. CS2 can be chosen from either English Language or Mathematics. 66 . Description of CELS is available on page 25. CS1 is Physical Education. Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives.

of AUs 3 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Primary Level PE & Sports Science 9 2 CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC301 Instructional Methods in Physical Education Science CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Select 1 from each grouping) PE & Sports APC331 Curriculum Gymnastics Science APC333 Dance APC334 Swimming APC335 Track and Field CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 & 3 (Select 2 Curriculum Studies subjects) Art ACA301 Artistic Processes II (includes Subject ACA302 Concepts and Practices in Art Education Knowledge) English ACE301 Teaching Reading and Writing 2 Language Mathematics ACM301 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics II Music ACI301 Music Curriculum II Science ACS301 Assessment Modes and Resource Management in Primary Science Social Studies ACL301 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom II SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE (2 Subject Knowledge areas aligned to CS2 & CS3) English ASE302 Exploring Language in Texts Language Mathematics ASM301 Geometry Topics Music ASI301 General Musicianship II Science ASK301 Topics in Biological Science for Primary Science Teaching Social Studies ASL302 Singapore: Challenges and Responses ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences PRACTICUM APR302 Teaching Practice 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 6 67 .BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Primary) Year 3 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED303 ACADEMIC SUBJECT AS 1 Title No.

BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Primary) Year 4 Category/ Course Subject Code ACADEMIC SUBJECT AS 1 Title No. of AUs 5 3 PE & Sports Science CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC401 Instructional Strategies in Teaching of Science Physical Education CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 & 3 (Select 2 Curriculum Studies subjects) Art ACA401 Visual Arts and New Media Technologies (includes ACA402 Visual Arts Education in Museums and Subject Galleries Knowledge) ACA403 Systems English ACE401 Teaching Oral Communication Language ACE402 Teaching the Language Skills in the Upper Primary Mathematics ACM401 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics III ACM402 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics IV Music ACI401 Music Curriculum III ACI402 Music Curriculum IV Science ACS401 Innovations in Design and Practices for Primary Science ACS402 Current Trends. Issues and Challenges in Primary Science Social Studies ACL401 Managing Diversity in the Social Studies Classroom ACL402 Teaching Social Studies to Upper Primary Level School Children SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE (2 Subject Knowledge areas aligned to CS2 & CS3) English ASE401 Current Trends in Language Education in the Language Upper Primary School Mathematics ASM401 Further Mathematics Topics Music ASI401 General Musicianship III Science ASK401 Further Topics for Primary Science Teaching Social Studies ASL402 Asian Civilisations: Origins and Legacies PRACTICUM APR402 Teaching Practice 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 12 68 .

Drama. Chemistry. student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101. English Language. Family and Consumer Sciences. Geography. Biology. History. Music. of AUs 2 3 AED107 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching ICT for Meaningful Learning 2 12 12 3 0 ACADEMIC SUBJECTS AS1 Science Subject * AS2 Arts or Science Subject # LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience * # AS1: AS2: Select 1 from the following Science Subjects: Biology.BSc (Ed) (General) (Secondary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR BSC (ED) (GENERAL) (SECONDARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BSc (Ed) (General) (Secondary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 11 below: Table 11: Curriculum Structure for BSc (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Programme Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. English Literature. Physics Note: In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. Chemistry. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. Mathematics. Mathematics. Physics Select 1 from the following list: Art. 69 .

Music. Chemistry. Mathematics. History. English Literature.BSc (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Year 2 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 ACADEMIC SUBJECTS AS1 AS2 Title No. Drama. Biology. of AUs 2 12 12 2 3 PRACTICUM APR201 * # AS1: AS2: Teaching Assistantship 3 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning Science Subject * Arts or Science Subject # LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers GENERAL ELECTIVES@ Select 1 from the following Science Subjects: Biology. Physics @ Student teachers are required to select 1 General Elective worth 3 AUs 70 . Physics Select 1 from the following list: Art. English Language. Mathematics. Geography. Family and Consumer Sciences. Chemistry.

Family and Consumer Sciences. Physics 71 .BSc (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Year 3 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED323 ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS1 CURRICULUM STUDIES (CS1 Art ACA321 ACA322 ACB321 ACB322 ACY321 ACY322 ACU321 ACU322 ACE321 ACE322 English Literature Family and Consumer Sciences Geography History ACR321 ACR322 ACQ321 ACQ322 ACG321 ACG322 ACH321 ACH322 ACM321 ACM322 ACI321 ACI322 ACP321 ACP322 Title No. Mathematics. Chemistry. of Aus 3 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Secondary Level Science Subject * align with AS1. CS2 align with AS2) The Development of Adolescent Art & Its Implications for Teaching Concepts and Practices in Art Education Teaching of Biology I Teaching of Biology II The Teaching of Chemistry I The Teaching of Chemistry II Elements of Drama Drama and Theatre in Education Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Oral Communication Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Reading Teaching Prose Teaching Poetry Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences Teaching Planning for Geography Teaching Classroom-based Teaching Methods Teaching and Learning of Secondary History and Social Studies I Teaching for Historical Understanding Teaching and Learning Mathematics I Teaching and Learning Mathematics II General Musicianship I General Musicianship II Teaching of Physics I Teaching of Physics II Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences Teaching Practice 1 12 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Biology Chemistry Drama English Language Mathematics Music Physics ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 PRACTICUM APR302 * AS1: 6 Select 1 from the following Science Subjects: Biology.

CS2 align with AS2) Art ACA421 Creativity. Mathematics. Chemistry.BSc (Ed) (General) (Secondary) Year 4 Category/ Course Title Subject Code ACADEMIC SUBJECT * AS1 Science Subject * CURRICULUM STUDIES (CS1 align with AS1. Thinking Skills and the Visual Arts Visual Arts Education in Museums and ACA422 Galleries Biology Teaching of Biology III ACB421 Teaching of Biology IV ACB422 Chemistry The Teaching of Chemistry III ACY421 The Teaching of Chemistry IV ACY422 Drama Theatre for Young People ACU421 Process Drama ACU422 English Language Teaching Grammar at the Secondary Level ACE421 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: ACE422 Writing English Literature Teaching Drama ACR421 Literature Assessment ACR422 Family and Evaluation in Family and Consumer Sciences ACQ421 Consumer Teaching Sciences Trends in Family and Consumer Sciences ACQ422 Education Geography Field-based Teaching Strategies and ACG421 Assessment in Teaching Geography Teaching Social Studies to Secondary School ACG422 Students History Teaching and Learning of Secondary History ACH421 and Social Studies II Assessment and Evaluation in Secondary ACH422 History and Social Studies Mathematics Teaching and Learning Mathematics III ACM421 Teaching and Learning Mathematics IV ACM422 Music General Musicianship III ACI421 The Secondary School Music Syllabus ACI422 Physics Teaching of Physics III ACP421 Teaching of Physics IV ACP422 PRACTICUM APR402 * AS1: Teaching Practice 2 12 No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Select 1 from the following Science Subjects: Biology. Physics 72 . Family and Consumer Sciences.

BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Secondary) CURRICULUM STRUCTURE FOR BSC (ED) (PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS SCIENCE) (SECONDARY) PROGRAMME Student teachers enrolled in the BSc (Ed) (PE and Sports Science) (Secondary) programme will follow the curriculum structure shown in Table 12 below: Table 12: Curriculum Structure for the BSc (Ed) (PE and Sports Science) (Secondary) Programme Year 1 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED105 AED106 Title No. 73 . Geography & Mathematics 3 0 In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives. of AUs 2 3 AED107 ACADEMIC SUBJECTS AS1 AS2 Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching ICT for Meaningful Learning PE & Sports Science Arts or Science Subject # 2 9 12 2 1 2 CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC121 Principles of Games Science APC122 Outdoor Residential Camp CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Select 1 from this grouping) PE & Sports APC141 Badminton Science APC142 Volleyball LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills PRACTICUM APR102 School Experience # Note: AS2: Select 1 from the following list: English Language. Description on GESL projects is available in page 25. student teachers are required to undertake a compulsory Group Endeavours in Service Learning (GESL) project AGS101.

of AUs 2 11 12 1 The Social Context of Teaching & Learning ACADEMIC SUBJECTS AS1 PE & Sports Science AS2 Arts or Science Subject # CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC221 Fitness & Conditioning Science CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Select 1 from each grouping) PE & Sports APC241 Soccer Science APC242 Netball APC245 Hockey APC243 Rugby APC244 Basketball APC246 Softball APC247 Tennis LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers GENERAL ELECTIVES@ 2 2 2 2 3 PRACTICUM APR202 @ Teaching Assistantship 3 Student teachers are required to select 1 General Elective worth 3 AUs 74 .BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Secondary) Year 2 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED201 Title No.

BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Secondary) Year 3 Category/ Course Subject Code EDUCATION STUDIES AED323 ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 AS1 Title No. of AUs 3 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Secondary Level PE & Sports Science 9 2 CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC321 Instructional Methods in Physical Education Science CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 (Select 1 from each grouping) PE & Sports APC341 Curriculum Gymnastics Science APC343 Dance APC342 Swimming APC344 Track & Field CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 (Align with Academic Subject 2) Art ACA321 Development of Adolescent Art & Its Implication for Teaching ACA322 Concepts and Practices in Art Education Biology ACB321 Teaching of Biology I ACB322 Teaching of Biology II Chemistry ACY321 The Teaching of Chemistry I ACY322 The Teaching of Chemistry II Drama ACU321 Elements of Drama ACU322 Drama and Theatre in Education English ACE321 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Language Oral Communication ACE322 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Reading English ACR321 Teaching Prose Literature ACR322 Teaching Poetry Geography ACG321 Planning for Geography Teaching ACG322 Classroom-based Teaching Methods 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 75 .

BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Secondary) c Year 3 Category/ Subject History Course Code ACH321 Title Teaching and Learning of Secondary History and Social Studies I Teaching for Historical Understanding Teaching and Learning Mathematics I Teaching and Learning Mathematics II General Musicianship I General Musicianship II Teaching of Physics I Teaching of Physics II Multicultural Studies: Appreciating & Valuing Differences Teaching Practice 1 No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ACH322 Mathematics ACM321 ACM322 Music ACI321 ACI322 Physics ACP321 ACP322 ESSENTIAL COURSE AMX301 PRACTICUM APR302 6 76 .

Thinking Skills and the Visual Arts ACA422 Visual Arts Education in Museums and Galleries Biology ACB421 Teaching of Biology III ACB422 Teaching of Biology IV Chemistry ACY421 The Teaching of Chemistry III ACY422 The Teaching of Chemistry IV Drama ACU421 Theatre for Young People ACU422 Process Drama English ACE421 Teaching Grammar at the Secondary Level Language ACE422 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Writing English ACR421 Teaching Drama Literature ACR422 Literature Assessment Geography ACG421 Field-based Teaching Strategies and Assessment in Teaching Geography ACG422 Teaching Social Studies to Secondary School Students History ACH421 Teaching and Learning of Secondary History and Social Studies II ACH422 Assessment and Evaluation in Secondary History and Social Studies Mathematics ACM421 Teaching and Learning Mathematics III ACM422 Teaching and Learning Mathematics IV Music ACI421 General Musicianship III ACI422 The Secondary School Music Syllabus Physics ACP421 Teaching of Physics III ACP422 Teaching of Physics IV PRACTICUM APR402 Teaching Practice 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 12 77 .BSc (Ed) (PE & Sports Science) (Secondary) Year 4 Category/ Course Subject Code ACADEMIC SUBJECT 1 AS 1 Title No. of AUs 5 3 PE & Sports Science CURRICULUM STUDIES 1 PE & Sports APC421 Instructional Strategies in Teaching of Science Physical Education CURRICULUM STUDIES 2 (Align with Academic Subject 2) Art ACA421 Creativity.

the application of psychology in teaching and learning.Education Studies EDUCATION STUDIES This area of study will acquaint student teachers with the key concepts and principles in education that are necessary for effective instruction and reflective practice in primary and secondary schools. and the use of instructional technologies. the social context within which schooling operates. 78 . the learning and thinking process. Five core courses for Education Studies are compulsory and deal with basic educational concepts such as pupil development.

of AUs 2 3 2 2 3 3 Prerequisites - 3 4 5 6 AED107 AED201 AED303 AED323 Note: The courses listed below are only meant for Dip Ed crossovers and returning teachers entering the BA/BSc (Ed) programmes who need to top up on AU requirements in order to meet the minimum number of AUs required for graduation. Course Code AED231 AED232 AED233 AED237 Title Diversity.ES: Education Studies Education Studies Year 1 2 Course Code AED105 AED106 Title Critical Perspectives on Education Educational Psychology: Theories and Applications for Learning and Teaching ICT for Meaningful Learning The Social Context of Teaching and Learning Teaching and Managing Learners at the Primary Level Teaching and Managing Learners at the Secondary Level Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 2 2 2 Prerequisites - 79 . Inclusivity and Reflective Practice Introduction to Counselling Psychology Critical Reasoning Skills for Effective Teaching ICT-based Cognitive Tools for Meaningful Learning Course Category Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed No.

knowledge. concepts in education such as teaching. citizenship education. students will be encouraged to reflect on what it takes in terms of skills. moral education. It introduces key aspects of education to students and provides a platform to stimulate critical individual reflection and class discussion. In particular. Topics may include the philosophical foundations of education. 80 . learning. and the psychology of learning. The ways in which these aspects influence the processes of learning will be considered. and thinking explored. as well as the role of assessment in teaching and learning. and current educational issues and challenges in Singapore. and proactive approaches to enhancing student motivation. AED106 Educational Psychology: Theories Applications for Learning and Teaching and This course provides the foundation for understanding learners. Asia and the rest of the world. learner development. the course will consider areas such as why and how some students learn or fail to learn. In the course of exploring topics such as these.ES: Education Studies AED105 Critical Perspectives on Education This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to expose student teachers to the broad concerns and challenges to contemporary educational thought and practices. and multicultural education. how moral development occurs. and motivation to become a teacher. cognitive development will be introduced and its implications for classroom-practice considered. attitudes. learning.

they will be made aware of the diverse and multiple roles that are played by teachers in the education system. They will have the opportunity to understand the rationale of major education policies and new government initiatives that impact the work of school leaders.e. Student teachers will be assessed for their skills and knowledge in designing meaningful ICT-enabled teaching and learning activities. political and social roles in the context of a multi-ethnic and multicultural society. AED201 The Social Context of Teaching and Learning This course provides student teachers with an introduction to the Singapore education system that they will be working in. Student teachers will also analyse critical issues related to designing technology-enabled lessons. students and other stakeholders in order to achieve the Desired Outcomes of Education laid out by the Ministry of Education.ES: Education Studies AED107 ICT for Meaningful Learning This course prepares student teachers to engage learners in meaningful learning with the use of ICT. engaging collaborative learning and self-directed learning. learning by doing. Student teachers will learn to analyse the affordances of ICT for promoting dimensions of meaningful learning. 81 . such as integration of appropriate instructional strategies and cyberwellness issues. i. teachers. At the same time. They will need to know the functions of the school system in socializing citizens for economic.

Inclusivity and Reflective Practice This course situates teachers within the realities of their classrooms and the lives of their pupils in contemporary Singaporean society where diversity is increasingly recognized as the norm. Emphasis will also be placed on multicultural counselling. as well as basic theories and principles of counselling process and counselling skills will be presented. The course is also designed to explore contemporary. ethical and professional issues that influence the counselling profession. An overview of the philosophy. history. Student teachers will have the opportunity to become reflective practitioners in understanding and engaging with their own experiences in working with their pupils for the purpose of regenerating themselves and their classroom communities. vocational. conditions for an effective counselling relationship and techniques of interviewing used especially to problems of educational. and research in counselling. legal. career counselling. The role and function of the counsellors in the educational settings will be discussed. AED232 Introduction to Counselling Psychology This course is intended to provide a general introduction to the field of counselling psychology. The emphasis in the course is on student teachers learning the knowledge and skills to build classroom communities that are inclusive of and responsive to pupils of diverse needs and abilities. The characteristics of good counsellors. and personal counselling will be integrated into the course content.ES: Education Studies AED231 Diversity. assessment and working with students from diverse background. 82 . including confidentiality.

as well as the formulation and articulation of good arguments and judgments.based Learning Cognitive Tools for Meaningful The participants will be introduced the concepts and applications of cognitive tools with emphasis for use in local context. as well as practical reasoning skills. AED237 ICT. The experience and exposure gained in this course will help participants integrate technologies appropriately with learning activities. The participants are also expected to contribute actively to class discussion and group works.ES: Education Studies AED233 Critical Reasoning Skills for Effective Teaching The course will equip student teachers with a broad range of critical reasoning skills to develop the thinking and analytical abilities of their pupils in schools. they help to provide meaningful learning by extending the human cognition for learning and engendering conducive learning conditions. The participants are expected to work in pairs or groups on activities that employ cognitive tools. These skills are used for the analysis and evaluation of situations and arguments. Critical reasoning is based in part on mastery of basic rules of elementary logic. 83 . Working in groups. student teachers will acquire an appreciation of how these critical thinking skills can be used to facilitate multiand inter-disciplinary learning in their teaching. The course assessment includes individual and group assignments. they will design innovative lesson plans that would help to stimulate interest in critical thinking and problem solving among their pupils. By learning how to formulate and articulate good arguments. When ICT tools are used as cognitive tools.

and managing learning and behaviour in the secondary school classrooms. This requires relevant classroom management skills and pedagogical approaches to effectively meet their differentiated learning needs. This course aims to equip student teachers with relevant knowledge and skills in relation to creating productive and supportive learning environments. The theory-practice 84 . This course aims to equip student teachers with relevant knowledge and skills in relation to creating productive and supportive learning environments. and managing learning and behaviour in the primary school classrooms. The theory-practice link to strengthen competencies of student teachers with respect to classroom management challenges will be emphasized.ES: Education Studies AED303 Teaching and Managing Learners at the Primary Level Mainstream schools in Singapore attend to learners of various needs and abilities across their different stages of development. This requires relevant classroom management skills and pedagogical approaches to effectively meet their differentiated learning needs. Student teachers will also be provided with opportunities to reflect on their personal pedagogy/philosophy for classroom management. AED323 Teaching and Managing Secondary Level Learners at the Mainstream schools in Singapore attend to learners of various needs and abilities across their different stages of development.

ES: Education Studies link to strengthen competencies of student teachers with respect to classroom management challenges will be emphasized. 85 . Student teachers will also be provided with opportunities to reflect on their personal pedagogy/philosophy for classroom management.

Curriculum Studies CURRICULUM STUDIES BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) student teachers will specialise in the methodology for teaching at either the primary or secondary school level. 86 . The choice of Curriculum Studies (CS) subjects depend on the track and options to which the student teacher has selected. These are designed to give student teachers the pedagogical skills in teaching specific subjects in Singapore schools.

Chinese specialisation CS1: Chinese Language CS2: Chinese Literature Malay specialisation CS1: Malay Language CS2: Malay Literature Physical Education and CS1: PESS Sports Science (PESS) CS2: aligned with AS2 specialisation 87 . For a full list of AS subjects. see section on Academic Subjects. CS1 will align with AS1 and CS2 will be aligned with AS2.Curriculum Studies Primary Track General Any 3 CS subjects from o Art o English o Mathematics o Music o Science o Social Studies CS1: Chinese Language CS2: Moral Education (Chinese) CS1: Malay Language CS2: Moral Education (Malay) Chinese specialisation Malay specialisation Physical Education and CS1: PESS Sports Science (PESS) CS2: English Language or Mathematics specialisation CS3: Any CS subject (if not selected as CS2): o Art o English o Mathematics o Music o Science o Social Studies Secondary Track General Student teachers will offer 2 CS subjects which are aligned with the choice of Academic Subjects (AS) chosen.

Title Artistic Processes I its Implications for Teaching Artistic Processes II Concepts and Practices in Art Education Visual Arts and New Media Technologies * Visual Arts Education in Museums and Galleries Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No.CS: Art (Primary) The Teaching of Art (Primary) Course Code ACA201 ACA202 ACA301 ACA302 ACA401 ACA402 ACA403 Semiotic Systems * Student teachers reading AS: Art are exempted from Visual Arts and New Media Technologies. of AUs 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 Prerequisites - ACA201 Artistic Processes I This course introduces student teachers to the practices of art appreciation through critical studies as well as two-dimensional art activities that will increase their own understanding of the practical processes appropriate to primary art teaching. ACA202 Implications for Teaching This course will consist of introductions to classical and contemporary theories of children development in the visual arts. Student teachers will be aware of the values and 88 . This course will help student teachers understand the various theoretical frameworks and how these underpin particular approaches to pedagogy and classroom practice. The course will also show the role that art processes play during childhood in fostering and encouraging thinking skills and creativity.

The course will also show the role that art processes play during childhood in fostering and encouraging thinking skills and creativity. ACA301 Artistic Processes II This course introduces student teachers to the practices of art appreciation through critical studies as well as three-dimensional art activities that will increase their own understanding of the practical processes appropriate to primary art teaching. Student teachers will also learn how to design art experiences for young children which will promote and encourage intellectual and emotional development. 89 . Issues that arise from the various education philosophies and theories and their curriculum implications in art education will be discussed. ACA302 Concepts and Practices in Art Education The course will look into how the teaching of art has evolved over history.CS: Art (Primary) philosophies that underpin the art curriculum in primary school. The course will also examine how government policies and initiatives in the arts influence the teaching of art in local schools.

ACA402 Visual Arts Education in Museums and Galleries This course will explore the educational role of museums and galleries and its relationship to art education.CS: Art (Primary) ACA401 Visual Arts and New Media Technologies This course shows the role of art processes in new media applications. The primary aim is to help student teachers conceptualise and develop innovative gallery-based resources for different levels of schooling. ACA403 C Systems This course will introduce student teachers to encounters with representational and expressive media. children learn the foundations of representational and symbolic thought particularly well in art education. Thus. 90 . Fieldtrips will be conducted to the various local museums and galleries. It describes recent contemporary art approaches as well as practical and pedagogical projects that serves as a method for introducing student teachers to Art and New Media. he/she realises the key principle of representation. Student teachers will learn that this dual function shows up especially clearly for children when they engage in art practices. This principle has been termed the the work of Vygotsky.

so he/she makes his/her entry into the more formal semiotic systems of societies and cultures.CS: Art (Primary) Student teachers will learn how. including those used in his/her own society and culture. as the child moves from lower to upper primary school. Pedagogical implications will be considered. 91 .

CS: Chinese Language (Primary) The Teaching of Chinese Language (Primary) Course Code ACC201 ACC202 ACC301 ACC302 ACC401 ACC402 Title Teaching of Chinese Language 1 Teaching of Chinese Language 2 Teaching of Chinese Language 3 Teaching of Chinese Language 4 Teaching of Chinese Language 5 Teaching of Chinese Language 6 Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core No. Key stages in the curriculum and material development processes are examined. including the Chinese character (zi) and hanyu pinyin. practical. ACC202 Teaching of Chinese Language 2 This course discusses the aims. objectives and contents of existing Chinese Language curriculum. Its objective is to enable student teachers to design their own lesson plans with confidence. ACC301 Teaching of Chinese Language 3 This course focuses on the teaching of the written forms of words (ci). comprehensive overview of the different phases and activities involved in developing. 92 . with special reference to Chinese. rational and effective Chinese Language programme. backed by sound theoretic knowledge. managing and evaluating a sound. of AUs 4 4 1 5 2 2 Prerequisites - ACC201 Teaching of Chinese Language 1 This course aims to provide student teachers with the basic theories and concepts related to language and language teaching at primary level. It also provides a systematic.

the procedures of language testing. Student teachers will acquire a comprehensive understanding of the various teaching methods and various practical techniques. Student teachers will be asked to deliver a CL lesson in a micro teaching room and be observed and later receive feedback and suggestions from peers and the lecturer. ACC402 Teaching of Chinese Language 6 Student teachers will be introduced to basic concepts of Chinese language testing.CS: Chinese Language (Primary) ACC302 Teaching of Chinese Language 4 This course aims to equip student teachers with techniques in the teaching of different language skills. ACC401 Teaching of Chinese Language 5 The course teaching competency through a mock classroom teaching setting. 93 . the effective ways of setting various types of questions and the cognitive levels involved.

Hands-on experience and the preparation of teaching plans. ACZ301 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese) 2 This course the teaching of civics and moral education as well as the Chinese language. ACZ401 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese) 3 This course deals with the use of IT in the teaching of Civics and Moral Education. as well as the Chinese language. An overview of the primary school Civics and Moral Education programme. The various approaches to the teaching of moral education. 94 . The selection of relevant materials for the teaching of moral education.CS: Chinese Civics & Moral Ed The Teaching of Chinese Civics and Moral Education Course Code ACZ201 ACZ301 ACZ401 Title Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese) 1 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese) 2 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese) 3 Course Category Core Core Core No of AUs 4 2 3 Prerequisite - ACZ201 Teaching of Civics and Moral Education (Chinese) 1 The historical background of moral education in Singapore schools.

and methods of monitoring and and writing. ACE301 Teaching Reading and Writing 2 This course will focus on the strategies for teaching developing readers and writers at the upper primary level. Student teachers will learn how language is learnt at home and in school so that they will be able to select teaching strategies that are appropriate for multilingual classrooms. Student teachers will learn strategies for teaching the reading and writing of fiction. Description of CELS is available on page 25. non-fiction 95 . Student xts and textbooks as resources for teaching reading and writing.CS: English Language (Primary) The Teaching of English Language (Primary) Course Code ACE201 ACE301 ACE401 ACE402 Title Teaching Reading and Writing 1 Teaching Reading and Writing 2 Teaching Oral Communication Teaching the Language Skills in the Upper Primary Course Category Core Core Core Core No of AUs 3 3 2 2 Prerequisite - Certificate in English Language Studies (CELS) BA/BSc (Ed) (Primary) student teachers doing English Language as a Curriculum Studies (CS) but not studying English as an Academic Studies (AS) subject are required by the Ministry of Education to do language enhancement courses leading to the Certificate in English Language Studies (CELS). ACE201 Teaching Reading and Writing 1 This course will equip student teachers with the knowledge of processes and strategies to teach reading and writing at the lower primary level. They will become familiar with the learning outcomes of the Primary English Language Syllabus.

CS: English Language (Primary) and multimodal texts. listening and viewing. ACE402 Teaching the Language Skills in the Upper Primary This course is for student teachers who wish to specialise in teaching English in the upper primary. They will learn how to teach language across the curriculum through strategies to teach reading. They will also learn methods of monitoring and assessing the reading and writing of upper primary pupils. Student teachers will also learn how to teach language for literary response and expression in ve thinking. and learn how to integrate grammar teaching within these approaches. In addition. ACE401 Teaching Oral Communication This course will focus on the teaching and assessment of childre Student teachers will learn how to teach children to express themselves in individual presentations as well as to participate as members of a group. Throughout the course. Student teachers will become familiar with the learning outcomes for oral communication specified in the English Language Syllabus and learn how to plan lessons using a range of resources to teach speaking. student teachers will learn appropriate and alternative methods of assessment. student teachers will be shown how to evaluate and select texts out of the 96 . writing and oral skills for inquiry and research. They will become familiar with the learning outcomes for the upper primary level as specified in the English Language syllabus.

97 .CS: English Language (Primary) complete range of genres and modes created for children for use in the upper primary multicultural classroom.

CS: Malay Language (Primary) The Teaching of Malay Language (Primary) Course Code ACD201 ACD301 ACD302 ACD401 ACD402 Title The Teaching of Malay Language 1 (Pri) The Teaching of Malay Language 2 (Pri) The Teaching of Malay Language 3 (Pri) The Teaching of Malay Language 4 (Pri) The Teaching of Malay Language 5 (Pri) Course Category Core Core Core Core Core No of AUs 5 5 3 3 2 Prerequisite - ACD201 The Teaching of Malay Language 1 (Pri) This course focuses on the theories. reading and writing. Basic knowledge of the reading process and development of reading skills and strategies for teaching reading and comprehension skills will be an important component of the course. ACD301 The Teaching of Malay Language 2 (Pri) The course deals with the concepts and processes of listening and speaking skills where the learning and teaching of oral and aural skills in Malay language classrooms will be given due emphasis. Special emphasis will be given to the teaching of grammar and vocabulary as well as integrating the four language skills such as listening. The objectives. content and methods of teaching Malay language in the primary school curriculum will be dealt with in a holistic manner. speaking. principles and approaches in language learning and language acquisition. 98 .

managing and motivating students in their writing tasks will form the major part of the course. Intervention techniques and linguistic difficulties faced by pupils. 99 . ACD402 The Teaching of Malay Language 5 (Pri) Learning differences among pupils. The basic concepts in testing. Understanding of the writing processes and methods of teaching. Learning styles and learning support to enhance language learning. the concept of validity and reliability. Use of IT-based materials in Malay language tests. the construction.CS: Malay Language (Primary) ACD302 The Teaching of Malay Language 3 (Pri) The link between reading and writing and the teaching of writing skills are the main focus of this course. Analysis of test items and materials. development and administration of Malay language tests. ACD401 The Teaching of Malay Language 4 (Pri) Language evaluation and testing.

100 . ACV302 The Teaching of Moral Education (Malay) 2 (Pri) An introduction to the study of moral education.e. the approaches. ACV401 The Teaching of Moral Education (Malay) 3 (Pri) An overview of the programme. The Singapore curriculum and its objectives. Handson experience in the preparation of specific lessons. cultural transmission approach.CS: Malay Moral Education (Primary) The Teaching of Malay Moral Education (Primary) Course Code ACV301 ACV302 ACV401 Title The Teaching (Malay) 1 (Pri) The Teaching (Malay) 2 (Pri) The Teaching (Malay) 3 (Pri) of of of Moral Moral Moral Education Education Education Course Category Core Core Core No of AUs 3 3 3 Prerequisite - ACV301 The Teaching of Moral Education (Malay) 1 (Pri) Introduction to an analysis of the various components of cross cultural practices existing in our multi-racial culture. places of worships. cognitive developmental approach and values clarification approach. The aims and objectives. The aims of moral education and the presentation of four approaches. techniques and strategies and preparation of teaching plans. Religion and how it can contribute to the components. The important festivals and their values. i. customs and traditions. consideration approach.

CS: Mathematics (Primary) The Teaching of Mathematics (Primary) Course Code ACM201 ACM301 ACM401 ACM402 Title The Teaching and Mathematics I The Teaching and Mathematics II The Teaching and Mathematics III The Teaching and Mathematics IV Learning of Primary Learning of Primary Learning of Primary Learning of Primary Course Category Core Core Core Core No of AUs 3 3 2 2 Prerequisite - ACM201 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics I Overview of the Singapore Primary Mathematics Curriculum. the teaching of various topics. [ICT and teaching of various topics. Decimals.] 101 . Teaching of Whole Numbers. Mathematical Communication. NE infusion. Algebra. Money and Measures. Percentages. Fractions. Pedagogical Strategies and Psychological Theories. Ratio and Direct Proportion. Graphical Representation and Statistics. Teaching of Geometry. Mensuration. Preparation of Scheme of Work and Lesson Plans. Rate and Speed.] ACM301 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics II Teaching Problem Solving and Investigations.

102 . Challenging Problems in Upper Primary Mathematics. Topics include: Games in Mathematics. Advanced use of ICT in mathematics teaching. ACM402 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics IV This course provides further pedagogical skills for those who will go deeper into teaching mathematics. including catering for pupils of mixed abilities. especially at upper primary levels. Student teachers will also undertake Independent Study Topics which will enhance their teaching repertoire. the planning and construction of test items and (b) Practice of teaching skills. in particular.CS: Mathematics (Primary) ACM401 The Teaching and Learning of Primary Mathematics III This course covers two broad areas: (a) Various traditional assessment modes in Mathematics and the use of these modes in schools to assess pupil performance.

focusing on the rationale. background and philosophy of the syllabus together with practical experience of the musical material used towards managing and developing a general music programme. ACI301 Music Curriculum II The course examines the music syllabus currently taught in Singapore lower primary schools. Pedagogies and practices that are suitable for primary 1.CS: Music (Primary) The Teaching of Music (Primary) Course Code ACI201 ACI301 ACI401 ACI402 Title Music Curriculum I Music Curriculum II Music Curriculum III Music Curriculum IV Course Category Core Core Core Core No of AUs 3 3 2 2 Prerequisite - ACI201 Music Curriculum I The application of musicianship skills towards analysing and diagnosing appropriate instructional goals. objectives. 103 . improvisation/composition and voice studies is developed and explored in broader segments. music teaching strategies and teaching materials for the primary school in Singapore. Foundational musicianship such as music and movement. 2 and 3 levels will be explored to help student teachers plan and teach a holistic and integrated music curriculum. elementary conducting and rehearsal techniques.

objectives.CS: Music (Primary) ACI401 Music Curriculum III Further examines and evaluates relevant teaching materials. creativity and critical thinking skills.and mid-term goals of both classroom and non classroom music. long. ACI402 Music Curriculum IV The course focuses on curriculum planning as well as the management of musical co-curricular activities. philosophy. methods and practices available for the teaching of upper primary music curriculum. Continue to explore different aspects of music teaching and learning processes to develop an understanding of the music of local and global cultures. current policies and initiatives by the Ministry and their impact on music syllabuses. It examines the rationale. 104 .

A broad spectrum of lead-up games will be presented covering four classifications of invasion. net/barrier. Game-sense will be developed through an eclectic conceptual development using elements of approaches. 105 .CS: Physical Education (Primary) The Teaching of Physical Education (Primary) Course Code APC101 APC102 APC130 APC131 APC201 APC230 APC231 APC232 APC233 APC234 APC235 APC236 APC301 APC331 APC333 APC334 APC335 APC401 Title Principles of Games Outdoor Residential Camp Badminton Volleyball Fitness & Conditioning Soccer Netball Basketball Rugby Hockey Softball Tennis Instructional Methods in Physical Education Curriculum Gymnastics Dance Swimming Track & Field Instructional Strategies in Teaching of Physical Education Course Category Core Core Prescribed Prescribed Core Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Core Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Core No of AUs 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 Prerequisite - APC101 Principles of Games This course is designed to introduce student teachers to the management strategies and theories underpinning the teaching of games. striking/fielding and target to provide a systematic and creative understanding of the transferability of principles.

The students will also learn the basic rules of the game so that they will be able to umpire games in the competitions. Ample emphasis is given to making outdoor education a positive learning experience. expedition planning. and programme evaluation. drop shots and drives).CS: Physical Education (Primary) APC102 Outdoor Residential Camp This course provides student teachers with the essential knowledge. APC130 Badminton Badminton is a game that volleys a shuttlecock across a net with rackets. facilitation skills. execution of activities. 106 . skills and experience in outdoor education that will allow them to conduct similar outdoor education activities in schools. logistics management. The course employs the experiential learning approach to prepare student teachers in areas such as programme planning. risk assessment and safety management. In this course students will be introduced to a variety of methods in which beginners could acquire the basic volleying skills in badminton (such as the net shots. The aim of this course is to enable students to improve their volleying skills in badminton so that they are equipped with adequate badminton skills and learning strategies to enable them to teach badminton in school.

Special attention will be paid to acquiring the basic skills in volleyball i. the face pass (volley). Equal emphasis will be given to health related as well as performance related components of physical fitness. Information about the latest rules of the game and referee hand signals will also be incorporated into the course. Ample practice. Emphasis is placed on small-group activity and how to organize and conduct small-group activity in the school situation.CS: Physical Education (Primary) APC131 Volleyball This course is designed to equip student teachers with the necessary basic skills and teaching points in order to teach volleyball in schools in Singapore. The emphasis of the course is on providing ample opportunities to 107 . reinforced with sound teaching points. Various methods of training and testing for the components of physical fitness will be dealt with in practicals planning and writing training plans will be the concluding part of this course. forearm pass (dig). APC201 Fitness and Conditioning This course is designed to help student teachers understand the theoretical and practical considerations regarding physical fitness and its development. the spike and the block. is given to the use of the basic skill/skills in small-group game situations. APC230 Soccer This course is designed to impart basic soccer skills and knowledge to student teachers for the purpose of teaching children in a school setting.e. the serve (underarm and overhand).

