Chinese Literature

,
Ancient and Classical
by
Andre Levy
translated by
William H. Nienhauser,Jr.
Indiana University Press
Bloomington and Indianapolis
This book is a publication of
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© 2000 by Andre Levy
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No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form
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Manufactured in the United States of America
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Levy, Andre, date
[La litterature chinoise ancienne et classique. English]
Chinese literature, ancient and classical I by Andre Levy ;
translated by William H. Nienhauser, Jr.
p. em.
Includes index.
ISBN 0-253-33656-2 (alk. paper)
I. Chinese and criticism. I. Nienhauser,
William H. II. Title.
PL2266.L48 2000
895.1 99-34024
I 2 3 4 5 05 04 03 02 01 00
For my own early translators of French,
Daniel and Susan
Contents
Preface ix
Introduction 1
Chapter 1: Antiquity 5
I. Origins
II. "Let a hundred flowers bloom, Let a hundred schools of thought
contend!"
1. Mo zi and the Logicians
2. Legalism
3. The Fathers of Taoism
III. The Confucian Classics
Chapter 2: Prose 31
I. Narrative Art and Historical Records
II. The Return of the "Ancient Style"
III. The Golden Age of Trivial Literature
IV. Literary Criticism
Chapter 3: Poetry 61
I. The Two Sources of Ancient Poetry
1. The Songs of Chu
2. Poetry of the Han Court
II. The Golden Age of Chinese Poetry
1. From Aesthetic Emotion to Metaphysical Flights
2. The Age of Maturity
3. The Late Tang
III. The Triumph of Genres in Song
Chapter 4: Literature of Entertainment: The Novel and Theater 105
I. Narrative Literature Written in Classical Chinese
II. The Theater
1. The Opera-theater of the North
2. The Opera-theater of the South
III. The Novel
1. Oral Literature
2. Stories and Novellas
3. The "Long NoveY' or Saga
Index 151
Translator's Preface
I first became·interested in translating Andre Levy's history of
Chinese literature, La litterature chinoise ancienne et classique (Paris:
Presses Universitaires de France, 1991), in 1996, after finding it in a
bookshop in Paris. I read sections and was intrigued by Professor
Levy's approach, which was modeled on literary genres rather than
political eras. I immediately thought about translating parts of the
book for my graduate History of Chinese Literature class at the
University of Wisconsin, a class in which the importance of dynastic
change was also downplayed.
Like many plans, this one was set aside. Last spring, however,
when the panel on our field's desiderata headed by David Rolston at
the 1998 Association for Asian Studies Meeting pronounced that one
of the major needs was for a concise history of Chinese literature in
about 125 pages (the exact length of Professor Levy's o r i g i ~ a l text), I
revived my interest in this translation. I proposed the book to John
Gallman, Director of Indiana University Press, and john approved it
almost immediately-but, not before warning me that this kind of
project can take much more time than the translator originally
envisions. Although I respectjohn's experience and knowledge in
publishing, I was sure I would prove the exception. After all, what
kind of trouble could a little book of 125 pages cause?
I soon found out. Professor Levy had originally written a, much
longer manuscript, which was to be published as a supplementary
volume to Odile Kaltenmark-Ghequier's La Litterature chinoise (Paris:
Presses Universitaires de France, 1948)
1
in the Qjle sais-je? (What Do
I Know?) series. This concept, however, was soon abandoned, and it
1
Several decades ago Anne-Marie Geoghegan translated this volume as
Chinese Literature(New York: Walker, 1964).
X Translator's Preface
was decided to publish the Levy "appendix" as a separate volume-in
125 pages. Professor Levy was then asked to cut his manuscript by
one-third. As a result, he was sometimes forced to presume in his
audience certain knowledge that some readers of this book-for
example, undergraduate students or interested parties with little
background in Chinese literature-may not have. For this reason,
working carefully with Professor Levy, I have added (or revived) a
number of contextual sentences with these readers in mind. More
information on many of the authors and works discussed in this
history can be found in the entries in The Indiana Companion to
Traditional Chinese Literature (volumes 1 and 2; Bloomington: Indiana
University Press, 1986 and 1998). Detailed references to these entries
and other relevant studies can be found in the "Suggested Further
Reading" sections at the end of each chapter (where the abbreviated
reference Indiana Companion refers to these two volumes).
I also discovered that re-translating Professor Levy's French
translations of Chinese texts sometimes resulted in renditions that
were too far from the original, even in this age of "distance education."
So I have translated almost all of the more than 120 excerpts of
original works directly from the original Chinese, using Professor
Levy's French versions as a guide wherever possible.
All this was done with the blessing and cooperation of the
author. Indeed, among the many people who helped with this
translation, I would like to especially thank Professor Andre Levy for
his unflinching interest in and support of this translation. Professor
Levy has read much of the English version, including all passages
that I knew were problematic (there are no doubt others!), and offered
comments in a long series of letters over the past few months. Without
his assistance the translation would never have been completed. Here
in Madison, a trio of graduate students have helped me with questions
Translator's Preface
xi
about the Chinese texts: Mr. Cao Weiguo Ms. Huang
Shu-yuang and Mr. Shang Cheng [;16I¥. They saved me
from innumerable errors and did their work with interest and high
spirits. Mr. Cao also helped by pointing out problems in my
interpretation of the original ,French. Mr. Scott W. Galer of Ricks
College read the entire manuscript and offered a number of invaluable
comments. My wife, Judith, was unrelenting in her demands on behalf
of the general reader. The most careful reader was, however, Jane
Lyle of Indiana University Press, who painstakingly copy-edited the
text. If there is a literary style to this translation, it is due to her
efforts.
My thanks, too, to the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation which
supported me in Berlin through the summer of 1997 when I first
read Professor Levy's text, and especially to John Gallman, who
stood behind this project from the beginning.
Madison, Wisconsin, 16 February 1999 (Lunar New Year's Day)
Chinese Literature,
Ancient and Classical
Introduction
Could one still write, as Odile Kaltenmark-Ghequier did in 1948 in
the What Do I Know series Number 296, which preceded this book, that
"the study of Chinese literature, long neglected by the Occident, is still in
its infancy?"
1
Yes and no. There has been some spectacular progress and
some foundering. At any rate, beginning at the start of the twentieth
century, it was Westerners who were the first -followed by the Japanese,
before the Chinese themselves-to produce histories of Chinese literature.
Not that the Chinese tradition had not taken note of an evolution in
literary genres, but the prestige of wen )(, signifying both "literature" and
"civilization," placed it above history-anthologies, compilations, and
catalogues were preferred. Moreover, the popular side of literature-fiction,
drama, and oral verse-because of its lack of "seriousness" or its "vulgarity,"
was not judged dignified enough to be considered wen.
