B4EE – Unit 2, Session 2 planning template Blog post template Use this template as a basis to guide you through

assisting students in creating their first blog posts(s). You can use this template in conjunction with the Blog Post Worksheet: http://www.scribd.com/doc/15599512/Blog-Post-Worksheet-Convince-and-Convert Download and save this template for your own reference. Note: Blog posts are traditionally 250-500 words in length.

1.

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Outline your blog

Before getting started, take 5 minutes to write down your blog’s audience, your blog’s topic, and your blog’s goal. What are your readers needs? Do they need facts? Do you want to increase their understanding of different sides of an argument? Do you have information to share? Are you opening or contributing to a debate? Make your topic your own – put your own spin on it! Keep your post simple with one topic per post. Ask yourself what are you trying to accomplish in this post? What is your goal?

NOTES:

This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource through the Blogging for Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge University College Falmouth and the B4EE project.

2. Create a meaningful title – one the ‘says what’s in the tin’
Your title should act like a short, concise, synopsis for your post. It should be capable of standing on its own – end being entirely self-explanatory. Funny, clever and witty titles are all well and good…but not if they cause confusion, don’t translate very well or confuses your readers. Make your title pop. Read the following tips…


What’s in it for me? – if a reader has a need to know why increasing innovation funding is good, put it in the title: 5 Reasons to Fund Innovation Create controversy or debate – explore two+ sides of an argument Ask a question – Is a fall in literacy rates a cause for concern? Personalise titles – How You Can Advocate for Widening Participation in Higher Education Use keywords – when readers search for content online, they use keywords and key phrases such as “science technology innovation,” “performance sportswear design,” and “new ceramics firing methods.” Use these keywords in your title so the blog will pop up when your reader searches for the topic. Use power words – intrigue your readers and use action words like “discover” and “advocate”

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NOTES:

3.

Write a strong first sentence

Following your title, use an opening line that draws your reader into the rest of your post. Your first sentence acts as a very short abstract. An opening line does not have to be one sentence – it can be a couple of sentences to help jump-start your post. Here are a few tips… • • • • • Ask your reader a question Tell a story – explore two sides of an argument Make a controversial statement Use statistics Start with a quote

NOTES:
This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource through the Blogging for Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge University College Falmouth and the B4EE project.

4.
• • •

Make your main point(s) count

You’ve crafted a framework for your blog and got your readers interested. Now it is time to articulate your content with some style! Brainstorm a main point/points that are relevant to your topic and that you want to the reader to know Support these main points with context, supporting evidence, sub points, etc. Have these points lead to your Call to Action

NOTES:

5.

Call(s) to action

There might be times when you want to mobilise and engage your readers to take action! Make this easy for them. In a few short sentences, write one tangible and easy action step for your readers. The action step can be as easy as copying a link for readers to learn more OR letting them know where to sign a petition OR to sign up for membership or a listserv OR a guide for how to talk to legislators. Here are some tips… • • • • • Know what action you want your reader to take One Call to Action per post Make it simple and achievable Clearly express what you want people to do Lead your readers to the action with your blog narrative.

NOTES:
This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource through the Blogging for Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge University College Falmouth and the B4EE project.

6.

Adding depth

After writing your post and doing some reflecting, see if you can add depth into your piece without making it too lengthy or wordy. Concise and to the point is powerful! NOTES:

This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource through the Blogging for Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge University College Falmouth and the B4EE project.

Blog worksheet 1.Outline your blog…
Audienc e: Topic: Goal:

2.Blog Title:
Is my title relevant to my audience? Does my title actively reflect my topic? Does my title GRAB my attention? Does my title give a sneak preview to my goals?

3.Opening lines …
1 to 3 sentences:

Does my opening line foreshadow the rest of my blog? Does my opening line cause interest?

4.Your main points

(spend 4-5+ sentences on each point depending on how many you have – remember less can be more!)…

Point #1 + supporting information Point #2 + supporting information Point #3 + supporting information
This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource through the Blogging for Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge University College Falmouth and the B4EE project.

5.Call to action…
Is my call to action a realistic request for my readers? Does my call to action benefit my reader? Is my call to action clear in what I am asking?

This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource through the Blogging for Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge University College Falmouth and the B4EE project.

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