APC231 Netball The course is designed to impart basic netball skills and knowledge to student teachers for the purpose of teaching children in a school setting.CS: Physical Education (Primary) play the game as well as to gain better knowledge on how to teach students. 2) team/game situations and 3) delivery of a basketball class using action-station and team-teaching methods are used to improve skills and knowledge in basketball. Independent and Self Paced Learning will be explored. 108 . goal shooting. and attacking/defending. Inquiry Based Learning. Problem Solving and Decision Making. ball skills. Consistent team with draft. Record keeping/accountability/statistical analysis/match reports. Instructional characteristics will include: Festive atmosphere. APC232 Basketball A variety of practical applications including: 1) individual on-ball and off-ball skill development. APC233 Rugby The form of Sport Education incorporating Games Concept Approach. as well as the application of these skills and game concepts/tactics in game play. The course will teach the basic skills of footwork. Students will be able to assimilate that knowledge (apply it into the Physical Education pedagogy context) in a fun learning-oriented environment.

APC234 Hockey The game of Hockey. It is intended to combine Sport Education and Games Concept Approach as both programs provide a focus of student centeredness. The emphasis of the course is on providing ample opportunities to play the game as well as to learn how to demonstrate basic skills. while inherently exciting. 109 . The Australia Rugby Union SMART Program and gain recognition by the Singapore Sports Council as registered coaches. Modified Games. Sport Education Roles. APC235 Softball This course is designed to impart basic softball skills and knowledge to student teachers for the purpose of teaching children in a school setting. The focus is not on traditional development of sports skills rather on wider learning outcomes.CS: Physical Education (Primary) Formal scheduled competition. Student teachers will have the opportunity to complete the International Rugby Union (IRB) Level 1. is usually poorly taught in schools and is consequently course aims to provide Physical Education teachers with the necessary skills and knowledge to present the game in a safe yet enjoyable manner to their students. and the development of games play through the early immersion of students into modified games situations.

basic floor. Course format will include lectures. and student management systems. Advances in video and computer technology will be introduced to student teachers to 110 . APC331 Curriculum Gymnastics This course will introduce the curriculum gymnastics to participants by means of thematic movement concepts based largely on floor activities and incorporating small and large apparati. time on task. teaching and evaluating physical education including: content selection and development.CS: Physical Education (Primary) APC236 Tennis This course is designed to assist student teachers develop their basic tennis skills to a level of efficiency which will enable them to introduce and teach the games to beginners in schools. and microteaching in a neighbourhood school. The aims of curriculum gymnastics will be espoused. instructional strategies. and feedback provision. organization. discussions. APC301 Instructional Methods in Physical Education This course covers the foundation skills of planning. group work. In addition. The basic vocabulary of movement will be enhanced with emphasis on the cognitive and affective development through the appropriate use of pedagogical styles. observation of student performance. practical experiences. kipping and vaulting skills will be taught with a focus on a mechanical understanding of the techniques involved as well as developing appropriate progression and competent spotting and an understanding of the biomechanical principles involved.

interests and developmental stages. student teachers are introduced to the methods of leading creative dance experiences for children. finally. breaststroke. demonstrate correct and efficient technique in at least three out of the four swimming strokes (front crawl. acquire and. Safety in and around swimming pools (and other aquatic environments) will be emphasised in this course. backstroke and butterfly).CS: Physical Education (Primary) enhance their ability to analyse movement qualitatively. This course is 111 . Student teachers will be expected to practise. The teaching methods used enable the design of lessons appropriate for a wide range of ages. Participants will enhance selfconfidence to teach gymnastics in a safe and fun way. It also aims to give student teachers a chance to discover the creative juice in them and draw on the elements of dance to create their own dances. and water games will also be introduced. Student teachers will learn how to teach swimming to beginners by employing basic learn-to-swim and lead-up activities. diving. In addition. APC334 Swimming This course aims to develop introductory teaching skills and stroke competencies in swimming. Other related skills of swimming such as floating. APC333 Dance Teaching methods and resource for the planning and instruction of folk and line dances in the primary and secondary school curriculum. Student teachers will learn dances from different cultures reflecting a variety of styles and techniques.

physiological. Student teachers will be encouraged to refine their own teaching through systematic observation and analytic reflection. practical workshops.and microteaching assignments in a neighbourhood school. Emphasis is concept approach to the teaching of games. second in a series. pedagogical and social issues and concepts will be used to show the link between the sciences and Track and Field events. Biomechanical. It develops competence in a variety of teaching methods including inquiry. Course content will be presented through lectures. builds on foundation pedagogical knowledge and skills appropriate for school students. Student teachers will be required to be in proper swimming attire for each lesson.CS: Physical Education (Primary) primarily activity-based and hence. 112 . teaching and evaluating situationally relevant lessons. anatomical. The benefits of Track and Field as a vehicle for fun and fitness. In the second part of this course. basic coaching of Track & Field events will be emphasized so as to enable teachers to take charge of Track & Field as a CCA in the schools. as well as growth and development will be emphasised. seminars. peer. problem solving. group work and peer-teaching. The focus is on planning. APC401 Instructional Strategies in Teaching of Physical Education This course. participation is required. APC335 Track and Field This course is designed to equip teachers with the necessary knowledge and skills to teach selected Track and Field events.

Formal/non-formal methods of assessment as well as the construction and analyses of tests and practical work will be taught. and other curricular materials with respect to present educational initiatives in Singapore. Issues and Challenges in Primary Science Course Category Core Core Core Core No of AUs 3 3 2 2 Prerequisite - ACS201 Curriculum and Pedagogy for Primary Science The nature of Science and scientific inquiry for young children will be the central guiding principles for learning in this course. Drawing on contemporary learning theories and research findings. textbooks. ACS301 Assessment Modes and Resource Management in Primary Science The course examines the underlying concepts and rationales in Primary Science assessment. learning aids and other resources for effective Primary Science teaching and learning.CS: Science (Primary) The Teaching of Science (Primary) Course Code ACS201 ACS301 ACS401 ACS402 Title Curriculum and Pedagogy for Primary Science Assessment Modes and Resource Management in Primary Science Innovations in Design and Practices for Primary Science Current Trends. Learners will also know how to use ICT. Beginning teachers will gain an overview of the goals/objectives of the Primary Science curriculum from the analyses of syllabuses. various methods and strategies in Primary Science will be taught through lectures and practical work. 113 .

and designing investigative Science projects. 114 . In particular.CS: Science (Primary) ACS401 Innovations in Design and Practices for Primary Science Beginning teachers will critically reflect on their own planning. issues and challenges in Primary Science. instruction and assessment practices from previous courses and during their teaching practicum. issues and challenges involving innovations in practices on curriculum. Issues and Challenges in Primary Science This course will focus in greater depth on current trends. instruction and assessment. Discussion will focus on trends. The emphasis in this course will be on the roles of a teacher as an action researcher and as a life-long learner. issues and challenges. An attempt will be made to balance both international and local trends. this course will introduce conceptual change. ACS402 Current Trends.

The historical. scope and goals of Social Studies in the context of the Singapore primary curriculum. explorations of the use of effective co-operative groupwork and the use of IT in enhancing learning in the classroom. There will be reinforcement of understanding and skills in planning effective units of instruction incorporating the use of inquiry and other pupil-centred strategies. ACL301 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom II This course aims to provide student teachers with further strategies for teaching the Singapore Primary Social Studies syllabus. It seeks to equip them with a variety of classroom-based teaching strategies that are relevant to the Singapore Primary Social Studies syllabus.CS: Social Studies (Primary) The Teaching of Social Studies (Primary) Course Code ACL201 ACL301 ACL401 ACL402 Title Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom I Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom II Managing Diversity in the Social Studies Classroom Teaching Social Studies to Upper Primary Level School Children Course Category Core Core Core Core No of AUs 3 3 2 2 Prerequisite - ACL201 Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Classroom I This course aims to develop within student teachers an understanding of the nature. The 115 . geographical and economic concepts and skills in the syllabus will be examined and effective teaching strategies for Social Studies will be explored.

ACL401 Managing Diversity Classroom in the Social Studies This course aims to provide student teachers with the knowledge and skills to use an inter-disciplinary approach to teaching Social Studies. More opportunities are given to explore in greater depth. The course will also provide them with the knowledge and skills to cater to diversity in the primary classroom. 116 . complex task design. advanced co-operative learning strategies and the use and development of inquiry and IT-related research skills. ACL402 Teaching Social Studies to Upper Primary Level School Children This course will equip student teachers with more advanced strategies to teach Social Studies at the upper primary levels.CS: Social Studies (Primary) principles and practice of organizing and conducting fieldwork will also be covered.

Thinking Skills and the Visual Arts Visual Arts Education in Museums and Galleries Course Category Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACA321 The Development of Adolescent Implications for Teaching Art & its This course will consist of introductions to classical and contemporary theories of adolescent development and their implication in the visual arts education. 117 . ACA322 Concepts and Practices in Art Education The course will look into how the teaching of art has evolved over history. This course will help student teachers understand the various theoretical frameworks and how these underpin particular approaches to pedagogy and classroom practice.CS: Art (Secondary) The Teaching of Art (Secondary) Course Code ACA321 ACA322 ACA421 ACA422 Title The Development of Adolescent Art & Its Implications for Teaching Concepts and Practices in Art Education Creativity. Student teachers will be aware of the values and philosophies that underpin the art curriculum in secondary school. The course will also examine how government policies and initiatives in the arts influence the teaching of art in local schools. Issues that arise from the various education philosophies and theories and their curriculum implications in art education will be discussed. Student teachers will also learn how to design art experiences for adolescents which will promote and encourage intellectual and emotional development.

This course examines recent research which shows that within form.CS: Art (Secondary) ACA421 Creativity. Given the opportunities and appropriate teaching many later kinds of creative thinking. in addition to aesthetic understandings. logicomathematical thinking and problem solving skills. The primary aim is to help student teachers conceptualise and develop innovative gallery-based resources for different levels of schooling. ACA422 Visual Arts Education in Museums and Galleries This course will explore the educational role of museums and galleries and its relationship to art education. Thinking Skills and the Visual Arts This course explores the role art processes play during adolescence in fostering and encouraging the growth of thinking skills and creativity. Fieldtrips will be conducted to the various local museums and galleries. 118 .

multiple intelligences theory. The management and control of pupil behaviour.CS: Biology (Secondary) Teaching of Biology (Secondary) Course Code ACB321 ACB322 ACB421 ACB422 Title Teaching of Biology I Teaching of Biology II Teaching of Biology III Teaching of Biology IV Course Category Core Core Core Core No. Part 3: covers the various learning theories. and the use of analogies and word juxtapoz for teaching biology. ACB322 Teaching of Biology II This course examines the Biological Sciences curriculum in Singapore Schools and how to plan lessons for pupils of different ability ranges and levels in secondary schools. styles and approaches. and the use of history for teaching biology. and the use of concept maps for teaching biology. It also introduces student teachers to biologists belonging to the minority groups. are explored. IT. are thinking/study skills and co-operative learning strategies are discussed. its applications and resources for Biology teaching from the Internet. safety practices in science. Part 2: discusses alternative conceptions. difficulties and problems in various biology topics. A variety of teaching/learning strategies. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACB321 Teaching of Biology I The course consists of three parts: Part 1: discusses some issues of the nature and philosophy of science. 119 .

120 . Alternative assessments of practical skills. The role of resource centres for field trips. and its implications for teachers and teaching styles are addressed. Test construction. The course will provide students with an understanding of relevant issues to help them become more reflective practitioners. It will include problems.CS: Biology (Secondary) ACB421 Teaching of Biology III This course focuses on issues on the what and why of testing in science. issues. marking of examination scripts. instruction and assessment. ACB422 Teaching of Biology IV This course focuses on current trends. crafting rubrics for nd marking of practical work are also considered. and challenges in biological education. practices and innovations in curriculum. the setting of tasks for Science Practical Assessment. planning and conducting field trips are also featured.

Psychological principles crucial to the teaching and learning of chemistry. The planning and teaching strategies. marking. assessment of attitudes and values. ACY322 The Teaching of Chemistry II Purposes of evaluation. The management of the chemistry laboratory and laboratory safety. constructivist approach. and project work will be considered. and analysis. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACY321 The Teaching of Chemistry I Basic issues. Issues related to the organisation and implementation of the science/chemistry curriculum. The management. problem-solving. test construction.CS: Chemistry (Secondary) The Teaching of Chemistry (Secondary) Course Code ACY321 ACY322 ACY421 ACY422 Title The Teaching of Chemistry I The Teaching of Chemistry II The Teaching of Chemistry III The Teaching of Chemistry IV Course Category Core Core Core Core No. and resources crucial for the effective teaching of chemistry that includes unit and lesson planning. administration. expository teaching and demonstrations. concepts and principles in chemical education. interpretation of test scores. concept mapping. The integration of IT into the chemistry curriculum. take-home examinations. 121 . assessment and moderation of SPA (school-based practical assessment). the inquiry approach. Alternative assessment modes such as open-book tests. tables of specifications.

CS: Chemistry (Secondary) ACY421 The Teaching of Chemistry III Micro-teaching provides opportunities to identify and practise basic teaching skills such as opening and closing a lesson. Web 2. Student teachers practise the relevant skills through mini-presentations on selected chemistry topics at the secondary level. explaining concepts. 122 .0 applications. multimedia learning framework. This includes blended learning design. questioning and responding to pupils. issues and challenges in chemistry education. and inquiry based teaching and learning. ACY422 The Teaching of Chemistry IV This course will focus in greater depth on current trends. The presentations are reviewed and critiqued by peers and the tutor.

objectives and contents of existing Chinese Language curriculum. of AUs 4 3 4 2 2 Prerequisites - ACC221 Teaching of Chinese Language 1 This course aims to provide student teachers with basic theories and concepts of language and language teaching at secondary level. It also provides an overview of different phases and activities involved in developing. and evaluating a sound. Its objective is to enable student teachers to design their own lesson plans with confidence. ACC222 Teaching of Chinese Language 2 This course discusses the aims. managing. rational. and effective Chinese language programme. ACC321 Teaching of Chinese Language 3 This course aims to equip student teachers with techniques in the teaching of different language skills. Key stages in the curriculum and material development process are examined. backed by sound theoretic knowledge. with special reference to Chinese.CS: Chinese Language (Secondary) The Teaching of Chinese Language (Secondary) Course Code ACC221 ACC222 ACC321 ACC421 ACC422 Title Teaching of Chinese Language 1 Teaching of Chinese Language 2 Teaching of Chinese Language 3 Teaching of Chinese Language 4 Teaching of Chinese Language 5 Course Category Core Core Core Core Core No. Student teachers will acquire a comprehensive understanding of the various teaching methods and various practical techniques. 123 .

the effective ways of setting various types of questions and the cognitive levels involved. 124 . Student teachers will be asked to deliver a CL lesson in a micro teaching room and be observed and will later receive feedback and suggestions from peers and the lecturer. the procedures of language testing.CS: Chinese Language (Secondary) ACC421 Teaching of Chinese Language 4 This course aims to develop student teach teaching competency through a mock classroom teaching setting. ACC422 Teaching of Chinese Language 5 Student teachers will be introduced to basic concepts of Chinese language testing.

The objective is to equip student teachers with the knowledge and skills in the teaching of Chinese literature. 125 . both classical and modern. of AUs 2 5 2 Prerequisites - ACJ221 Teaching of Chinese Literature 1 The course introduces student teachers to the Chinese literature syllabus for Singapore secondary schools. Student teachers will also be equipped with basic knowledge about major elements of Chinese literature. as well as the aims and objectives of teaching of Chinese literature. stylistic and thematic features of various literary genres and the skills of teaching of different literary Chinese genres. ACJ222 Teaching of Chinese Literature 2 The course deals with the formal.CS: Chinese Literature (Secondary) The Teaching of Chinese Literature (Secondary) Course Code ACJ221 ACJ222 ACJ321 Title Teaching of Chinese Literature 1 Teaching of Chinese Literature 2 Teaching of Chinese Literature 3: IT and Project Work Course Category Core Core Core No. The course will also introduce various literary theories and discuss their implications in the teaching of Chinese literature. It also deals with the infusing of thinking skills in the teaching of Chinese literature.

It also introduces to student teachers the aims and objectives as well as fundamental concepts and strategies in supervising group projects in secondary school.CS: Chinese Literature (Secondary) ACJ321 Teaching of Chinese Literature 3: IT and Project Work This course provides the fundamental principles and knowledge on the use of IT in the studying and teaching of Chinese Language and Literature. It equips student teachers with basic skills and approaches in searching. selecting and integrating of digital resources in the teaching of Chinese language and literature. 126 .

of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACU321 Elements of Drama This course introduces student teachers to the key features of dramatic forms. 127 .CS: Drama (Secondary) The Teaching of Drama (Secondary) Course Code ACU321 ACU322 ACU421 ACU422 Title Elements of Drama Drama and Theatre in Education Theatre for Young People Process Drama Course Category Core Core Core Core No. personal development. Student teachers will experience and come to understand the processes intrinsic to understanding and creating dramatic works. ACU322 Drama and Theatre in Education This course introduces key concepts and developments in the practice of drama as pedagogy. Theory is combined with practice in this interactive and developmental approach to drama. Student teachers will come to understand a range of philosophical viewpoints relating to the educative purpose and power of drama and how they are realized in practice. In varying contexts drama has been used for: artistic communication. meaningmaking and empowerment.

Process drama enhances learning in the cognitive. The course examines current issues in the philosophy and practice of TYP. 128 . Student teachers will work through a playbuilding process to devise material suitable for the Singapore school context. ACU422 Process Drama This course employs drama as an investigative or problem-solving method. Student teachers will develop understanding of the particular structural requirements of process dramas and the learning opportunities they afford.CS: Drama (Secondary) ACU421 Theatre for Young People (TYP) Topics will include Children and Theatre for Youth. aesthetic and affective domains.

and investigate varied teaching strategies for meeting The course 129 . The course engages student teachers through collaborative learning activities and demonstrations of approaches to teaching oral communication. evaluating and adapting teaching tasks and resources. Student teachers will develop an understanding of the critical role that reading plays in the language classroom. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACE321 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Oral Communication This course will enable English Language student teachers to develop expertise in teaching and assessing oral communication skills at secondary level. ACE322 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Reading This course will enable English Language student teachers to develop expertise in teaching and assessing reading skills at secondary level. and provides guidance in developing.CS: English Language (Secondary) The Teaching of English Language (Secondary) Course Code ACE321 ACE322 ACE421 ACE422 Title Teaching of English at the Level: Oral Communication Teaching of English at the Level: Reading Teaching Grammar at the Level Teaching of English at the Level: Writing Secondary Secondary Secondary Secondary Course Category Core Core Core Core No. Student teachers will develop a foundational knowledge of oral communication and review the main approaches to teaching and assessing listening and speaking skills effectively in the classroom.

evaluating and adapting reading tasks and resources. and provides guidance for developing. and explore different strategies for effectively integrating classroom writing with other language skills and curriculum subjects. and practice designing appropriate grammar teaching and assessment strategies within the wider context of teaching other language skills. The course engages student teachers through collaborative and reflective activities that provide guidance in developing. evaluating and adapting textual and media resources for the writing syllabus.CS: English Language (Secondary) engages student teachers through collaborative learning activities that explore approaches to teaching and assessing reading. 130 . ACE422 Teaching of English at the Secondary Level: Writing This course will enable English Language student teachers to develop expertise in teaching and assessing writing skills at the secondary level. Student teachers will develop an understanding of theoretical approaches to teaching and assessing writing. Student teachers will develop an understanding of the role of grammar in syllabus text types and current textbooks. evaluating and adapting grammar teaching tasks and resources. and provides guidance for developing. The course engages student teachers through presentations and demonstrations of approaches to grammar teaching. ACE421 Teaching Grammar at the Secondary Level This course will enable English Language student teachers to develop expertise in teaching and assessing grammar at the secondary level.

It considers the assumptions underlying different approaches to Literature teaching. It will pay attention to the links between reading and writing while considering teaching prose for literary development. and general methodology of teaching Literature as a subject. cultural literacy. aims and objectives. Issues such as text selection. The course will then consider the various approaches and techniques for teaching prose fiction like the short story and the novel. ACR322 Teaching Poetry This course introduces approaches and techniques for teaching poetry. It covers the selection of appropriate material as well as teaching strategies for the different elements of narrative and style.CS: English Literature (Secondary) The Teaching of English Literature (Secondary) Course Code ACR321 ACR322 ACR421 ACR422 Title Teaching Prose Teaching Poetry Teaching Drama Literature Assessment Course Category Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACR321 Teaching Prose This course starts by giving a broad overview of the principles. It covers the selection of appropriate material and teaching ideas for the different elements of poetry. canon-formation and problems of representation will also be considered. and creative and critical thinking. It will also pay attention to the links between reading and writing about poetry while considering the teaching of poetry for literary 131 . as well as examines the local Literature curriculum.

ACR422 Literature Assessment This course considers the principles of assessment and the various ways of assessing Literature through traditional pen-and-paper assessment. and creative and critical thinking. Student teachers will have the opportunity to practice marking Literature essays as well as to set and critique different questions. cultural literacy. ACR421 Teaching Drama This course introduces approaches and techniques for teaching drama. and portfolio-keeping. and creative and critical thinking. It covers the selection of appropriate material as well as teaching strategies for the different elements of drama. It also pays attention to the links between reading.CS: English Literature (Secondary) development. performance and writing. 132 . cultural literacy. project work. extended writing. while considering the teaching of drama for literary development. tests and exam papers.

133 .CS: Family & Consumer Sciences (Secondary) The Teaching (Secondary) Course Code ACQ321 ACQ322 ACQ421 ACQ422 of Title Family and Consumer Course Category Core Core Core Core No. and philosophical base of family and consumer sciences. historical. Innovative use of instructional methods in relation to current trends is also highlighted. Instructional strategies appropriate for formal and informal settings including specific strategies for diverse audiences will be discussed. the rationale and objectives of teaching family and consumer sciences. Student teachers will develop teaching skills through their participation in simulated teaching activities with emphasis on the management of strategies. ACQ322 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences Teaching The focus of this course is on the principles of teaching and learning applied to family and consumer sciences content. integrative focus of disciplines and areas of specializations. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Sciences Prerequisites - Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences Teaching Evaluation in Family and Consumer Sciences Teaching Trends in Family and Consumer Sciences Education ACQ321 Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum The focus of this course is on the nature. curriculum development and planning in family and consumer sciences programmes in school settings.

CS: Family & Consumer Sciences (Secondary) ACQ421 Evaluation in Family and Consumer Sciences Teaching The focus of this course is on the principles of evaluation. framework for evaluation. 134 . instruction and assessment of family and consumer sciences in schools. ACQ422 Trends in Education Family and Consumer Sciences The focus of this course is on topical concerns and current issues of teacher and school and its impact on the curriculum. Content includes the construction of a range of evaluation instruments related to family and consumer sciences programmes in schools. procedures for appraising students progress in the attainment of objectives. Each student teacher will undertake a project in a cognate area of family and consumer sciences education in school. Student teachers will learn the necessary knowledge and skills that will enable them to carry out small scale research studies in a relevant cognate area.

Student teachers will develop an understanding of inquiry learning and concept-based approaches and design unit and lesson plans using these two approaches. 135 .CS: Geography (Secondary) The Teaching of Geography (Secondary) Course Code ACG321 ACG322 ACG421 ACG422 Title Planning for Geography Teaching Classroom-based Teaching Methods Field-based Teaching Strategies and Assessment in Teaching Geography Teaching Social Studies to Secondary School Students Course Category Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACG321 Planning for Geography Teaching This course lays the foundation for student teachers to teach Geography for understanding. Student teachers will develop an in-depth understanding of the Geography discipline by exploring the geographical concepts. ACG322 Classroom-based Teaching Methods The focus of this course is to help student teachers acquire teaching approaches and strategies to teach Geography for deep understanding. They will also explore the diversity of the learners in this planning stage. It provides an overview of the rationale and evolution of teaching and learning of Geography.

Student teachers will have opportunities to set source-based questions and structured-essay questions. Participants will be given opportunities to explore and discuss issues in the planning and execution of fieldtrips in the school curriculum. Student teachers will be exposed to these strategies through experiential learning. devise the mark schemes and mark answer scripts. skills and values to differentiated learners in the social studies classroom. as well as in regular classroom interaction. both during and after fieldwork. discuss and practice some of teaching strategies. Consideration will also be given to the assessment of learning in geography. The course will provide opportunities for student teachers to reflect on issues related to the secondary social studies syllabus content.CS: Geography (Secondary) ACG421 Field-based Teaching Strategies & Assessment in Teaching Geography This course emphasizes the importance of fieldwork in the effective teaching and learning of geography. scope and goals of social studies education in Singapore. ACG422 Teaching Social Studies to Secondary School Students This course aims to provide student teachers with an understanding of the nature. It also seeks to equip student teachers with a variety of classroom-based teaching strategies that are appropriate for the teaching of concepts. 136 . and acquire an understanding of these issues. and design and develop unit and lesson plans in a cooperative learning environment. The tutorials will also provide opportunities for student teachers to reflect on critical issues of social studies teaching. content.

An increasing body of research on History and Social Studies education demonstrates that learning History. details. names and dates) to memory may no longer be tenable. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACH321 Teaching of Secondary History and Social Studies I This course introduces student teachers to the teaching and learning of History and Social Studies at the secondary school level. and allow them to explore the curriculum as well as examine the issues and key questions that are central to these disciplines. for the purpose of deeper understanding. involves not only the study of such narratives but also the acquisition of a set of 137 . ACH322 Teaching for Historical Understanding The general assumption that a sturdy understanding of the past may be acquired by a process of committing historical narratives (events.CS: History (Secondary) The Teaching of History (Secondary) Course Code ACH321 ACH322 ACH421 ACH422 Title Teaching of Secondary History and Social Studies I Teaching for Historical Understanding Teaching and Learning of Secondary History and Social Studies II Assessment and Evaluation in Secondary History and Social Studies Course Category Core Core Core Core No. This course is designed to equip student teachers with teaching strategies that may enhance the learning of History and Social Studies in the classroom. and provide them with ample opportunities to plan for teaching. The course will give student teachers an insight into the nature and purpose of History and Social Studies in schools.

ACH421 Teaching and Learning of Secondary History and Social Studies II This course seeks to expose student teachers to an interesting and challenging strategy in the teaching of History and Social Studies by taking them out of the classroom. Teaching for historical understanding aspires to equip students not only with historical content but also with the necessary tools that can enable them to explore. Not only will student teachers discover valuable information about the sites visited. This course is designed to equip student teachers with the ability to plan. 138 . This course introduces student teachers to the challenging and complex undertaking of teaching for historical understanding. as well as the importance of sources as the primary means of historical inquiry.CS: History (Secondary) discipline-specific cognitive strategies that students can use to better learn and understand the past. the key skills and processes that are involved in historical writing & investigation. as a part of learning to think historically. interpret and understand the past. Student teachers will be exposed to selected concepts that underpin the historical discipline. they will themselves be able to organize such trips to enhance their students of their own culture and heritage. The course will focus on how field trips can be used to enhance student increase their knowledge of a subject through active hands-on experience with the rich resources within the local community. organize and conduct field trips to selected sites in Singapore.

In line with the objectives and examination requirements of the current syllabus. the course aims at enabling student teachers to conduct assessment in these subjects. the main emphasis of the course will be on the ways source materials can be used to meet assessment demands of the two subjects. the course has been designed to give student teachers ample opportunities at setting source-based and structured essay questions. as well as giving them adequate practice at both devising marking schemes and the marking of answer scripts. For this purpose. Student teachers will also be introduced to formative assessments and how these may be used in schools to evaluate 139 . with attention given to the practical aspects of how to assess what students learn from being taught History and Social Studies. Generally.CS: History (Secondary) ACH422 Assessment and Evaluation in Secondary History and Social Studies This course seeks to expose student teachers to key issues involved in the assessment and evaluation of History and Social Studies in secondary schools.

The learning and teaching of oral. The objectives and content of teaching Malay language curriculum in schools. ACD321 The Teaching of Malay Language 2 (Sec) The course deals with the processes of listening and speaking skill. Integrating language skills such as listening. The reading process and development of reading skills. reading and writing. speaking. Various theories and general approaches to language teaching and learning. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACD221 The Teaching of Malay Language 1 (Sec) The principles of language learning.CS: Malay Language (Secondary) The Teaching of Malay Language (Secondary) Course Code ACD221 ACD321 ACD322 ACD421 Title The Teaching of Malay Language 1 (Sec) The Teaching of Malay Language 2 (Sec) The Teaching of Malay Language 3 (Sec) The Teaching of Malay Language 4 (Sec) Course Category Core Core Core Core No. Planning a Malay language lesson. 140 . The teaching of grammar and vocabulary. listening and speaking skills in language classroom. The strategies used to teach reading and comprehension skills.

Understanding the writing process. Introduction to the salient principles for the teaching of writing. ACD421 The Teaching of Malay Language 4 (Sec) Malay Language testing and assessments. 141 . and skills in developing Malay language tests and assessments at secondary school level. item review and analysis. discrete item test and integrative tests. the construction and administration of test items. Creative methods to the teaching of writing such as process writing and genre writing. Creative and critical thinking in assessments will be emphasized. including IPW and others. The basic concepts. rubric designs and its application in classroom settings with students of differing academic abilities in mind. The crafting of examination papers. The introduction of authentic and alternative assessments.CS: Malay Language (Secondary) ACD322 The Teaching of Malay Language 3 (Sec) Teaching of writing. including marking schemes as well as hands-on practice on marking.

An overview of the developments of modern Malay and Indonesian literature. An overview of the main features and developments of traditional Malay literature. poetry and drama/play at secondary schools. The knowledge and skills of teaching modern Malay and Indonesian novel. methods and techniques of teaching selected classical genres and texts. The principles. The general methods and techniques of teaching literature. short story. The knowledge and skills of the teaching of traditional Malay prose and poetry. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACF321 The Teaching of Malay Literature 1 The aims and objectives of teaching literature and the place of literature in the curriculum.CS: Malay Literature (Secondary) The Teaching of Malay Literature (Secondary) Course Code ACF321 ACF322 ACF421 ACF422 Title The Teaching of Malay Literature 1 The Teaching of Malay Literature 2 The Teaching of Malay Literature 3 The Teaching of Malay Literature 4 Course Category Core Core Core Core No. 142 . ACF322 The Teaching of Malay Literature 2 The course prepares the pre-service student teachers to teach traditional Malay literature in secondary schools.

The teaching of modern and traditional literature are integrated in the formal classroom as well as informal learning environment within and beyond the school vicinity. 143 . Special skill training in utilizing and integrating multimedia and multi artistic forms to express meanings in literary texts will be incorporated. It attempts to provide a holistic and integrative approach in the teaching of Malay literature in school. ACF422 The Teaching of Malay Literature 4 The principles. Participants are trained to explore and design creative literary programmes and performances. evaluation and testing of traditional and modern literature will be the main focus of this course.CS: Malay Literature (Secondary) ACF421 The Teaching of Malay Literature 3 This course is a continuation of earlier courses. Appreciation. methods and techniques of teaching selected classical genres and modern texts.

CS: Mathematics (Secondary) The Teaching of Mathematics (Secondary) Course Code ACM321 ACM322 ACM421 ACM422 Title Teaching and Learning Mathematics I Teaching and Learning Mathematics II Teaching and Learning Mathematics III Teaching and Learning Mathematics IV Course Category Core Core Core Core No. The content of this course includes: learning theories in mathematics. lesson planning. mathematics curriculum in Singapore. hands-on learning using Dynamic Geometry software. exposition of mathematical ideas in a whole class instructional setting. mathematical problem solving. The content of this course includes: aims and objectives of mathematics education.Mensuration. teaching of mathematics topics . Geometry. role of ICT in mathematics education. and Trigonometry. teaching of mathematics topics .Arithmetic and Algebra. task analysis. ACM322 Teaching and Learning Mathematics II This course is designed to equip student teachers with an understanding of the theories of learning that inform instruction as well as the practice of classroom skills and preparation based on such theories. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - ACM321 Teaching and Learning Mathematics I The main objective of this course is to equip student teachers with a working knowledge of basic teaching principles and a comprehensive knowledge of the curriculum. 144 .

CS: Mathematics (Secondary)

ACM421 Teaching and Learning Mathematics III This course seeks to help student teachers understand the major issues in teaching secondary mathematics and to further extend their knowledge of pedagogy to include more complex teaching strategies. The content of this course includes: current issues in mathematics education; design of investigative and enrichment activities; teaching of mathematics topics - Functions and Graphs, Statistics, Probability, Sets, Matrices and Vectors. ACM422 Teaching and Learning Mathematics IV This course seeks to help student teachers understand the fundamentals of assessment in teaching secondary mathematics and to develop their pedagogical content knowledge for the teaching of Higher Algebra and Calculus.

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CS: Music (Secondary)

The Teaching of Music (Secondary)
Course Code ACI321 ACI322 ACI421 ACI422 Title General Musicianship I General Musicianship II General Musicianship III The Secondary School Music Syllabus Course Category Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites -

ACI321

General Musicianship I This course seeks to establish a foundation in musicianship skills (aural-training, sight-singing, keyboard skills, functional music theory and analysis) for the music classroom via the activities of creating, performing and responding. This course is to help student teachers develop essential functional musical concepts and skills that are required as a classroom music teacher with a view to cultivating performance and listening skills.

ACI322

General Musicianship II This course seeks to apply these skills (auraltraining, sight-singing, keyboard skills, functional music theory and analysis) to music teaching and learning for the classroom. This course is designed to prepare student teachers to formulate instructional goals and organize teaching strategies, and to utilize a variety of techniques and materials for the secondary classroom.

146

CS: Music (Secondary)

ACI421

General Musicianship III This course seeks to further reinforce and sharpen their aural perception, sight singing and keyboard skills and analytical understanding to fulfil the task of a music specialist in teaching and learning for both classroom and co-curricular music settings, managing classroom music activities and development of a secondary music programme.

ACI422

The Secondary School Music Syllabus This course involves a thorough survey and discussion of the Secondary School Music Syllabus in relation to practices and policies outlined by the Ministry of Education. This course aims to familiarize student teachers with the requirements and Music Syllabus, to enable them to develop a congruent, comprehensive, developmental programme of music education in secondary schools. The teaching of music in the secondary school with particular reference to the syllabus as it is in operation in Singapore schools.

147

CS: Physics (Secondary)

The Teaching of Physics (Secondary)
Course Code ACP321 ACP322 ACP421 ACP422 Title Teaching of Physics I Teaching of Physics II Teaching of Physics III Teaching of Physics IV Course Category Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites -

ACP321 Teaching of Physics I The course attempts to provide student teachers in initial teacher education programmes with an understanding of school pupils they will be taking charge of. To improve their teaching efforts, they will be exposed to individual differences in learning, diagnosis, and strategies to deal with different ability groups as represented in the Gifted, Express, Normal (Academic) and Normal (Technical) Streams. Special effort will be devoted to helping the student teachers deal with critical incidents. Lectures on showmanship, creativity, thinking skills, inquiry, telling and explaining will be included as the key elements in support of good teaching.

148

CS: Physics (Secondary)

ACP322 Teaching of Physics II This course will introduce student teachers to physics curriculum development with respect to international and local trends. The infusion of thinking, the meaningful integration of ICT and the linkage to national education, innovation and enterprise spirit will be given due attention and focus. An understanding of the constructivist-inquiry approach, investigative problem-solving, meaningful demonstration and purposeful deductive inquiry will facilitate the teaching and learning of physics. This course will also address alternative conceptions of students on various physics topics. Activities based on the physics curriculum and involving experiences that are hands-on, minds-on and experiential will be introduced to model how conceptual development and change can be facilitated. ACP421 Teaching of Physics III Two important aspects of Physics teaching; namely, that of resources management and evaluation will be covered in this course. Resources include those available to the classroom teacher, both within and outside school. Safety in science laboratories, the role of practical work and its importance as an integral part of physics education will also be discussed. Of special mention will be the recent School based Science Practical Assessment (SPA). Other aspects include the setting, marking and analyzing of physics examination papers and how to give constructive feedback to students and parents.

149

CS: Physics (Secondary)

ACP422 Teaching of Physics IV Teaching and learning in our classroom can be improved if teachers take cognizance of the findings of studies of different aspects of the teachinglearning process. There is therefore a need to equip student teachers with sufficient knowledge and skills to read and interpret these findings as well as carry out small scale studies in their science area. The course provides student teachers with an understanding of issues to help them in their classroom practices, be it curriculum, instruction or assessment. This will better prepare them as life-long learners.