Our goal is not to add a new work to an already lengthy list of
histories of Chinese literature, nor to supplant the excellent summary by
Odile Kaltenmark-Ghequier which had the impossible task of presenting
a history of Chinese literature in about a hundred pages. Our desire
would be rather to complement the list by presenting the reader with a
different approach, one more concrete, less dependent on the dynastic
chronology. Rather than a history, it is a picture-inevitably incomplete-
of Chinese literature of the past that this little book offers.
Chinese "high" literature is based on a "hard core" of classical
training consisting of the memorization of texts, nearly a half-million
characters for every candidate who reaches the highest competitive
examinations. We might see the classical art of writing as the arranging,
in an appropriate and astute fashion, of lines recalled by memory, something
1
0dile Kaltenmark-Ghequier, "Introduction," La litterature chinoise (Paris:
Presses Universitaires de France, 1948}, p. 5; "Que sais-je," no. 296.
2 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
that came almost automatically to traditional Chinese intellectuals.
The goal of these writers was not solely literary. They hoped through
their writings to earn a reputation that would help them find support for
their efforts to pass the imperial civil-service examinations and thereby
eventually win a position at court. Although there were earlier tests leading
to political advancement, the system that existed nearly until the end of
the imperial period in 1911 was known as the jinshi "presented
scholar" examination (because successful candidates were "presented" to
the emperor), and was developed during the late seventh and early eighth
centuries A.D. It required the writing of poetry and essays on themes set
by the examiners. Successful candidates were then given minor positions
in the bureaucracy. Thus the memorization of a huge corpus of earlier
literature and the ability to compose on the spot became the major
qualifications for political office through most of the period from the
eighth until the early twentieth centuries.
These examinations, and literature in general, were composed in a
classical, standard language comparable to Latin in the West. This
"classical" language persisted by opposing writing to speech through a
sort of partial bilingualism. The strict proscription of vulgarisms, of elements
of the spoken language, from the examinations has helped to maintain
the purity of classical Chinese. The spoken language, also labeled "vulgar,"
has produced some literary monuments of its own, which were recognized
as such and qualified as "classics" only a few decades ago. The unity of
the two languages, classical and vernacular, which share the same
fundamental structure, is undermined by grammars that are appreciably
different, and by the fact that these languages hold to diametrically opposed
stylistic ideals: lapidary concision on the one hand, and eloquent vigor
on the other.
We conclude by pointing out that educated Chinese add to their
surnames, which are always given first, a great variety of personal names,
which can be disconcerting at times. The standard given name (ming i;)
Introduction
3
is often avoided out of decorum; thus Tao Qjan is often referred to
by his zi .':_f: (stylename) as Tao Yuanming We will retain only the
best known of these names, avoiding hao name or nickname),
hie hao (special or particular literary name), and shi ming
(residential name) whenever possible: When other names are used, the
standard ming will be given in parentheses.
The goal here is to enable the reader to form an idea of traditional
Chinese literature, not to establish a history of it, which might result in a
lengthy catalogue of works largely unknown today. We are compelled to
sacrifice quantity to present a limited number of literary "stars," and to
reduce the listing of their works to allow the citation of a number of
previously unpublished translations, inevitably abridged but sufficient,
we hope, to evoke the content of the original.
The chronological approach will be handled somewhat roughly
because of the need to follow the development of the great literary genres:
after the presentation of antiquity, the period in which the common
culture of the educated elite was established, comes an examination of
the prose genres of "high" classical literature, then the description of the
art most esteemed by the literati, poetry. The final section treats the
literature of diversion, the most discredited but nonetheless highly prized,
which brings together the novel and the theater.
Chapter 1. Antiquity
Ancient literature, recorded by the scribes of a rapidly evolving
warlike and aristocratic society, has been carefully preserved since earliest
times and has become the basis of Chinese lettered culture. It is with this
in mind that one must approach the evolution of literature and its role
over the course of the two-thousand-year-old imperial government, which
collapsed in 1911, and attempt to understand the importance (albeit
increasingly limited) that ancient literature retains today.
The term "antiquity" applied to China posed no problems until
certain Marxist historians went so far as to suggest that it ended only in
1919. The indigenous tradition had placed the break around 211 B.C.,
when political unification brought about the establishment of a centralized
but "prefectural" government under the Legalists, as well as the famous
burning of books opposed to the Legalist state ideology. Yet to suggest
that antiquity ended so early is to minimize the contribution of Buddhism
and the transformation of thought that took place between the third and
seventh centuries.
The hypothesis that modernity began early, in the eleventh or
perhaps twelfth century in China, was developed by N ait6 Kanan I*JJ]i#J]
l¥.i (1866-1934). This idea has no want of critics or of supporters. It is
opposed to the accepted idea in the West, conveyed by Marxism, that
China, a "living fossil," has neither entered modern times nor participated
in "the global civilization" that started with the Opium War of 1840.
Nor is there unanimity concerning the periodization proposed in
historical linguistics, a periodization which distinguishes Archaic Chinese
of High Antiquity (from the origins of language to the third century) from
Ancient Chinese of Mid-Antiquity (sixth to twelfth centuries), then Middle
Chinese of the Middle Ages (thirteenth-sixteenth centuries) from Modern
Chinese (seventeenth-nineteenth centuries), and Recent Chinese (1840-
1919) from Contemporary Chinese (1920 to the present).
6 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
In the area of literature, the beginning of the end of antiquity could
perhaps be placed in the second century A.D. Archaeology has elevated
our knowledge of more ancient writings toward the beginning of the
second millennium B.C., but this archaic period, discovered recently,
cannot be considered part of literary patrimony in the strictest sense.
Accounts of this archaic period are traditionally divided into six eras,
2
but to honor them would be to fall into the servitude of a purely
chronological approach.
I. Origins
Since the last year of the last century, when Wang Yirong
(1845-1900) compiled the first collection of inscriptions written on bones
and shells, the increasing number of archaeological discoveries has allowed
the establishment of a corpus of nearly 50,000 inscriptions extending
over the period from the fourteenth to the tenth centuries before our era.
Dong Zuobin ii1'Fj{ (1895-1963) proposed a periodization for them and
distinguished within them the styles of different schools of scribes. Scholars
have managed to decipher a third of the total of some 6,000 distinct
signs, which are clearly related to the system of writing used by the
Chinese today-these were certainly not primitive forms of characters.
The oracular inscriptions are necessarily short-the longest known
text, of a hundred or so characters, covers the scapula of an ox and
extends even over the supporting bones; the shell of a southern species of
the great tortoise, also used to record divination, did not offer a more
extensive surface. Whether a literature existed at this ancient time seems
rather doubtful, but this scriptural evidence causes one to consider whether
2
These eras are the early Chou dynasty (eleventh century-722 B.C.), the
Spring and Autumn era (722-481 B.C.), the Warring States (481-256 B.C.), the
Ch'in dynasty (256-206 B.C.), the Western or Early Han dynasty (206 B.C.-A.D.