150

CS: Physical Education (Secondary)

The Teaching of Physical Education (Secondary)
Course Code APC121 APC122 APC141 APC142 APC221 APC241 APC242 APC243 APC244 APC245 APC246 APC247 APC321 APC341 APC342 APC343 APC344 APC421 Title Principles of Games Outdoor Residential Camp Badminton Volleyball Fitness and Conditioning Soccer Netball Rugby Basketball Hockey Softball Tennis Instructional Methods in Physical Education Curriculum Gymnastics Swimming Dance Track and Field Instructional Strategies in Teaching of Physical Education Course Category Core Core Prescribed Prescribed Core Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Core Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Prescribed Core No. of AUs 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 Prerequisites -

APC121 Principles of Games This course is designed to introduce student teachers to the management strategies and theories underpinning the teaching of games. A broad spectrum of lead-up games will be presented covering four classifications of invasion, net/barrier, striking/fielding and target to provide a systematic and creative understanding of the transferability of principles. Game-sense will be developed through an eclectic conceptual development using elements of approaches.

151

CS: Physical Education (Secondary)

APC122 Outdoor Residential Camp This course provides student teachers with the essential knowledge, skills and experience in outdoor education that will allow them to conduct similar outdoor education activities in schools. The course employs the experiential learning approach to prepare student teachers in areas such as programme planning, logistics management, risk assessment and safety management, expedition planning, execution of activities, facilitation skills, and programme evaluation. Ample emphasis is given to making outdoor education a positive learning experience. APC141 Badminton Badminton is a game that volleys a shuttlecock across a net with rackets. In this course student teachers will be introduced to a variety of methods in which beginners could acquire the basic volleying skills in badminton (such as the net shots, drop shots and drives). The aim of this course is to enable student teachers to improve their volleying skills in badminton so that they are equipped with adequate badminton skills and learning strategies to enable them to teach badminton in school. The student teachers will also learn the basic rules of the game so that they will be able to umpire games in the competitions.

152

Ample practice. Emphasis is placed on small-group activity and how to organize and conduct small-group activity in the school situation. Special attention will be paid to acquiring the basic skills in volleyball i. the spike and the block. the face pass (volley). the serve (underarm and overhand). is given to the use of the basic skill/skills in small-group game situations.e. forearm pass (dig). APC221 Fitness & Conditioning This course is designed to help students understand the theoretical and practical considerations regarding physical fitness and its development. Various methods of training and testing for the components of physical fitness will be dealt with in practicals. reinforced with sound teaching points. The emphasis of the course is on providing ample opportunities to 153 .CS: Physical Education (Secondary) APC142 Volleyball This course is designed to equip student teachers with the necessary basic skills and teaching points in order to teach volleyball in secondary schools in Singapore. Information about the latest rules of the game and referee hand signals will also be incorporated into the course. APC241 Soccer This course is designed to impart basic soccer skills and knowledge to student teachers for the purpose of teaching children in a school setting. Planning and writing training plans will be the concluding part of this course. Equal emphasis will be given to health related as well as performance related components of physical fitness.

and attacking/defending. Formal scheduled competition. The focus is not on traditional development of sports skills rather on wider learning outcomes.CS: Physical Education (Secondary) play the game as well as to gain better knowledge on how to teach students. The course will teach the basic skills of footwork. The Australia Rugby Union 154 . and the development of games play through the early immersion of students into modified games situations. Independent and Self Paced Learning will be explored. Problem Solving and Decision Making. goal shooting. APC243 Rugby The form of Sport Education incorporating Games Concept Approach. Sport Education Roles. Instructional characteristics will include: Festive atmosphere. Modified Games. Record keeping/ accountability/ statistical analysis/match reports. It is intended to combine Sport Education and Games Concept Approach as both programs provide a focus of student centeredness. Consistent team with draft. Student teachers will have the opportunity to complete the International Rugby Union (IRB) Level 1. ball skills. as well as the application of these skills and game concepts/tactics in game play. Inquiry Based Learning. APC242 Netball The course is designed to impart basic netball skills and knowledge to teachers for the purpose of teaching children in a school setting.

The course aims to provide Physical Education teachers with the necessary skills and knowledge to present the game in a safe. APC244 Basketball A variety of practical applications including: 1) individual on-ball and off-ball skill development.CS: Physical Education (Secondary) SMART Program and gain recognition by the Singapore Sports Council as registered coaches. 155 . Student teachers will be able to assimilate that knowledge (apply it into the Physical Education pedagogy context) in a fun learning-oriented environment. The emphasis of the course is on providing ample opportunities to play the game as well as to learn how to demonstrate basic skills. is usually poorly taught in schools and is consequently labelled a dangerous game. yet enjoyable manner to their students. while inherently exciting. APC245 Hockey The game of hockey. 2) team/game situations and 3) delivery of a basketball class using action-station and team-teaching methods are used to improve skills and knowledge in basketball. APC246 Softball This course is designed to impart basic softball skills and knowledge to student teachers for the purpose of teaching children in a school setting.

APC321 Instructional Methods in Physical Education This course covers the foundation skills of planning. basic floor. time on task. The basic vocabulary of movement will be enhanced with emphasis on the cognitive and affective development through the appropriate use of pedagogical styles. The aims of curriculum gymnastics will be espoused. teaching and evaluating physical education including: content selection and development. Course format will include lectures.CS: Physical Education (Secondary) APC247 Tennis This course is designed to assist student teachers develop their basic tennis skills to a level of efficiency which will enable them to introduce and teach the games to beginners in schools. organization. In addition. practical experiences. and microteaching in a neighbourhood school. APC341 Curriculum Gymnastics This course will introduce the curriculum gymnastics to participants by means of thematic movement concepts based largely on floor activities and incorporating small and large apparati. and feedback provision. Advances in video and computer 156 . kipping and vaulting skills will be taught with a focus on a mechanical understanding of the techniques involved as well as developing appropriate progression and competent spotting and an understanding of the biomechanical principles involved. observation of student performance. instructional strategies. and student management systems. group work. discussions.

In addition. Student teachers will be expected to practise. Student teachers will learn dances from different cultures reflecting a variety of styles and techniques.CS: Physical Education (Secondary) technology will be introduced to student teachers to enhance their ability to analyse movement qualitatively. student teachers are introduced to the methods of leading creative dance experiences for children. The teaching methods used enable the design of lessons 157 . Safety in and around swimming pools (and other aquatic environments) will be emphasised in this course. Other related skills of swimming such as floating. acquire and. finally. APC342 Swimming This course aims to develop introductory teaching skills and stroke competencies in swimming. Student teachers will learn how to teach swimming to beginners by employing basic learn-to-swim and lead-up activities. diving. APC343 Dance Teaching methods and resource for the planning and instruction of folk and line dances in the primary and secondary school curriculum. demonstrate correct and efficient technique in at least three out of the four swimming strokes (front crawl. breaststroke. and water games will also be introduced. This course is primarily activity-based and hence. Student teachers will be required to be in proper swimming attire for each lesson. participation is required. backstroke and butterfly). Participants will enhance selfconfidence to teach gymnastics in a safe and fun way.

pedagogical and social issues and concepts will be used to show the link between the sciences and Track and Field events. as well as growth and development will be emphasised.CS: Physical Education (Secondary) appropriate for a wide range of ages. APC344 Track and Field This course is designed to equip teachers with the necessary knowledge and skills to teach selected Track and Field events. basic coaching of Track & Field events will be emphasized so as to enable teachers to take charge of Track & Field as a CCA in the schools. It also aims to give student teachers a chance to discover the creative juice in them and draw on the elements of dance to create their own dances. physiological. interests and developmental stages. Biomechanical. anatomical. 158 . The benefits of Track and Field as a vehicle for fun and fitness. In the second part of this course.

Student teachers will be encouraged to refine their own teaching through systematic observation and analytic reflection. practical workshops. second in a series.and microteaching assignments in a neighbourhood school. 159 .CS: Physical Education (Secondary) APC421 Instructional Strategies in Teaching of Physical Education This course. seminars. peer. Emphasis is concept approach to the teaching of games. The focus is on planning. It develops competence in a variety of teaching methods including inquiry. teaching and evaluating situationally relevant lessons. Course content will be presented through lectures. group work and peer-teaching. problem solving. builds on foundation pedagogical knowledge and skills appropriate for school students.

Those in the Secondary track will not be reading SK courses as it is assumed that they would have obtained this knowledge from the 2 AS subjects offered. Subject Knowledge is integrated with Curriculum Studies. Art For Art.SK: Art SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE This group of courses helps to reinforce subject content mastery for primary school teaching. Student teachers in the primary track must offer SK subjects aligned with their choice of Curriculum Studies (CS) subjects. 160 . student teachers will offer SK subjects aligned with the CS2 and CS3 subjects and will read 3 SK courses per subject. For Physical Education and Sports Science specialisation in the primary track.

Through tutorial activities. They will study both fiction and non-fiction texts written for children. student teachers will understand how language is used in different text types to achieve different purposes. enabling them to understand the language requirements of the English Language Syllabus 2010. the course explores ways of explaining grammar in use. as well as key language features. 161 . and will learn how to analyse these text types in terms of context. Through examining the grammatical systems of English in selected text types. purpose and audience to identify organisational structure.SK: English Language English Language Course Code ASE201 ASE302 ASE401 Title Grammar Exploring Language in Texts Current Trends in Language Education in the Upper Primary School Course Category Core Core Core No of AUs 2 2 2 Prerequisite - ASE201 Grammar This course introduces student teachers to the grammatical structures of the English Language. ASE302 Exploring Language in Texts In this course. student teachers will see how all these features of texts work together and are used by readers and writers to communicate and construct meaning.

student teachers will learn about current Ministry of Education initiatives and how they are being implemented in schools at the upper primary level. The principles presented will be referred to in the course Skills at the Upper Primary Level 162 . In this course. multiliteracies and multimodalities. The course will consider current moves in language education towards curriculum integration. principles of assessment.SK: English Language ASE401 Current Trends in Language Education in the Upper Primary School This course is for student teachers who wish to specialise in teaching English at the upper primary level.

163 . Classification of number systems. Course topics are: Problem solving. Algorithms on number operations in a place value system.SK: Mathematics Mathematics Table 1: For student teachers offering AS: Mathematics Course Code ASM202 ASM302 Title Fundamental Principles Mathematics I Fundamental Principles Mathematics II of of Primary Primary Course Category Core Core No of AUs 2 2 Prerequisites - Table 2: For student teachers offering Other AS Course Code ASM201 ASM301 ASM401 Title Number Topics Geometry Topics Further Mathematics Topics Course Category Core Core Core No of AUs 2 2 2 Prerequisites - ASM201 Number Topics This course provides the foundational understanding of arithmetic topics which form a major portion of the primary mathematics curriculum. Foundations of the Hindu-Arabic System. Divisibility. Problem solving processes will be introduced and re-visited in the different topics.

Proportional reasoning. 164 .SK: Mathematics ASM202 Fundamental Principles of Primary Mathematics I This course surveys topics covered in primary school curriculum and provides linkages between the Academic Subject Mathematics courses. Topics include: Problem solving and problem posing. Number Theory and divisibility. Binary operations and four operations of numbers. Properties of geometrical figures. classification of number systems. Processes such as mathematical deduction and induction will be emphasized. rational and irrational numbers. Counting methods and systematic listing. Similarity and Congruency. ASM301 Geometry Topics This course aims to equip the primary mathematics teacher with a deeper understanding of geometry and measurement topics in the primary mathematics curriculum. Historical Numeration system. Computation in different bases. Algebraic reasoning. Motion Geometry and tessellations. Constructions and proofs. Inequalities and approximations. Basic elements of geometry as study of space in 2 and 3 dimensions. Sequence and Series and decimal representation of numbers. Properties associated with parallel lines. Topics are: Mathematical deduction and induction. Measurement.

SK: Mathematics ASM302 Fundamental Principles of Primary Mathematics II This course knowledge of geometry and data topics from the perspective of concepts which are taught in the primary mathematics syllabus. The course will draw upon concepts and processes learned in Academic Subject Mathematics courses. Representations of data. Measures of central tendency and spread. Geometrical figures in 3-dimensions. Statistics. ASM401 Further Mathematics Topics This course provides the mathematics teacher with deeper understanding and appreciation of the topics in the upper primary mathematics curriculum. misuse of statistics. Algebra. Problem solving in geometry. Measurement in Geometry. 165 . Topics are: Mathematical thinking. Statistical investigations: Stages. Use of dynamic geometry software and other software for mathematical investigations. Geometrical constructions with concrete and virtual tools. Topics are: Introduction to Geometry and geometrical entities.

SK: Music Music Table 1: For student teachers offering AS: Music Course Code ASI201 ASI301 Title General Musicianship I General Musicianship II Course Category Core Core No of AUs 2 2 Prerequisites - Table 2: For student teachers offering Other AS Course Code ASI201 ASI301 ASI401 Title General Musicianship I General Musicianship II General Musicianship III Course Category Core Core Core No of AUs 2 2 2 Prerequisites - ASI201 General Musicianship I This course seeks to establish a foundation in musicianship skills (aural-training. ASI301 General Musicianship II This course builds on foundational musicianship skills and seeks to intensify these skills while introducing concepts and principles of applying such skills to music teaching and learning for the classroom. functional music theory and analysis) for the music classroom via the activities of creating. keyboard skills. sight-singing. performing and responding. 166 .

167 . sight singing and keyboard skills and analytical understanding to fulfil the task of a music specialist in teaching and learning for both classroom and co-curricular music settings.SK: Music ASI401 General Musicianship III This course provides advanced level musicianship training to prepare student teachers as a music specialist. It seeks to further reinforce and sharpen their aural perception.

168 . magnetism and electricity. light and the solar system. forces and simple machines. The topics include matter and materials.SK: Science Science Table 1: For student teachers offering AS: Biology Course Code ASK201 ASK401 Title Topics in Physical Science for Primary Science Teaching Further Topics for Primary Science Teaching Course Category Core Core No of AUs 2 2 Prerequisites - Table 2: For student teachers offering AS: Physics Course Code ASK301 ASK401 Title Topics in Biological Science for Primary Science Teaching Further Topics for Primary Science Teaching Course Category Core Core No of AUs 2 2 Prerequisites - Table 3: For student teachers offering other AS Course Code ASK201 ASK301 ASK401 Title Topics in Physical Science for Primary Science Teaching Topics in Biological Science for Primary Science Teaching Further Topics for Primary Science Teaching Course Category Core Core Core No of AUs 2 2 2 Prerequisites - ASK201 Topics in Physical Science for Primary Science Teaching This course deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of Physical Science topics selected from the new Primary Science Curriculum. heat. forms of energy and conversions.

forces and motion. mechanisms of plant and animal functions. ecology and environmental issues. structure and function of animal systems. structure and function of plant systems.SK: Science ASK301 Topics in Biological Science for Primary Science Teaching This course deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of topics in Biological Science from the new Primary Science Curriculum. Topics in physical science include: electricity and magnetism. ASK401 Further Topics for Primary Science Teaching This course is a continuation of the SK Science Courses 1 and 2 and further elaborates on topics in biology and physics for teaching the primary science syllabus. DNA. The topics to be discussed include basic biology. and contemporary physics concepts. Topics in biology include cells. classification and diversity of organisms (reproduction and life cycles). and conservation. 169 . forms of energy.

community. democratic society. 170 . More specifically. the challenges which Singapore faced as part of the nation-building process and how its people and leaders have responded to these challenges in the past and present will be explored. The influence of diverse groups. institutions and cultures in shaping these multiple identities will be examined. ASL302 Singapore: Challenges and Responses This course examines the interrelationship between man and the environment in Singapore. national and regional identities. food and transport. It looks at how the physical environment shapes the way we live and how in turn. It also looks at changes and continuities of identities over time and space as well as the roles of people in contributing to the development of a multicultural.SK: Social Studies Social Studies Course Code ASL202 ASL302 ASL402 Title Identity and Community Singapore: Challenges and Responses Asian Civilizations: Origins and Legacies Course Category Core Core Core No of AUs 2 2 2 Prerequisites - ASL202 Identity and Community This course explores the concepts and the interrelationships of personal. we shape the environment to meet our basic needs in areas such as housing.

achievements and legacies of these civilizations. In particular. the course will explore the development of socio-economic institutions. 171 . China and Southeast Asia.SK: Social Studies ASL402 Asian Civilisations: Origins and Legacies with their environment over time and space. It will also focus on commonalities and connections of diverse communities across Southeast Asia. It will cover the impact of physical landscapes on the development of civilizations in India.

In the case of a BA (Ed) (Primary) student teacher. All BA (Ed) Secondary student teachers must read an Arts subject as Academic Subject 1 but can choose an Arts or Science subject as Academic Subject 2. the Academic Subject must be a Science Subject. due to the nature of workload for some subjects. However. The lists of subjects for the different programmes are shown below. the choice of the first Academic Subject must be an Arts subject while in the case of a BSc (Ed) Primary student teacher. 172 . Similarly. all BSc (Ed) Secondary student teachers must choose a Science subject as Academic Subject 1 but can choose an Arts or Science subject as Academic Subject 2. the subject combinations allowed will have to be necessarily limited.Academic Subjects ACADEMIC SUBJECTS This area of study covers knowledge of the content and fundamental concepts and principles of either one or two subjects depending on the programme enrolled for.

Academic Subjects BA (Ed) (Primary/Secondary): Academic Subjects Academic Subject BA (Ed) Primary AS X X X BA (Ed) Secondary AS1 AS2 X X X X Art Biology Chemistry Chinese Language* Chinese Literature* Drama English Language English Literature Geography History Malay Language** Malay Literature** Mathematics Music Physics * X X X X X X X X Chinese Language and Chinese Literature must be offered as AS1 and AS2 together and not with another Academic Subject in both the primary and secondary specialisations. However. Malay Language and Malay Literature must be offered as AS1 and AS2 together and not with another Academic Subject in the primary specialisation. Malay Language must be offered as AS1 and Malay Literature as AS2. ** 173 . student teachers can opt to offer Malay Language as AS1 and any other Arts subject as AS2 but they will then not be considered as specialising in Malay Language. In the secondary specialisation.

Academic Subjects BSc (Ed) (Primary/Secondary): Academic Subjects Academic Subject BSc (Ed) Primary AS X BSc (Ed) Secondary AS1 AS2 X Art Biology Chemistry Drama English Language English Literature Family & Consumer Sciences Geography History Mathematics Music PE and Sports Science Physics X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 174 .

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - 1 2 3 4 The Study of Art: Contexts and Concepts I Visual Representation and AAA102 Expression I: Issues in twodimensional praxis AAA103 Understanding Visual Literacy Visual Representation and AAA104 Expression II: Issues in three-dimensional praxis The Study of Art: Contexts and AAA201 Concepts II Visual Representation and AAA202 Expression III: Issues in new media praxis Visual Representation and AAA203 Expression IV: Issues in new media praxis Visual Representation and AAA204 Expression V: Issues in two-dimensional praxis Contemporary Southeast Asian Art AAA301 I Visual Representation and AAA302 Expression VI: Issues in three-dimensional praxis Contemporary Southeast Asian Art AAA303 II Visual Representation and AAA304 Expression VII: Issues in interdisciplinary praxis Choose one of the following: AAA431 Studio Specialisation AAA432 Curatorial Practices and Exhibition Total AUs for Degree Core 3 - Core Core Core Core Core 3 3 3 3 3 - Pres Pres 3 3 39 - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.AS: Art ACADEMIC SUBJECT: ART Table 1: AS 1 Art Structure for BA (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Art Structure for BA (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAA101 Title Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core No. 175 .

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - Course Code AAA101 AAA102 1 AAA103 AAA104 AAA201 AAA202 2 AAA203 Core 3 - AAA204 Core 3 24 - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. and interpretation of art. and the relationship of art to the culture in which it was created. 176 . film. Discussion will revolve around a variety of media. including the fine arts. with emphasis on twentiethcentury modernism and visual arts in its historical context. Student teachers will be helped to understand the main characteristics of the art produced. architecture. video. techniques.AS: Art Table 2: Year AS 2 Art Structure for BA/BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title The Study of Art: Contexts and Concepts I Visual Representation and Expression I: Issues in twodimensional praxis Understanding Visual Literacy Visual Representation and Expression II: Issues in threedimensional praxis The Study of Art: Contexts and Concepts II Visual Representation and Expression III: Issues in new media praxis Visual Representation and Expression IV: Issues in new media praxis Visual Representation and Expression V: Issues in twodimensional praxis Total AUs for Degree Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core No. AAA101 The Study of Art: Contexts and Concepts I A critical introduction to the materials. and installation and performance work.

It is essential that we develop the capacity to understand that visual images do more than merely decorate. from computer games to MTV clips. information is being communicated visually. In contemporary culture. 177 . AAA103 Understanding Visual Literacy Visual literacy refers to the capacity to read and interpret visual images. Additionally. links will be made to the role played by intellectual and emotional development. Links with classroom practice will be made. Using a combination of studiopractice and theory. This course will offer an introduction to the study and interpretation of visual culture through a range of theoretical perspectives that seek to explain how visual images generate meaning. Student teachers will consider the use of two-dimensional expressive and representational media and its role in the formation of symbolic systems. the visual image is being increasingly used as a vehicle through which information is relayed.AS: Art AAA102 Visual Representation and Expression I: Issues in two-dimensional praxis Introduction to the concept and practice of representation and expression. from television to the internet. Student teachers will also explore innovative methods of documenting a range of investigative and research-oriented activities undertaken in this course. Visual images need to be read with the rigor and attention that was once reserved for the printed word. From billboards to DVDs. student teachers will develop their own competence in two-dimensional representation and expressive processes.

AAA201 The Study of Art: Contexts and Concepts II This course will explore the visual and critical skills for interpreting the varied forms of artistic expression in Asia. student teachers will develop their own competence in threedimensional representational expressive processes. and religious ideas. political. Links will be made to the role played by intellectual and emotional development. Student teachers will be helped to examine a variety of themes related to the techniques and functions of art. Emphasis will be on the awareness of historical and critical functions of the visual arts. social. 178 . both contemporary and traditional times.AS: Art AAA104 Visual Representation & Expression II: Issues in three-dimensional praxis The concept and practice of representation and expression will continue to be investigated. Links with classroom practice will be made. and study the way art expresses various moral. They will be encouraged to undertake projects in which they will develop an understanding of the relationships which link Sculpture and Ceramics. Student teachers will consider the use of three-dimensional expressive and representational media and its role in the formation of symbolic systems. Using a combination of studio-practice and theory.

They will further consider the use of digital and interactive technologies in relation to expressive and representational media and their role in the formation of symbolic systems. Student teachers will acquire working methods. research skills and the knowledge necessary for the successful implementation of concepts. develop and sustain a self-generated inquiry. AAA203 Visual Representation & Expression IV: Issues in new media praxis Student teachers will have the opportunity to build on their knowledge of concepts of representation and expression. They will continue to develop a critical awareness of contemporary and historical art issues relevant to the new technologies and their application to teaching. Links with classroom practice will be made. Using a combination of studiopractice and theory.AS: Art AAA202 Visual Representation and Expression III: Issues in new media praxis The concept and practice of representation and expression will continue to be investigated. Student teachers will consider the role of digital and interactive technologies in expressive and representational media and their role in the formation of symbolic systems. 179 . Using a combination of studio-practice and theory. student teachers will use new media technologies to develop their own competence in representational and expressive processes. student teachers will continue to investigate the use of new media and digital technologies in order to formulate.

The approach entails studies of art practices. research skills and the knowledge necessary to successfully carry out concepts. Student teachers will be encouraged to generate interdisciplinary links between an area of twodimensional studio practice (drawing. This course focuses on ways by which the contemporary and the region are diversely seen. Student teachers will also explore innovative methods of documenting the range of investigative and research-oriented activities relevant to this course. The interest here is in prospecting the contemporary in historical terms. read. claimed and discussed.AS: Art AAA204 Visual Representation & Expression V: Issues in Two-dimensional praxis Student teachers will further their investigations into the concept of representation and expression and their roles in the formation of symbolic systems. digital and new media studio practice. AAA301 Contemporary Southeast Asian Art I This course is the first of two courses that looks at the development of art in Singapore and in Southeast Asia. desired. painting or printmaking) and an aspect of either three dimensional studio practice or interactive. productions and critical texts. They will continue to develop a critical awareness of contemporary and historical issues in art and their application to teaching. 180 . Student teachers will be expected to acquire working methods.

In consultation with lecturers. The interest here is in examining the domains of the modern in Singapore and Southeast Asia and their connections and disconnections with the contemporary. Through an indepth investigation they will continue to extend their understanding of concepts of representation and expression and their roles in the formation of symbolic systems.AS: Art AAA302 Visual Representation & Expression VI: Issues in three-dimensional praxis Student teachers will have the opportunity to elect to work in either sculpture or ceramics. Links with class room practice will be made. 181 . The approach entails studies of art practices. research skills and the knowledge necessary to successfully realize the full scope of a self-initiated project. student teachers will produce a body of work through which they will acquire working methods. The courses focus on ways by which the contemporary and the modern are framed historically and art historically. productions and critical texts. They will also continue to develop a critical awareness of contemporary and historical issues in art and their application to teaching. AAA303 Contemporary Southeast Asian Art II This course advances the aims and objectives in Contemporary Southeast Asian Art 1.

Student teachers will be expected to acquire working methods. Student teachers will be encouraged to conduct an interdisciplinary investigation through which they will explore and articulate a personal artistic direction. three-dimensional and new media studio practices. research skills and knowledge necessary for the successful implementation of a self-initiated project.AS: Art AAA304 Visual Representation & Expression VII: Issues in interdisciplinary praxis This course provides student teachers with the opportunity to draw upon and combine their previous investigations into the concepts and practices of representation and expression in two-dimension. Links with classroom practice will be made. AAA431 Studio Specialisation This course offers the opportunity for student teachers to develop a specific specialization in an area of artistic practice of their choice by drawing upon their previous investigations into the concept and practice of representation and expression. 182 . Student teachers will be required to engage in the development of a body of work under the guidance of an appointed supervisor. They will also continue to develop a critical awareness of contemporary and historical issues in art and their application to teaching.

183 .AS: Art AAA432 Curatorial Practices and Exhibition This course will help student teachers develop an understanding about the ideas and values that shape the practice of exhibition in art museums and galleries. Through discussions about the major issues intrinsic to specific types of exhibition projects. Links with classroom practice will be made. the class will develop critical awareness of contemporary and art historical issues surrounding curatorial practices and exhibition.

AS: Biology ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BIOLOGY Table 1: Year AS 1 Biology Structure for BSc (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Biology Structure for BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title Biodiversity in Natural Ecosystems Cell Structure and Function General Microbiology Current Genetics Diversity and Evolution of Plants Animal Diversity and Evolution Ecology Molecular Biology Biochemistry Animal Physiology Plant Physiology Quantitative Biology 1 Independent Study Project Modern Biotechnology Animal Behaviour Physiological and Biochemical Adaptation Tropical Marine Biology Total AUs for Degree Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 39 Prerequisites - 1 2 3 4 Course Code AAB101 AAB102 AAB103 AAB104 AAB201 AAB202 AAB203 AAB204 AAB301 AAB302 AAB303 AAB304 Select any AAB431 AAB432 AAB433 AAB434 AAB435 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters 184 .

plants and animals). 185 . intertidal shores and coral reefs.AS: Biology Table 2: Year AS 2 Biology Structure for BA/BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Course Code AAB101 Title Biodiversity in Natural Ecosystems Cell Structure and Function General Microbiology Current Genetics Ecology Molecular Biology Evolution and Diversity of Life General Physiology Total AUs for Degree Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites - 1 AAB102 AAB103 AAB104 AAB203 AAB204 AAB205 AAB206 2 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters AAB101 Biodiversity in Natural Ecosystems Origin. Biological adaptation and phylogenetic relations among the major groups of organisms (micro organisms. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. classification and organization of living organisms as they increase in complexity from lower to higher forms. Overview of natural ecosystems. with particular emphasis on tropical rainforests. Study of the diversity and interactions of organisms in these tropical ecosystems. mangrove habitats.

and the importance of microorganisms to life will be introduced. How microorganisms play a part in disease and health.AS: Biology AAB102 Cell Structure and Function The course provides an overview of the chemical constituents of cells. how they grow and replicate. Topics of this course are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. viruses. fungi . Issues relating to the emergence of new and resurgence of old infectious diseases are included. 186 . AAB103 General Microbiology This is a basic course on general microbiology. The structure of different cell types and organ systems in both plants and animals and the relation to their physiological functions in an organism will also be discussed. Topics of this course are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. their biological roles and the organization and function of eukaryotic cells.what they are. Microorganisms bacteria. and how they are controlled will also be discussed. their interactions with the environment.

plant adaptations and selected life history strategies. Principles of genetics and its fundamental laws on genetic segregation and assortment. RNA and protein activities of the various genes and the mutations and variations that have or are occurring in a dynamic fashion. AAB201 Diversity and Evolution of Plants The diversity of plants has long been one of the cornerstones of "traditional" biology. Developments in the field of plant diversity studies will be highlighted. Topics to be covered will include photosynthetic protists. a survey of the Plant Kingdom. is a dynamic and progressive field. The effect of DNA make-up. mitosis and meiosis. far from being a static body of knowledge. Plant diversity. but also about the evolutionary history of plants. and an introduction to plant phylogeny. Topics of this course are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Genetic laws of inheritance and the effect of genotype and alleles affecting phenotype and trait.AS: Biology AAB104 Current Genetics Cell division. cancer and behavioral genetics will also be covered. Mendelian genetics and extensions of Mendelian ratios. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Developmental. Population and evolutionary genetics. We will not only learn about the diversity of plants per se. as well as the links between plant diversity studies and other areas of the biological sciences. 187 .

Topics included are: population parameters. 188 . population fluctuations and cycles. skeletal system. regulation and dynamics. organization and composition over time. body size. major organ systems.g.. their measurements and methods of studying populations. integumentary. form and functions. Topics of this course are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. e. biological design. adaptations. AAB203 Ecology The course covers concepts in population. and applied ecology. nervous systems. life history patterns and strategies.AS: Biology AAB202 Animal Diversity and Evolution Concepts of evolution of diversity. cardiovascular system. community. interspecies interactions and co-evolutionary interactions. developmental and comparative embryology. changes in community structure. biomechanics. population growth. the influences of agents of disturbance or stability as well as diversity indices as measurements of community structure. ectothermy and endothermy. Topics of this course are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. speciation and phylogenetic inter-relationships among major invertebrate and vertebrate phyla are discussed based on anatomy. organizational and functional basis in plant and animal communities. A synthesis of evolutionary biology concludes the course. Other aspects covered include allometry.

controls at transcriptional and translational levels. we intend not only to study diversity alone. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Topics to be covered include an introduction to evolution and phylogeny. Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. process and significance of gene amplification. but in addition we will examine the processes by which diversification occurs in Nature. and survey of the living world. and what types of research are at the cutting edge of this exciting field? Moreover. introns and exons. The transposons and its derivatives through evolution.AS: Biology AAB204 Molecular Biology Topology of nuclei acids. 189 . operons. AAB205 Evolution and Diversity of Life Our planet is home to millions of different kinds of life forms. how do scientists classify this diversity. Replicons and DNA replication and recombination. Role of centromere and telomere. classification systems. Topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Dynamics of DNA in genome. What is the range of diversity among living things. Roles of homeotic genes in development of eukaryotes. The importance of understanding these concepts and facts in deriving benefits for mankind and the environment will be emphasized. Satellite DNAs and immune diversity. Protein trafficking and signal transduction.

enzymes. spectrophotometry. AAB301 Biochemistry Cells depend on a continuous inflow and outflow of energy. material and information for its continued existence. hormonal communication and reproduction in plants and animals. cellular respiration. excretion and osmoregulation. The emphasis here will be on the principles of bioenergetics. homeostasis. Basic biochemical techniques like centrifugation. Topics include energy transformation. uptake and transport in plants. biosynthesis and catabolism of carbohydrates. 190 . integration of metabolic pathways in the organism and enzyme kinetics. amino acids and nucleic acids and the regulation.AS: Biology AAB206 General Physiology The course provides an introduction to the basic physiological processes in an organism. gaseous exchange in animals. thin-layer chromatography. and electrophoresis will be covered in the practical session. heterotrophic nutrition. physiology of cellular transport in animals. column chromatography. fats. autotrophic nutrition including plant mineral nutrition and photosynthesis. muscle contraction. Topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. nervous control and temperature regulation in animals.

gas exchange. mode. variance. plant hormones: chemical signalling in plant development. One sample hypotheses concerning the mean. The importance of understanding plant physiological processes from the horticultural point of view. range. Two sample hypotheses: 191 . osmoregulation. The topics are learnt through lecture. reporting variability about the mean. acid base balance. distribution of photoassimilate within plants. Topics covered include digestion. and discussion on selected current research literature of plant physiology. sampling from populations. median. responses of plants to environmental stress and the ability of a plant to withstand stress. contingency tables. mean deviation. light use and leaf gas exchange. heart and circulation. standard deviation. Chisquare goodness-of-fit. AAB304 Quantitative Biology Data description and types of biological data. The arithmetic mean. coefficient of variation. The integration of these physiological processes in an organism will also be discussed. practical class and miniproject. plant growth and options for reproduction. cooperative learning.AS: Biology AAB302 Animal Physiology This course seeks to explain the physiological processes that are needed for the functioning of an organism. muscle contraction and locomotion. temperature regulation and nervous control. AAB303 Plant Physiology Metabolism of water and inorganic ions. carbon dioxide assimilation and respiration.

Plant biotechnology: tissue 192 . cladistics and numerical taxonomy in vertebrate zoology. data collection and analyses. This course provides opportunities for investigations in current research in the life sciences. Microbial biotechnology: industrial fermentation. plastics). recombinant DNA technology. Paired-sample hypotheses: the pairedsample t test. Simple linear regression. AAB432 Modern Biotechnology Developments. genetic modification of microorganisms. Other quantitative aspects of quantitative biology: Hardy-Weinberg equation in population genetics. clustering in molecular biology. Data transformations. regression vs correlation.AS: Biology testing for difference between two means and variances. and the discussion of results. vaccines. methods and applications in microbial. These include the formulation of a research problem. use of immobilised cells. Multisample hypotheses: the analysis of variance (ANOVA). the design of experiments. setting of hypotheses. single factor analysis and multiple comparisons. AAB431 Independent Study Project This course exposes student teachers to all phases of the research process through inquiry-based learning strategies. multiple regressions. bioconversions. the molecular revolution. antibiotics. Overview of biotechnology: what is biotechnology. Two factor ANOVA and interaction between variables. plant. products from microbial sources (enzymes. Fundamentals of experimental design. animal and medical biotechnology.

). bivalves. conditioning. cloning. Animal biotechnology: gene transfer methods (microinjection. social behaviour and eusociality. biological clocks. embryonic stem cell gene transfer). imprinting. AAB433 Animal Behaviour Approaches to the study of the behaviour of diverse animals. habituation. communication. altruism. stem cell research. and genetic analysis of behaviors. DNA sequencing. Medical biotechnology: human genome project. somatic embryogenesis. parental care and mating systems. gene therapy. rhythmic behaviour. sexual selection. physiological. drug delivery.AS: Biology culture (micropropagation. tissue engineering. the measurement and analysis of animal behaviour for an understanding of the evolutionary and adaptive significance of behaviour as a functional unit are the foci of this course. Topics covered include: mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. plant genetic engineering. 193 . learning (instinct. Ethical. Regulation of biotechnology. foraging and antipredator behaviour. group living. etc. transgenic animals. sea slugs and mudskippers able to live in the mudflats that are exposed to fluctuating salinities. primate behaviour AAB434 Physiological and Biochemical Adaptation Why are some fishes capable of surviving on land for long periods of time while others would die within minutes? Why are some animals like the sipunculids. legal and social implications of uses of biotechnology in agriculture and medicine. neural. DNA fingerprinting. spatial orientation. somaclonal variation). xenotransplantation.

Living in the epipelagic and nature of marine food webs. AAB435 Tropical Marine Biology The ocean as a habitat.AS: Biology high ammonia and low oxygen contents? How do plants sense the changing environment? How do plants cope with drought stress? How do plants respond to increases and decreases in photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)? Under what environmental conditions. C4. chemical defences. Applications of marine biofouling. drug discovery in the biomedical and environmental sciences. and CAM plants)? How do plants tackle global warming and is an increased CO2 levels benefiting plant productivity? This course aims to provide the physiological and biochemical mechanisms found in different types of animals and plants which allow them to survive in their unique habitat. Deep sea. 194 . plants engage different types of photosynthesis based on the modes of carbon fixation (C3. Advances in marine technology and exploration. continental shelf. Adaptations of marine life. resources from the sea. coral reef ecosystems and life in the abyss). open ocean. Classification of the marine environment. Intertidal shore and soft-bottom communities (including estuaries. Modern marine biotechnology.