6), and the Eastern or Latter Han dynasty (25-A.D. 220).
Chapter 1. Antiquity 7
the Shu jing (Classic of Documents), supposedly "revised" by Confucius
but often criticized as a spurious text, was based in part on authentic
texts. The presence of an early sign representing a bundle of slips of
wood or bamboo confirms the existence of a primitive form of book in a
very ancient era-texts were written on these slips, which were then bound
together to form a "fascicle."
The purpose of these ancient archives, which record the motivation
for the diviner's speech, his identity, and sometimes the result, has been
ignored. Of another nature are the inscriptions on bronze that appeared
in about the eleventh century B.C. and went out of fashion in the second
century B.C. They attracted the attention of amateur scholars from the
eleventh century until modern times. Many collections of inscriptions on
"stone and bronze" have been published in the intervening eras. The
longest texts extend to as much as five-hundred signs, the for;ms of which
often seem to be more archaic than those of the inscriptions on bones
and shells.
The most ancient inscriptions indicate nothing more than the person
to whom the bronze was consecrated or a commemoration of the name
of the sponsor. Toward the tenth century B.C. the texts evolved from
several dozen to as many as a hundred signs and took on a commemorative
character.
The inspiration for these simple, solemn texts is not always easily
discernible because of the obscurities of the archaisms in the language.
An echo of certain pieces transmitted by the Confucian school can be
seen in some texts, but their opacity has disheartened many generations
of literati.
II. "Let a hundred flowers bloom, Let a hundred schools of thought
contend!"
This statement by Mao Zedong, made to launch a liberalization
movement that was cut short in 1957, was inspired by an exceptional
period in Chinese cultural history (from the fifth to the third centuries
8 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
B.C.) in which there was a proliferation of schools-the "hundred schools."
The various masters of these schools offered philosophical, often political,
discussion. The growth of these schools paralleled the rise of rival states
from the time of Confucius (the Latinized version of the Chinese original,
Kong Fuzi =FL:;/i:;:r or Master Kong, ca. 551-479 B.C.) to the end of the
Warring States period (221 B.C.). The "hundred schools" came to an end
with the unification of China late in the third century B.C. under the
Legalist rule of the Qjn dynasty (221-206 B.C.). This era of freedom of
thought and intellectual exchange never completely ceased to offer a
model, albeit an unattainable model, in the search for an alternative to
the oppressive ideology imposed by the centralized state.
Much of what has reached us from this lost world was saved in the
wake of the reconstruction of Confucian writings (a subject to which we
will turn shortly). The texts of the masters of the hundred schools, on the
periphery of orthodox literati culture, are of uneven quality, regardless of
the philosophy they offer. Even the best, however, have not come close
to dethroning the "Chinese Socrates," Confucius, the first of the great
thinkers, in both chronology and importance.
1. Mo Zi and the Logicians. The work known as Mo Zi ~ - T
(Master Mo) is a collection of the writings of a sect founded by M o D i ~
II, an obscure personage whom scholars have wanted to make a
contemporary of Confucius. It has been hypothesized that the name Mo,
"ink," referred to the tattooing of a convict in antiquity, and the given
name, Di, indicates the pheasant feathers that decorated the hats of the
common people. Although we can only speculate about whether Mo Zi
was a convict or a commoner, he argued for a kind of bellicose pacifism
toward aggressors, doing his best to promote, through a utilitarian process
of reasoning, the necessity of believing in the gods and of practicing
universal love without discrimination. Condemning the extravagant
expense of funerals as well as the uselessness of art and music, Mo Zi
Chapter 1. Antiquity
9
wrote in a style of discouraging weight. The work that has come down to
us under his name (which appears to be about two-thirds of the original
text) represents a direction which Chinese civilization explored without
ever prizing. Mo Zi's mode of argument has influenced many generations
of logicians and sophists, who are known to us only in fragments, the
main contribution of which has been to demonstrate in their curious way
of argumentation peculiar features of the Chinese language.
Hui Shi ;!;:ht!! is known only by the thirty-some paradoxes which
the incomparable Zhuang Zi !lfr cites, without attempting to solve, as
in:
There is nothing beyond the Great Infinity ... and the Small Infinity is
not inside.
The antinomies of reason have nourished Taoist thought, if not the other
way around, as Zhuang Zi attests after the death of his friend Hui Shi:
Zhuang Zi was accompanying a funeral procession. When he passed
by the grave of Master Hui he turned around to say to those who were
following him: "A fellow from Ying had spattered the tip of his nose
with a bit of plaster, like the wing of a fly. He had it removed by [his
crony] the carpenter Shi, who took his ax and twirled it around. He cut
it off, then heard a wind: the plaster was entirely removed without
scratching his nose. The man from Ying had remained standing, impassive.
When he learned of this, Yuan, the sovereign of the country of Song,
summoned the carpenter Shih and said to him, "Try then to do it again
for Us." The carpenter responded, "Your servant is capable of doing it;
however, the material that he made use of died long ago."
After the death ofthe Master, I too no longer can find the material:
I no longer have anyone to talk to. (Zhuang Zi 24)
Sons of the logicians and the sophists, the rhetoricians shared with
the Taoists a taste for apologues. They opposed the Taoist solution of a
10 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
detached "non-action," involved as they were in diplomatic combat. Held
in contempt by the Confucians for their "Machiavellianism," the Zhanguo
ce (Intrigues of theW arring States) remains the most representative
work of the genre. It was reconstructed several centuries later by Liu
Xiang (77-6 B.C.), but the authenticity of these reassembled materials
seems to have been confirmed by the discovery of parallel texts in a
tomb at Mawang Dui in 1973. A great variety animates these
accounts, both speeches and chronicles; they are rich in dialogue, which
cannot be represented by this single, although characteristic, anecdote-it
is inserted without commentary into the "intrigues" {or "slips") of the
state of Chu:
The King of Wei offered the King of Chua beautiful girl who gave
him great satisfaction. Knowing how much the new woman pleased
him, his wife, the queen, showed her the most intense affection. She
chose clothes and baubles which would please her and gave them to
her; it was the same for her with rooms in the palace and bed clothes.
In short, she gratified her with more attention than the king himself
accorded her.
He congratulated her for it: a woman serves her husband through
her carnal appeal, and jealousy is her nature. Now, understanding how
I love the new woman, my wife shows her more love than l-it is thus
that the filial son serves his parents, that the loyal servant fulfills his
duties toward his prince.
As she knew that the king did not consider her jealous, the queen
suggested to her rival: "The king appreciates your beauty. However, he
is not that fond of your nose. You would do better to hide it when he
receives you."
Therefore, the new one did so when she saw His Majesty. The king
asked his wife why his favorite hid her nose in his presence. She responded,
"I know." "Even if it is unpleasant, tell me!" insisted the king. "She does
not like your odor." "The brazen hussy!" cried the sovereign. "Her nose
is to be cut off, and let no one question my order!"
Chapter 1. Antiquity
ll
The Yan Zi chunqiu (Springs and Autumns of Master
Yen) is another reconstruction by Liu Xiang, a collection of anecdotes
about Y an Ying a man of small stature but great ability who was
prime minister to Dukejing Qj. (547-490 B.C.)-the state that occupies
what is now Shandong. Without cynicism, but full of shrewdness, these
anecdotes do not lack appeal; some have often been selected as anthology
pieces, of which this one is representative:
When Master Yan was sent as an ambassador to Chu, the people of
the country constructed a little gate next to the great one and invited
him to enter. Yan Zi refused, declaring that it was suitable for an envoy
to a country of dogs, but that it was to Chu that he had come on
assignment. The chamberlain had him enter by the great gate.
The King of Chu received him and said to him: "Was there then no
one for them to have sent you?" "How can you say there is no
one in when there would be darkness in our capital of Linzi if the
people of the three hundred quarters spread out their sleeves, and it
would rain if they shook off their perspiration-so dense is the population."
"But then why have you been sent?" "The practice is to dispatch a
worthy envoy to a worthy sovereign; I am the most unworthy .... "
2. Legalism. The diplomatic manipulations and other little
anecdotes we have seen in the Yan Zi chunqiu were of little interest to the
Legalists, who took their name from the idea that the hegemonic power
of the state is founded on a system of implacable laws supposing the
abolition of hereditary privileges-indeed a tabula rasa that rejects morals
and traditions. In fact, historians associate them with all thought that
privileges efficacy. From this point of view, the most ancient "Legalist"
would be the artisan of Qj.'s hegemony in the seventh century B.C., Guan
Zi (Master Guan). The work that was handed down under his name
is a composite text and in reality contains no material prior to the third
century B.C. Whether or not he should be considered a Legalist, Guan Zi
12 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
embodies the idea that the power of the state lies in its prosperity, and
this in turn depends on the circulation of goods. In sum, Guan Zi stands
for a proto-mercantilism diametrically opposed to the primitive
physiocraticism of Gongsun Yang (also known as Shang Yang j{ij
minister of Qj.n in the fourth century. Shang jun shu J{ij;.g. (The
Book of Lord Shang), which is attributed to Gongsun Yang, gives the
Legalist ideas a particularly brutal form:
It is the nature of people to measure that which is advantageous to
them, to seize the best, and to draw to themselves that which is profitable.
The enlightened lord must take care if he wants to establish order in his
country and to be able to turn the population to his advantage, for the
population has at its disposal a great number of means to avoid the
strictness that it fears. Within the country he must cause the people to
consecrate themselves to farming; without he must cause them to be
singly devoted to warfare. This is why the order of a sage sovereign
consists of multiplying interdictions in order to prevent infractions and
relying on force to put an end to fraud. (Shangjun shu, "Suan di")
Shang Y aug's prose is laden with archaisms, which hardly lighten the
weight of his doctrine.
It is in the work of Han Fei Zi (ca. 280-233) that Legalism
found its most accomplished formulation. The book Han Fei Zi contains a
commentary on the Classic of the Way and of Power of Lao Zi in which the
ideal of Taoist non-action is realized by the automatism of laws. The
"artifice" of the latter may go back to the Confucianism of Xun Zi ffir
(Master Xun, also known as Xun Qj.ng ca. 300-230 B.C.), a school
rejected by orthodox Confucianism.
Xun Zi, who happens to have been the teacher of Han Fei Zi,
developed the brilliant theory that human nature inclines individuals to
satisfy their egoistic appetites: it was therefore bad for advanced societies
of the time. The "rites" -culture-are necessary for socialization. Xun Zi's
Chapter 1. Antiquity 13
argumentation was unprecedentedly elaborate, examining every facet of
a question while avoiding repetition: In a scintillating style peppered with
apologues, Han Fei Zi argues that the art of governing requires techniques
other than the simple manipulation of rewards and punishments. The
prince is the cornerstone of a system that is supposed to ensure him of a
protective impenetrableness. The state must devote itself to eliminating
the useless, noxious five "parasites" or "vermin:" the scholars, rhetoricians,
knights-errant, deserters, and merchants (perhaps even artisans).
3. The Fathers of Taoism. A philosophy of evasion, this school
was opposed to social and political engagement. From the outset Taoism
was either a means to flee society and politics or a form of consolation for
those who encountered reversals in politics and society. The poetic power
of its writings, which denounced limits and aphorisms of reason, explains
the fascination that it continues. to hold for intellectuals educated through
the rationalism of the Confucians. These works, like most of the others
from antiquity that were attributed to a master, in fact seem to be rather
disparate texts of a school.
The Dao de jing (Classic of the Way and of Power) remains
the most often translated Chinese work-and the first translated, if one
counts the lost translation into Sanskrit by the monk Xuanzang in
the seventh century A.D. This series of aphorisms is attributed to Lao Zi
(Master Lao or "The Old Master"), whom tradition considers a
contemporary of Confucius. He is said to have left this "testament" as he
departed the Chinese world via the Xian'gu Pass for the West. In their
polemics against the Buddhists, the Taoists of the following millennium
used this story as the basis on which to affirm that the Buddha was none
other than their Chinese Lao Zi, who had been converting the barbarians
of the West since his departure from China. Modern scholarship estimates
that the Lao Zi could not date earlier than the third century B.C. The
1973 discoveries at Mawang Dui in Hunan confirmed what scholars had
suspected for centuries: the primitive Lao Zi is reversed in respect to
14 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
ours: a De dao jing 1 ! & f f i ~ (Classic of Power and the Way). Its style,
which is greatly admired for its obscure concision, seems to owe much to
the repair work of the commentator Wang Bi .:£585 (226-249). Thus it is
tenable that the primitive Lao Zi was a work of military strategy. Whatever
it was, the text that is preferred today runs a little over 5,000 characters
and is divided into 81 sections (9 x 9). The Taoist attitude toward life is
expressed here in admirably striking formulae, which lend themselves to
many esoteric interpretations:
He who knows does not speak; he who speaks does not know (#56}.
Govern a great state as you would fry small fish! (#60}.
Practice non-action, attend to the useless, taste the flavorless. (#63}
The Zhuang Zi )1±-=f, written by Zhuang Zhou )/±)jlfj or Zhuang Zi
(Master Zhuang), was apparently abridged at about the same time as the
Lao Zi, but at the hands of the commentator Guo Xiang ~ ~ ~ (d. 312),
who cut it from fifty-two to thirty-three sections. Scholars cannot agree
whether the seven initial sections, called "the inner chapters," are from
the same hand of Zhuang Zhou as the sixteen following, called "the outer
chapters," and the final ten "miscellaneous chapters." It is in the final ten
that we find a characteristic arrangement of reconstructions from the first
century, works of one school attributed to one master. In fact, it is the
first part which gives the most lively impression of an encounter with an
animated personality whose mind is strangely vigorous and disillusioned:
Our life is limited, but knowledge is without limit. To follow the limitless
with that which is limited will exhaust one. To go unrelentingly after
knowledge is exhausting and can only cause one to rush to his ruin.