204 AAY102 AAY203 AAY 101.104.AS: Chemistry ACADEMIC SUBJECT: CHEMISTRY Table 1: AS 1 Chemistry Structure for B Sc (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Chemistry Structure for B Sc (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAY101 AAY102 AAY104 AAY105 AAY201 2 AAY202 AAY203 AAY204 AAY301 AAY302 Title General Chemistry Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry Introductory Organic Chemistry Main Group Chemistry Introduction to Spectroscopy Chemical Kinetics and Electrochemistry Further Organic Chemistry Transition Metal Chemistry Introductory Analytical Chemistry Bio-inorganic and Bio-organic Chemistry Experimental Techniques in Chemistry Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No.104 AAY303 and CGPA>3.204 AAY 101. 104 AAY104. 105 AAY101.202 AAY 203. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites AAY101 AAY102 AAY104 AAY101 AAY 201. 102.50 (for Chemistry courses) 1 AAY303 Core 3 Select any 1 elective below 3 AAY330 AAY331 AAY332 AAY333 AAY334 Environmental Chemistry Organometallic Chemistry Phase Equilibria and Colligative Properties Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Synthesis Industrial Chemistry Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 3 3 Select any 1 elective below AAY430 4 AAY431 AAY432 AAY433 Independent Study Project Advanced Analytical Chemistry Materials Chemistry Medicinal Chemistry Total AUs for Degree Pres Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 3 39 AAY301 AAY104 AAY203 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters 195 .

These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Periodic properties and group trends. Gibbs equation and general applications of redox reactions in our environment. properties of ionic and covalent compounds. Redox reactions.AS: Chemistry Table 2: Year AS 2 Chemistry Structure for BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title General Chemistry Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry Introductory Organic Chemistry Main Group Chemistry Introduction to Spectroscopy Chemical Kinetics and Electrochemistry Further Organic Chemistry Transition Metal Chemistry Total AUs for Degree Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. the exclusion principle. ionic. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites AAY101 AAY102 AAY104 AAY101 Course Code AAY101 AAY102 AAY104 AAY105 AAY201 1 2 AAY202 AAY203 AAY204 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters AAY101 General Chemistry Atomic structure and properties. covalent and metallic bondings. electronic configurations of elements. 196 . Polarity of bonds. characteristics of polar and non-polar compounds. Ionic and atomic sizes. Mole concept and stoichiometry. balancing equations. quantum numbers. half reactions. polarising ability and polarisability.

alkynes. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. classification. 197 . alkenes. kinetic theory of gases. chemical equilibria. with emphasis on hydrides. the van der Waals equation. bond order and bond strength. oxides and halides. Molecular shapes and VSEPR theory. sp3d2. aromatic compounds. hybridization of orbitals. second and third laws and their applications. thermodynamics: first. concept and applications of non-aqueous solvent systems. sp2. alcohols and thiols. thermochemistry. AAY105 Main Group Chemistry Simple molecular orbital treatment of diatomic molecules.AS: Chemistry AAY102 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry The gas laws: real gases. AAY104 Introductory Organic Chemistry General principles of organic chemistry bonding. protonic and aprotic. both homonuclear and heteronuclear. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. sp3. sp. alkyl halides. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Concepts of acids and bases. reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. General trends in the chemistry of Main Group elements. and ethers and epoxides. Physical and chemical properties of alkanes.

198 . Vibrational spectroscopy: infrared and Raman spectroscopies. shielding/deshielding and chemical shifts. Arrhenius equation. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. quantum theory of absorption and emission. Nuclear magnetic and electron-spin resonance spectroscopy: nuclear and electron spin energy levels in a magnetic field. AAY202 Chemical Kinetics and Electrochemistry Chemical kinetics: rate law. Electrochemistry and transport phenomena: conductance. activated complex theory. Electrodes and electrochemical cells. order and mechanism of reactions. UV-visible and atomic spectroscopy. Electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy: chromophores.AS: Chemistry AAY201 Introduction to Spectroscopy Basic principles of spectroscopy: electromagnetic radiation. BeerLambert Law. Basic theories of reaction rates: simple collision theory. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. steady state approximation. enzyme kinetics. mobility and transport number. electrolyte equilibria and activity. spin-spin coupling.

ultraviolet and visible spectral interpretations. Jahn-Teller effects. Simple Ligand Field and Molecular Orbital treatments. AAY204 Transition Metal Chemistry Nomenclature and structures. octahedral. coordination and optical isomerisms. The use of ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy. mass spectrometry and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for structural elucidation of organic molecules. Electronic transitions. 199 . These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Simple reaction mechanisms. labile and inert complexes. tetrahedral and square planar environments. weak and strong fields. inner and outer sphere electron-transfer mechanisms. geometric. Crystal field theory. infra-red (IR) spectroscopy. Paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties of transition metal complexes. Kinetic and thermodynamic stability. amines and amides. Curie and Curie-Weiss laws. associative and dissociative.AS: Chemistry AAY203 Further Organic Chemistry Aldehydes and ketones. heterocycles. selection rules. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. carboxylic acids and derivatives.

making logical deductions and in communicating results accurately and precisely. In this course. organic. Introduction to electroanalysis. AAY303 Experimental Techniques in Chemistry This is a laboratory-based course. Applications of analytical chemistry. potentiometry. student teachers will learn experimental techniques and instrumental methods in advanced inorganic. Spectrometric methods: atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. 200 . The role of metal ions in biological systems. steroids and terpenes. and storage. Separation techniques: gas.AS: Chemistry AAY301 Introductory Analytical Chemistry Concepts in analytical chemistry and data handling. AAY302 Bio-inorganic and Bio-organic Chemistry Biomolecules: amino acids. Sample treatment and extraction. UV-visible spectrophotometry. physical and analytical chemistry. voltammetry and coulometry. electron-transfer proteins and metalloenzymes. It aims to bring student teachers to a high level of competence in synthesis. oxygen-carrier proteins. fats. carbohydrates. The course builds on the experimental skills acquired through the various chemistry courses offered in previous years. transport. liquid and 2-D chromatography. nucleic acids. peptides and proteins. making careful chemical and physical measurements. conductometry. Metal management: uptake. oils.

with emphasis on carbon. The atmosphere and atmospheric chemistry. alkyl. Bio-geochemical cycles of elements. isomerization. Solar energy. reductive elimination. polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Organometallic reaction mechanisms: sigma-pi rearrangement. Pollution control and minimization. nitrogen and oxygen cycles. Wacker process. fossil fuel and the green-house effect. Toxic metals in the environment. solid waste and waste management. Water chemistry and resources. photochemical reactions. 201 . Chlorinated organic compounds. including: hydrogenation. bonding. betaelimination. Air pollution. migratory insertion. Environmental chemical analysis. hydroformylation. oxidative addition. polymerisation. synthesis and reactions of metal complexes with carbonyl.AS: Chemistry AAY330 Environmental Chemistry Concepts and basic problems in environmental issues. advanced oxidation processes. kinetics and ozone depletion. Sewage. decontamination and remediation methods. hydride and unsaturated hydrocarbon ligands. Homogeneous catalysis of organic reactions by transition metal complexes. AAY331 Organometallic Chemistry Structure.

freezing point depression. Factors controlling organic reactions: thermodynamic and kinetic factors. Reactions of carbonyl compounds with alpha hydrogen atoms. chloro-alkali products and the 202 . enols and enolates. Petrochemical industry and energy sector. osmotic pressure. stereochemical and electronic factors. pollution and logistic issues. synthons. Survey of the main types of organic reaction mechanisms. colligative properties: elevation of boiling point. Frontier orbitals. Two-component systems (simple mixtures): thermodynamic description of mixtures and partial molar properties. Industrial catalysts. AAY333 Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Synthesis Basic principles for writing organic reaction mechanisms. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. The disconnection approach to organic synthesis. petrochemicals and their utilizations. their social and economical importance towards national and regional development. Clapeyron equation and Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Pericyclic reactions. molar mass determination by freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. phase rule.AS: Chemistry AAY332 Phase Equilibria and Colligative Properties One-component systems: phase diagrams. AAY334 Industrial Chemistry History and development of the industry. Main sectors of chemical industries. vapour-liquid equilibria of binary liquid mixtures: ideal solutions. Sources of chemicals. Operational.

hyphenated techniques. data management and quality assurance in modern analytical science. Modern chromatographic systems: column and detector technology. miniaturization. The experience will prepare the student teacher in the supervision of project work of school students in future.AS: Chemistry gas industry. The student teacher is expected to carry out experiments in the Chemistry laboratory. AAY431 Advanced Analytical Chemistry laws. Mass spectrometry: methods of ionization and mass analysis. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. GC-MS. 203 . MS-MS. LC-MS. principles of peak retention and resolution. Research and development. theoretical plates. head-space analysis. AAY430 Independent Study Project In this course. Automation. solid-phase microextraction. This course enables the student teacher to apply knowledge and hone problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Case studies. purge-and-trap. zone spreading. Einstein diffusion coefficient. Agricultural chemicals and specialty chemicals. a student teacher undertakes an individual research project under the supervision of an academic staff that will expose him/her to the various phases of research work.

antibacterial. generation of lead compounds. Crystal structures.AS: Chemistry AAY432 Materials Chemistry Introduction to the major groups of materials: metals. polymer degradation and biodegradable polymers. polymer properties. and finally into clinical trials. hydrogels. and anti-parasitic) used for treatment of human ailments will be discussed. Chemical principles of herbal medicine will also be discussed. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. anti-inflammatory. AAY433 Medicinal Chemistry This course introduces the basic principles and practice of medicinal chemistry. ceramics. defects and fundamental properties of materials. Biomaterials. Polymer synthesis and characterization. optimization of biological activity. 204 . The mechanism of action of clinical drugs (antiviral. This is illustrated by how ideas for new drugs are taken through the various stages from initial discovery. and composites. anticancer. polymers. polymer processing for tissue engineering.

AS: Chinese Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT: CHINESE LANGUAGE Table: AS 1 Chinese Language Structure for BA (Ed) (Chinese) (Primary) AS 1 Chinese Language Structure for BA (Ed) (Chinese) (Secondary) Course Code AAC101 Title Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - Year 1 2 3 4 Textual Analysis and Writing Practices Modern Chinese Phonology and AAC102 Hanyu Pinyin AAC103 Chinese Rhetoric Chinese Etymology and the AAC201 Modern Chinese Script Critical Reading and Writing in AAC202 Chinese AAC203 Modern Chinese Lexicology AAC204 Modern Chinese Grammar Select any 2 Translation and Contrastive AAC331 EnglishChinese Linguistics AAC332 Features of Singapore Mandarin Language Acquisition and AAC333 Learning of Chinese Select any 1 AAC334 Classical Chinese Grammar Selected Readings in Chinese AAC335 Linguistics Select any 1 Computer Applications in Chinese AAC431 Language and Literature AAC432 Chinese Language and Culture Total AUs for Degree Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 3 3 - Pres Pres 3 3 33 - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. 205 .

Such knowledge will enhance their ability as a Chinese language teacher. AAC201 Chinese Etymology and the Modern Chinese Script This course aims to equip student teachers with basic knowledge in Chinese etymology and the modern Chinese script.AS: Chinese Language AAC101 Textual Analysis and Writing Practices This course aims to acquaint student teachers with good Chinese writing through close textual analysis of literary works and commentaries of different kinds of writing. AAC102 Modern Chinese Phonology and Hanyu Pinyin This course will equip student teachers with basic knowledge of Phonetics and Phonology of Modern Standard Chinese. AAC103 Chinese Rhetoric This course deals with the functions of rhetoric in literature and everyday life. It aims to enable student teachers to determine the linguistic structure of an expression and relate it to its meaning and rhetorical effects. The objective is to enable student teachers to apply such knowledge in teaching. It also aims to enhance student teachers reading ability and sharpen their writing skills. especially when it comes to the teaching of recognition of Chinese characters. 206 .

models and examples of contrastive study between Chinese and English at orthographical. constructing a focused. writing a mini research paper. It will equip them with the concepts and skills to analyze parts of speech and sentence structures of various kinds of modern Chinese writings in daily and academic life as well as in school settings. selecting and sourcing relevant research material. morphological. AAC331 Translation and Contrastive English-Chinese Linguistics Introduction to synchronically contrastive linguistics.AS: Chinese Language AAC202 Critical Reading and Writing in Chinese This course aims to familiarize student teachers with the form and conventions of academic writing in Chinese. drafting. revising and editing a short essay. theories and practice of translation. such as analyzing given texts from various sources. AAC204 Modern Chinese Grammar This course aims to provide student teachers with a basic knowledge of modern Chinese grammar. AAC203 Modern Chinese Lexicology The course aims to provide student teachers with a basic knowledge of the nature and classification of the Chinese lexicon. semantic and syntactic levels. The objective is to enhance critical reading and writing competencies through a variety of tasks. logical. theoretical and practical aims. 207 . coherent view-point.

and the role of Mandarin in the multilingual context of Singapore will also be examined. It aims to enhance student teachers ability to read classical Chinese writings as well as consolidating their understanding of the grammar of the Chinese language. AAC333 Language Acquisition and Learning of Chinese This course aims to equip student teachers with a basic knowledge in language acquisition models and theories. AAC334 Classical Chinese Grammar This course focuses on the grammar of the Chinese language prior to the Tang period. the different varieties of Singapore Mandarin and its standardization. 208 . The historical and present-day influence on Singapore Mandarin from Chinese dialects and other non-Chinese languages in Singapore. with focus on the morphological and syntactic components. vocabulary. It deals with the development of classical Chinese grammar and compares classical Chinese grammar with modern Chinese grammar. and syntax of Singapore Mandarin. Student teachers will also be able to have a better understanding of developing bilingualism from infancy through school and the role of language socialization in language acquisition. It aims also to enhance their understanding of normal language development in primary and secondary school and the issues related to learning Chinese as a second language in the special context of Singapore.AS: Chinese Language AAC332 Features of Singapore Mandarin This course focuses on the description of the phonology.

phonology and sociolinguistics. Student teachers will better grasp the cultural and social dimensions of Chinese language and thereby have a greater ability of communication. The objectives are to enrich their knowledge in Chinese language and enhance their ability to do research in the field of Chinese linguistics for academic and teaching purposes. grammar.AS: Chinese Language AAC335 Selected Readings in Chinese Linguistics This course exposes student teachers to various kinds of writings in the area of Chinese general linguistics. with an emphasis on the dynamic relationship between them. It also aims to equip student teachers with essential digital skills and power tools to achieve the goals in their academic and teaching profession. lexicology. AAC431 Computer Applications in Chinese Language and Literature This course provides the fundamental principles and knowledge on the use of IT in the studying and teaching of Chinese Language and Literature. 209 . AAC432 Chinese Language and Culture This course aims to introduce different aspects of Chinese language and culture. Chinese etymology.

AS: Chinese Literature ACADEMIC SUBJECT: CHINESE LITERATURE Table: AS 2 Chinese Literature Structure for BA (Ed) (Chinese) (Primary) AS2 Chinese Literature Structure for BA (Ed) (Chinese) (Secondary) Course Code AAJ101 Title Course Category Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Core Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites - Year 1 2 3 4 Survey of Modern Chinese Literature Select 1 (Primary) AAJ131 AAJ132 Creative Writing Workshop Select 1 (Secondary) AAJ132 Creative Writing Workshop Readings in Singapore and AAJ133 Malaysia Chinese Literature Selected Readings in Classical AAJ201 Chinese Prose Selected Readings in Classical AAJ202 Chinese Poetry Select 2 AAJ331 Chinese History AAJ332 History of Chinese Literature AAJ333 Introduction to Chinese Thought Select 1 AAJ334 Tang Poetry AAJ335 Song Ci Select 1 AAJ431 Contemporary China AAJ432 Classical Chinese Fiction AAJ433 Classical Chinese Drama Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. 210 .

imaginative and psychological development of children. AAJ131 This course examines the historical development of c literature. AAJ132 Creative Writing Workshop This course aims to enhance student teachers ability to appreciate and write creative writings so that eventually they can guide their pupils in creative writing.AS: Chinese Literature AAJ101 Survey of Modern Chinese Literature This course aims to provide student teachers with a basic knowledge of modern Chinese literature and enhance their understanding of modern Chinese people and their society. its various genres and its relevance to the linguistic. 211 . AAJ133 Readings in Singapore and Malaysia Chinese Literature The course aims first to equip student teachers with basic knowledge of the trends and developments of writings by Singapore and Malaysia writers. It also aims to enable student teachers to make good use of Singapore and Malaysia Chinese literary works in Chinese language & literature teaching and curriculum design. with focus on the teaching of Chinese in primary schools.

AAJ331 Chinese History This is a survey of Chinese history from antiquity to the modern era in the perspective of world history.AS: Chinese Literature AAJ201 Selected Readings in Classical Chinese Prose This course aims to enhance student teachers ability to appreciate classical prose writings and enrich their understanding of Chinese culture. as well as the stylistic features of various genres throughout Chinese history. AAJ202 Selected Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry The course aims to equip student teachers with a basic knowledge of classical Chinese poetry and enhance their ability to appreciate the works of this genre. AAJ332 History of Chinese Literature This course aims to equip student teachers with a basic knowledge of the history of Chinese literature from the Western Zhou to the Qing dynasty. Student teachers will be challenged to reflect on their own life beliefs and modern ethics and norms. 212 . AAJ333 Introduction to Chinese Thought This course aims to provide student teachers with a basic knowledge of the major philosophical schools in Chinese history.

AAJ432 Classical Chinese Fiction This course aims to provide student teachers with a basic knowledge of the development and characteristics of the classical Chinese fiction. political. economic. They will read selected tales of the Six Dynasties.AS: Chinese Literature AAJ334 Tang Poetry This course to understand and appreciate Tang poetry. 213 . AAJ335 Song Ci This course to understand and appreciate Song lyric poetry. sociological. and international latest development. AAJ431 Contemporary China This course aims to provide student teachers with a basic understanding of contemporary China from various perspectives such as historical. The Water Margin. The Journey to the West and The Dream of the Red Chamber. chuanqi and huaben stories of the Tang and Song periods as well as excerpts from the four major novels. The Romance of the Three Kingdoms. geographical. namely.

214 . It will include a comparative study of systems and traits of classical drama. the classification and appreciation of classical drama. An understanding of the influence of the classical drama on Chinese ethics and moral concepts.AS: Chinese Literature AAJ433 Classical Chinese Drama The course aims to equip student teachers with the basic knowledge of the form and development of Chinese classical drama.

215 . Media and Theatre AAU301 Cultural Theory and the Theatre AAU302 The Director in the Theatre Choose from one of the following options: AAU331 Technical Theatre AAU332 Early Modern Theatre and drama Theatre for Development 3 AAU333 Choose from one of the following options: Semiotics and Aesthetics of AAU334 Theatre AAU335 Modern Drama Dramaturgy and Writing for the AAU336 Theatre 4 AAU402 Performance and Production Total AUs for Degree Pres Pres Pres Core 3 3 3 3 39 - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.AS: Drama ACADEMIC SUBJECT: DRAMA Table 1: Year AS 1 Drama Structure for BA (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Drama Structure for BA (Ed) (Secondary) Title Acting Foundations of Drama Educational Drama Contemporary Theatre in Singapore and Southeast Asia Twentieth-Century Theatre and Drama Applied Theatre Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Core Core Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - 1 Course Code AAU101 AAU102 AAU103 AAU104 AAU201 AAU202 2 AAU203 Physical Theatre Choose from one of the following options: AAU231 Traditional Asian Theatre Forms AAU232 Technology.

AAU101 Acting Explores the processes of personal preparation for a range of acting roles and performance modes. Emphasises personal commitment to and ownership of the process. supported by journals and written theoretical accounts. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites - 1 Course Code AAU101 AAU102 AAU103 AAU104 AAU201 AAU202 2 AAU203 Physical Theatre Choose one of the following: AAU231 Traditional Asian Theatre Forms AAU232 Technology. Media and Theatre Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. Gives initial experience of Asian and presentational modes as well as the traditional core work in realistic acting.AS: Drama Table 2: Year AS 2 Drama Structure for BA/ BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title Acting Foundations of Drama Educational Drama Contemporary Theatre in Singapore and Southeast Asia Twentieth-Century Theatre and Drama Applied Theatre Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres No. 216 . Both group and individual performances will be presented and assessed.

Set texts will include a Shakespeare play and a Singapore play. and there will be a theatre visit. Elementary theory will be incorporated to give the student teachers critical purchase on the knowledge base. The plays will be approached dramaturgically through the means of analysis for theme. structure. character and patterns of language. and through practical work on the text as a script for performance. Links will be drawn between developments in our understanding of how children learn and the ways that educational drama practices have contributed to discourse in the field. and in this context the important area of educational drama will be introduced.AS: Drama AAU102 Foundations of Drama This will constitute a general introduction to the field of drama. AAU103 Educational Drama This course introduces student teachers to the history. through the possible theatrical modes for their realisation. The focus will be on learning in. The course thus establishes a foundation for the other six core courses at Levels 1 and 2. focussing on the work of the actor/performer. philosophies and theories of educational drama. through and about drama with a practical orientation. theatrical. performative and educational aspects. in its literary. 217 . An overarching concern will be the historical and present-day social purposes of theatre.

and their integration into theatre practice. 218 . history. The course will be taught through workshop and lecture and student teachers will be required to engage in practical and theoretical discussion. Sometimes it will include other cultural influences such as political thought and social ideology. It will include an introduction to the elements of traditional theatre as well as theatre forums with theatre practitioners on current practices.AS: Drama AAU104 Contemporary Theatre in Singapore and Southeast Asia The course will explore issues that are relevant in contemporary Southeast Asian theatre. and will consider questions of identity. AAU201 Twentieth-Century Theatre and Drama The course will explore some of the practices and ideas that have had a significant impact on theatre in the 20th Century. with particular emphasis on Singapore and Malaysia and a brief introduction to Indonesia and the Philippines. as well as prepare a workshop performance for assessment. It will often revolve around the writings or practices of theatre practitioners. Student teachers will be required to prepare a 10-20 minute workshop performance in groups which may be an excerpt or adaptation of a play from the region. social and cultural changes and the trends.

This course introduces the practical. It will use experimental techniques of improvisation.AS: Drama AAU202 Applied Theatre Applied Theatre is a term pertaining to drama/theatre practices which focus on participation and transformation. contact improvisation and basic choreography in extending the vocabulary of the body. movement analysis. theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of these approaches. 219 . AAU203 Physical Theatre This course explores the fundamental ideas of physical theatre and provides practical training in the relevant skills. Theatre in Education (TIE). It will discuss how physical theatre has influenced much contemporary theatre and trace its origins to traditions from the East and West. The course will also employ selected literary texts of poetry and prose to be used for performance. It will focus on the articulation of ideas through the articulation of the body by emphasizing movement and gesture. Theatre in Health Education (THE). and Theatre for Development (TFD) as well as Process Drama are all forms of Applied Theatre.

It will study technologised performance as an emergent space and analyse how will also explore how theatre contends with mass media and popular forms of technologised culture. style and technique in major traditional theatre forms across Asia. It will employ an integrated approach to learning these forms by using practical workshops that are informed by history and theory. The course will discuss and analyse the theoretical frameworks within which these forms have developed and how they continue to influence ideas about tradition in Asia.AS: Drama AAU231 Traditional Asian Theatre Forms This course will examine aspects of form. AAU232 Technology. Media and Theatre This course will examine theatre as a live performance and its implications in a mediatized increasingly dominated by media technology and consider how performances. Beijing Opera in China and Kathakali in India. It will also examine some relevant literary texts that have become part of the tradition. such as Noh in Japan. The course will provide opportunity for creating live performance that uses technology and engages media culture to enhance as well as question the 220 .

AS: Drama AAU301 Cultural Theory and the Theatre This course explores contemporary theatre within the frame of cultural theory. The approach taken will include the close examination of theatre practice that is informed by cultural theory. The significance of changing relationships with the actor and with audience are two central motifs. The course will also provide opportunity to create original performances that are critically informed by theory and analysed within the respective framework. and trace how they have had a marked impact on theatre performances in a range of contexts. 221 . It will highlight significant aspects of theories such as post-colonialism. gender and post-modernism. It will study how practice can be constructed to embody and develop forms of contemporary theatre making. AAU302 The Director in the Theatre Practical work in the process of directing from conceptualization through design and rehearsal to performance with the working context of managing relationships and the theoretical context of the major directors in the last hundred years and the implications of their work for the cultural operation of theatre. It will involve watching contemporary performances and analyzing the construction of work according to the ideas being examined.

costume and set design and stage management practices (including safety). AAU332 Early Modern Theatre and Drama Covers the major theatre developments in Western Europe between 1580 and 1700. Student teachers will consider the ethics and implications of social and cultural constraints and impacts of TFD in a global society.AS: Drama AAU331 Technical Theatre A detailed practical investigation of lighting design and operation. sound design and operation. and the historical disruptions which were part of this change. The large context is the change from pre-modern to enlightenment mentalities. just as much as through changing playscripts. embodies and reflects upon these changes. in the detail of its modes of presentation. 222 . The theatre is seen as a cultural site which. together with study of representative dramatic texts. AAU333 Theatre for Development This course takes a critical stance with regard to contemporary Applied Theatre and Community Theatre models. The practical workshops aim to empower student teachers to devise and co-create impactful and culturally sensitive works. The context for this work is the essential artistic contribution made by these practical aspects of theatre-making and the historical changes that are represented through changing techniques.

AAU336 Dramaturgy and Writing for the Theatre This course offers an investigation of the role of the dramaturg in contemporary theatre practice. the politics of performance. Student teachers will have the opportunity to create original texts and act as dramaturgs for their peers. These texts may be addressed in seminars and performance workshops. The approach will involve examining what is involved in the practical construction of performance texts and mise en scene whilst giving opportunity for original performance texts created in the course to be deconstructed and analysed. audience and spectatorship. It will draw on critical theory in semiotics and aesthetics to inform the understanding of theatre as a sign-system and aesthetic space. dramaturgical methods. AAU335 Modern Drama An investigation of modern approaches to drama and theatre from Chekhov and Ibsen through to more contemporary playwrights. the performing body. criteria used for script assessment and the role of the script editor. It focuses on playwriting processes. 223 .AS: Drama AAU334 Semiotics and Aesthetics of Theatre This course will examine key topics in analyzing performance such as decoding the sign.

Or it could be a classic production. 224 . aiming to be a polished topping-out ceremony. or an interdisciplinary performance piece. at the same time. if co-operative creation and the educational nexus were considered the most important areas to develop further. however much it is. that is out of processes that will be valuable beyond the context of the immediate performance. The production work will grow out of continuing drama training. The character of the production will depend upon the further developmental needs of the group at that time for instance. it could take the form of a devised Theatre-in-Education piece to be toured through schools. It will also be theorized and subject to critique and review to place it firmly in the arena of work-in-progress.AS: Drama AAU402 Performance and Production This course represents the final collaborative theatre work of the cohort.

AS: English Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT: ENGLISH LANGUAGE Table 1: AS 1 English Language Structure for BA (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 English Language Structure for BA (Ed) (Secondary) Title Introduction to the Study of Language Language in Context Understanding the Sounds & Words of English Exploring the Grammar of English The Social Variation of Language Language Meaning and Use Language Acquisition & Development The Role of Language in Education Analysing Text Language and Literacy The Structure of Singapore English Aspects of Early Literacy Second Language Academic Writing Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - Year Course Code AAE101 AAE102 AAE103 AAE104 AAE201 AAE202 AAE203 1 2 Select any 1 elective AAE231 AAE232 AAE233 AAE234 AAE235 AAE236 225 .

AS: English Language Year 3/4 Course Code Select any AAE 331/431 AAE 332/432 AAE 333/433 AAE 334/434 AAE 335/435 AAE 336/436 AAE 337/437 AAE 338/438 AAE 339/439 AAE 340/440 AAE 341/441 AAE 342/442 AAE 343/443 AAE 344/444 AAE 345/445 AAE 346/446 AAE 347 AAE 447 Title 5 electives An Introduction to Systemic Functional Grammar Topics in Phonetics / Phonology Topics in Pragmatics Lexicology and Lexicography Critical Discourse Analysis English in New Cultural Contexts Understanding Reading Understanding Writing Multiliteracies Classroom and the Language Course Category Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres and the Pres Pres & Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 39 Prerequisites AAE347 Bilingual Education Using IT in the Language Classroom Language Testing History of Modern Linguistics Comparative Linguistics Theory of Translation Language Across the Curriculum Special Topics Education Research Methods Independent Reading and Research Total AUs for Degree in Language Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. 226 .

history and structure of English. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - 2 Language Meaning and Use Language Acquisition AAE203 Development Select any 1 elective The Role of Language AAE231 Education AAE232 Analysing Text AAE233 AAE234 AAE235 AAE236 in Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 - Language and Literacy The Structure of Singapore English Aspects of Early Literacy Second Language Academic Writing Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. 227 . It provides the basis of investigation in subsequent courses. investigating the nature. and how language relates to the mind. and education. of English. of the major branches of language. society. the connections between the various branches are emphasized. It provides an overview.AS: English Language Table 2: AS 2 English Language Structure for BA/ BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAE101 1 AAE102 AAE103 AAE104 AAE201 AAE202 Title Introduction to the Study of Language Language in Context Understanding the Sounds & Words of English Exploring the Grammar of English The Social Variation of Language & Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. with basic terminology. Throughout the course. and of applied linguistics. AAE101 Introduction to the Study of Language This course comprises a basic introduction to the study of language.

to enable them to read the phonetic transcription in dictionaries and also describe features of their own speech. 228 . they will be introduced to sound-letter correspondences. Finally. but also to understand how it often works to cover underlying purposes and values. the course will enable them to appreciate how language works to enable purposeful communication in context. for future teachers. The course is organized around specific weekly small-scale tasks. It will examine spoken and written texts across a variety of settings and for a wide range of purposes. including the location of sentence stress and the contribution of intonation to discourse structure. interactions and social context. are likely to be relevant to their pupils. where student teachers apply and fine-tune the framework and concepts provided to texts which feature in their everyday and professional/academic life. By providing student teachers with a age for talking about texts. The course will discuss the rules for the pronunciation of suffixes. Student teachers will become thoroughly familiar with the IPA. the basic patterns of intonation will be introduced. and which. and the influence of derivational suffixes on word stress. AAE103 Understanding the Sounds and Words of English This course will introduce the basic concepts of English morphology and then consider the pronunciation of English words. to provide a foundation for the teaching of reading.AS: English Language AAE102 Language in Context The major aim of this course is to make student teachers systematic and critical observers of language as they use and encounter it in different contexts. In addition.

AAE201 The Social Variation of Language This course introduces student teachers to basic concepts in sociolinguistics. 229 . the emergence of new language varieties such as pidgins and creoles. which combine with other words to form phrases. The course draws attention to the key features of the major constituents of the English sentence. and the various functions they perform. Issues such as language maintenance and language shift. including socially determined variation in style and register. combine with other phrases to form clauses. language varieties reflecting social class. Student teachers are also given a brief introduction to the two main approaches to the study of grammar the formal and the functional. and the impact of globalization and new communicative orders on the status of languages will also be covered. Topics also include investigations of factors influencing language choice in bilingual societies. It covers the full range of units the individual words.AS: English Language AAE104 Exploring the Grammar of English This course introduces grammar as the study of the different parts of the English sentence and how these parts relate to each other. as well as related phenomena such as code-mixing and code-switching. which. gender and ethnicity. in turn.

grammar and use. It introduces important concepts about how languages are learnt and used in society. the role of dictionaries. It will consider the nature of meaning. different types of word. how computer corpora can provide information about meaning. the course considers the normal path of development for English monolinguals and bilinguals at home and in school. how words are linked by different meaning relationships. Making links between psychological and social factors. different types of meaning. how we use meanings and meaning patterns to construct different kinds of text. idioms. how meanings and words change over time. the nature and characteristics of words. and how we can use meanings and words conventionally and creatively. and in contexts of real interaction and use. how meanings function in spoken and written discourse. words. It highlights features of English language development in primary and secondary schools in multilingual societies such as Singapore. Such knowledge can help teachers understand key factors that influence language learning and make informed decisions about instruction. AAE203 Language Acquisition and Development This course examines theories and issues of language learning from both psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives. as rule and imaginative resource. how we use metaphor to create new meanings. relationships between meaning and form. 230 .AS: English Language AAE202 Language Meaning and Use This course looks at the meanings of English and how we use meaning to represent and interact with reality and other people. from word to discourse level.

AS: English Language AAE231 The Role of Language in Education This course explores the centrality of language in education. and emphasises semiosis meaning-making and the semiotic resources available to users. and one of the principal to use language. of schooling more readily than others? AAE232 Analysing Text This course builds on earlier courses concerned with language. 231 . written and visual discourse. similarities and differences. and people and texts. discourse and text. Among the key questions raised are the following: What is the relationship between language and learning. and involve analysis of spoken. or types of language. and their importance in educational contexts. the roles they play in our everyday lives. The course will explore the relationships between texts and contexts. or types of language. in order to understand and appreciate their characteristics. should be taught in school and why? Why do some students learn the language. Through language the process of teaching and learning takes place. people and contexts. meaning. where it is both the medium and the message. and how can teachers use language effectively to promote learning? Which language.

Readings and discussion focus on the diverse nature of literacies across time and space and different communities.AS: English Language AAE233 Language and Literacy This course introduces student teachers to the ways in which definitions of and research on literacy have changed in recent years from static. phonology. and the social. Throughout the course. lexis and discourse. unidimensional understandings to views of literacy as diverse in nature and as sets of situated social practices inextricably linked to culture and societal structures. and also by comparison with standard international English. This is achieved by examining Singapore English as a new variety of English in its own right. morphology. In each area. the concepts and findings of the readings will be linked to literacy development and teaching in the multiracial and multilingual Singapore context. and relate these to issues and practices of the use of the informal variety of Singapore English in Singapore schools. cognitive and linguistic aspects of becoming literate. student teachers will carry out investigations of their own variety of (Singapore) English. AAE234 The Structure of Singapore English This course examines the structure of Singapore English: its grammar. 232 .

whole language approaches. i. Throughout this introductory course student teachers will look at the implications for teachers who need to serve diverse roles in Singapore classrooms. These include the mismatch between the dominant home language and medium of instruction. emphasis-on-literacy approaches. through collaborative activities and group discussion. Student teachers will acquire an understanding of specific problems encountered by children who struggle to read and write.AS: English Language AAE235 Aspects of Early Literacy This course introduces student teachers to the issues surrounding literacy acquisition in young children. 233 . It will provide both a sound theoretical base and the practical teaching skills needed for early literacy classrooms. This course will cover some of the following topics: the nature of second language academic writing.. and the low socio-economic status of young learners. children in kindergarten or pre-school up to Grades 2-3 (P2/P3). will be guided towards a better understanding of what second language academic writing entails. Student teachers will study the major debates in teaching reading: the phonics vs. the approaches to teaching academic writing interculturally. ways to plan and teach different aspects of second language writing. Student teachers. AAE236 Second Language Academic Writing The purpose of this course is to introduce student teachers to major issues in second language academic writing studies.e. and some of the more controversial issues in second language writing assessment. and the emphasis-on-oracy vs. Finally student teachers will also evaluate programs in various countries which help struggling readers.

Finally. and examines in detail the interpersonal. AAE332/ Topics in Phonetics/ Phonology 432 This course provides an in-depth description of the vowel. 234 . including a detailed study of phoneme theory as well as an introduction to generative phonology. consonant. rhythm and intonation systems of English. and they will be required to compare their findings against existing research on Singapore English. and equips student teachers with the knowledge to account for how language is used in a particular way.AS: English Language AAE331/ An Introduction to Systemic Functional Grammar 431 This course explores the structure of English in context. stress. It will include an overview of phonological theory. It introduces key concepts from Michael systemic functional grammar. Student teachers will also learn how to measure features of their own speech. This course focuses on the broad functions of language. experiential and textual organization of texts. student teachers will investigate and report on their own intonation and other patterns of their discourse.

Gricean Maxims. It explores the processes by which lexicographers compile dictionary entries and also the factors which affect the type. AAE334/ Lexicology and Lexicography 434 This course focuses on the history. and the application of pragmatics to discourse. and innovations in the design of lexical resources for language learners. Conversational Structure and the coherence of talk. 235 . It explores the philosophical aspects of meaning in Speech Acts. Relevance Theory. A feature of the course is a hands-on review of corpus-based methods in language description for compiling dictionaries and other reference resources. the relations between pragmatics and society. design and use of dictionaries.AS: English Language AAE333/ Topics in Pragmatics 433 A study of the ways in which meanings are generated in context. extent and focus of the information presented in language learning resources for language learners.

such as linguistic human rights. The main objective is to increase student teachers' understanding of the characteristics of New Englishes and the development of new meanings and structures in new cultural contexts. gender discourse and political discourse to uncover the linguistic processes that underlie the ideological construction of contemporary society. is an approach to discourse analysis which looks at issues of power and ideology and the ways by which they are reproduced through language. the roles and functions of new varieties of English in societies around the world. language death. 236 .AS: English Language AAE335/ Critical Discourse Analysis 435 Critical Discourse Analysis or CDA. for short. decolonisation and the search for cultural roots in new literatures in English will also be examined. AAE336/ English in New Cultural Contexts 436 This course surveys the socio-cultural and linguistic characteristics. and so student teachers with a background knowledge of functional grammar may have an advantage. A range of issues related to the spread of English. This critical approach to discourse analysis will explore areas like media discourse.

237 . intertextual construct. purpose and situation is given an important role emphasizing the social dimension of the learning situation. Context as realized by the constraints of task. The concept of reading and comprehension has undergone massive change in several ways.AS: English Language AAE337/ Understanding Reading 437 This course will incorporate theoretical and research foundations of past years as well as new conceptualizations of reading and literacy. social context and culture. the comprehension process and the role of metacognition in the development of reading will form the focus of this course. The text is viewed as a multiple. Implications for the teaching/learning of writing will be discussed. Student teachers will develop an understanding of comprehension and the processes of reading embedded within a learning framework that stresses cognitive development and the social context of learners. This requires an understanding of various models of reading and literacy processes. Aspects of language processes connected with initial encounters with print. AAE338/ Understanding Writing 438 Student teachers will be introduced to significant research and theoretical perspectives on the nature of writing (composing) and the development of writing competence in school and non-school contexts. They will use the research and theoretical models to explore the nature of writing and writing tasks in local school and non-school situations. The reader is seen to play a central role in the process of constructing meaning.

or writing what image does? How do new forms of message arrangement in texts and genres affect the processes of reading and writing? Does learning happen differently when we engage with knowledge through image or language. mother tongue languages in multilingual communities. and the politics of language policy planning will be examined. It will include discussion on models of bilingual education. Specific issues discussed are: Does knowledge remain the same when it is represented in language. and are taught in traditional or computer-mediated classrooms? The course also looks at examples of language classrooms which show how the increasingly complex demands of language and literacy pedagogy in contemporary times can be effectively addressed. socio-psychological aspects of bilingualism: attitudes to language. gesture or other modes? Can image do what writing does. forms of message arrangement and technologies and a rapidly changing English language. the roles and functions of languages. image. e. AAE340/ Bilingual Education 440 This course includes an exploration of issues in societal bilingualism. factors influencing language maintenance and shift. official.AS: English Language AAE339/ Multiliteracies and the Language Classroom 439 language and literacy teaching in the context of new and emerging communication channels. 238 . culture. Issues related to linguistic minorities.g. identity & ethnicity.

Through the creation and trialing of a language test. of the English language. washback and ethical testing.AS: English Language AAE341/ Using IT in the Language Classroom 441 This course focuses on the use of Information Technology (IT) in the study. Chomsky. including validity. AAE342/ Language Testing 442 This course provides an introduction to fundamental concepts in language test development. Bloomfield. student teachers will discover the practical implications of the theoretical aspects covered in the course. AAE343/ History of Modern Linguistics 443 This course surveys the developments and broad directions in linguistics from the 19th century to the present day. as well as the teaching. and the prime architects of each school Saussure. reliability. It describes the tenets of the major schools of linguistics and their analytical approaches. among others are also discussed. 239 . We explore how various themes of language and learning can meet the challenges of the Digital Age. The intellectual atmosphere within which various ideas were evolved.

the nature of the texts and textbooks used in schools. and knowledge about. and the ways in which theories of language and learning can be put into practice so that teachers can address the learning needs of their student teachers more effectively and confidently. developing awareness of. The course will explore the use of language in primary and secondary subject classrooms. focusing on issues that home language into English and comparisons of the structure of English with one of the other languages of Singapore.AS: English Language AAE344/ Comparative Linguistics and the Theory of 444 Translation This course provides an overview of the theories and techniques of translation. the important role that teachers play in the thinking and learning processes. and progress. of their students at primary and secondary levels. the language of subjects across the curriculum. AAE345/ Language Across the Curriculum 445 This course emphasises the crucial role of language in learning. 240 .

Student teachers will be familiarised with different types of research design. AAE347 Research Methods This course examines the various research methods employed in the study of English Language. concepts or strategies learned during the first three years of study spark an interest in exploring 241 .AS: English Language AAE346/ Special Topics in Language and Education 446 This course will focus on subjects. Topics vary with the instructor and the interests of student teachers. AAE447 Independent Reading and Research This course provides an opportunity for undergraduate student teachers to do independent reading and research in a topic of their choice in English Language under the guidance of an ELL staff member. It aims to provide basic knowledge and skills needed for student teachers to identify and define a significant issue in an area of English Language or Applied Linguistics and to decide on the appropriate theoretical framework and methodology to investigate it. Student teachers use this opportunity to explore an area of study or issue that relates to their academic and/or professional interests. the course will give student teachers a chance to explore a topic or the work of an educational linguist in greater depth. Often. key texts or persons that have played an important role in the study of language and education. and their strengths and limitations. Because of its specialised nature. quantitative and qualitative. new tools.

personalised reading and research. 242 . Subject to the approval of the Academic Group. This independent study course is an excellent opportunity for focused. student teachers will select a topic and will be matched with a research mentor.AS: English Language further applications of ideas.

AS: English Literature ACADEMIC SUBJECT: ENGLISH LITERATURE Table 1: AS 1 English Literature Structure for BA (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAR101 AAR102 1 AAR103 AAR104 AAR201 AAR202 Title Speaking of Narrative Survey of British Literature I: Chaucer. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - 2 Group A Literature. Shakespeare & the Renaissance Survey of British Literature II: 17th Century to Modernism Reading Strategies American Literary Tradition Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. Education and Culture Singapore and the Region in AAR203 Literature Select any 1 course from Group A Shakespeare and Early Modern AAR231 Drama AAR232 The Restoration to Blake AAR233 17th Century Poetry and Prose Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 - 243 .

of Code Category AUs Select 5. 244 . with at least 1 each from Group B. Group C and Group D AAR Romanticism Pres 3 331/431 AAR Victorian Poetry and Prose Pres 3 332/432 AAR The English Novel: Jane Austen to Pres 3 333/433 the 19th Century AAR Pres 20th Century Drama 3 334/434 AAR Pres 20th Century Poetry 3 335/435 AAR Pres Contemporary British Literature 3 336/436 AAR Contemporary American Literature Pres 3 337/437 AAR Film Studies Pres 3 338/438 AAR Adolescent Literature Pres 3 339/439 AAR Understanding Critical Theory Pres 3 340/440 AAR Post-colonial Theory and Literature Pres 3 341/441 AAR Literature and Feminism Pres 3 342/442 AAR Approaches to Cultural Studies Pres 3 343/443 AAR Developments in Anglophone Pres 3 344/444 Literatures Research Methods in the Study of AAR345 Pres 3 Literature in English AAR446 Independent Reading and Research Pres 3 Group B Group C Group D Total AUs for Degree 39 Prerequisites AAR345 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.AS: English Literature Year 3/4 Course Title Course No.

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24* for BA Course Code AAR101 AAR102 Prerequisites - 1 AAR103 AAR104 AAR201 2 AAR202 AAR203 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. Shakespeare & the Renaissance Survey of British Literature II: 17th Century to Modernism Reading Strategies American Literary Tradition Literature. Note: * For the AS2. C or D in the AS1 listings for a total of 24 AUs.AS: English Literature Table 2: Year AS 2 English Literature (Ed)/BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title Speaking of Narrative Survey of British Literature I: Chaucer. 245 . Education & Culture Singapore and the Region Literature Total AUs for Degree in Structure Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. B. student teachers will in addition choose any course from Groups A.

Once again the three major genres of prose fiction. This course literary tradition. poetry and drama will be highlighted. this course will introduce the student teacher to some of the modes of storytelling which have arisen through the ages from narrative poetry fiction and drama to more recent developments such as film. a necessary step in the preparation of a teacher of Literature. The three major literary genres of prose fiction. AAR102 Survey of British Literature Shakespeare & the Renaissance I: Chaucer.AS: English Literature AAR101 Speaking of Narrative As the first step in the education of a teacher of Literature. continuing from where Survey leaves off in the preparation of a teacher of Literature. poetry 246 . Shakespeare and readings from the Renaissance. television anime. movements and aesthetics. AAR103 Survey of British Literature II: 17 th Century to Modernism This course English literary tradition. The selection of authors and texts will continue to introduce student teachers to important literary periods. The selection of authors and texts will introduce student teachers to literary periods. This is in anticipation of the various types of narrative structures a student teacher will have to deal with in the classroom. movements and aesthetics. and computer realizations of current events. and the particular emphasis will be Chaucer.

Student teachers will also be introduced to some basic psychoanalytical strategies of reading world of intellectual and cultural practices outside it. 247 . Wheatley. Franklin. the United States.AS: English Literature and drama will be well-highlighted even as this course is mindful of its emphasis on historical survey. and how those ideas and ideals have been enunciated in American literature through the end of the nineteenth century. student teachers will be able to relate to literature as social text and view reading as social practice. By the end of the course. Cooper. AAR201 American Literary Tradition This course examines the definition of the term with its appropriation as a descriptive for the country. They may also learn how to affiliations. AAR104 Reading Strategies Student teachers will be given a selected number of texts and taught how to subject them to multiple readings. Poe. and be well prepared to proceed to the second year of their education as teachers of Literature. The readings will include selections from some of the following writers: Winthrop. using a variety of approaches. and read critically into its gaps and absences. Mather. They will start by mapping the semiotics of a text and understanding how it works as a system of signs before learning how to read gender biases and assumptions in its use of figurative language and narrative perspective.

However. Whitman and Twain. youth-targeted consumption culture and the change in gender expectations of men and women. Emerson. for literature education to be effective. The social category Given these challenges.AS: English Literature Hawthorne. along with the more literature in English should be taught in a multiethnic/multi-lingual context. and the potential uses of youth culture as foci for the teaching of literature and the development of a more general cultural literacy. Melville. Thoreau. the roles of cultural literacy and complex written texts remain important as they are linked with the educational potential of developing creativity. Dickinson. Education and Culture This course explores what the relationship might be between contemporary culture and literature education in the secondary school. 248 . Fuller. Central to the challenge of literature education is the ongoing rapid growth of the mass media. This course investigates the implications of contemporary culture for education. strong identity and expanded formal and informal learning capacities. teachers cannot ignore both the challenges and opportunities offered by contemporary culture. AAR202 Literature.

Primary attention will be give to major poets (including John Dryden. Using translated works as well as writing in English. at the modern rewriting of Hindu and Malay myths in the region. Shakespeare and his work will be studied in the context of Elizabethan history and culture. AAR231 Shakespeare and Early Modern Drama The course focuses on the bread writing. covering his major plays as well as his poetry. personal and political power. for example.AS: English Literature AAR203 Singapore and the Region in Literature This course will explore cultural and historical connections and shared ethnic traditions in the literatures of post-independence South-east Asian nations and Singapore. Alexander Pope. AAR232 The Restoration to Blake This course provides an introduction to the literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Samuel Johnson. excluding novels. identity. and examine the literary treatment of immigrant identities. It could also look at s struggle against Asian patriarchal cultures and consider similarities and modernity and their engagement with globalisation. the effects of economic expansion and/or the roots of empire. 249 . Particular attention will be given to the role of the author as social actor and commentator. and William Blake) as well as essayists and prose satirists (especially Johnson and Jonathan Swift). student teachers will look. Topics might include performance.

Coleridge. the representation of the past. and exoticism. cavalier poetry (Ben Jonson. romantic love. Southey. Richard Lovelace et al. and Wordsworth. Issues of style and elements of Poetry including form and imagery will be considered. Shelley. Issues explored will include the nature of revolution. George Herbert. and the interaction of those traditions on Milton. The course may also include a study of the emergence of Progress. 250 .AS: English Literature AAR233 17 th Century Poetry and Prose This course studies major non-dramatic literature of the period with primary attention given to the works of John Donne and John Milton. Andrew Marvell et al. Keats.). AAR331/ Romanticism 431 This course considers Romanticism as an intellectual and aesthetic movement and looks at the work of the major writers such as Blake.). Byron. Nature. the sublime. Thomas Carew. travel. Topics include metaphysical poetry (Donne.

the Brontes. John Ruskin and William Morris will also be considered. Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Poetic works to be studied may include those of Robert Browning. industrialisation. John Stuart Mill. point of view and the conventions of realism will be considered. serial publication and the material conditions of production. George Eliot.AS: English Literature AAR332/ Victorian Poetry and Prose 432 This course looks at a selection of poetry and prose and considers it in relation to such major concerns and cultural pre-occupations of the Victorian period as the woman question. Christina Rosetti. colonialism. class struggle. Other issues to be examined include the trope of the fallen woman. the changing landscape. Charles Dickens. Questions of poetic prose form will be integral to the course. AAR333/ The English Novel: Jane Austen to the 433 19th Century This course looks at the nineteenth-century English novel and by major writers like Jane Austen. Questions of form. 251 . Matthew Arnold. Alfred Tennyson. the place of the writer in Victorian society. Wilkie Collins. William Thackeray. social ills. and the division between private and public spheres. and Thomas Hardy. Thomas Macaulay. sensation fiction. and Thomas Hardy. Prose writing by Thomas Carlyle. Elizabeth Gaskell.

and social and cultural identities in response to major shifts in the intellectual life and socio-political climate leading to and during the twentieth century. AAR335/ 20 th Century Poetry 435 This course begins with an examination of poetry in English as a distinctively international phenomenon. Wallace Stevens. W. Yeats and Ezra Pound. August Strindberg. on the poetry that follows by writers such as W. for example. There will be consideration of how the experimentation with concerns. Anton Chekov. Eugene examine the ways in which these playwrights rejected conventional theatrical forms as well as look at concerns of subjectivity. Auden. 252 .AS: English Literature AAR334/ 20 th Century Drama 434 This course focuses on the seminal figures of the modern dramatic movement in Europe and the USA: Henrik Ibsen. among others. It also considers the impact of the central issues and modernist poetry of T.H. Sylvia Plath. Eliot. Eugene Ionesco. as well as late twentieth-century figures such as Derek Walcott.B. Other issues may include the ways in which feminist and postcolonial concerns.S. gender. have influenced the development of modern poetry. George Bernard Shaw.

Williams. Hemingway. mores. Morrison. and areas of dispute of contemporary British society. Stevens. Northern Ireland. Pynchon. Coover. Vonnegut. Miller.AS: English Literature AAR336/ Contemporary British Literature 436 Working from the conviction that the study of literature is without equal in providing an understanding of other cultures. Baldwin. 253 . poetry and drama and non-fiction prose. this course will offer a grounding in some of the fundamental attitudes. Attention will be given to such issues as regional diversity for example. Scotland. Kingston. the differences between the literatures of England. Frost. and Wales and the impact of the literatures produced by immigrants and their descendants after World War II. AAR337/ Contemporary American Literature 437 This course examines twentieth-century American literature through the often-cited argument that all American literature can be traced back to Mark The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Writers may include some of the following: Cummings. Readings will include fiction. The course will survey a range of contemporary fiction poetry and drama of the British Isles.

Some film history will be included but that is not the main focus of the course. and canonical and contemporary writing for adolescents. It aims to teach student teachers how to read a film by introducing them to the tactics of practical film criticism. AAR339/ Adolescent Literature 439 Much of what society intends in terms of identities and values can be inferred from writing for the child and what he/she is made out to be in such writing. 254 . the basic language of the discipline. Texts include the folk tale. The selection of films to be studied is at the discretion of the instructor and is liable to change from year to year. and the major critical theories. books used for language arts teaching. This course examines representative texts for an indepth understanding of the didactic and cultural aspects of socialisation.AS: English Literature AAR338/ Film Studies 438 This is basically a methods and materials course in film criticism.

writing and culture. imagine new national. postmodernist theories of the arts. such as the paradoxes of imagining post-colonial identity in the problems that stem from contemporary global movements of peoples. as well as the Asian diaspora. cultural criticism and theories of mass culture. and the Caribbean. Africa. structural and poststructural theories. psychoanalytical criticism. Michel Foucault and Fredric Jameson. among others. The range of humanistic approaches to criticism. Marxist and postMarxist criticism and theories.AS: English Literature AAR340/ Understanding Critical Theory 440 This course is a survey of some of the currents of theoretical thinking which have proven to be influential in the study of literature. Student teachers will also study the ways in which selected literary texts from the Indian subcontinent. The course will prepare student teachers to tackle in the classroom. transnational and ethnic identities for their communities. important cultural and social concerns raised today 255 . Jean-François Lyotard. Jacques Derrida. AAR341/ Post-colonial Theory and Literature 441 Selected readings of theory and literature will introduce student teachers to salient topics concerning post-colonial culture. Major figures which this course will focus on may include Claude Lévi-Strauss. Understanding the contemporary debates on literature and reading will affect the way we read and teach literature in the classroom.

resistance against hegemonic notions of culture and society. Course readings will range from canonical AAR343/ Approaches to Cultural Studies 443 This course introduces the study of culture beyond the literary text. race and class in literary study. 256 . Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno.AS: English Literature within the new context transnational identities. the emergence of youth culture. AAR342/ Literature and Feminism 442 of globalisation and The cou study of literature. the development of the concerns of gender. Major figures focused on may include Raymond Williams. the concerns of mass culture in consumptionoriented societies. counter cultures and other sub-cultures. Stuart Hall. They will scrutinise the gender biases in wri literature and literary criticism are patriarchal in character. This course will also consider the question of the relevance of cultural studies in contemporary Asian contexts. It considers the development of British cultural studies and the development of the ues in an industrial society. Student teachers will begin by learning how to read literature from a female subjectas a genre. Paul Gilroy.

and bibliographic research. AAR345 Research Methods in the Study of Literature in English This course examines the various research methods employed in the study of Literature in English. South Asia. It aims to provide the basic knowledge and skills needed for student teachers to identify and define a significant issue in an area of literary-cultural study and to decide on the appropriate theoretical framework and methodology to investigate it. 257 . the Caribbean. with a focus on texts from a particular region.AS: English Literature AAR344/ Developments in Anglophone Literatures 444 This course will consider developments in Anglophone literary traditions as they developed outside the United Kingdom. along with their strengths and limitations. Magic Realism. These could include Australasia. and challenges to Western conceptions of history could be among developments considered. As they are drafting their research plan. The course will introduce student teachers to the cultural imaginary of a region. North America and Africa. student teachers will also discuss what constitutes effective academic argumentation and style in their area of study. The influence of native oral literary traditions. Student teachers will be familiarised with different types of research design.

AS: English Literature AAR446 Independent Reading and Research This course provides an opportunity for undergraduate student teachers to do independent reading and research in a topic of their choice in Literature in English under the guidance of an ELL staff member. student teachers will select a topic and will be matched with a research mentor. new tools. Subject to the approval of the Academic Group. personalised reading and research. concepts or strategies learned during the first three years of study spark an interest in exploring further applications of ideas. Often. 258 . This independent study course is an excellent opportunity for focussed. Student teachers use this opportunity to explore an area of study or issue that relates to their academic and/or professional interests.

203 AAQ103 AAQ101 - Course Code AAQ101 AAQ102 AAQ103 AAQ104 AAQ201 1 2 AAQ202 AAQ203 AAQ204 AAQ301 AAQ302 3 AAQ303 AAQ304 4 AAQ401 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.AS: Family and Consumer Sciences ACADEMIC SUBJECT: FAMILY AND SCIENCES Table 1: Year CONSUMER AS1 Family and Consumer Sciences Structure for BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title Principles of Nutrition Resource Management for Individuals and Families Textiles Study Food and Society Food Management and Preparation Creative Textiles Consumer Issues Entrepreneurship in Family and Consumer Sciences Food Science and Principles Consumer Research Methods Clothing and the Consumer Applied Nutrition Individual Project Industrial Attachment Total AUs for Degree with Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. 259 . 103. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 39 Prerequisites AAQ103 AAQ102 AAQ101. 201. 202 AAQ102.

The application of nutrition principles to the needs of individuals and groups at different stages in the life cycle. physical and chemical properties. Global issues such as food safety. work and family. Identification of fibres (burning tests. why manage.and micro-nutrients affect health. managing human resources. dimensional stability and serviceability. environmental resources time and finances. AAQ103 Textiles Study The study of textile fibres according to their origin. 260 . household and families.AS: Family and Consumer Sciences AAQ101 Principles of Nutrition An overview of how macro. energy balance and weight control. management as a process of using resources to achieve goals. The basic concepts of what is management. microscopic appearance and reactivity with reagents used in the home). The principles of digestion. values. who manages. Characteristics of yarns and fabrics in relation to production processes that affect the finishing. decision making and problem solving. attitudes. Various aspects of food composition and its relationship to food choices and subsequent impact on health issues. stress. resources. structure. food technology and world hunger. disease. goals. AAQ102 Resource Management for Individuals and Families This course focuses on the application of management principles to individuals. absorption and metabolism.

preparation.AS: Family and Consumer Sciences AAQ104 Food and Society This course focuses on the patterns. 261 . Integration of knowledge and skills in food science and nutrition to food choice. AAQ201 Food Management and Preparation The study of nutrient values of specific foods and changes of nutrient content of foods during food preparation. customs and management of foods in the context of diverse cultural populations. Developing creativity and production of objects through the use of different materials and surface decorative techniques. the impact of geographical and economic factors on food patterns. storage. culture and religions on foods. including hand and machine embroidery. presentation and evaluation of a variety of meals and food products that are nutritious. The influences of history and origins. texture. preparation of traditional foods from around the world. and the impact of these on the Singapore food scene and marketplace. selection. appealing and balanced. eating habits. Emphasis on food preparation and food investigation skills from the perspective of the Singapore Healthy Diet Pyramid. preventing food spoilage and food-borne poisoning will be discussed. Ways of minimizing food loss. AAQ202 Creative Textiles The study of aesthetic principles involved in the selection of colour. line and shape and their application in the design and production of clothing and other textile products.

This investigative approach to the underlying principles provides content knowledge and develops process skills and experiments that can be applied to teaching at secondary school levels. idea conception. business planning. housing and family finance. emphasising the functional. 262 . selection. entrepreneurship. A study of consumer problems such as consumer rights. AAQ301 Food Science and Principles This course illustrates the principles of food science. Consumer purchase decisions with a specific focus on consumer issues in the areas of food.AS: Family and Consumer Sciences AAQ203 Consumer Issues This course focuses on the basic economic principles as they apply to the consumer marketplace. evaluation. responsibilities and remedies in the context of purchase decisions. entrepreneurial opportunities and strategies. AAQ204 Entrepreneurship Sciences in Family and Consumer The focus of this course is on the development of business ventures related to food and textiles. preparation. storage and usage of food. Topics include how a concept is taken from a business plan to a start up in the first phases of the entrepreneurial process. physical and chemical properties of food constituents and their behaviour in production. An introduction to business applications and how they apply to an entrepreneurial venture. processing. product safety. market research.

menu adaptations for specific groups and effects of various food preparation on the nutritive value of foods. Data collection methods are explored in the context of family and individual purchase decisions. The function of clothing will be explored by investigating the fibre content and fabric structure in relation to construction techniques.AS: Family and Consumer Sciences AAQ302 Consumer Research Methods This course focuses on the analysis of consumption patterns and behaviour of consumers in the marketplace. 263 . Clothing issues will be explored through surveying market trends. AAQ304 Applied Nutrition This course covers the study of nutrition relating to physiological adaptations and nutritional needs through the lifespan. A range of quantitative methods with emphasis on the use of simple regression analysis and correlation to explain consumer behaviour. Factors relating to food choice/selection to meet nutritional requirements and decision making about current nutrition-related issues will be discussed. AAQ303 Clothing and the Consumer The focus of this course is on introducing clothing issues as they relate to the consumer. included are the translation of nutrients in food terms.

AS: Family and Consumer Sciences AAQ401 Individual Project with Industrial Attachment The focus of this course is on reviewing the family and consumer science philosophy and how it has been anchored in businesses. Practice will be followed by a consideration of the ways in which the individual consumer and the family as a consuming unit are the driving forces behind a variety of businesses/industries relevant to the content areas of family and consumer sciences. 264 .

AS: Geography ACADEMIC SUBJECT: GEOGRAPHY Table 1: AS 1 Geography Structure for BA (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Geography Structure for BA (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Title Course No. must choose 2 from each of the 2 strands) AAG231 Humid Tropical Environments Pres 3 Pres AAG232 Biogeography 3 Pres AAG233 Climate and Climate Change 3 AAG234 AAG251 AAG241 AAG242 AAG243 Coastal and Ocean Systems Introduction to Geographical Information Systems Economic Geography and Globalisation Urban Development and Change Space. 265 . Place and Culture Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Core 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 39 AAG251 - 1 2 Physical Geography and Techniques Human Geography 3 4 AAG244 Population and Sustainability AAG245 Political Geography Select 2 for each semester (Total of 4 courses) Catchment Management and AAG331 Conservation AAG332 Ecosystem Dynamics Resource and Environmental AAG333 Management AAG341 Dynamics of Industrial Location AAG342 Feeding the World AAG343 Ethnic Geography Transportation Systems and AAG344 Planning AAG345 City and Regional Planning Applied Geographical Information AAG351 Systems AAG352 Remote Sensing AAG401 Geographical Methods and Fieldwork Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. of PreCode Category AUs requisites AAG101 Elements of Physical Geography Core 3 AAG102 Elements of Human Geography Core 3 AAG103 Techniques in Geography Core 3 AAG104 Singapore in Asia Core 3 Select 2 for each semester (Total of 4 courses in Year 2.

Place and Culture AAG244 Population and Sustainability AAG245 Political Geography Total AUs for Degree Pres Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 - Human Geography Pres Pres Pres Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. 266 . must choose 2 from each of the 2 strands) Humid Tropical AAG231 Pres 3 Environments Pres AAG232 Biogeography 3 Pres AAG233 Climate and Climate Change 3 AAG234 Coastal and Ocean Systems Introduction to Geographical Information Systems Economic Geography and AAG241 Globalisation Urban Development and AAG242 Change AAG251 AAG243 Space.AS: Geography Table 2: Year AS 2 Geography Structure for BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Course Code AAG101 Title Course Category No. of AUs Prerequisites 1 2 Physical Geography and Techniques Elements of Physical Core 3 Geography Elements of Human AAG102 Core 3 Geography AAG103 Techniques in Geography Core 3 AAG104 Singapore in Asia Core 3 Select 2 for each semester (Total of 4 courses in Year 2.

AS: Geography

AAG101 Elements of Physical Geography Global occurrences of natural phenomena and the physical environment associated with such events. Studying Earth as a multi-dimensional and dynamic system. Understanding of the various processes operating within the physical environment and their inter-relationships. AAG102 Elements of Human Geography Introduces some fundamental concepts of human geography concerning human characteristics of cultural, spatial, political and development patterns. Culture components, cultural change, bases of spatial interaction, migration and behaviour, population change, ethnic geography, systems and evolution of rural and urban settlements. Also political ordering of space, and impacts of globalisation on development. AAG103 Techniques in Geography This course introduces the basic techniques in geography for the collection, analysis, interpretation and presentation of geographical information. It covers quantitative, qualitative and cartographic methods of investigation through lectures, tutorials/workshops and fieldwork. Hands-on experience with basic Geographical Information Systems will also be introduced. Student teachers will be expected to participate in fieldwork activities.

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AAG104 Singapore in Asia This course integrates geographical skills and different study strands human, environmental and technical in the study of Singapore in the Asian region. The global positioning of Singapore and the contemporary challenges to development that it faces in a highly competitive and fast changing global environment will be the framework for the study of issues and problems that have emerged - SARS, bird flu, haze, terrorism, implications of cross-straits relations between China and Taiwan, economic liberalization in China and India among others. AAG231 Humid Tropical Environments Study of the physical environment of the humid tropics. The geomorphological and hydrological processes operating within the region form the main platform. Local and regional physical attributes and examples are analysed around the key concepts and the interrelationships between the operating processes and the resulting landforms are discussed. Elements of fluvial sedimentation and applications of urban geomorphology under humid tropical environments are included. Techniques applied to geomorphological research and analysis of field data are integral parts of the coursework. Field trips are an essential component of the course. AAG232 Biogeography Deals with biological processes and concepts that are basic to the understanding of the complex interrelationships between the inorganic and the organic world. After the initial groundwork on soils
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and their properties, the course will deal with plants, as these are the primary food producers which form the essential link between humans and the physical environment. The course also deals with the reciprocal relationships between biogeographic processes and humans. Field trips and laboratory work are essential to this course. AAG233 Climate and Climate Change This course will examine atmospheric processes that are involved in anomalous and adverse weather conditions, climate zones of the tropics and transboundary atmospheric issues and global climate change. The focus of the course will include discussion on impacts and management responses to climate changes. AAG234 Coastal and Ocean Systems Describes the landforms and processes operating along the land-sea interface as well as in the oceans. Challenges facing coastal and ocean environments. Topics covered include the evolution of coastal landforms, history of sea level changes and shoreline response, current state of the coastal and ocean environment and coastal management initiatives. Particular attention will be given to the coastal environments of the Straits of Malacca and the Singapore Straits and in field techniques.

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AAG241 Economic Geography and Globalisation Global patterns of resource production, consumption and distribution. Regional disparities in sectoral performance (primary, secondary, tertiary). Problems of inequality and poverty. Impacts of globalization and the phenomena of spatial convergence and divergence of global economic development. Interregional and intra-regional disparities in growth and development. The roles of the states, supra-states, transnational corporations, local authorities and nongovernmental organizations. Technology change and economic development, the North-South problems and digital divide. The limits to growth and development. The knowledge-based economy in the ICT age. AAG242 Urban Development and Change Urban concepts are introduced and defined on the basis of three selected elements of contemporary urban geography: spatial, social and economic. These fundamental characters are translated into three respective key areas and explored in greater details: city as environment (physical and land use change, settlement, transport); city as people (urbanization, suburbanization, poverty and segregation); and city as economy (industrial, postindustrial, world city developments). Worldwide relevant urban issues including those from Singapore are used as teaching and class reflection materials.

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AAG243 Space, Place and Culture Examines the cultural turn in geography that has led to a renewed interest in senses of place, identity and meaning, rather than deterministic views of the world that do not map neatly onto the experience of everyday life. The new cultural geography has been enriched by a variety of approaches and interdisciplinary connections, particularly from debates in feminist, postcolonial and cultural studies. The evolving meanings and significance of gender, ethnicity and race will be discussed in a Southeast Asian context. AAG244 Population and Sustainability Population trends in the world today provide a confusing and contradictory mix of policy issues that are at the centre of the discussion in this course. While affluent countries in Asia and the West face declining fertility rate and ageing populations with resulting policy packages that are pro-natalist, there are societies which have been focused on addressing rapid population growth rates. In an age of global or international migration flows, it is not f the challenge to sustainability concerns in the last millennium has been population growth, then the issue today is the spatial distribution of such population. This course considers global sustainability concerns and changing population trends like the demographic transition in advanced industrialized societies.

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AAG245 Political Geography This is a course that engages with the politics of space and place-making. The course will consider how politics has resulted in contestation for space and spatially defined life in societies in terms of social integration as well as other outcomes such as, fragmentation and divides. Globalisation increasingly challenges the territorial meanings of nation-states and the process of nation-building. While seeking to raise consciousness of the importance of geography in the understanding of politics at the global and everyday levels, the course will also highlight the meanings of citizenship and the contestation for both

AAG251 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems This course provides conceptual and technical foundations of geographical information systems (GIS). It equips student teachers with basic skills for collecting, storing, manipulating, analysing and presenting geographical data and information using GIS, and for the use of GIS in support of school teaching. It is laboratory-based, giving hands-on experience of GIS software. AAG331 Catchment Management and Conservation Primary concepts of catchment management and conservation. Problems of environmental degradation in the face of increasing urban development. Catchment management as an integrated systems approach. Concepts relating to conservation and management of natural systems with a distinct
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emphasis on their application. Environmental Impact Assessment and monitoring. AAG332 Ecosystem Dynamics Understanding of ecosystem essentials. Ecosystem concept and inter- relationships between inorganic and organic worlds. Concepts of vegetation ecology such as plant communities, migration, vegetation dynamics, competition are covered. Local ecosystems, such as the tropical rainforest, and the mangroves. Urban vegetation. Field trips to areas of biogeographical interest as an essential component of the course. AAG333 Resource and Environmental Management Introduces current environmental issues and concerns, principles underlying the various major global environmental initiatives starting from the Stockholm Earth Summit, builds on some topics covered in environmentally related courses in earlier years. Topics covered include Agenda 21, sustainable earth, environmental impact assessment and specific resource (such as water) and environmental management from the global to local scale. AAG341 Dynamics of Industrial Location Conventional and contemporary theories in explaining the location of industrial activities and the changing patterns from global to local scales. Changes in manufacturing production, processes, management and organization from the era of
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AS: Geography

Industrial Revolution to the ICT-KBE age. Geographic variations in distribution of manufacturing industries. The roles of small and medium-sized and transnational firms. Locational conditions and changing production factors the new supply chain. The impact of technological changes, government policies, foreign direct investment, mobility of production factors. Industrial transformations and new industrial spaces and their implications. AAG342 Feeding the World The food chains and the natural environments. Food production and consumption and regional disparities from Green Revolution to Gene Revolution. Food distribution and problems of hunger, famines and malnutrition. Food manufacturing - producer and consumer services in developing and developed countries, impact of biosciences and life sciences. Food culture tradition, religion, society, ethnicity and innovations. The culinary delights and etiquette of the oriental, the occidental and the universal. The roles of the states, supra-states and transnational corporations and the impacts. AAG343 Ethnic Geography A relatively neglected field within geographical studies of the impact of society on cultural landscapes apart from the introductory sessions incorporated into first year human geography courses, contemporary issues that have arisen since and ethnic identities in human as well as global development. This course considers the meanings and interpretations of ethnicity and ethnic identities
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environmental quality control and sustainable land use. AAG345 City and Regional Planning The course traces traditions of town planning in industrial Europe. globalization and international transportation. transportation modeling. transportation networks and their spatial structure. policies are examined as an evolutionary process and in different perspectives in both developed and developing worlds. From basic planning principles. and postcolonial Singapore provides learning examples of planning theories and practice. including accessibility measures. land use and urban transportation. network analysis and resource allocation. AAG344 Transportation Systems and Planning Historical evolution of transportation.AS: Geography as well as diversity in the global stage drawing on case-studies of policies that states have introduced to manage multi-ethnicity as well as the ethnic conflicts that have de-stabilised societies and economies in the region and around the world. equitable distribution of resources. London. Roles of city and regional planning agencies in managing local and regional problems and in pursuing economic growth. regulations. modern urban planning concepts. AAG351 Applied Geographical Information Systems 275 . methods in transportation analysis and planning. Renewal and modernization of Paris. with reference to garden city and new town developments. socio-economic and environment impacts of transportation.

network analysis and 3-D visualisation. Case studies and hands-on practices allow student teachers to gain experience in the use of GIS in both human and physical geographical studies. such as digitizing and GPS. AAG352 Remote Sensing The objective of this course is to help student teachers familiar with the processing. and spatial analysis techniques. including cartographical modeling. AAG401 Geographical Methods and Fieldwork 276 .AS: Geography This course equips student teachers with essential GIS skills for geographical problem solving and spatial decision-making. student teachers are expected to be able to appreciate the character and quality of geographical data and the ways in which they can be used in geographical studies. Thus. It introduces GIS data collection techniques. student teachers will have a better understanding of the adoption of remote sensing into research and teaching. Student teachers are also required to address specific geographical or environmental issues and adopt relevant techniques and knowledge to solve the problems. Through problem-based learning. this course emphasizes on the implementation of digital image processing so student teachers can practice remote sensing technologies by hand. terrain modelling. By the end of the course. and interpretation of remote sensing data. analysis. in addition to understanding principles of remote sensing.