(Zhuang Zi, 3}
Chapter 1. Antiquity
Great knowledge encompasses, small knowledge discriminates. Great
words glitter, small words prattle. (Zhuang Zi, 2}
15
Passages and apologues familiar to every Chinese scholar abound as well
in the "outer chapters:"
Zhuang Zi was fishing with rod and line in the river Pu when two
great officers sent by the King of Chu came toward him: "His majesty
hopes to put you in charge of interior affairs." Without raising his line
or turning his head, Zhuang Zi replied: "I have heard it said that there is
a tortoise sacred to Chu, dead for three thousand years. The king has
stored it away in a casket, wrapped in linen cloth, on high in the temple
of his ancestors. Would it rather be dead with honors accorded to its
bones or alive but dragging its tail through the mud?" The two great
officers replied, "It would rather drag its tail through the mud." "Get
along with you, then!" concluded Zhuang Zi. "Let me drag my tail in
the mud." (Zhuang Zi 17}
The ideas of Zhuang Zi have sometimes been compared to nihilism:
Master Dongguo questioned Zhuang Zi: "Where, then, is found this
thing you call the Way (the Tao}?" "It is everywhere." "I am waiting for
you to tell me more exactly." "In the ants." "More lowly?" "In the
millet." "Still more lowly?" "In the shards of tiles." "The lowest possible?"
"In shit and piss!" Master Dongguo could find no reply. (Zhuang Zi 22}
The work ends with a critical depiction of the "hundred schools," parallels
of which are found in the Xun Zi and the Han Fei Zi. It is curious to read
there an evaluation of Zhuang Zi himself, which emphasizes his sense of
humor:
He expressed himself in extravagant discourses, in strange words, in
phrases without head or tail, often too freely, but without partiality, for
16 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
he did not espouse any particular point of view. The world is too
muddy to endure serious talk. ... (Zhuang Zi 33)
The Lie Zi 3/Ur (Master Lie), a work divisible into 8 parts and
nearly 150 sections, is of a most heterogeneous character. Its attribution
to the legendary Lie Yukou 3/Ul!JTI, to whom chapter 32 of the Zhuang Zi
is consecrated, is not worthy of serious consideration. It is no less than a
treasury of well-known apologues, perhaps of a popular nature, such as
that of "the faith that raised mountains" (see part five, section three), a
modern version of which was propagated by Mao Zedong.
A number of other schools have left nothing but allusions or
fragmentary descriptions which can be discovered in the writings of their
adversaries, such as-thanks to Mencius-the anarchists who refused to
exploit the work of others and, so it is said, produced everything with
their own hands. Neither the one nor the other was much concerned
with literature in the pure sense. The triumph of the Confucian school,
which was most violently persecuted during the ephemeral Legalist reign
of the Qj.n (221-206 B.C.), can be explained by political, moral, and
social reasons. The scholarly doctrine, however, has expanded its empire
only progressively, and not without fits and starts. It was the examination
system, instituted in the seventh century A.D., that made the Confucian
school the official ideology of the state. But the work of reconstructing a
worn-out tradition was energized from the second century B.C. by the
sort of literary influence exercised by these Confucian texts on all cultivated
spirits in China for more than two thousand years.
ill. The Confucian Classics
The word jing f.iill means the warp of a fabric: on the woof of the
Confucian Classics is woven the cultural unity of China. The same term
designates the Buddhist sutras, later the "Marxist Classics."
With an impetus from Confucius, the school seems to have assumed
from the outset the role of transmitter of The Tradition. The "Six Classics"
Chapter l. Antiquity
17
are mentioned in the Zhuang Zi. Over the passage of time, the classics
grew in number to seven, nine, twelve, and finally thirteen.
The Yi jing (Classic of Changes), the only work that was not
proscribed by the First Emperor of Qj.n (r. 221-210 B.C.), is unique; it is
first a book of divination, the "bible" of a binary method that permits the
construction of sixty-four hexagrams derived from the eight basic trigrams.
The first paragraph following each hexagram, the tuan reveals
the network of meanings; the yao :)t, a second paragraph, explains each
of the lines of the hexagram, full or broken-this is the technical part,
which appeared toward the end of the second millennium B.C., tradition
assures us, but only in the seventh or eighth century A.D. according to
modern scholarship. Numerous philosophical or divinatory glosses have
been incorporated into it. It has added "ten wings," certain commentaries
in which have been attributed to Confucius himself. In these "wings,"
which were certainly later additions, metaphysical considerations of a
profound obscurity are sometimes developed. The work has fascinated a
number of scholars who have been able to satisfy their taste for mystery
in it without deserting orthodoxy.
The documents preserved in the Shu jing wf.iill, translated by James
Legge (1815-1897) under the title The Book of Historical Documents, are
similarly dated to the eleventh to seventh centuries B.C. The book is a
collection of memorable speeches, discourses, harangues, and instructions,
arranged in chronological order. The extant text is the version written in
ancient-style characters in fifty chapters, of which twenty-two are forgeries
dating from the third or fourth century B.C.
The Chun qiu '§:tk (Spring and Autumn) is a chronicle of the years
722 to 481 B.C. in the state of Lu, where Confucius lived. Although this
book is written in an extraordinarily laconic style, Confucius is said to
have hidden his judgments in it through the subtle choice of words. Two
commentaries, Gongyang dwan 0$1$ and Guliang ;dluan are said
to have been written by individuals named Gongyang and Guliang
respectively, about whom little else is known; they endeavor to show the
18
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
positive or negative values in these judgments. The glosses in these two
works appear to date to the third century B.C. The third commentary,
attributed to Zuo Qiuming :b:Ji13f!EI and titled Zuo ;:ftuan appears to
be older. Each of these commentaries is considered a classic. The Zuo
;:ftuan, translated with the Chun qiu under the title Spring and Autumn
Annals and Tso chuan by James Legge, often has only the most distant
relationship to the text upon which it comments and is probably composed
of fragments of chronicles of other kingdoms, of a fantastic prolixity
compared to the dryness of the Chun qiu chronicle itself.