Research design.AS: Geography Geographical issues. Individual academic reports of the field investigations and field data collected are assessed. acquisition of data through field surveys. techniques and applications in research both physical and human are rigorously debated and discussed in the course. 277 . Field investigations spanning 10 to 14 days are conducted as part of the course and fieldwork sites are located outside of Singapore. methods of data analysis and report writing are core areas of work done.

AS: History ACADEMIC SUBJECT: HISTORY Table 1: AS 1 History Structure for BA (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 History Structure for BA (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAH101 AAH102 Title Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - 1 2 3 Film as History Biography and History Singapore History: The Making of a AAH103 Global City-State AAH104 Dawn of Asian Civilisations AAH201 Modern Southeast Asia AAH202 Historical Interpretations Select any 1 for each semester AAH231 Early Modern Asia AAH232 Rise of Modern India AAH234 Modern East Asia AAH235 Modern Europe AAH236 Australia and Asia United States :The Emergence of a AAH237 Superpower Select any 2 for each semester International History: From World AAH331 War One to the Present AAH332 Themes in Southeast Asian History China and Japan: A Comparative AAH333 History AAH334 Heritage and Culture AAH335 Asian Strategic Thought A Glimpse of the Past: Reading AAH336 Sources Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 3 3 3 - 278 .

AS: History Year 4 Course Title Code Select any 1 Peace and War in TwentiethAAH431 century Asia AAH434 The History of Racial Thought Tradition and Revolt in Southeast AAH435 Asia Diplomacy in Pre-modern Asia: AAH437 China and its Neighbours AAH438 AAH439 The Vietnam War Total AUs for Degree Course Category Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 39 Prerequisites - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. 279 .

AS: History Table 2: AS 2 History Structure for BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAH101 AAH102 Title Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres No. and how history has been represented in film. The emphasis is on empowering student teachers to interpret films in critical and analytical ways. This course is offered to all NTU students. can be used in looking at the past. This course covers the use of film as a source for exploring the past. The skills of historical interpretation and writing history are taught. Other mediums. such as film. 280 . as well as teaching student teachers how films are created. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites - 1 2 Film as History Biography and History Singapore History: The Making of AAH103 a Global City-State AAH104 Dawn of Asian Civilisations AAH201 Modern Southeast Asia AAH202 Historical Interpretations Select any 1 for each semester AAH231 Early Modern Asia AAH232 Rise of Modern India AAH234 Modern East Asia AAH235 Modern Europe AAH236 Australia and Asia United States :The Emergence of AAH237 a Superpower Total Aus for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters AAH101 Film as History History does not only include examining the written word. The history of cinema and television is also studied.

This course is suitable for NTU students who want a good overview of key points in the historical formation and shaping of Singapore up to 1965. Biographies covered range from those of Hitler to Mao. and the variety of that history. such as psychoanalysis and interviews.AS: History AAH102 Biography and History Biography is one of the most popular and enjoyable ways of reading history. as a multicultural city-state. The course studies the life stories of not biography and doing oral history are taught. This course is offered to all NTU students. and wealth and poverty. decline and rise again of Singapore as a Global City. and then from 1819 entered a new. AAH103 Singapore History: The Making of a Global City State This course looks at critical stages in the birth. to the tumultuous birth of a new nation after the war. declined into relative obscurity as a minor Malay port. multiculturalism and modernity. This course takes the story from the early years. with its experience of development and disaster. through the nineteenth century. Singapore first briefly bloomed in the thirteenth to fourteenth centuries. It is a History that allows for the perspectives of a variety of people who helped to build Singapore. Biographers employ a range of interesting methods in researching their subject. to the prostitute and the opium addict. It covers the major markers of Singapore history. free-trade and multicultural phase of development. conflict and peace. from the politician and the colonialist. located in the 281 .

towards independence. AAH104 Dawn of Asian Civilizations This course provides an introductory survey of the beginning and the growth of civilizations across Asia from the prehistoric times to 1400 AD. 282 . Southeast Asia and China in the light of archaeological evidence and other historical records. but also becoming first an Imperial and then a Global City. as lives were transformed. AAH201 Modern Southeast Asia This course deals mainly with the tumultuous period from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1970s. through the nightmare of the Pacific War. and modern nationalism and nation-states were born. This course is open to all students in NTU who are interested in learning about the early phase of Asian civilization. this course will discuss major cultural developments such as the rise and the expansion of religions and the ways in which they influenced the life of people. when Southeast Asia went from independence to colonial subjugation. Using innovative technological means and drawing examples from India. and local responses to those forces.AS: History Malay maritime world. It deals with the international forces brought to bear on Southeast Asia. and how their material life changed over time. The course begins with a brief study of the early phase of human society before studying the rise of first states and their socio-economic underpinnings.

Southeast Asia and China are discussed in the context of economic changes that affected both the rulers and the ruled as Asia came into close contact with Europe. course will be asking myriad questions of the theoretical and the practical but crucially will attempt to explore the subject of history from how it affects the individual.AS: History This course is suitable for NTU students who want an overview of main points in the historical formation and shaping of Southeast Asia up to 1975. AAH231 Early Modern Asia This course explores main themes in political. society and nation in the past and into the future. student teachers will consider the many ways in which historians go about creating history. AAH202 Historical Interpretations Can history be objective? Who owns history? History is what we make of it or what we want it to be? Historical interpretations essentially beg many other such infuriating questions from the definition. This course is open to all students in NTU who are interested in learning about the 283 . socioeconomic and cultural developments across Asia from 1400 to the 1820s. The course concludes with a brief analysis of the ways in which indigenous states tried to modernize themselves and the extent to which they were successful. ushering in the age of globalization. The rise and fall of states and development of political institutions in India. Through selective case studies such as post World War Two accounts.

efforts to forge national unity against regional. comparisons and contrasts with China will also be frequently made. ethnic and religious diversity and to achieve economic growth and modernization after independence are examined in the context of regional and global political and economic affairs. the Nationalist revolution. economic and sociodevelopment as a modern nation. the rise of Communism. "feudalistic" society to a modern democracy and a leading industrialized and political changes. and Deng Xiaoping's reforms in the 1970's and the 1980s. Discussions on China include such topics as the decay of the imperial order. AAH234 Modern East Asia This course deals with the broad current of historical changes in China and Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries. In the transformation from an isolated. The course begins with a brief introduction to the social and cultural milieu of India. Its economic and social transformation under colonial rule and the struggle against colonial rule leading to the foundation of a nation-state are discussed at some length. the Cultural Revolution.AS: History beginnings of modern socio-economic and political developments of Asia before the rise of colonial state. This course is 284 . the founding of the People's Republic. AAH232 Rise of Modern India This course provides a broad survey of political.

such as Australia helping the birth of the new nation of views of Australia. It covers transformations in foreign policy. with an emphasis on the later period. They are advised to check the Humanities and Social themes. Each semester there will be a different set of themes and countries covered. A focus is on one of the consequences of that position examines Australian-Asian relations concentrating on Australian interventions into the Asian region. and the United Kingdom at the other. democracy. AAH236 Australia and Asia Examines how Australia came to occupy the unique position of being a predominantly European culture in an Asian region. AAH235 Modern Europe This course deals with Europe from the French Revolution to present-day. cultural and economic relations between 285 . and European interactions with each other and the world. Europe is here defined to include Russia at one extreme. so as to introduce student teachers to aspects of European politics and society.AS: History also offered to students of NTU with an interest in the modern history of China and Japan. This course is suitable for NTU students who want a general introduction to European History. Typically. these might include issues as varied as Nazism. and the growth of European unity.

AAH331 International History: From World War One to the Present This course examines the major developments in international history beginning with the First World War with a view to understanding the dynamics of underlying political.AS: History Australia and Asia. Watergate and the so-called This course is also offered to all NTU students. This focus on global engagement will be framed together with domestic political and social changes marked by such events as the turbulent 60s. The first half of the century will be examined in such areas as the legacies of the Great War. AAH237 United States: The Emergence of a Superpower This course presents a political. We shall discuss the ways in which hopes of progress and stability were kindled and shattered as the world came to be divided into power blocks. the boom of the 1920s and the Great Depression. social. the Civil Rights movement. This will be followed by an analysis of the Second World War. This course is offered to all NTU students. the Cold War and the current course will explore the motivations. It starts with the Progressive period and continues to the current administration. impulses and manifestations of a growing superpower becoming fully engaged in global affairs and the impact on the rest of the world. cultural and economic history of the United States in the 20th Century and up to the present. The 286 . economic and social forces which have shaped the world in the course of the twentieth century.

This course is ideal for the student teachers who like to exercise a degree of freedom to explore in depth various aspects of political and socioeconomic changes in modern Southeast Asia.AS: History course concludes with a discussion on the beginning of a new era in international politics starting with the collapse of bipolarity and the emergence of one superpower towards the end of the twentieth century. communication and disciplines other than history may also find that this course provides them with a new set of tools to broaden their understanding of the region. AAH333 China and Japan: A Comparative History Adopting a comparative approach to the study of premodern history of China and Japan. mode of 287 . AAH332 Themes in Southeast Asian History This course provides an opportunity to study in depth chosen facets of political. economic and cultural developments in the two countries. strategic. this course focuses on the similarities and differences in terms of political. political institutions. The students in NTU pursuing business management. This course is also offered to all NTU students interested in international history. The forces that have shaped society are examined through a multidisciplinary focus so as to stimulate critical understanding of the ways in which modern Southeast Asia has emerged and what challenges it faces in the 21st century as a result of its historical legacy. The course will treat such topics as bilateral relations. socio-economic and cultural developments in Southeast Asia from the mid-19th century onwards.

AS: History economic development. Student teachers consider why some historical sites and monuments and not others are regarded as essential for school field trips and tourism. Yukio Mishima. Takuan Soho. 288 . museums and in historic buildings is also analysed. AAH335 Asian Strategic Thought This course re-visits the strategic writings of selected Asian thinkers. Miyamoto Musashi. Kautilya. We will seek to explore the following questions in the course: How the writings reflect the spirit of the particular period and its problems. Kenichi Ohmae. Lee Kuan Yew. Weiliaozi. AAH334 Heritage and Culture Student teachers are engaged in making practical assessments of historic landscapes and examining the heritage value of historical sites and landmarks. Sunbin. such as Sunzi. This course is also offered to NTU students who are interested in East Asian history. Vo Nguyen Giap. The question of how the public perceives the past as it is presented in the media. textbooks. and to what extent they are still relevant. Wuzi. They do a major case study of a place that they consider to be of heritage value. religion as well as culture. This course is offered to all NTU students. the Bhagavad-Gita. The significance and meaning of what constitutes heritage is covered. Mao Zedong. This course is offered to all NTU students with an interest in the evolution of Asian Strategic Thinking.

the Second World War and the Cold War. Topics covered by this course will include the rise of newly independent states in Asia. This course is open to all students in NTU who are curious about learning how our ancestors lived and how their minds worked.AS: History AAH336 A Glimpse of the Past: Reading Sources This course provides a critical understanding of the ways in which historians read and interpret primary sources and reconstruct historical reality. and the broad ideological. Students who are keen to undertake historical research will find this course very useful as it provides a sound training in using sources. private papers including diaries and letters and newspapers from both Asia and Europe. particularly in international politics of modern Asia. state papers. the Vietnam war. and cultural forces that have influenced the evolution of international politics in the twentieth century. the major regional conflicts: the Korean war. Drawing examples from a wide range of primary sources such as chronicles. economic. AAH431 Peace and War in Twentieth-century Asia This course focuses on the history of relations between Asian countries. This course is also offered to students of NTU with an interest in world history. the cause and consequences of the three major global conflicts in Asia: the First World War. the course will explore how the historians penetrate into the minds and milieu of people represented in the sources and opens a window to the world we have lost through a multi-disciplinary focus. 289 . and the armed conflicts between China and the Soviet Union. inscriptions.

Social Darwinism. This course is offered to all NTU students. 290 . Then the course deals with the impact of the enlightenment and the rise of scientific racism. It ends with a study of contemporary racism in western societies. reached a climax just before the organized modern political movements came into existence in the early 1900s and changed its character as new nationstates emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. We shall begin our discourse with a brief survey of how popular movements of social and political agitation emerged under colonial rule. passing onto anti-Semitism and Nazi racial ideology.AS: History AAH434 The History of Racial Thought An examination of the history of racial thought in Western societies. protest movements and peasant wars in Southeast Asia from the 1870s to the end of the twentieth century. We shall try to understand how the painful process of modernization through which people adjusted themselves to numerous forces of socioeconomic and political changes in Southeast Asia from the 1870s is reflected in rural protest movements. America. Australia. The course starts with classical and Biblical views of human types. Racial justifications for slavery and colonialism are covered. There is a focus on racial ideologies rationalising European settlement of the New World. AAH435 Tradition and Revolt in Southeast Asia This course examines the dynamics of popular uprisings. and the Pacific.

Parhae in Manchuria. diplomatic correspondence.AS: History AAH437 Diplomacy in Pre-modern Asia: China and its Neighbours This course examines the international system in premodern Asia. a comparative approach can be taken with regards to the historical and transnational contexts which shaped the articulation of gender in Asia. and the Nanzhao Kingdom of Yunnan. this course provides an in-depth analysis of the nature of diplomacy in pre-modern Asia. It starts with a critical assessment of the relations between China and its major Asian neighbours: the three Korean states (Koguryo. Through an examination of these issues. the Turkic empire on the steppe. Singapore and other Asian countries. Silla and Paekche). 291 . the Tibetan Kingdom of Tubo. nationalism and political rights. and war and its legacies. Japan. and overland as well as maritime trade. Countries to be examined in this course may include China. AAH438 This course will examine the history of women in Asia through interpretations and critiques of gender theories that has been articulated in the 20th century. Through such case studies as diplomatic protocol. It seeks to examine the definitions of feminism and the manifestation of female activism from various geographic and cultural locales within Asia. the family and society. Korea.

There will be opportunities for students to pursue in greater depth topics related to the Vietnam War which may be of particular interest. films and music of the Vietnam War in order to capture the human dimension of the war on both sides of the conflict. Beijing and Moscow. It is a stateof-the-field survey/study of the conflict from its beginning (soon after World War II) to its end in 1975. At the thematic level. This course is also offered to students of NTU with an interest in the Vietnam War. North and South Vietnam (that is Hanoi and Saigon). 292 . the course will trace the development of the war from both the communist and non-communist perspectives and the decisionmakings (both military and diplomatic) of the United States (Washington and beyond). the course will also look at other aspects such as the literature.AS: History AAH439 The Vietnam War This course focuses on the Vietnam War. Attention will also be paid to the perspective of Southeast Asia. At the chronological level.

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites Must have done AAD103 - Year 1 Course Code AAD101 AAD102 AAD103 AAD201 AAD202 2 AAD203 AAD204 AAD301 AAD302 Select any 2 AAD331 AAD332 AAD333 Select any 1 4 AAD431 AAD432 Pres Pres 3 3 36 3 - 293 .AS: Malay Language ACADEMIC SUBJECT: MALAY LANGUAGE Table 1: AS 1 Malay Language Structure for BA (Ed) (Malay) (Primary) AS 1 Malay Language Structure for BA (Ed) (Malay) (Secondary) Title Introduction to Malay Linguistics Jawi and Malay Literacy Phonetics and Phonology in Malay Education of the Malays Malay Morphology and Syntax Introduction to Sociolinguistics Origin and Development of Malay Language Semantics and Pragmatics in Malay Islam and Malay Society Standardization and Issues in Malay Language Malay Arts & Civilization The Cultural Life and Practices of the Malays Readings in Malay Language Education Approaches in Malay Language Studies Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres No.

The study of sounds and their patterns in Malay (phonetics and phonology). 294 . The old and modern development of Jawi writings and manuscript will be examined. It traces the origin of the Arabic script. AAD102 Jawi and Malay Literacy This course highlights the special place of Jawi and Islamic writings in Malay literacy. As a means of recording phonetics material.AS: Malay Language AAD101 Introduction to Malay Linguistics An introduction to the scientific study of human languages. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of phonological description to the teaching of Malay language. and meanings (semantics and pragmatics). and intonation). Word formation and Malay affixes (morphology). old and new will be provided AAD103 Phonetics and Phonology in Malay This course consists of training in the discrimination and production of Malay sounds (vowels. Word classes and sentential constituents (syntax). It also includes practical reading from phonetic texts of Malay for the purpose of improving diction and pronunciation. student teachers will be trained in the use of international Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The segmental and supra-segmental sounds of language will be covered. Practice in reading and writing of Jawi materials. consonants. diphthongs. the Persian influences and adaptations into Malay classical script. The second part of the course will deal with the sound systems of Malay in structural and generative terms.

problems of linguistic minorities. education level. Linguistic problem-solving skills. morphological processes. ethnic origin etc. 295 .AS: Malay Language AAD201 Education of the Malays This course looks at traditional education and the historical development of education among the Malays of South East Asia. age. structural relations among phrases. AAD202 Malay Morphology and Syntax Analysis of the morphological structure of the Malay language: word structure. Modern Malay in relation to social factors: social class. type of education. Cross-cultural differences in language behaviour. the process of Islamization. AAD203 Introduction to Sociolinguistics Concepts in Sociolinguistics studies. The role of language and culture in influencing education systems will be examined. and formal and functional grammars. Malaysia and Brunei. Language Varieties and patterns of language use in multilingual communities. Explorations of roles and functions of languages in multilingual communities. affixes and reduplication. and the foundations for syntactic analysis and grammatical description. Social factors in the variation in language. word formation. It covers education during the Srivijaya period. and interface between morphology and syntax. sex. factors influencing language maintenance and language shift. Study of the syntax of Malay: structure of sentences. through the beginnings of modernization during the colonial period up to the development of education in the independent states of Indonesia.

and logical form. ambiguity. Also the phenomenon of the dakwah movement since the 1970s will be discussed. Old Malay inscriptions. aesthetics. Amongst the themes that will be explored are: the Islamization of the Malays in the past and contemporary period. AAD302 Islam and Malay Society A historical and sociological understanding of the role of Islam in Malay society will be the focus of this course. language-culture relationships. 296 .AS: Malay Language AAD204 Origin and Development of Malay Language An overview of the historical development of Malay from its origin to the modern period. AAD301 Semantics and Pragmatics in Malay Introduction to a scientific description of linguistic meaning in Malay: semantic properties and relations. The types of evidence and arguments vis-à-vis key concepts and claims in semantics and pragmatics. community life and economic ethos. The meaning of metaphors. Topics in pragmatics such as presupposition. Development of Malay as a modern language. speech acts. conversational implicature. Characteristics of Malay language in pre and post war era. the Sanskrit. religious institutions in Malay society and the influence of Islam on Malay ideas in education. the conditioning of the Malay value system. Arabic and Persian elements and influences in Malay language. theories of word and sentence meaning. Malay language in the family of Austronesian languages. entailment.

etc. literature. AAD333 The Cultural Life and Practices of the Malays Introduction to an analysis of the various components of Malay beliefs. economies. AAD332 Malay Arts and Civilization An overview of the historical and cultural development of arts and civilization of the Malays. places of worships. The important festivals and their values. identity and maintenance and shift in use of Malay with special emphasis on the role of Malay in Singapore. Important events in the development of vocabulary. Sebutan baku. crafts. music and dance. Interaction of the 297 . customs and practices. grammar and genres within the Malay and Indonesian languages. language.AS: Malay Language Overall the significance and contribution of Islam in the cultural life of the Malays will be examined. Malay as medium of instruction. AAD331 Standardization and Issues in Malay Language The socio-political history in the standardization of the Malay language. the extent of cultural regions and the spatial diffusion of cultural groups. This will include the location of cultural hearths. performance and fine arts. will be examined as well as processes of cultural acculturation and assimilation. customs and traditions. traditional Malay architecture. Multiple manifestations of Malay arts and civilization such as Jawi scripts. government. Investigation of issues such as the status of Malay.

bilingual and multilingual education. language and cognition as well as language and literacy issues visà-vis national. the inculcation of values through language education. 298 . approaches to research design. AAD431 Readings in Malay Language Education Readings and discussions of selected areas in language literacy and education. language and culture. teaching mother tongues. Some of the topics covered will include the social construction of the language curriculum. including principles and procedures in language research. AAD432 Approaches in Malay Language Studies Exploration of research in the Malay language.AS: Malay Language Malays with the various components of cross-cultural practices existing in our multi-racial culture. language and ethnicity. economic and cultural development. data collection and analysis and the methodologies of writing a report.

299 .AS: Malay Literature ACADEMIC SUBJECT: MALAY LITERATURE Table 1: Yea r 1 Course Code AAF101 AAF102 AAF103 AAF201 AAF202 2 AS 2 Malay Literature Structure for BA (Ed) (Malay) (Primary) Title Traditional Malay Literature 1 Traditional Malay Literature 2 Modern Malay/ Indonesian Literature 1 Critical Theory Modern Malay/ Indonesian Literature 2 Reading of Literary Canon Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 Prerequisites - AAF231 Select any 1 AAF232 Singapore Malay Literature AAF233 AAF234 Literature Modern Malay Drama Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.

The concepts. AAF101 Traditional Malay Literature 1 An overview of the development of traditional Malay literature. Special focus on the oral/folk literature (Sastera Rakyat) and major works produced during the Hindu period such as Hikayat Seri Rama and Sastera Panji. The religious. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites - AAF231 Select any 2 AAF232 Singapore Malay Literature Child and AAF233 Literature AAF234 Modern Malay Drama Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. genres. cultural and historical factors influenced the content. classification and functions of literature in the traditional Malay society. The influence of Islam on the 300 . AAF102 Traditional Malay Literature 2 Further discussion on the development of traditional Malay literature. production. distribution and contribution of the literature.AS: Malay Literature Table 2: Yea r 1 Course Code AAF 101 AAF102 AAF103 AAF201 AAF202 2 AS 2 Malay Literature Structure for BA (Ed) (Malay) (Secondary) Title Traditional Malay Literature 1 Traditional Malay Literature 2 Modern Malay / Indonesian Literature 1 Critical Theory Modern Malay / Indonesian Literature 2 Reading of Literary Canon Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres No.

Sastera Ketatanegaraan. AAF103 Modern Malay/Indonesian Literature 1 Introduction to the socio-historical development of modern Malay literature. The vision and idea of literature amongst the various literary circles. nazam and gurindam etc. The effects and influences of the theories towards the development of creative writing and Malay literature will also be discussed. The significance of literary movements and orientations will be examined such as in the institutions of Pejabat Karang Mengarang.AS: Malay Literature development of Malay literature. Sastera Undang-Undang (adat laws). beginning from Munsyi Abdullah in the 19th century to the early decades of the twentieth century. Sastera Epik (epics). Sastera Kitab. AAF201 Critical Theory Focuses on modern and post-modern literature theories to enable the student teacher to master the subject and enable them to carry out practical criticism on literary texts. Balai Pustaka. classical poetry such as syair. 301 . This proposed course will prepare student teachers to be knowledgeable and competent literature teachers. Sastera Sejarah (Malay historiography) such as Sejarah Melayu. the literary movement of Pujangga Baru and Angkatan 45 in pre-War Indonesia and Malaya. major authors and the growth of literary genres will be examined in the context of pre-war nationalism and cultural revivalism. Sastera Hikayat. especially on written works or classical manuscripts.

the functions of literature and the religious orientations in literature as encapsulated in the discourse of sastera Islam. Hikayat Abdullah. WS Rendra.AS: Malay Literature AAF202 Modern Malay/Indonesian Literature 2 This course is a detailed thematic survey of Malay/Indonesian literature in the postwar period. AAF231 Reading of Literary Canon A study on canon literature by analyzing texts which had already reached the highest and supreme ranking in order to explore their characteristics in terms of textual and contextual aspects. Special attention will be given to examining the works of major authors like Masuri S. Shahnon Ahmad in Singapore-Malaysian literary scene. and selected novels such as Ranjau Sepanjang Jalan. The main objective is to appreciate those evergreen texts so that their characteristics will be followed upon and to simultaneously enhance the development of creative writing and literature critics. 302 . etc. Usman Awang. Kering. in the Indonesian case. Various issues in the development of contemporary literary culture will be evaluated such as the issues on nation building and literature. Sukma Angin etc. Mochtar Lubis. Keris Mas. A Samad Said.N. Syair Hamzah Fansuri.. Achdiat Mihardja. while focusing on Pramoedya Ananta Toer. Among the texts for study will include Sejarah Melayu. Poetry by Chairil Anwar and Usman Awang. Hikayat Hang Tuah. Sutarjdji Calzoum.

writing technique and stream. music. lighting. 303 . techniques and thematic the development of children and adolescent literature in Malay language. costumes. tempo and drama management. Examination of selected and popular stories and poetry for children and its application in school contexts. AAF234 Modern Malay Drama An in-depth account of the history of modern drama development starting with sandiwara. Staging aspects will also be discussed and will include topics such as text transformation. acting and technical aspects such as setting. Emphasis will be given to text analysis. major stages of literary movements before and after the World Wars. AAF233 The role and function of literature in childr adolescent psychological development. cultural and literary centre in the 19th century. realism. Discussion on various styles. directing.AS: Malay Literature AAF232 Singapore Malay Literature The development of Malay literature in Singapore from the earliest time to date. The role of Singapore as the regional publication. and the emergence of new literature after Independence (1965) and its recent developments. absurdism until the latest trend.

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites Must have done AAM102 - 1 Statistics I Core 3 Computational AAM204 Core 3 Mathematics Select any 4 courses. at least one from Group A and one from Group B AAM331 Differential Equations Pres 3 Pres AAM332 Statistics II 3 AAM341 AAM342 AAM333 AAM334 AAM343 AAM344 Real Analysis Modern Algebra Modelling with Differential Equations Statistics III Combinatorial Analysis Complex Analysis Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 3 3 3 - Group A 3 Group B Group A AAM331 AAM332 - Group B 304 .AS: Mathematics ACADEMIC SUBJECT: MATHEMATICS Table 1: AS 1 Math Structure for B Sc (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Math Structure for B Sc (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAM101 AAM102 AAM103 AAM104 AAM201 AAM202 2 AAM203 Title Calculus I Algebra I Finite Mathematics Number Theory Calculus II Algebra II Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core No.

305 . of PreCode Category AUs requisites Select any 1 from the list below OR any 1 from the list of year 3 Grp B courses Advanced Mathematical AAM431 Pres 3 AAM331 Modelling Pres AAM432 Statistical Theory 3 AAM332 Pres AAM433 Applied Statistics 3 AAM332 Techniques in Operations Pres AAM434 3 Research Mathematical Programming AAM435 Pres 3 and Stochastic Processes Pres AAM436 Metric Spaces 3 AAM341 AAM437 AAM438 AAM439 Galois Theory Graph Theory Geometry Total AUs for Degree Pres Pres Pres 3 3 3 39 AAM342 - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.AS: Mathematics Year 4 Course Title Course No.

AAM102 Algebra I Introduction to set theory. graphs. Euclidean n-space. composition of functions. Matrix algebra. Integration and applications of integration. AAM101 Calculus I Functions: domain. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 (Ed) 1 2 Course Code AAM101 AAM102 AAM103 AAM104 AAM201 AAM202 AAM203 AAM204 Calculus I Algebra I Finite Mathematics Number Theory Calculus II Algebra II Statistics I Computational Mathematics Total AUs for Degree Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Prerequisites AAM102 - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. Vectors in R² and R³. determinant function. Differentiation and applications of differentiation. dot product. Limits and continuity. 306 . linear transformations. codomain.AS: Mathematics Table 2: Year AS 2 Math (Secondary) Title Structure for BA/BSc No. cross product and geometric applications. Linear systems and methods of solving linear systems. range.

Permutations and combinations. tangent planes and normal lines. The sum and number of Law of Quadratic Reciprocity. 307 . The Pigeonhole principle. generalization of the concepts to functions of more than two variables. Sample space and probability distributions. Primitive roots and indices. differentiability and chain rules for functions of two variables. Congruences. Real-life applications such as check digits. Conditional probability. Double integrals and triple integrals. Power series. Generalized permutations and combinations. AAM201 Calculus II Sequence and series. Prime numbers. Linear Diophantine equations. Independent events. The Euclidean algorithm. directional derivatives and gradients for functions of two variables. Partial derivatives for functions of two or more variables. maxima and minima of functions of two variables. Greatest common divisor. AAM104 Number Theory Divisibility.AS: Mathematics AAM103 Finite Mathematics Basic principles of counting. Binomial theorem and combinatorial identities. The Chinese Remainder Theorem. The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic. cryptography.

diagonalization. General vectors spaces. AAM203 Statistics I Descriptive statistics. and numerical simulations. Orthogonality in n-space. Estimation and confidence intervals: one sample for mean. Discrete and continuous distributions. bases and dimensions. Linear transformations between general vector spaces. approximation of functions. Applications. Sampling distributions and Central Limit Theorem. science and other disciplines. Methods of proof. Use of computing techniques to solve problems in mathematics. solving systems of linear equations.AS: Mathematics AAM202 Algebra II Introduction to propositional logic. matrices of linear transformations. conic sections. diagonalization of quadratic forms. Mathematical expectations. 308 . proportion and variance and two samples for means and proportions. AAM204 Computational Mathematics Introduction to computational methods and computing tools. Examples may be drawn from problems involving numerical solutions of equations in one variable. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

trajectories and fixed points. Existence and uniqueness of solutions. Euler's method. Runge-Kutta method. Stability and classification of fixed points. Second order ODEs: fundamental solutions. Phase-plane. pendulum motions and predator/prey models. Examples will include mass/spring systems. Sketching solutions in the phase-plane. AAM332 Statistics II Hypothesis testing: one and two samples for means. Laplace transform method for initial value problems. including system of ODEs. Confidence interval for ratio of two variances.AS: Mathematics AAM331 Differential Equations Separable. linear and exact first order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Wronskian. 309 . Modelling with first order ODEs. Simple linear regression: least squares estimation and inference (including diagnostic checking). proportions and variances. AAM333 Modelling with Differential Equations The solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). solving and interpreting physical problems with second order ODEs. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations: initial value problems. Applications of numerical techniques. linear dependence. Chi-square tests and contingency tables. Applications and approaches in modelling.

The Archimedean Property. Extreme Value Theorem. factorial designs. Ideals. Riemann Integration. Rings of polynomials. Rings and fields.AS: Mathematics AAM334 Statistics III Analysis of variance: completely randomized design. The limit of a function. Mean Value Theorem. 310 . figur homomorphisms and the Fundamental homomorphism theorems. Differentiation. AAM343 Combinatorial Analysis Combinatorial techniques in proving. The Intermediate Value Theorem. The generating function of a sequence of numbers. the continuity of a function. AAM341 Real Analysis The Completeness Axiom. rank correlation test. Density of rational and irrationals. ring homomorphism. The limit of a sequence. randomized block design. The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem. Groups. Nonparametric tests including sign test. limit theorems. AAM342 Modern Algebra Permutations and permutation groups. The principle of Inclusion and Exclusion and the general principle of Inclusion and Exclusion. quotient rings. Wilcoxon tests.

AAM432 Statistical Theory Further univariate distributions. Selected topics from estimation theory and hypothesis testing theory. such as the unsteady diffusion equation. analytic functions. the residue theorem. Application of numerical techniques for solving PDEs to industrial problems. complex functions. and chi-square distributions. Residues and poles. Complex integration over paths. Complex differentiation. Moment generating functions and proof of Central Limit Theorem. design of experiments. F-. evaluation of real definite integrals. Direct and iterative methods for solving systems of algebraic equations. Taylor series. parabolic and hyperbolic PDEs. AAM433 Applied Statistics Selected topics from multiple regression models. Cauchy integral formula. Cauchy integral theorem.AS: Mathematics AAM344 Complex Analysis Complex numbers. Laurent series. Sampling distributions: t-. the CauchyRiemann equations. Analytical and numerical solutions of PDEs. Bivariate distributions. Explicit and implicit finite difference techniques for time-dependent PDEs. 311 . Fundamental theorem of algebra. AAM431 Advanced Mathematical Modelling Introduction to partial differential equations (PDEs) and classification into elliptic.

integer programming. solvability by radicals. transportation problem. AAM436 Metric Spaces Topology in R. introduction to duality. Galois extensions. Metric spaces. simple. finite and algebraic extensions. finite fields. probabilistic inventory models. AAM435 Mathematical Programming and Stochastic Processes Selected topics from the theory of linear programming: the simplex algorithm. dual simplex algorithm. primitive elements. AAM437 Galois Theory Field extensions. sensitivity analysis. project scheduling under uncertainty. constructions with straight-edge and compass. travelling salesman problem. Galois groups. Equicontinuity.AS: Mathematics AAM434 Techniques in Operations Research Topics from the theory of networks: minimal spanning trees. Convergence and completeness. Topics from the advanced theory of networks: least cost flows. 312 . maximal flows. dynamic programming. Topological spaces. Open sets and closed sets. critical path analysis. normal and separable extensions. shortest paths. Selected topics from the theory of stochastic processes: queueing theory. splitting fields. The Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory. non-linear programming. Arzela-Ascoli Theorem. Continuity and compactness.

Trees and applications. chromatic polynomials. Brief excursions to the classical projective geometry and the modern geometry of fractal. Euler tours. Hamiltonian cycles. Euclidean geometry. AAM439 Geometry The axiomatic approaches to various geometries. vertex and edge cuts. isomorphisms of graphs. hyperbolic geometry and spherical geometry. planar graphs. including finite geometries. dual graphs. 313 . Ramsey theory. Selected topics from: theorem.AS: Mathematics AAM438 Graph Theory Graphs. map colouring and the four la. symmetries and isometries. representations of graphs. Geometric transformations of the Euclidean plane. extremal graphs.

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - 1 2 3 Musical Practices I (including Instrumental Studies) Foundations in Musical Studies I AAI102 (including Ensemble Studies) Musical Practices II (including AAI103 Instrumental Studies) Foundations in Musical Studies II AAI104 (including Ensemble Studies) Musical Practices III (including AAI201 Instrumental Studies) Orchestration and Arranging AAI202 (including Ensemble Studies) Musical Practices IV (including AAI203 Instrumental Studies) Foundations in Music Education AAI204 (including Ensemble Studies) Studies in Music Education AAI301 (including Instrumental Studies) Select any 1 Music and Technology (including AAI330 Ensemble Studies) Ethnomusicology (including AAI331 Ensemble Studies) Select any 1 Musical Behaviours (including AAI332 Ensemble Studies) Analysis of Twentieth-century Music AAI333 (including Ensemble Studies) Select any 1 Conducting (including Ensemble AAI334 Studies) Composing (including Ensemble AAI335 Studies) Pres Pres 3 3 - Pres Pres 3 3 - Pres Pres 3 3 - 314 .AS: Music ACADEMIC SUBJECT: MUSIC Table 1: AS 1 Music Structure for BA (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Music Structure for BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAI101 Title Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No.

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 39 Prerequisites - Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. 315 . * Special Note: All students must obtain a pass in both written and practical components to pass the entire course.AS: Music Year 4 Course Title Course Code Category Select any 1 Performance Studies Project AAI430 Pres (including Ensemble Studies) Music Education Project (including AAI431 Pres Ensemble Studies) Ethnomusicology Project (including AAI432 Pres Ensemble Studies) Musicological Research Project AAI433 Pres (including Ensemble Studies) Composition Project (including AAI434 Pres Ensemble Studies) Total AUs for Degree No.

seeks to introduce musical practices by situating them in a social and historical context. Musical practices. * Special Note: All students must obtain a pass in both written and practical components to pass the entire course. This course acknowledges a constructivist paradigm in the teaching and learning of and about music asserting knowledge as being uniquely 316 .AS: Music Table 2: AS 2 Music Structure for BA (Ed) / BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Year Course Code AAI101 AAI102 1 AAI103 AAI104 AAI201 AAI202 2 AAI203 AAI204 Title Musical Practices I (Including Instrumental Studies) Foundations in Musical Studies I (including Ensemble Studies) Musical Practices II (Including Instrumental Studies) Foundations in Musical Studies II (including Ensemble Studies) Musical Practices III (Including Instrumental Studies) Orchestration and Arranging (including Ensemble Studies) Musical Practices IV (Including Instrumental Studies) Foundations in Music Education (including Ensemble Studies) Total AUs for Degree Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters. form the basis of learning about any specific musical practice and the activity of experiencing and reflecting on the musical practice. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites - AAI101 Musical Practices I (including Instrumental Studies) This course. Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. as the first of a series of similarly constructed courses. Each musical practice would have to be viewed from its own culturally situated and practice specific context. via creating performing and responding.