Thus the simple mention of the death of a prince of Qi in the
eleventh month of the twenty-third year of the reign of Duke Xi {:g of Lu
(636 B.C.) provides an occasion, following a brief formal commentary, to
retrace at length the career of Chong'er ££+, exiled son of Duke Xian
l:k, the ruler of the state of Jin. A dispute with his wives occupies a
considerable part of this account-here is an episode:
The Earl of Qjn gave five women to him [Chong'er], among them Ying
[widow of Yu ofjin, posthumously Duke] of Huai. When she presented
him with a pitcher to wash his hands and rinse his mouth, he signaled to
her [to retire] when he had finished [with hands still wet]. Indignant,
she angrily said, "Qjn andjin are states of the same rank. Why do you
treat me in this contemptuous fashion?" The son of the duke was so
afraid that he took off his clothes and put on the garb of a prisoner.
Traits common to the majority of these anecdotes are the importance
attached to the rites which governed the "civilized" peoples of the Early
Chou dynasty states and the warfare so often recalled by the Zuo ;dluan.
The reconstruction of three ritual books, each of a quite different
character, can be attributed to the Confucian school. Together they
constitute a systematic description of the social and political organization
of the upper classes in ancient society.
The Zhou li translated by Edouard Biotin 1851 under the
Chapter 1. Antiquity 19
title Rites des Tcheou (Rites of Zhou), is a systematic description of an ideal
administration, or at least it has been so judged by generations of reformers
of the imperial regime in search of a utopian model.
The Yi li (rendered as the Book of Etiquette and Ceremonial in
the 1917 translation by John Steele) is the only one of these three "ritual
books" which merits that label from cover to cover. Completely different
as well from a work such as Leviticus, this book, which is divided into
twenty-seven chapters, describes in detail the ceremonies that punctuated
the life of the noble houses. This system of rules presented in a series of
narratives does not seem to go back beyond the third century B.C.,
although it does include some older material. A concern for detail is
evident here that presages the Chinese novelists of some two-thousand
years later. Rules of savoir-faire are expressed with a wealth of impressive
detail.
The Li ji translated by James Legge in 1885 (Oxford:
Clarendon) under the title Book of Rites, is a composite work nearly three
times the size of the Yi li. Its forty-six chapters are the result of an
abridgment of a primitive collection by Dai the Elder, a little-known
figure. In the first century B.C., Dai combined eighty-five treatises on
ritual. Dai the Younger, a cousin, extracted from this a work of forty-six
treatises, three of which differ from our current text of the Li ji, which
was edited and reshaped in the second century A.D.
The principal interest of the Li ji is clearly not literary, but it
nevertheless occupies a place in literary history for having provided two
of the Four Books or Si shu 12..911=. These texts have been the foundation of
Chinese primary education since the fourteenth century. At the same
time, they were popular books and forbidding texts to their youthful,
semiliterate readers. The first of the Four Books, which was edited by the
eminent scholar and Neo-Confucian philosopher Zhu (1130-1200),
is essentially the treatise that appears as chapter 39 of the Li ji, the Da xue
or Grand Study, that is to say, what adults were intended to study
(according to Zhu Xi's interpretation). The text developed a typically
20 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Confucian reasoning in the form of a sorites, of which the second and
third part, where "things and beings are examined," depict Confucius as
similar to a defender of the natural sciences in the nineteenth century.
Those [of the princes] from the past who wished to make their
virtue shine brightly under heaven, began by ordering the reigns in
their own states. Whoever wished to order the reign of his own state,
began by harmonizing his family. Whoever wished to harmonize his
family, began by cultivating his person. Whoever wished to cultivate his
person, began by rectifying his heart and his spirit. Whoever wished to
rectify his heart and his spirit, began by making his will sincere. Whoever
wished to make his will sincere, first set out to perfect his knowledge.
Perfecting one's knowledge consists in investigating things and beings.
It is only after investigating things and beings that knowledge is
perfected. It is only when knowledge is perfected that the will is sincere.
It is only when the will is sincere that the heart and spirit are rectified ..
. [thus it follows until the conclusion]. It is only when the state is well
governed that the world is at peace. From the Son of Heaven to the
common people, all should apply themselves to cultivating their persons.
The second of the Four Books comes from chapter 28 of the Li ji. It
is entitled Zhong yong if:! II, translated by James Legge as the Doctrine of the
Mean. Legge's translation is based on the inspired commentary of Zhu Xi
and returns in the text to the most ancient interpretation of the "true
Mean." The Zhong yong abounds in allusions and citations taken from the
other Confucian classics, in particular from the poetry of the Ski jing, to
which we will soon return.
The third of the Four Books, the Analects of Confucius or the Lunyu rnH
"iiN (Words [of the Master] Arranged in Order), is the most prestigious of
the Confucian Classics, revered in all of East Asia. Here Confucius speaks
to us in person (although he is referred to simply as "the Master"); thus, it
is not excessive to see a parallel to the Gospels, even though traditional
Chapter 1. Antiquity 21
Chinese critics have shown that the collection could not have been put
together until a generation or more after the Master died, and that the
last five of its "books" are of a separate origin. Although these "texts"
were probably passed on orally at first, different versions were recorded
in different states; the version used today was established only in the
third century A.D., based on the edition from the state of Lu (the editors
taking into consideration two others versions, that of the state of Qj. and
that in ancient-style characters). The Confucius that one discovers in the
Analects inspired enthusiasm among the rationalist philosophers of the
Enlightenment era in the West. Though he is the patron of the orthodox
doctrines of Chinese imperial regimes, Confucius expresses in this book
a grassroots wisdom, offered in lively dialogues, which gives substance to
the atheism shared by the majority of Chinese scholars throughout history.
The famous response of the Master to Zilu is dictated only by his concern
for consecrating his teachings to the conduct his disciples ought to follow
in order to serve mankind in serving the state, as a benevolent ruler, not
a tyrant:
(XI, 12) Asked by Zilu about the service of the gods and demons,
the Master replied, "How can one be adept in this, when one still
doesn't know how to serve man?"
"Can I question you about death?"
"How could I, still not understanding life, know of death?"
Confucius advocated modesty rather than agnosticism:
(II, 17) The Master said, "Zilu, I am going to teach you what it is to
know. To know is to know what you know and what you do not know.
This is knowledge!"
Posterity has exalted Confucius to the point of making him a shengren
~ A , a term without religious implications that could be translated as
"saint." He did not speak of this himself:
22 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
(VII, 26) A "saint" I have not had the good fortune to see. It would
be good enough to encounter an "honest man."
(VII, 34) As for the question of "saintliness" or "goodness," how
can I claim them? The most that can be said is that I apply myself to
them without lassitude, teach them without tiring.
"Goodness," ren 1=, is the cardinal virtue advocated by Confucius.
It has been argued that it is best translated by "altruism," "humanity," or,
very simply, "virtue." The moral ideal is that of the "son of the sovereign
or lord," jun::::.i :S-T. Legge's rendering of this term as "gentleman" has
been followed by most English translators.
The "petty man," xiaoren 1]\A, is the jun::::.is opposite.