This course also requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument and prescribed ensembles. Musical practices. Students will develop an understanding of western classical harmony and structural principles in relation to other parameters such as rhythm and texture. Each musical practice is viewed 317 . A good foundation in music theory is required. continues to introduce musical practices by situating them in a social and historical context. via creating performing and responding.AS: Music constructed by individuals. Some analysis of music from outside the western classical tradition namely. AAI103 Musical Practices II (including Instrumental Studies) This course. popular music will be To help students better appreciate the inner workings of music. which is created and/or constructed by both student teachers and facilitators as stakeholders. modal and tonal two-part writing as well as figured-bass realization will be taught. For a more holistic and embodied understanding of music. this course has an ensemble participation requirement. Learning is facilitated in an environment. AAI102 Foundations in Musical Ensemble Studies) Studies I (including This is the first of a two-part foundation course that integrates music analysis with music writing as complementary means to understand music. the second in the series. form the basis of learning about any specific musical practice and the activity of experiencing and reflecting on the musical practice.

pitch. students will continue with eighteenthcentury two-part writing and chorale harmonization in the style of Bach as the next step towards free composition. AAI104 Foundations in Musical Ensemble Studies) Studies II (including This is a sequel course to AAI 102. Learning is facilitated in an environment. rhythmic and textural organization. the third in the series. This course also requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument and prescribed ensembles. developing greater awareness of style elements. With a foundation in species counterpoint and figured-bass realization from AAI 102. Analysis of music from outside the western classical tradition will continue to be included as supplementary studies. This course acknowledges a constructivist paradigm in the teaching and learning of and about music asserting knowledge as being uniquely constructed by individuals. Students will further their understanding of the western musical language (including some 20th-century styles) in terms of its structural. from a culturally 318 . via creating performing and responding.AS: Music from its own culturally situated and practice specific context. AAI201 Musical Practices III (including Instrumental Studies) This course. For a more holistic and embodied understanding of music. which is created and/or constructed by both student teachers and facilitators as stakeholders. represents a further development in learning musical practices. this course has an ensemble participation requirement.

with a view to developing skills in applying and sequencing instrumental combinations effectively in creating an effective piece of music. performing and responding. ethnomusicology and anthropology through musical learning which is facilitated in an environment. and explores the capabilities of the various instruments. rock. while still engaging them via creating. mainstream/marginal.AS: Music situated and practice specific context. techno to big band. specifically music of popular culture and jazz. This course introduces concepts in cultural theory. prepares student teachers for a more advanced approach to learning musical practices from a culturally situated and practice specific context. AAI203 Musical Practices IV (including Instrumental Studies) This fourth and final course in the series of musical practices. which is created and/or constructed by both student teachers and facilitators as stakeholders. This course introduces concepts about construction of greater/lesser in musical traditions and ramifications of such a construction. This course critically examines the ramifications of constructing labels in musical traditions such as greater/lesser. This course also requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument and prescribed ensembles. pop. which is created and/or 319 . Learning is facilitated in an environment. written/oral (aural). AAI202 Orchestration and Arranging (including Ensemble Studies) This course involves a study of varied repertoire ranging from orchestral music.

teaching methods. administration. supervision and evaluation alongside comparative studies of major music educators with music curriculum design. principles and educational practices in the field of music education forms a knowledge base for developing ways of thinking and knowing of and about music education for the music classroom. psychological and philosophical foundations of music education including established music educators and their contributions. This course also requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument as well as prescribed ensembles. 320 . AAI204 Foundations in Music Ensemble Studies) Education (including This course introduces a study of historical.AS: Music constructed by both student teachers and facilitators as stakeholders. AAI301 Studies in Music Education (including Ensemble Studies) This course seeks to develop the foundations of music education by introducing aspects of programme development. This introduction to fundamental philosophies. This course also requires prescribed instrumental/vocal ensemble participation. This course also requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument and prescribed ensembles.

The terms and tools of technology are critically examined in their nature. This course requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument and prescribed ensembles. sociology and the teaching and learning of the various musical traditions. AAI331 Ethnomusicology (including Ensemble Studies) A study of the theory and methods of ethnomusicology. AAI332 Musical Behaviours (including Instrumental Studies) A study of musical practices around the world with special emphasis on interdisciplinary perspectives such as philosophy. performing and responding. This course requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument and prescribed ensembles. role and function in musical practice. 321 . This course also requires student teachers to take up instrumental studies in the form of prescribed ensembles. music education. This study will also emphasise the importance of techniques and technology in ethnomusicological fieldwork studies and methodology as well as a study of musical transcriptions from various cultures and their significance for ethnomusiological study. analysis. There will also be a study of the traditional music from a wide range of cultures.AS: Music AAI330 Music and Technology (including Ensemble Studies) This course introduces ways in which technology supports musical practice in the areas of creating.

This course also requires prescribed instrumental/vocal ensemble participation. AAI334 Conducting (including Ensemble Studies) This course seeks to introduce fundamental principles and practices of conducting ensembles like band or choir with emphasis on consolidation of techniques and practical skills. seen as a knowledge base for developing other skills in performing and ensemble directing. A portfolio of examples via practicalbased composition is also taken into account and includes musics of popular cultures from around the world. AAI335 Composing (including Ensemble Studies) Further exploration of compositional procedures study of composition. set-theory based approaches to art music as well as approaches to understanding jazz. These skills involve the study of rehearsal procedures and performance practice. including pop. music of popular culture. in which the student teacher produces either an extended work or a portfolio of compositions.AS: Music AAI333 Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music (including Ensemble Studies) This course involves a more in-depth study of twentiethworks) and their attendant musical aesthetics and techniques like serial analysis. 322 . This course also requires prescribed instrumental/ vocal ensemble participation. This course also requires prescribed instrumental/vocal ensemble participation. rock and rap.

AS: Music

AAI430

Performance Studies Project (including Ensemble Studies) This course offers the opportunities for student teachers to pursue in-depth performance/ instrumental studies in the form of their main instrument or ensemble related performances, like conducting an ensemble.

AAI431

Music Education Project (including Ensemble Studies) This course requires the student teacher to carry out research projects by tapping into knowledge and skills introduced and developed in previous courses in the areas of historical, psychological and philosophical foundations of music education, programme development, methods of teaching, administration, supervision and evaluation and the comparative study of the philosophies of major music educators, along with music curriculum design. This course also requires prescribed instrumental/vocal ensemble participation.

AAI432

Ethnomusicology Project (including Ensemble Studies) The project involves the application of approaches and methods of ethnomusicology to a chosen musical culture as well as a study of the theory and methods of ethnomusicology, with emphasis on techniques in ethnomusicological field work methods and the study of musical transcriptions from various cultures. There will also be a study of traditional musics from a wide range of cultures. This course
323

AS: Music

also requires prescribed instrumental/vocal ensemble participation. AAI433 Musicological Research Ensemble Studies) Project (including

An exploration of some aspects of the history of music in some depth, based on contemporary historical theories. Student teachers will have the opportunity to explore chosen topics. The project explores problems and issues surrounding the study of musical compositions and involves the use of analytical techniques applied to them. This course also requires prescribed instrumental/vocal ensemble participation. AAI434 Composition Studies) Project (including Ensemble

This course is an advanced study of composition, in which the student teacher must produce either an extended work or a portfolio of compositions which can include practical-based composition like musics of popular cultures from around the world. Student teachers here are now expected to have their compositions performed by ensembles and performances recorded. This course is used for developing other skills like composing using music technology. This course also requires prescribed instrumental/vocal ensemble participation.

324

AS: Physical Education and Sports Science

ACADEMIC SUBJECT: PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPORTS SCIENCE Table :

&

AS 1 PE & Sports Science Structure for BSc (Ed) (PESS) (Primary) AS 1 PE & Sports Science Structure for BSc (Ed) (PESS) (Secondary)
Title Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Core Core No. of AUs 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 34 Prerequisites APA102 APA104 APA103 APA201 APA201 APA105 APA105 APA231 APA232 APA233 APA234 APA235 APA236 -

Year

1

2

3

4

Growth and Motor Development Anatomical and Biomechanical APA103 Foundations of Physical Activity APA104 Physiology of Exercise Introduction to Physical Education & APA105 Sport Foundations of Psychology & Motor APA201 Learning in Physical Activity APA202 Measurement and Evaluation Select any 2 APA231 Physiological Bases of Exercise Quantitative Methods in APA232 Biomechanics Psychology of Physical Education & APA233 Sport Neuromuscular Control of Human APA234 Movement APA235 Sociology of Sport APA236 Management of Sport Organisations Select any 3 APA331 Applied Physiology of Exercise APA332 Biomechanics in Sport Applied Psychology of Physical APA333 Education & Sport Neural and Behavioural Perspectives APA334 of Human Movement APA335 Social History of Sport Event and Facilities Management in APA336 Sport APA337 Theory of Coaching APA338 Adapted Physical Education & Sport Teaching Effectiveness in Physical APA402 Education Curriculum Design in Physical APA403 Education Total AUs for Degree

Course Code APA102

Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.

325

AS: Physical Education and Sports Science

APA102 Growth and Motor Development This course is designed to understand the relation between physical growth and motor development in children and adolescent. Various topics including stages, age related changes, individual differences, and gender differences in relation to growth and motor development will be covered during the course. In addition, interventional strategies to facilitate growth and motor development will be discussed. Implications for the teaching of physical education will be emphasized throughout the course. APA103 Anatomical and Biomechanical Foundations of Physical Activity Structural anatomy deals with the knowledge and an understanding of the skeleton, joints and muscle structure that produces movement. Biomechanics is the study of a biological system by means of mechanics. This course introduces the basic mechanical and anatomical concepts and principles that govern human movement. The aim of this course is to enable student teachers to perform qualitative analyses of human movement using basic concepts of mechanics and anatomy in the context of PE and sports. APA104 Physiology of Exercise The principal areas covered include energy metabolism for exercise, aerobic performance and anaerobic performance, sex and age-associated differences in exercise performances and thermoregulation in the heat. The associated teaching implications will be brought to the fore. In
326

AS: Physical Education and Sports Science

addition, aspects of functional anatomy dealing with the associated exercise parameters and the part each plays in physical performance, health and fitness will be discussed in this course. APA105 Introduction to Physical Education & Sport This course emphasises concepts related to the broad field of physical education and sport. It provides an overview of the disciplines that study the , cultural, and sociological foundations and their applications to professional practice. The course examines the structure of the Singapore Sports Council, National Sport Associations, Singapore Schools Sports Council and the Co-Curricular Activities Branch and their relationships in promoting participation in sports from recreational to high performance levels. The daily work in physical education and sport, looking at the traditional field of teaching and coaching, is also highlighted. Current issues and future directions in the field are also explored. APA201 Foundations of Psychology & Motor Learning in Physical Activity This course examines the foundations of sport and exercise psychology and the concepts and principles associated with skill acquisition. Specifically, the course will focus on topics and issues related to the social psychological variables that influence participation in physical activity and sport, the sport and exercise environments within which participants operate, as well as selected outcomes of such participation.
327

AS: Physical Education and Sports Science

APA202 Measurement and Evaluation This course is designed to provide student teachers with basic concepts of measurement and evaluation in physical education. The course will focus on basic concepts of statistics and the use of computers for data analysis. In addition, techniques to analyse the effectiveness of physical education programme will be introduced and discussed. This course is designed to prepare future teachers to become knowledgeable in administering and evaluating tests within the discipline of physical education. APA231 Physiological Bases of Exercise This academic course on exercise physiology embraces important concepts in the physiology of exercise in the school-going age population (8-18 years), contrasting with those of adults. The principal areas covered include the trainability of aerobic & anaerobic performance in young people compared to adults, and nutritional aspects of performance including fluid supplementation.

328

AS: Physical Education and Sports Science

APA232 Quantitative Methods in Biomechanics This course introduces participants to quantitative methods for determining mechanical parameters of movement, namely linear and angular kinematic and kinetic quantities through laboratory work. Participants should have completed the mechanical and anatomical bases of human motion before enrolling for this course. A quantitative analysis of sports using basic biomechanical concepts will be introduced to explain movements required in various activities. The use of such quantitative procedures will allow the teacher or coach to effectively analyse movement, explain causes of observed effects and to remediate errors using a safe and scientific approach. APA233 Psychology of Physical Education & Sport This course is designed to provide student teachers with an understanding of how psychological variables influence participation in sport and physical education, focusing on the key motivational perspectives of exercise and sport. APA234 Neuromuscular Control of Human Movement The purpose of this course is to examine the concepts associated with motor control and the neuromuscular basis of human movement. Student teachers will look at the structures involved in motor control from anatomical, neurophysiological, and biomechanical perspectives, and then, their motion will be interpreted from motor control perspective. Student teachers are encouraged to actively
329

AS: Physical Education and Sports Science

participate in the class by making questions or raising problems. APA235 Sociology of Sport The course focuses on the role of sport in society. Sociological theories and methodologies are examined and applied to the study of sport. The course will examine issues such as globalisation, race, and women in sport. APA236 Management of Sport Organisations This course introduces student teachers to the types of sport organisations and the important issues relating to the management of such organisations. The study of sport organisations will be based on organisational the The important topics of the course include: type of sport organisations, legal identity of sport organisations, goals and objectives of sport organisations, leadership, conflict management and decision making in sport organisations, and strategic planning in sports. The course also introduces to the student the key managerial roles and functions important to managing sport and physical education. The physical education department will be used as a constant management unit to illustrate the key concepts covered.

330

and strength in young people (ages 8-18 yrs). nutrition for sports & training (ergogenic aids). Student teachers will learn how to design a quantitative analysis. The course will consist of theory and applied field work. APA333 Applied Psychology of Physical Education & Sport This is an applied sport psychology course targeted at student PE teachers who want to consider mental training as a useful tool for enhancing sport performance. The participants will be introduced to the role of applied sport psychologist. student teachers will be expected to examine the relationship between performance measure and human motor system. and theories underpinning each mental skill. Student teachers will have the opportunity to explore the underlying processes that is involved in the production of this human movement in sports. From the analysis work of this course. This course will focus on the quantitative analysis of human movement in sports. short term power output. analyze and interpret data obtained from the equipment associated with the measurement technique. 331 . the development and evaluation of basic mental skill training. collect. power recovery from intermittent exercise & effects of attitude training on swimming performance.AS: Physical Education and Sports Science APA331 Applied Physiology of Exercise This course examines the sports training adaptations for aerobic endurance. APA332 Biomechanics in Sport Biomechanics is the study of a biological system by means of mechanics.

and contrast current theoretical perspectives of motor learning and control. concept of tort and negligence. APA335 Social History of Sport This course will examine the historical development of sport across cultures. In addition. sport facilities design. compare. 332 . Issues such as Olympism. from its elitist neoclassical origins to its present commercialized form.AS: Physical Education and Sports Science This course will be both theoretically and practically based. mainly from the behavioural perspectives. Design and maintenance considerations of a sport facility will also be studied to determine what is preferable. APA336 Event and Facilities Management in Sport The course will focus on the important considerations required to successfully conduct a sport event. and risk management in sport. tracing the significant milestones in the changing role of sport in society. Course topics include: important publics of a sport event. The range of topics covered in this course will be from the basic principles of human movements to complex human behaviour. organizing sport competitions. executing a sport event. APA334 Neural and Behavioural Perspectives of Human Movement The objective of this course is to describe. will be examined. the basic concept of neural interpretation of human motor control will be addressed.

They can. and should. need to develop movement control and efficiency of movement in fine and gross motor skills. The effective physical education teacher can encourage and plan for successful integration of student teachers with special needs in mainstream physical education lessons or inclusive physical activity settings. they may register for the NCAP Level 3 certification. like all other student teachers. This course aims to equip pre-service teachers with the foundation knowledge and skills to integrate students with special needs into the regular PE/physical activity program. 333 . Discussions will be centered on theoretical concepts. This introductory course introduces preservice PE teachers to the area of adapted physical education and to the different disability conditions. APA338 Adapted Physical Education & Sport Student teachers with special needs. If participants so wish.AS: Physical Education and Sports Science APA337 Theory of Coaching This course will focus on issues related to the effective coaching of young athletes. This certification will be conferred on and paying the appropriate fee to the Singapore Sports Council. The content from NCAP Level 1. yet placed in the context of practical applications for the local competitive environment. be equipped with the necessary skills and knowledge to participate in modified and regular games and sporting events. 2 and 3 will be covered.

334 . The content will focus on issues related to the development and assessment of physical education curricular and attention will be given to the PE curriculum in Singapore.AS: Physical Education and Sports Science APA402 Teaching Effectiveness in Physical Education This course covers a range of topics relevant to the teaching of physical education in schools. APA403 Curriculum Design in Physical Education This course will build on the knowledge and theory gained in the Instructional Methods and Strategies Units. It cerns arising from their teaching experiences and addresses these in relation to the research on teaching effectiveness in physical education. Observer systems that can be used to analyse the effectiveness of the teacher and the management of student behaviours in teaching settings are introduced. Teacher socialization issues that occur in schools are discussed.

335 .AS: Physics ACADEMIC SUBJECT: PHYSICS Table 1: Year AS 1 Physics Structure for BSc (Ed) (Primary) AS 1 Physics Structure for BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title Understanding Essential Mechanics Optics and Waves Electricity and Magnetism Physics Laboratory I Modern Physics and Special Relativity Exploring Thermal Physics Electromagnetism Physics Laboratory II Solid State Physics Quantum Mechanics Material Science Physics Laboratory III 1 Plasma Science and Technology Atomic and Molecular Physics Relativity Spectroscopy Astrophysics Condensed Matter Physics Thermonuclear Fusion and Radiation Physics Research Project Intermediate Quantum Mechanics Total AUs for Degree Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres Pres No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 39 Prerequisites AAP103 AAP201 AAP101 AAP201 AAP201 AAP201 AAP203 AAP302 AAP302 AAP302 AAP203 AAP302 AAP203 - 1 Course Code AAP101 AAP102 AAP103 AAP104 AAP201 2 AAP202 AAP203 AAP204 AAP301 AAP302 AAP303 AAP304 Select any AAP431 AAP432 AAP433 AAP434 AAP435 AAP436 AAP437 AAP438 AAP439 3 4 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.

Supplementary material: Solution of linear differential equations and use of Mathematica or Maple. Harmonic Waves. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 Prerequisites AAP103 - 1 Course Code AAP101 AAP102 AAP103 AAP104 AAP201 2 AAP202 AAP203 AAP204 Please refer to the NIE Portal for the list of courses offered by semesters.AS: Physics Table 2: Year AS 2 Physics Structure for BA (Ed)/BSc (Ed) (Secondary) Title Understanding Essential Mechanics Optics and Waves Electricity and Magnetism Physics Laboratory I Modern Physics and Special Relativity Exploring Thermal Physics Electromagnetism Physics Laboratory II Total AUs for Degree Course Category Core Core Core Core Core Core Core Core No. Thin Lens. 336 . Physical Optics: Wave Motion and equation. oscillations. Standing Waves. Conservation laws: Rigid body kinematics and dynamics. Beats. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. The Superposition of Waves. Group Velocity. Circular motion & universal gravitation. Phase and Phase Velocity. Interference. Friction. AAP101 Understanding Essential Mechanics simple applications. introduction to continuous media. AAP102 Optics and Waves Geometrical Optics: Basic concepts in geometrical optics: .

Eddy currents. wires. Bio-Savart law. Capacitance. Transformer and other applications of induction such as microphone. impulse and momentum.Hall effect and mass spectrometer. Polarization. Inductance: self and mutual. airtrack. Electrical awareness. motors and loudspeakers. Electric dipoles. Electromagnetic Induction. Free fall and projectile motion.AS: Physics Diffraction. Magnetic field. Resonance. Energy stored in magnetic field. Introduction to computer aided experimentation and data loggers. Measurement of length. Magnetism. Impedance matching. time and temperature. Torque on a current loop and applications such as galvanometers. AAP103 Electricity and Magnetism potential energy and potential. errors and statistics. Conservation of energy. Energy stored in electric field. damped and driven oscillators. with special emphasis on the use of dataloggers in school context. Charge particles in E and B fields . Analysis of AC circuit. AAP104 Physics Laboratory I Experimental techniques. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. multimeter 337 . resonance and vibrating strings. Heat transfer experiment. including LRC. Accelerated motion. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. tape recording and seismograph. Electric circuit.

capacitors. concept of half-life and mean life. AAP201 Modern Physics and Special Relativity Galilean Relativity and transformation. Wavefunction. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current secondary school curricula. Equipartition theorem.AS: Physics and oscilloscope. Heat transfer. Heisenberg Uncertainty principle. Diffusion. Thermal expansion. time dilation and length contraction. Rutherford's Model of Atom and Bohr's theory. Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics. Specific and latent heat. Nuclear Physics: Nuclear shape and size. Atomic structure: plum-pudding model. Kinetic theory. Enthalpy. Postulates of relativity and implications: simultaneity and clock synchronization. Binding energy. and inductors. Relativistic mechanics: energy and momentum and relativity in nuclear & particle physics. Ideal gas law. Modern circuits. Blackbody radiation. Nuclear stability. Davisson and Germer experiment. Wave-particle dualism. Photoelectric effect. Internal energy & First Law of Thermodynamics. Nuclear fission and fusion. MichelsonMorley Experiment. Heat capacities of gases. conservation laws. Stefan-Boltzmann law. Lorentz Paradoxes of relativity: Pole and barn paradox. Mean free path. Schrödinger's theory of quantum mechanics. Compton scattering. Linear and nonlinear devices. Radioactivity. Adiabatic 338 . Geometrical and physical optics. AAP202 Exploring Thermal Physics Temperature. Resistors. Electric and magnetic fields. and twin paradox.

Metal Detectors. Carnot cycle.k. Color Perception. a vast variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Lightning. transistors and operational amplifiers. Atom Smashers or Colliders). Electrostatic energy. Radios. AC Circuits. Superconductivity. characteristics of diodes. Aurora Borealis. Electric Shock Treatment. Fermi-Dirac distribution. Pacemakers. Doppler Effect. Mass Spectrometers. Entropy: order & disorder. Reversibility. Digital 339 . Big-Bang Cosmology. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula. Blue Skies. AAP203 Electromagnetism Polarization. TV. Electromagnetic waves in free space and isotropic insulating materials. Red Sunsets. Magnetic Levitation. Heat engines and efficiency. Musical Instruments. Rainbows. Bullet Trains. Quantum statistics.a. Haloes around Sun and Moon. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current secondary school curricula. Maxwell distribution. radiation law. Particle Accelerators (a. In addition. Free Energy and chemical thermodynamics.AS: Physics processes. Interferometers. Second Law of Thermodynamics. Radio Telescopes. Debye theory of solids. Boltzmann statistics. Car Coils. Electric Motors. Delectrics and their applications. AAP204 Physics Laboratory II Analogue electronics: Impedance of resistors. Electrocardiograms. Electric displacement vectors. Macroscopic and microscopic fields in deielectrics. Bose-Einstein distribution. capacitors and inductors.

Using electronics for physics experiments. Electrons. the operators and expectation values. Semiconductor processing. eigenfunction and eigenvalues. Carrier concentrations in intrinsic and extrinsic materials. Physics of low dimensional solids. wave function and its interpretation. Carrier mobility and ways to measure it. Semiconductors. bra and ket vectors and the vector space. 340 . donors and acceptors. AAP301 Solid State Physics Introduction to basic concepts of solid-state physics and materials sciences. probability density. the basic postulate of quantum mechanics. holes. Teaching of solid state physics at secondary level. TTL. phonons and their interactions. CMOS. AAP302 Quantum Mechanics -particle duality. free electron theory of metals and Fermi surface. The Schrodinger theory of quantum mechanics. concepts of quantum states. Physics of P-N Junction and MOSFETs. displays and binary arithmetic. Transport Properties. Use of logic gates flip flops for counters. Nanostructures and nanotechnology. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects.AS: Physics Electronics: Introduction to types of logic gates e. Hall Effect. state vectors and its properties. principle of superposition. reciprocal lattice. Crystalline states and symmetry. Exposure to real life applications of electronics. Density of States and energy bands.g. The experiments are selected with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula.

Atomic Structure and Bonding in solids. alpha. Physics and applications of analytical techniques for materials characterization. measurement of speed of light. Optical Properties of Materials. fine structure constant. symmetry and degeneracy. Free electrons. Magnetic Properties of Materials. Phonons. the hydrogen atom. superconductivity. AAP304 Physics Laboratory III Experiments covering a broad range of modern physics such as Franck-Hertz. beta particles and gamma radiation. Hall effect. liquid crystals. charge carrier measurement. Nanomaterials and nanotechnology. and Compton experiments. the central potential problem. Band formation. and Planck constant. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects. nuclear magnetic resonance. anisotrophy. diffusion. Wave propagation and transmission 341 . the orbital angular momentum and the spin angular momentum. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school based projects.AS: Physics one-dimensional potential problem. energy gaps and Fermi energy. Semiconducting materials. Boltzmann constant. Atomic arrangement and crystal structure. Biomaterials. Imperfections in solids. Teaching of quantum theory at secondary level. X-ray diffraction. AAP303 Material Science Introduction to advanced materials. Faraday. three dimensional potential problem. Electronic Properties of Materials. phonon transport.

the Lamb shift. and written and oral presentation of experiment results. Optical communication. radiative processes and selective rules. Vacuum systems and handling. Motion of charges in electric and magnetic fields. discharge characteristics and devices. Kinetic theory of gasses. applications of the Schrodinger equation.AS: Physics lines. Plasma assembly of nanomaterials. Breakdown of gases. relativistic correction of state energy. singlet and triplet energy states of 342 . AAP431 Plasma Science and Technology Introduction to plasma physics and applications. Interference spectroscopy and holography. Plasma properties. Plasma diagnostics and simulation. Plasma TV. Plasma generation. The course also stresses the basic experimental techniques and data acquisition and analysis. helium ground state and Pauli exclusive principle. Twoelectron atoms: Electrostatic interaction and exchange degeneracy. implantation and surface modifications. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects. Plasma-surface interaction. High temperature plasmas and controlled thermal nuclear fusion. etching. Chemically active plasmas and applications for plasma assisted deposition. AAP432 Atomic and Molecular Physics One-electron atoms: The Schrodinger equation and its solution for a Coulomb field. Electrodynamics of ionized gases. spin-orbit interaction energy. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects.

energy levels. Molecular Physics: Separation of electronic and nuclear motion. alkali atoms. relativity and electromagnetism. rotational energy-level population. the principle of general theory. particle decays and production. AAP434 Spectroscopy Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. Multielectron atoms: The central-field approximation. the experimental tests of the general theory of relativity. AAP433 Relativity Basic postulates of the Special Theory of Relativity. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects. elementary tensor analysis including tensor algebra and tensor calculus. Doppler shift and broadening. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects. rotational energy states for a rigid molecule and a nonrigid rotator. multiplet structure and Lande interval rule.AS: Physics helium. the relativistic dynamics. Relativistic dynamics including elastic and inelastic collision. vibrational energy states of diatomic molecules. the geometry of space-time. the field equation. applications in rotationvibration spectra of linear molecules and simple polyatomic molecules. potential energy function for a chemical bond. applications in Xray line spectra. Atomic spectroscopy: Emission spectra of 343 . the L-S and J-J couplings. space-time curvature. resolving power. allowed terms. the Minkowski diagram. energy ordering of the outer filled subshells. basic instrumentations.

X-ray spectroscopy. Measurement techniques: radiation. main & late stages). Ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy: Instrumentation. Mass determination. Large scale structure. black holes. optics. Star Formation: Formation of protostars. Stellar parameters. vibration-rotation spectra of diatomic. Stellar atmospheres. These topics are taught with 344 . Chandrasekhar Limit. and of polyatomic molecules. Infrared spectroscopy: Theory of the vibrating diatomic molecule. The Galaxies. Pressure equation of state. applications in analysis of elements and astronomy. The Solar System. colour in transition metal compounds.AS: Physics hydrogen and sodium. Stellar Energy Sources. Qualitative overview of cosmology. neutron stars. linear and polyatomic molecules. Spectra classifications. diatomic vibrating rotator. Transportation of energy. white dwarf stars. AAP435 Astrophysics General Introduction. Interiors of stars: Hydrostatic equilibrium. telescopes & interaction of matter with radiation. rotational spectra of diatomic molecules. White Dwarfs. electronic structures of atoms and periodicity of elements. microwave spectrometer. applications in organic chemistry. applications in the analysis of molecular structure of linear molecules. Black holes. Microwave spectroscopy: Theory of rotation of molecules. Main sequence. General cosmology (the Early Universe). These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and schoolbased projects. Fate of massive stars. Evolution of stars (pre. Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram. interaction of rotations and vibrations. applications in identification of gases and in chemical analysis. Qualitative overview of stellar evolution: nucleosynthesis. Neutron Stars.

rubber. The Fundamentals of Fusion Process: The Energy Balance. optical. Understanding of the speed of sound in gas. Properties of liquid: Mechanical.AS: Physics special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects. The dynamics of a liquid: the cell model. Clausius virial theorem. thermal. Ideal Plasma-Confinement Criterion. Bremsstrahlung Power Loss. internal energy and liquid crystals.experimental data and theory. Possible Fusion Reactions. Change of phase and the Gibbs free energy. AAP437 Thermonuclear Fusion and Radiation World Energy Scenario. and timescales in condensed matter. energies. AAP436 Condensed Matter Physics The focus of this course is the liquid state. Need to develop a relatively clean long-term alternative energy source. solid-in-liquid and liquid-in-gas) and polymers (glass. Initiation of a phase transition: Nucleation and growth -. liquid and solid. The energy crisis. Cyclotron Power Loss. Fusion Reaction Cross section. Plasma Confinement: The Magnetic 345 . Thermonuclear Fusion: The Nuclear fusion as energy source. electrical. as well as surface tension and viscosity -.experimental data and theory. Introduction to the colloidal state of matter (liquid-in-liquid. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and schoolbased projects. viscous flow. and ionic conduction. magnetic. Forces. Effect of Impurity. and polymer crystals). with emphasis on the liquid state: bonding in liquids and structure of liquids radial density function. diffusion.

AS: Physics Confinement. diagnostics and application of focus device to microlithography. either theoretical or experimental. process of gathering data and the technique of analyzing data to draw proper inferences. Closed-ended Toroidal Confinement. These topics are taught with special emphases on linkages to the current school curricula and school-based projects. Ignition and Propagation burn. Tokamak equilibrium and stability. The Tokamak: General consideration of toroidal devices. 346 . Current sheath dynamics in plasma focus. electron beam. Thermonuclear Burn Fraction. The objective of this course is to provide them with research experience. Plasma Radiation Sources and Application: Development of focus device as multiple radiation source of x-rays. Open-Ended Confinement-Magnetic Mirror. The Plasma Focus: General characteristics of Focus Device. Magnetic configuration of Tokamak. Laser Fusion: ICF Power gain and Driver requirements. thin film processing and thin film deposition. In this course. ions and neutron. the student teacher will be asked to carry out a short research project. under the supervision of an academic staff. They will learn how to formulate a research proposal. AAP438 Physics Research Projects Student teachers taking Physics as AS1 subject should be exposed to the various stages of research work to allow them to supervise and facilitate student projects in school and also to enable them to take up higher degree by research in the future. Implosion and compression of matter. Computational model of Plasma focus device.

Born approximation and partial wave analysis. The harmonic oscillator via ladder operators. ket and bra vectors. the hydrogen atom. Matrix description of quantum states and operator. 347 . Time-independent perturbation theory.AS: Physics AAP439 Intermediate Quantum Mechanics The formalism of quantum mechanics. Scattering theory. the variational principle. linear vector spaces. angular momentum and spin. Identical particles.

348 . of AUs 3 Prerequisites - AMX301 Multicultural Studies: Appreciating and Valuing Differences This course introduces student teachers to the implications of living in a diverse society primarily through addressing issues of class. society and the larger world. understanding the dynamics suggested by community. and other social structures. In an increasingly complex world.Essential Course ESSENTIAL COURSE Essential Course Course Code AMX301 Title Multicultural Studies: Appreciating and Valuing Differences Course Category Core No. gender.

of AUs 3 2 Prerequisites - ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills This course will introduce student teachers to academic reading materials and teach them how to produce academic discourse of their own with regard to researching and writing assignments in their chosen areas of academic specialisation.LEADS LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT AND ACADEMIC DISCOURSE SKILLS Language Enhancement & Academic Discourse Skills Course Title Code ALS101 Academic Discourse Skills ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers Course Category Core Core No. group collaboration. and liaising with a research supervisor. In addition. and present it in a coherent manner. and provide them with a level of expertise in primary and secondary datagathering. support it with evidence. they will gain some experience in other activities related to academic writing such as time-management. 349 . The course will introduce student teachers to the conventions of academic writing. They will learn how to generate and develop argument. including citation and documentation procedures.

As part of the learning process. Student teachers become more aware of the importance of considering the purpose.LEADS ALK201 Communication Skills for Teachers This is a practical course designed to provide student teachers with the oral and written skills necessary for effective communication as teachers in the classroom and in their professional interaction with colleagues. student teachers have the opportunities to practise good pronunciation. parents and the general public. The course provides opportunities for hands-on practice of target skills in realistic schoolbased situations. audience and context in communicating effectively to promote student learning. to understand effective voice production and to reflect and self-assess their application of the knowledge and skills that they acquire during the course. 350 .

Teaching Assistantship (TA).g.Practicum PRACTICUM The Practicum is a very important component of the degree programme. 351 . Teaching Assistantship) at the end of an academic year before the start of a new academic year. The Practicum is spread throughout the entire programme and is developmental in nature. It comprises four school attachment periods. Please note that when the practicum is held in the Jun/Jul period (e. Student teachers who fail to register for the necessary practicum course will be issued warning letters. Therefore. Teaching Practice 1 (TP 1) and Teaching Practice 2 (TP 2). They will learn from experienced cooperating teachers about the schooling process and prepare themselves for their roles and responsibilities in teaching. student teachers will be able to use the knowledge and skills acquired in the subjects they read at the university.e.. student teachers must register for the practicum course in Semester 1 of the new exercise). During the Practicum. School Experience (SE). i. and have opportunities to integrate theory and practice in schools. under the guidance and supervision of cooperating teachers and university lecturers. Its principal function is to provide student teachers with the opportunity to develop teaching competencies in a variety of instructional contexts and at different levels. A copy of the letter may be forwarded to the Ministry of Education (MOE) for student teachers employed by MOE. registration for that practicum posting is done after it has been completed.

352 . Its purpose is to provide them opportunities to observe their Cooperating Teachers (CTs) teach and to reflect on the roles and responsibilities of a teacher. The purpose for this is to provide student teachers opportunities to observe lessons in the primary and secondary classrooms. of AUs 0 3 6 12 Prerequisites SE TA TP 1 APR102 School Experience This is 2 weeks long. They will be Eventually they will learn to plan their own lessons to teach. prepare resources. APR302 Teaching Practice 1 The 3rd component of the Practicum is the 5-week Teaching Practice 1 which is to help the student teachers learn to teach independently. They will also be given the practical experience of helping their CTs plan lessons. with 1 week in a primary school and 1 in a secondary school.Practicum Practicum Course Code APR102 APR202 APR302 APR402 Title School Experience Teaching Assistantship Teaching Practice 1 Teaching Practice 2 Course Category Core Core Core Core No. prepare the relevant resources and manage pupils independently. APR202 Teaching Assistantship Next the student teachers will undergo a 5-week TA. in consultation with their CTs. manage pupils and to do some guided teaching.

Practicum

APR402 Teaching Practice 2 TP 2 is the last component of the Practicum, stretching over a period of 10 weeks. The student teachers will build up their skills and knowledge in a step-wise manner. They will develop planning and delivery skills, followed by classroom management and evaluation skills. In addition, to ensure that the student teachers have a holistic experience, they will also be provided opportunities to explore other teaching, for example, observing how CCAs are managed.