There is no more happy formula illustrating the position of Confucius
than the following:
(VIII, 13) lfthe world follows the good Way, show yourself; if not,
hide yourself. If it is shameful to live in poverty and scorn in a country
following the good Way; to be rich and honored in an inhumane country
is even more so.
But he rejects the extreme inferences that are drawn from the ideas of the
hermits, one of whom,Jieni, talks with Zilu here as he hoes his garden:
(XVIII, 6) ... "The world is everywhere carried along by a wave so
powerful that nothing can change its course. Rather than follow a scholar
who keeps fleeing from men [i.e., Confucius], wouldn't it be better to
follow someone who flees from the world?" Jieni responded to Zilu
without ceasing to hoe.
The disciple reported his words to Confucius, who sighed and said:
"One doesn't know how to flock with the birds and beasts. With whom
else should I associate if I give up the company of men? If the world
had the Way, I would not seek to change it."
Chapter 1. Antiquity
Not that the "goodness" of the Master did not extend beyond mankind:
(VII, 27) The Master fished with a line, but never with a net. He
did not shoot at perching birds.
23
The last of the Four Books contains the words of Meng Zi j&-=f
{Master Meng, ca. 390-305 B.C.), who is better known by his Latinized
title of Mencius; this work was also the last {seventh century A.D.) to be
considered part of the corpus of thirteen works known as the Confucian
Classics. The Meng Zi is the only text to have been temporarily excluded
from the classics after it had become a part of the corpus-in the fourteenth
century it was banned for a time, because it held that in some cases
tyrannicide was justified:
(I.B.8) King Xuan of Qj asked: "Is a subject allowed to assassinate
his sovereign?"
"He who robs 'goodness,' I call a robber. He who violates the
moral, I call a violator. A robber or a violator is only an ordinary
person. I have heard tell of the punishment inflicted on the tyrant Zhou,
an ordinary person, not of the murder of a sovereign."
The text of Mencius is probably the most ancient of the philosophic
works. Its style, devoid of archaisms, is supple in the lively discourses
presented in the form of dialogues, and its argumentation is sustained by
the colorful comparisons:
(VI.A.l) "Human nature," Gao Zi responded, "is like swirling water.
If a passage is opened for it to the east, it rushes there. But it could flow
out as well to the west, if a passage were opened to the west. Human
nature does not distinguish good and evil."
Mencius replied, "Water indeed does not distinguish east from west,
but is it the same for high and low? Human nature seeks the good as
water heads for a low point. There is no man who would not be good,
24 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
no water that would not flow downward. Of course, if it is struck, water
will splash higher than the forehead, if it is forced, it will climb hills. But
is this the nature of water? It adapts itselfto circumstances. The same is
true when men are pushed to evil."
Completely different from the Analects in its style, the Mencius is no less
tied to the richness of ideas which Mencius's master Confucius had treated,
but they are often examined in greater depth here.
There are only three more classics in the thirteen of the standard
edition titled Shisan jing z}tushu + .::=:#&B:.iffrt {The Thirteen Classics
Commented and Expanded Upon). The first of these is the Xiao jing
{Classic of Filial Piety), a relatively late pamphlet which does not have
much more literary importance than the second of this trio, the Er ya 'm
_ffi, a lexicon that classifies words into nineteen categories and can be
considered the most ancient Chinese dictionary extant today.
Remaining to be discussed is the most important of the classics
from a literary point of view, the Shi jing {Classic of Poetry). The
305 poems in this anthology were said to have been chosen by Confucius
from among more than 3,000. The standard version, which is also the
only complete text to have reached us, includes a commentary of moral
and political interpretations attributed to a certain Mao Heng =§-? in the
third century B.C. The edition is said to have been transcribed by Liu
Xin {50 B.C.-23 A.D.), one of the most ardent defenders of the
classics in ancient characters. The anthology contains pieces of greatly
differing dates and genres, stretching, according to certain critics, from
the twelfth to the fifth centuries B.C., and including odes, hymns, and
love songs. Love is the theme of the first poem in the collection {here the
rendering is based on the French of Marcel Granet's Festivals and Songs of
Ancient China {Fetes et chansons anciennes de laChine], 1911); the interpretation
here goes back to that of Zhu Xi {1130-1200), who later became the
paragon of orthodoxy:
Chapter 1. Antiquity
The Ospreys
In harmony the ospreys cry I In the river, on the rocks.
The maiden goes into retirement, I A fit mate for the prince.
Long or short the duck-weed: I To the left and right let us seek it.
The maiden goes into retirement, I Day and night let us ask for her.
Ask for her. .. useless quest. .. I Day and night let us think of her.
Ah! what pain! Ah! what pain! I This way and that we toss and tum.
Long or short the duck-weed: I To the left and right let us take it.
The maiden goes into retirement, I Guitars and lutes welcome her!
Long or short the duck-weed: I To the left and right let us gather it.
The maiden goes into retirement, I Bells and drums welcome her!
25
The 160 poems in the section devoted to the "airs of the [fifteen] states,"
guofeng preserve for the most part a popular, oral tradition, which
also seems to be the case for the "lesser odes," xiao ya 1}_ffi {numbers
161-234), songs of minor celebrations. The "greater odes," da ya :k.ffi
{nos. 235-265), celebrate the major occasions, particularly the
accompanying war dances. The hymns, {nos. 266-305), seem to
have been part of religious rituals.
Repetition, refrain, rhythm, and assonance are the common
characteristics of popular songs throughout the world. They also mark
the three hundred poems in this collection, and are sometimes still
perceptible when the poems are recited in modern Chinese pronunciation.
Recourse to metaphorical evocation, xing or the comparisons drawn
from nature, bi l:t, and the description, fo M, in some of the prestigious
poems, introduce some processes recognized as fundamental in the Chinese
prosodic tradition.
But the Classic of Poetry, which bookish scholars in subsequent
centuries sometimes regarded as primarily a means of enriching their
vocabulary of flora and fauna, played a completely different role in
26 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
antiquity. Filled with moral and political allusions, it was a treasure-trove
of much of the culture common to the Chinese "confederation" and was
often cited by gentlemen in ancient times to make a political point.
Confucius, in fact, was already emphasizing the double role of the Classic
of Poetry as both a literary and a diplomatic sourcebook in the Analects:
(XVII, 9} My children, why do you neglect studying the Poems?
The Poems will allow you to stimulate, allow you to observe, allow you
to keep company, allow you to protest. ... And you will learn there the
names of a good number of birds, beasts, plants, and trees.
(XVI, 13} Chen Kang asked the son of Confucius if his father had
given him special instructions.
"No. One time when I found him alone and I was hurrying across
the courtyard, he asked me if I had studied the Poems. 'Not yet,' I
responded. 'Without studying them, you will not know how to express
yourself."'