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GE: Art

GENERAL ELECTIVES In addition to the core courses and the required number of prescribed electives, student teachers in the Secondary track must offer 3 AUs of general electives which can be chosen from subjects offered by the University, whether within or outside the Institute. This section provides a list and description of the general electives offered in NIE. Student teachers are responsible for ensuring that the courses they select do not clash on the class timetable and the examination timetable.
Category/ Subject Course Code AAA180 AAA181 AAA182 AAA183 AAA184 AAA280 AAA281 AAA282 Art AAA283 AAA284 AAA285 AAA286 AAA287 AAA288 Title Introduction to Chinese-brush Painting Introduction to Printmaking Introduction to Contemporary Sculptural Practice Life Drawing Drawing Introduction to Ceramics I Introduction to Ceramics II Digital Media and Visual Arts: Still imaging Arts Across the Borders Visual Arts in Asia Screen, Scream & Psychoanalysis: An Introduction to Film Theory Traditional and Creative Chinese Painting Digital Media and Visual Arts: Moving Image Digital Media and Visual Arts: Exploring Modernity through Digital Imaging No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites -

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GE: Art

AAA180 Introduction to Chinese-brush Painting Studio practice of brush technique and the exploration of different subject matters, such as bird, flower, fish, landscape and others. AAA181 Introduction to Printmaking Investigates image making through a range of printmaking techniques. AAA182 Introduction to Contemporary Sculptural Practice A study of the skills and knowledge pertinent to three-dimensional art, allowing for exploration of contemporary sculptural practices. AAA183 Life Drawing Introduction to drawing through an exploration of the figure in both traditional and contemporary frameworks. AAA184 Drawing Investigates the nature of drawing, from traditional art practice to the range of meanings drawing has in contemporary art.

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GE: Art

AAA280 Introduction to Ceramics I Intensive course which involves the development of skills and production of clay works through inquiry and handbuilding techniques. AAA281 Introduction to Ceramics II Intensive course which involves the development of skills and production of clay works through inquiry

AAA282 Digital Media and Visual Arts: Still Imaging Introduction to contemporary art making with digital imaging tools. Participants will experience first hand current art making methodologies through theme based works. The course will go through the processes of concept development, basic software tutorials, production and group critiques. Very basic knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and possession of any kind of Digital Still Camera is required.

356

GE: Art

AAA283 Arts Across the Borders A study focused on the discovery and understanding of the artistic heritage, psychogeography and sociocultural significances of a specific part of Singapore. For 2005, the site chosen will be the very vibrant and sense may comprise the historic, contemporary, architectural, cultural, social, political, psychic and imaginary boundaries that define every day life in the area. A considerable part of the course will be spent doing experiential work (maps, photography, video itself). Course work will involve comprising Situationist-inspired interventions that take as starting point the ways that this particular quarter and its inhabitants perform. AAA284 Visual Arts in Asia Introduction to the various art forms in Asia. Influences of historical background, philosophical beliefs and trade has on symbolism, forms and techniques of artistic practices. AAA285 Screen, Scream & Psychoanalysis: Introduction to Film Theory An

The course offers an introduction of screen theory and psychoanalysis. Lectures, readings, group projects and most significantly, the viewing of a whole series of films, from classic contemporary (Hitchcock to Almodovar) will form the basis of the course work.

357

GE: Art

AAA286 Traditional and Creative Chinese Painting Basic skills of Chinese Painting, including the use of the Chinese brush, the painting of basic strokes, composition and the use of colour. Opportunities will be provided for students to explore new ideas of combining calligraphy and painting as an attempt to create a new approach to Chinese painting. AAA287 Digital Media and Visual Arts: Moving Image Introduction to contemporary art making with digital video tools. Participants will experience first hand current art making methodologies through themed based works. The course will go through the processes of concept development, basic software tutorials, production and group critiques. Very basic knowledge of any video editing software and possession of any kind of Digital Video Camera would be beneficial but not mandatory. AAA288 Digital Media and Visual Arts: Exploring Modernity through Digital Imaging Who is Picasso? What is Minimalism? Using digital imaging as an entry point, this course looks to introduce participants to concepts of modern art while providing one with basic digital imaging and imaging software skills. Through studio projects, lecture and class discussion, participants will explore and learn about key movements in art history through possibilities in digital imaging.

358

GE: Chinese Language & Literature

General Elective: Chinese Language and Literature
Category/ Subject Chinese Language and Literature Course Code AAC180 AAC280 Title Chinese Calligraphy Introduction to Traditional Customs and Beliefs Chinese No. of AUs 3 3 Prerequisites # #

# Pre-requisites: A1, A2, B3 or B4 A1 or A2 A, B, C, D or E (Student teachers specialising in Chinese are exempted from these pre-requisites)

AAC180 Chinese Calligraphy Origin and development of Chinese calligraphy; various styles; lives and styles of prominent calligraphers; the use of the Chinese brush; techniques in writing the basic strokes; demonstrations and practices. AAC280 Introduction to Traditional Chinese Customs and Beliefs An introduction to traditional Chinese customs and beliefs as reflected in popular idioms and moral precepts, myths, legends and festivals.

359

GE: Drama & Performance

General Elective: Drama & Performance
Category/ Subject Course Code AAU280 AAU281 AAU282 AAU283 AAU284 AAU285 Title Voice Studies & Production Introduction to Playwriting Shakespeare on Film Drama in the Literature Classroom Drama in the Primary School Classroom Visual Culture and Performance in Contemporary Singapore No. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites -

Drama & Performance

AAU280 Voice Studies & Production Aims to strengthen and enhance both the student teachers' natural voice and their use of the voice in various working contexts, particularly that of the school classroom. Uses established approaches to develop physical and personal awareness, a feeling for the dynamics of language, and understanding of basic theory of physiology and voice production. AAU281 Introduction to Playwriting The fundamentals of writing for the stage. The oneact play as a useful introduction to dramatic language and structure. The one-act play as an elaboration of a single incident, theme and subject matter, and the "discovery" of theme as an action's controlling ideas, plot construction and related elements such as beginnings, endings, proportion, climax, pacing, the building of suspense, characterisation through action and through dialogue; and the revision of dialogue.

360

particularly in history and the social sciences. Kenneth Branagh's production of Henry V. the Nicol Williamson and Mel Gibson versions of Hamlet. Range of process drama techniques to enhance creative learning outcomes across the Primary School curriculum. Range of process drama techniques to enhance creative learning outcomes in the teaching of literature.GE: Drama & Performance AAU282 Shakespeare on Film The aesthetic and technical aspects of adapting or translating Shakespearean drama to the screen. Focus on a core literary text currently on the curriculum. AAU284 Drama in the Primary School Classroom How to apply drama strategies in the Primary School Classroom. Consideration of such cinematic adaptions as Oliver's Othello. and Macbeth and King Lear as rendered by Akiro Kurosawa. 361 . AAU283 Drama in the Literature Classroom How to apply drama strategies to the teaching of literature.

videos. fashion. 362 . group discussions and presentations. Case material may be drawn equally from current local/international visual culture forms (film. movies. public spaces & shopping centres) and local/international arts and performance practice. excursions to shopping centres. Course sessions will take the form of lectures. performances & exhibitions. television. the aesthetic strategies with which contemporary arts and performance practice engage visual culture.GE: Drama & Performance AAU285 Visual Culture and Performance in Contemporary Singapore Provides a critical introduction to: visual culture in contemporary Singapore. experimental improvisations. advertising. our everyday performance and negotiation of visual culture.

and thinking dispositions which are the major foundations for problem solving. AED281 Basic Counselling Skills for Teachers in Initial Training Programme This course basic counseling and helping skills for working with pupils. The main features include an introduction to the concepts of helping.GE: Education Studies General Elective: Education Studies Category/ Subject Course Code AED280 AED281 AED282 AED380 Education Studies AED381 AED382 AED383 AED480 Title Problem-solving Strategies of Primary School Pupils Basic Counselling Skills for Teachers in Initial Training Programmes Fundamentals of Group Guidance Motivating Pupils to Learn Facilitating Asynchronous Online Discussion Designing ICT-Based Constructivist Activities Facilitating and Managing ICT-Supported Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Projects Problems and Issues in Singapore Education No. we will discuss two major types of problems: well structured problems and ill-structured problems. In addition. an exploration into the concepts of mental and maladjustment with pupils. identification of pupils with behavioural and emotional 363 . and problem solving strategies such as case-based reasoning approach. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 Prerequisites - AED280 Problem-solving Strategies of Primary School Pupils In this course. we will also cover Gagne s nine instructional events. We will cover thinking skills.

interpreting body language.GE: Education Studies problems. AED282 Fundamentals of Group Guidance This course introduces student teachers to the theory and practice of group guidance. covering themes of development and competencies in self-esteem. An understanding of the history and development of group guidance. and different approaches and techniques in counseling and helping. purpose of group guidance. student teachers will be making connections of theory to practice examining 364 . group dynamics in the classroom. the ethics of helping. social awareness and management. and competencies in problem-solving and decisionmaking. qualities of the effective teacher-helper. and developmental guidance to facilitate holistic development of pupils will be dealt with. Study topics include: active listening. Opportunities will be provided for participants to examine themes such as the motivation and its relationship to classroom learning and pupil behavior. group theories. AED380 Motivating Pupils to Learn This course is designed to help student teachers understand the theoretical and practical considerations regarding motivating pupils in the classroom. and the relationship and role of the teacher as a helper and teacher-counsellor. and theories of motivation. self-management. A broad spectrum of techniques and approaches in group guidance will also be presented. Throughout the course. basic helping skills.

AED382 Designing ICT-Based Constructivist Activities This course provides an opportunity for participants to learn constructivist learning theory and examples of how ICT tools may be used to support constructivist learning. Opportunities will be provided for participants to design ICT enhanced learning activities using constructivist approach. 365 . We will also discuss how to assess constructivist learning. the role of the teachers in designing and evaluating the environment. and the use of scaffolds in the online discussion environment to facilitate critical thinking skills. AED381 Facilitating Asynchronous Online Discussion This course will discuss how asynchronous online discussion can be used as an effective instructional strategy within primary and secondary school contexts. The topics covered will include the integration of the asynchronous collaborative online discussion environment with the face-to-face approach.GE: Education Studies effective strategies to motivate reluctant and disinterested learners and designing and evaluating motivational strategies in the classroom.

the participants will be equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills to conduct Project Work (PW) via the online and face-to face classroom setting. AED480 Problems and Issues in Singapore Education A socio-historical study of problems and issues in Singapore Education. hold online meetings. co-operative 366 .GE: Education Studies AED383 Facilitating and Managing ICT-Supported Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Projects The participants will be introduced to the key features of an interdisciplinary project. reform and school effectiveness. At the end of this course. conduct on-going group and individual reflections and maintain the project file in the online environment. school drop-outs and the educational disadvantages of working class children. skills of collaborative learning and scaffolding tools to design projects for primary and secondary schools. They are expected to work in groups of 4-5 to design the project. subjectcentred and student-centred curriculum.

and constructive critique of work produced. examining the use of language for both instructional and regulative purposes. AAE281 Teacher Talk written) in the language classroom. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - AAE280 Creative Writing Workshop approach to develop writing skills of student teachers in aspects of poetry.GE: English Language General Elective: English Language Category/ Subject English Language Course Code AAE280 AAE281 AAE282 AAE283 Title Creative Writing Teacher Talk Drama in Language Education Literature No. A practically oriented course that will enable student teachers to apply theory to practice in order to enhance self-awareness and effectiveness in teaching through the good use of language. Exploration of good models. student own writing process. 367 . fiction or drama. Analysis of teacher talk through video/ transcripts.

historical fiction. fantasy literature. Literary selections may include classic as well as contemporary works. hot-seating. Development of a language curriculum incorporating drama. focusing on techniques such as improvisation. 368 . fairy tales. and considering their relevance to the linguistic and imaginative development of young readers. myths. role-play and mime to enhance learning and creativity. themes and conventions. poetry and picture books from the West. Areas of study may include oral and written traditions. focusing on important traditions. Asia and other parts of the world. fables.GE: English Language AAE282 Drama in Language Education Introduction to the use of drama in the language classroom. AAE283 literature.

Naipaul. The following issues among others will be of particular significance: the relationship between travel and imperialism. focusing on the characteristics of the genre.S. the function of intensity of expression and the role of originality. It will explore the ways in which writers represent the encounter with the Other and the foreign as well as the notion of travel itself. V. AAR281 Poetry Workshop Examination of variety of possible forms of poetic creativity. Pico Iyer. of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites - AAR280 Literature and Travel This course considers the significance of travel in different periods and across various geographical spaces. Mary Kingsley. voice and control. Writers to be considered include Olaudah Equiano. Jamaica Kincaid. rhythm. Student teachers are invited to experiment in original and individualistic ways. travel as education. and the impact of travel on racial and gendered identities. stretching the range of use of language. Vikram Seth and Bruce Chatwin. the production and performance of the self in travel.GE: English Literature General Elective: English Literature Category/ Subject English Literature Course Code AAR280 AAR281 AAR282 AAR283 AAR284 Title Literature and Travel Poetry Workshop Short Story Workshop Literature and Technology The City in Literature No. 369 . Travel for pleasure and adventure will be considered together with other forms of travel like the pilgrimage and forced migration.

Urbanisation. centralised efficiency. alienation and depersonalisation. classic science fiction novels with close links to film: (and its film Do Andriods Dream of Electric Sheep? (the source of Blade Runner). AAR284 The City in Literature The representation of the city in literature and art. Is there a common bias against an accurate representation of the city? 370 . educational advancement. independence of thought and social harmony. AAR283 Literature & Technology This course introduces student teachers to the study of science fiction through an examination of major Sci-Fi films from 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) to the present. commercial growth. and Solaris (in relation to the two films made from it). industrialisation. We will be primarily concerned with the nature and politics of science fiction as a genre (or genres) and with the differences between literary and cinematic science fiction. We will also read three short.GE: English Literature AAR282 Short Story Workshop This course examines the demands of the short story form. What is a short story? What makes a good short story? How do you work on characters or engage the readers in a short story? Student teachers write their own stories as a way of responding to these questions.

371 .GE: Geography General Electives: Geography Category/ Subject Course Code AAG180 Title No. In particular. 3 AAG280 3 Geography AAG281 3 AAG282 3 AAG283 3 AAG284 Development and Nature Conservation 3 AAG180 Human Impact on the Environment This course will introduce the earth as a dynamic system consisting of interacting spheres that define t related environmental change in the atmosphere and ecosphere from the late Quaternary (about 12. Emphasis will be placed on the types.000 years ago) to present will be examined. evidences and causal mechanisms of these environmental changes. Perceptions Japan : Place. of AUs 3 Prerequisites Non-Geog Student Teachers Non-Geog Student Teachers Non-Geog Student Teachers Non-Geog Student Teachers Non-Geog Student Teachers Non-Geog Student Teachers Non-Geog Student Teachers Human Impact on the Environment AAG181 Singapore in Asia Urban Environmental Management in the Asia-Pacific Introduction to Geographical Information Systems Contemporary Chinese Cities Understanding People. the role of human on these changes will be discussed.

there are a growing list of environmental and sustainability issues that confront our urban societies today because of global development and competition . With the economic boom in China and India that has been driving substantive and major changes in urban consumption and production.local environmental degradation and the local responses as well as implications arising from such competitiveness. regional and local debates about environmental issues and sustainable development that are relevant to urban societies in the Asia-Pacific region. implications of cross-straits relations between China and Taiwan. environmental and technical in the study of Singapore in the Asian region. economic liberalization in China and India among others. AAG280 Urban Environmental Management in the AsiaPacific The lectures and seminars designed for this course aim to inform course participants of the current global.SARS.GE: Geography AAG181 Singapore in Asia This course integrates geographical skills and different study strands human. terrorism. The course is also aimed at encouraging a critical and analytical engagement by the course participants with the issues and policy implications that arise from the debates that are going on in sustainable development. 372 . haze. The global positioning of Singapore and the contemporary challenges to development that it faces in a highly competitive and fast changing global environment will be the framework for the study of issues and problems that have emerged . bird flu.

manipulating. storing. Basic skills for collecting. The first part covers the geography of resource distribution and production as well as population dynamics and governance regimes. The second part looks into current changes and problems of 373 . AAG283 Understanding Japan: Place. environmental impacts. economic and social transformations. People. From hukou Chinese cities have since opened up vast opportunities to f nationals.GE: Geography AAG281 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems Conceptual and technical foundations of geographical information systems (GIS). Hands-on practical exercises using GIS with real world data. Perceptions The course introduces background knowledge of Japan and the perceptions of other East Asian nations towards the country. It comprises three parts. floating population and rising urban poverty are used as case studies. global-local integration and dilemmas of regulated planning versus unregulated urban sprawl. Urban and regional planning. AAG282 Contemporary Chinese Cities The course examines the rapid urban change following market reforms in the 1980s. natural resource management. Issues of investment policies. analysing and presenting geo-spatial data and information. whose dynamic responses to market expansion have led to dramatic spatial. environmental planning through the implementation of modern GIS software.

The third section examines the contrasting views toward the island state the appreciation of its arts and culture. ikebana. with associated increase in the number of people residing in the urban centres. the condemnation of its aggression in the past and the perceived threat of its military popularization of Japanese traditional culture and practices in East Asian nations such as chado. urban planning and conservation. restoration of degraded ecosystem. This increase in urban centres has led to dwindling of natural areas with severe consequences on the natural environment. nature area management.GE: Geography development including the ongoing process of political. AAG284 Development and Nature Conservation The rate of urbanization has escalated in the last century. movies and songs and controversies with regard to the roles Japan will and can play in the region. Case studies from the region will be discussed. especially in the humid tropics. economic and social transformations. judo and Japanese cuisine. 374 . kendo. This course deals with the impacts of rapid urban growth on the natural environment and discusses the issues related to ecosystem conservation.

growth of our port. Topics covered include the founding of Singapore. origins of our plural society. merger and separation. and political and economic transformation after 1965. the Japanese occupation.GE: History General Elective: History Category/ Subject Course Code AAH180 AAH181 AAH182 AAH183 AAH184 History AAH185 AAH280 AAH281 AAH282 AAH283 Biography and History Women in History Introduction to International Relations Tradition and Revolt in Southeast Asia Contemporary International History 3 3 3 3 3 Title No. 375 . of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites Non-History Student Teachers Non-History Student Teachers Non-History Student Teachers - Contemporary Singapore Museum Studies An Interdisciplinary Approach Topics in Military History Film and Propaganda Film as History AAH180 Contemporary Singapore Provides student teachers unfamiliar with the history of Singapore with an overview of how our past is linked with our present. the conflicts of the tumultuous 1950s.

can be used in looking at the past. and how history has been represented in film.GE: History AAH181 Museum Studies An Interdisciplinary Approach Overview of historical background and development of museums. Other mediums. the United States. How museums conceptualise their exhibitions to make them interactive and engaging. Social Studies and Art. and the world wars. AAH183 Film and Propaganda The use of film as propaganda in the twentieth century. such as film. The emphasis is on 376 . The history of cinema and television is also studied. Conduct effective fieldtrips to museums and develop interdisciplinary learning experiences drawing from the disciplines of History. AAH184 Film as History History does not only include examining the written word. AAH182 Topics in Military History The chronology and theme focus of this course will vary from year to year. Fieldtrips will be conducted to the various museums in the Museum Roundtable. Primary emphasis on the military history of early modern and modern Europe. Focuses on how Hitler and the Nazis used film for propaganda purposes in Germany and traces the skilful manipulation of film during wartime for propaganda purposes by leaders of other nations as well as those of Nazi Germany. This course covers the use of film as a source for exploring the past.

letters. The skills of historical interpretation and writing history are taught. social. as well as teaching student teachers how films are created. magazines. Biographers employ a range of interesting methods to discover their subject. Themes and sample case-studies may be taken from a number of periods and places for comparisons of different traditions. films. and religions in order to examine how these affect the family. cultures. the memories of the subject and those of others who knew him or her are just a few. AAH185 Biography and History Biography is one of the most popular and enjoyable ways of reading history. economic and political roles and contributions of women. memoirs and diaries. 377 .GE: History empowering student teachers to interpret films in critical and analytical ways. Studies how life AAH280 Women in History Seeks to redress an imbalance in history by looking How women are viewed and written about will be examined through the use of secondary and primary sources such as newspapers.

Philippines.GE: History AAH281 Introduction to International Relations Basic introduction to international relations and key issues governing world politics. peasant uprisings and peasant wars under colonial rule are considered to be efforts to check the intrusive influence of modernization and to restore the traditional values which seemingly reflect a golden age in the perceptions of an overwhelmingly rural population in Southeast Asia. The large-scale wars and rebellions after decolonization suggest a radical shift tactics before rapid economic growth pacified the rural population. and Marxism. Emphasis is on three core international relations theories. peasant uprisings and peasant wars with reference to the experience of rural population in Indonesia. 378 . AAH282 Tradition and Revolt in Southeast Asia The rural protests. Burma. and in relation to the themes of conflict. Key issues and theories are analysed in relation to past and current events. Malaya. liberalism. Vietnam and Cambodia between 1880 and 1980. namely: realism. This course will examine how far notions such as tradition and rebellion capture the nature of pe responses towards the rapid socio-economic changes under colonial rule. change and cooperation. The course will explore different ways of acquiring an understanding of rural protests.

so prospective students should refer to the HSSE website for current details.GE: History AAH283 Contemporary International History This course looks at some of the main controversies in twentieth century international history. the end of empire in a colony. It will include aspects of international relations such as decision-making and the factors and processes that affect it. 379 . terrorist groups. and clashes between ideologies and beliefs. The unifying themes may vary according to recent events. and recent American foreign policy. right up to the present day. the decision to drop the atomic bomb. Typical topics might include the origins of a war. the history of a current or recent conflict. an international or supranational organisation.

educational attainment and cultural heritage. By highlighting some of the key issues that are discoursed in Malay society such as Malay ideas on development. Practise in reading and writing Jawi script. Jawi as in newspaper and Malay classics. of AUs 3 3 3 PreRequisites or equivalent. 380 . adaptation and accommodation that are taking place in the Malay society as they encounter the process of modernization and urbanization. Not open to students whose AS is Malay Language - AAD280 Jawi Reading and Writing Literacy in Jawi script.GE: Malay Language & Literature General Electives: Malay Language & Literature Year 2 3 4 Course Code AAD280 AAF381 AAF481 Title Jawi Reading and Writing Contemporary Malay Society Muslim Intellectual Traditions No. we shall have insights into the dynamics and the negotiations for advancing reforms and addressing some of the challenges and problems that confront the Malay society. AAF381 Contemporary Malay Society The course aims to teach student teachers about the aspects of change.

381 . with a particular attention to explain how historical. diagnosis of human predicament and the moral-ethical imperatives in the search for truth and rationality.GE: Malay Language & Literature AAF481 Muslim Intellectual Traditions The course aims to teach students teachers about the diversities and the dynamics of Muslim intellectual traditions that have evolved throughout history. political and ideological factors have shaped an intellectual tradition. socio-cultural. Highlighting the functions of intellectual traditions should make student teachers aware of the components of intellectual culture that include the notion of advancement.

applications and examples of distributions. The use of appropriate statistical software. This elective is not for student teachers taking AS Mathematics. of AUs 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites NonAS:Math student teachers - Mathematics AAM180 History of Mathematics Open to both mathematics and non-mathematics majors. AAM181 Statistics Around Us Introductory course in statistics for student teachers who need to understand basic statistical concepts in their own field of study. e. This will highlight the historical development of certain branches of mathematics. generation of random numbers. geometric distributions etc. Student teachers survey the personal lifestyles and philosophies of several well-known mathematicians. Topics covered include: sampling techniques. from Archimedes to Einstein. 382 . Poisson.GE: Mathematics General Elective: Mathematics Category/ Subject Course Code AAM180 AAM181 AAM182 AAM183 Title History of Mathematics Statistics Around Us Introductory Mathematics Understanding Higher Mathematics No.g. binomial.

Linear transformation from R n to Rm. Euclidean n-space. partial fractions. dot product. cross product. Differentiation and applications of differentiation. 383 . CauchySchwarz inequality. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. functions and relations. binomial theorem. lines and planes in 3-space. co-ordinate geometry. norm of a vector.GE: Mathematics AAM182 Introductory Mathematics Basically a bridging course for AS mathematics student teachers who require it. Integration and applications of integration. standard matrices. First and second order ordinary differential equations. methods of proofs. Vectors in 2-space and 3space. Topics to be covered are: number systems. Student teachers will also be introduced to a Computer Algebra System (or CAS) and its applications in the topics discussed. matrices and vectors. complex numbers.orthogonality. trigonometry. AAM183 Understanding Higher Mathematics Limits and continuity. vector operations. dot product. set theory. probability and statistics.

of AUs 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites AAI282 or audition AAI382 or audition - Music Note : Student teachers who wish to take up any Music General Elective must either satisfy stated pre-requisites for specified courses or.GE: Music General Elective: Music Category/ Subject Course Code AAI280 AAI281 AAI282 AAI283 AAI380 AAI381 AAI382 AAI383 AAI384 AAI385 AAI386 AAI387 AAI388 AAI389 AAI390 AAI391 AAI480 AAI481 AAI482 AAI483 AAI484 AAI485 AAI486 AAI487 AAI488 AAI489 AAI490 Title Improvisation Movement Studies Percussion Studies in Indonesian Gamelan I Studies in Indian Music Studies in Japanese Music Classical Guitar I Choir I Choir II Voice Recording Band I Band II Further Percussion Music Criticism and Writing Studies in Indonesian Gamelan II Studies in Chinese Music Studies in Malay Music Classical Guitar II Choir III Choir IV Studies in Pop and Jazz Music and Acoustics Band III Band IV Advanced Conducting Shakuhachi Ensemble No. must attend the first session for that elective. where pre-requisites are not specified. 384 . called an audition. to determine their suitability.

will be complemented by practical instruction in playing Javanese gamelan music. Audiovisual illustrations. AAI281 Movement Studies Revolves around some of the practical possibilities of making the body respond to music. and the relevance of Gamelan playing. and teaching in the context of Singapore. This course introduces the basic playing techniques and song forms of Gamelan and its function in Indonesian society. learning. which will emphasize cultural and contextual approaches. playing and reflecting about its practice. 385 . AAI283 Studies in Indonesian Gamelan I The objective of Studies in Indonesian Gamelan I is to enable students to enjoy Indonesian gamelan music by listening to. AAI282 Percussion A practically-based course in percussion playing and developing skills on a range of instruments as well as in ensemble playing. Knowledge of traditional gamelan as well as the gamelan in contemporary understanding of the region.GE: Music AAI280 Improvisation A practically-based course in the various musical and thought processes that underpin improvisation as a music-making activity with reference to a number of cultural contexts. its role in the music scene of Southeast Asia.

AAI382 Classical Guitar 1 guitar. AAI384 Choir II Further experience of the choral repertoire and of vocal techniques in the NIE Choir. preparation and presentation of concerts. 386 . Study of choral repertoire from all periods. Largely a practical based course.GE: Music AAI380 Studies in Indian Music A practical based course on both North and South Indian classical music. AAI381 Studies in Japanese Music Involves one or two traditional ensemble instruments. concentration on vocal and choral techniques as related to musical styles. Reading of basic notation and understanding and recognising chord symbols. koto or shakuhachi. sitar and using Indian vocal techniques. The study involves developing instrumental skills in performing on the tablas. Music activity will involve learning and developing skills in performing on the respective instruments as well as in ensemble playing. AAI383 Choir I Participation in the NIE Choir.

The nature and operation of studio equipment. both original and transcribed. AAI389 Further Percussion A further exploration and experience in percussion playing and developing skills on a range of percussion instruments as well as in ensemble playing. for the modern band. Recording live music.GE: Music AAI385 Voice Fundamentals and techniques of singing. including premieres of new works. AAI388 Band II Further participation in the symphonic band to perform the fine band literature. Study of the basic technique. 387 . AAI386 Recording Basic acoustics and Engineering Theory. repertoire and function of the vocal mechanism. Exposure visits to various professional studios. Differences in commonly-used recording techniques. The band provides performers with a wide range of repertoire. The process of recording. AAI387 Band I Rehearsing and performing in the symphonic band. Assembling a domestic playback system.

AAI391 Studies in Indonesian Gamelan II Studies in Indonesian Gamelan II will involve. Ensemble playing with other Chinese musical instruments. changing cultural and social contexts and functions. This course will continue to teach practical methods of the didactics of Indonesian gamelan practices. besides listening to. as too place and relevance. society in Singapore.GE: Music AAI390 Music Criticism and Writing This course seeks to generate an environment of critical thinking and discourse about music and the ability to communicate these thoughts effectively to a wider public through print media and medium. Studies in Indonesian gamelan II poses prospects for an informed perspective and understanding of practices which have been co-opted into the socio-cultural fabric of the Malay community and by extension. Contemporary reflections will also deal with the nature role and identity. playing and reflecting about its practice. musical and cultural including contemporary compositions within the tradition as well as compositions which respond by adoption and adaptation of the tradition. a more detailed study of the different musical aesthetics. Playing techniques and skill development. AAI480 Studies in Chinese Music The study of performance of Chinese flute in ensemble playing. of teaching the Indonesian Gamelan in Singapore schools. 388 .

AAI482 Classical Guitar II Advanced techniques in guitar performance will be taught. AAI484 Choir IV Further experience of the choral repertoire and of vocal techniques in the NIE Choir or the NIE Singers. AAI485 Studies in Pop & Jazz A study of the development of popular music in the late 20th century from its European and AfroAmerican roots. AAI483 Choir III Further experience of the choral repertoire and of vocal techniques. Performance techniques will involve acquiring skills in interlocking rhythmic variations and doing group performances. student teachers may be assigned to participate in the NIE Choir or. the NIE Singers. an a cappella vocal ensemble which consists of a selective group of singers. This is largely a practical based course. Based on individual singing proficiency. 389 .GE: Music AAI481 Studies in Malay Music Learning and playing of the Malay framed drums. kompang and the Malay lute gambus. Development of a broadly based classical guitar repertoire.

AAI490 Shakuhachi Ensemble An exploration of the practical-based approach to the shakuhachi in both individual and ensemble playing based on repertorie of both traditional and popular genres. AAI489 Advanced Conducting Development of knowledge and skills at a professional level. AAI488 Band IV Advanced experience in performing the band literature which requires individual musicianship and advanced playing techniques. AAI487 Band III Continued experience in the symphonic band. 390 . various periods and composers art. musical analysis and practice in conducting.GE: Music AAI486 Music and Acoustics A sounds and deals with the aspects of perception. propagation and transmission of sound as well as an exploration of acoustics of musical instruments. To perform literature of the highest aesthetic value with emphasis on major original works.

To provide student teachers with sufficient background and information to think about how to approach the environment and the hazards posed rather than just provide simple AGE181 Appreciation and Identification of Gemstones With gemstones as the theme. of AUs 3 of 3 3 3 3 of 3 3 3 3 3 to 2 Prerequisites - AGE180 Environmental Science Provides a comprehensive introduction to a complex interdisciplinary field. reflection and refraction of light. and crystal structure. selecting the gemstone for the occasion. (b) physics: density. chemical compositions. student teachers will be able to learn (a) chemistry: elements and compounds. toughness. hardness. ivory and pearls from animals. and luminescence. weights. (d) aesthetics and fashion: cutting patterns of gemstones. dispersion of light. (c) biology: studies on organic gemstones such as amber from plants. (e) geology: origin of 391 .GE: Natural Sciences General Elective: Natural Sciences Category/ Subject Course Code AGE180 AGE181 AGE183 AGE184 AGE185 Natural Sciences AGE186 AGE187 AGE188 AGE189 AGE190 AGE191 Title Environmental Science Appreciation and Identification Gemstones Human Diversity The Living World Food Biotechnology Conservation and Management Natural Habitats Economic Botany Life Sciences and Man Animal Behaviour Life in the Marine Environment Life Sciences: From Genes Genomes No.

Prevailing theories of where humans came from and why humans have been so successful as a species. mining methods. Approach taken is one of progression: . and in photosynthesis. (f) geography: distribution of gemstones. how the living cell including your body cells use the chemical energy to power their lives. paleontology. 392 . and genetics will be highlighted in this multi-disciplinary field.GE: Natural Sciences gemstones. Diverse range of methodologies such as archaeology. linguistics. AGE183 Human Diversity Questions on human origin and diversification. Furthermore. The later part of this course will tell you a story how green cells capture energy from sunlight to make chemical energy. from single cell to multicellular organism.the origin of life. mineral deposits. They will also learn to appreciate the diversity and usefulness of gemstones in homes.growth. Energy and life processes of cells . movement and transport of molecules across membranes. for personal development. and industries. and optics in primary or secondary school levels. from continuity of life to the diversity of life. AGE184 The Living World Teaching life science by telling its story. the student teachers will be more aware of imitations and synthetic gemstones when they wish to purchase one. and (g) science education: knowledge in properties of gemstones can be used to teach basic concepts in science such as chemical compositions.

Singapore. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food. juice and alcohol production (wine. beer). The conflicting demands between development and economic growth on one hand and conservation on the other. The management of natural areas -. and economic needs. Traditional ways of using and managing plants.such as mangrove swamps.(olive. AGE186 Conservation Habitats and Management of Natural Natural areas and the means by which they can be best preserved and managed. vegetable. tempeh) and meatprocessing (sausages. baking industry.and the dilemmas for policy makers to maintain a balance between ecosystem. Recent advances in miniaturisation. as an excellent case study. Plants of actual and potential uses as food. sometimes. kimchi. primary and secondary forests and rocky shorelines -. AGE187 Economic Botany Economically important plants and the dependence of man on plants. recreation. yoghurt).GE: Natural Sciences AGE185 Food Biotechnology Uses of micro-organisms in producing and modifying food. difficult decisions. salami) plants. where these issues have been considered and resolved through. plants as renewable 393 . fibre and timber. medicine. Monitoring food safety. automation and molecular methods for rapid detection of pathogenic and genetically modified organisms in food. Food fermentation and enzyme technologies in: dairy industry (cultured milk products.

the nature of the epipelagic food 394 . Living in the epipelagic. continental shelf and coral reefs as ecosystems. covering areas such as antibiotics. AGE188 Life Sciences and Man The success of biological science breakthroughs and its impact on man. current trends in bioprospecting for novel plant products of pharmaceutical and industrial value. what are the costs and benefits of these behaviours? How do animals pilot or navigate from one place to another? How do chimpanzees design tools and megatools? How are some behaviours learned? What is the size-maximization principle? Is behaviour adaptive? How do we explain animal behaviours? How do ethologists study animal behavior? How can we observe or design some lab and field experiments to study animal behaviour? AGE190 Life in the Marine Environment The ocean as habitat. Economic uses of estuaries. the green revolution and the latest in the world of molecular and DNA AGE189 Animal Behaviour Why do bees dance? Why do some birds lay eggs in cide. the territory which sex drives this behaviour. Focus is broad based.GE: Natural Sciences resources. Estuaries. Intertidal shore communities and soft-bottom communities. Adaptations of marine life. total defence of a piece of real estate. suicidal reproduction. classification of the marine environment.

genes and molecular genetics. Resources from the sea. life sciences Inc. human diseases. AGE191 Life Sciences: From Genes to Genomes A general course for degree student teachers to introduce them to some basic concepts and current issues in the life sciences. 395 . the chemistry of life.. social and ethical concerns of GMOs and impact of GMOs on the managin developments in the life sciences). Topics for the course include: What is life sciences all about & why should we care? Plagues. the growing of pest resistant crops in developed & developing counties). sex.GE: Natural Sciences webs. biotechnology applications. clones and generically modifies organisms. plant diseases. industrial plants. gene therapy. Life in the abyss and deep-sea hot springs. plant breeding & the green revolution. life science research & business opportunities. recombinant DNA Technology. and transgenic animals. basic cell biology. plants as factories). and mad cows. bird flus.

Tamils and Indians groups in Singapore. Culture and Customs (Traditions and Philosophy). of AUs 3 Prerequisites - AGE182 An Introduction to Indian Culture and Customs Geographical and Social Developments. 396 . Indian Beliefs. Language and Literature Developments. Indian Lifestyles. Indian Arts. Folklore and Scientific Thoughts. Historical Perspectives of India.GE: Tamil Culture General Elective: Tamil Culture Category/ Subject Tamil Culture Course Code AGE182 Title An Introduction to Indian Culture and Customs No.

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