We are assured that Confucius did his best to cite the Poems
without recourse to his dialectal pronunciation, as if the Master was
already aware that he was transmitting a common cultural fund. With the
glosses and regulation commentaries, the thirteen classics, Yi jing, Shu
jing, Ski jing, Zhou li, Yi li, Li ji, Chun qiu-Zuo <}zuan, Gongyang <}zuan,
Guliang </luan, Xiao jing, Lunyu, Meng Zi, and Er ya, total nearly six million
characters; the texts themselves, which every candidate for the civil service
examinations after the fourteenth century had to know by heart, contain
nearly a half-million words-the basis of a literary training that should not
be underestimated.
Chapter 1. Antiquity 27
Suggested Further Reading
A number of on-line resources of relevance can be found by consulting
the Association for Asian Studies "Asia Resources on the World Wide
Web" (http:/ /www.aasianst.org/asiawww.htm) and the Internet Guide for
Chinese Studies, World-Wide Web Virtual Library sponsored by Australia
National University and Heidelberg University (http:/ I sun. sino. uni-
heidelberg.de/igcs). The appropriate sections of Sources of Chinese Tradition,
ed. William Theodore deBary and Irene Bloom (2"d ed., New York:
Columbia University Press, 1998), are also highly recommended. Indiana
Companion in the entries below refers to The Indiana Companion to Traditional
Chinese Literature, volumes 1 and 2 (Bloomington: Indiana University
press, 1986 and 1998).
Antiquity
Ho, Ping-ti. The Cradle of the East. Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
1975.
Hsii, Cho-yun. Ancient China in Transition. Stanford: Stanford University
Press, 1965.
Keightley, David N. The Origins of Chinese Civilization. Berkeley: University
of California Press, 1983.
Maspero, Henri. China in Antiquity. Frank A. Kierman, trans. Amherst:
University of Massachusetts Press, 1978. Although sections are
dated, this is a good, basic introduction.
Watson, Burton. Early Chinese Literature. New York: Columbia University
Press, 1962.
The Hundred Schools of Thought
Ames, Roger, trans. Sun-tzu: The Art of Warfare. New York: Ballantine
Books, 1993.
28 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
"Chuang Tzu. "In Indiana Companion, II: 20-26.
"Chu-tzu pai-chia" (The Various Masters and the Hundred Schools). In
Indiana Companion, I: 336-343.
Henricks, Robert, trans. Lao Tzu, Te-Tao Ching. New York: Ballantine
Books, 1990.
Knoblock, John, trans. Xunzi: A Translation and Study of the Complete Works.
3 vols. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1988, 12990, 1994.
Lafargue, Michael. Tao and Method, A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te
Ching. Albany: SUNY Press, 1994.
Lau, D. C., trans. Lao Tzu-Tao Te Ching.Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1963.
LeBlanc, Charles. Huai-Nan Tzu: Philosophical Synthesis in Early Han Thought.
Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 1985.
Lundahl, Bertil. Han Fei Zi, the Man and the World. Vol. 4. Stockholm East
Asian Monographs, Stockholm: Institute of Oriental Languages,
1992.
Mair, Victor H., trans. Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching: The Classic Book of Integrity
and the Way-An Entirely New Translation Based on the Recently
Discovered Ma-wang-tui Manuscripts. New York: Bantam Books,
1990.
Major, John S., trans. Heaven and Earth in Early Han Thought: Chapters
Three, Four, and Five of the Huainan;:;i. Albany: SUNY Press, 1993.
Rickett, W. Allyn, trans. Guan;:;i: Political, Economic and Philosophical Essays
from Early China-A Study and Translation. 2 vols. Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 1985 and 1997.
Waley, Arthur, trans. The Way and Its Power. New York: Macmillan,
1934.
Watson, Burton, trans. Chuang t;:;u. New York: Columbia University Press,
1968.
_. Basic Writings of Mo tzu, Hsiin tzu, and Han-fti tzu. New York: Columbia
University Press, 1967.
Chapter 1. Antiquity 29
The Confucian Classics
Brooks, E. Bruce, with A. Taeko Brooks. The Original Analects: Sayings of
ConfUcius and His Successors. New York: Columbia University Press,
1998.
"Ching"(Classics). In Indiana Companion, I: 309-316.
Huang, Chichung. The Analects of ConfUcius: A Literal Translation with an
Introduction and Notes. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.
Karlgren, Bernhard, trans. The Book of Odes. Stockholm: Museum of Far
Eastern Antiquities, 1950.
Lau, D. C., trans. The Analects. Penguin: Harmondsworth, 1979.
Legge, James, trans. The Chinese Classics. Oxford: Clarendon Press,
1893-1895.
Loewe, Michael. Early Chinese Texts: A Bibliographic Guide. Berkeley: The
Society for the Study of Early China and the Institute of East
Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley, 1993.
Lynn, RichardJohn, trans. The Classic ofChanges: A New Translation of the I
Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi. New York: Columbia University
Press, 1994.
Shaughnessy, Edward L. Before ConfUcius: Studies in the Creation of the
Chinese Classics. Albany: SUNY Press, 1997.
"Shih ching"(Classic of Poetry). In Indiana Companion, I: 692-694.
"Tso chuan"(Tso Documentary). In Indiana Companion, I: 804-806.
Waley, Arthur, trans. The Analects ofConfocius. London: Allen and Unwin,
1938.
_.The Book of Songs. London: Allen and Unwin, 1937.
Watson, Burton, trans. The Tso Chuan: Selections from China's Oldest Narrative
History. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992.
Chapter 2. Prose
"If poetry is intended to express the sentiments and the will while
communicating the emotions, the role of prose is to communicate ideas,
nothing more." Such a literary doctrine could be extracted from the texts
transmitted by or commented on by Confucius. This utilitarian conception
of literature in the service of morality would be called into question in
the third century A.D. when the imperial unity of the Han dynasty
disintegrated into a number of statelets, a time that has come to be called
the Period of Disunion {180-589 A.D.). Was this a coincidence?
The same word, wen )(, the sense of which has evolved from
"writing" to "literature," can also mean "ornate" or "refined." Wen in this
latter sense was juxtaposed to dti J!r, "substance" or "substantial," to
become the two lines of opposing force in traditional literary criticism.
But wen in a restricted sense has come to designate prose dedicated to the
simplicity of the "substantial," in opposition to poetry, shi ~ ' which was
of necessity "ornate."
Literary realities respond only imperfectly to this scheme. The
frontiers that separate the two great domains of prose and poetry are
poorly defined. Rhythm, normally associated with poetry, is essential to
artistic prose. Rhyme and assonance are also not limited to verse. The
genres in parallel prose-pian wen ,!fr#)(, woven with literary allusions, or
the fo M (rhapsody or prose-poem), a descriptive evocation in rhythmic
prose-are closer to poetry, distinguished from it only by the priority
accorded the container over the contents.
To translate such texts, which are overloaded with "ornamentation,"
and even more to appreciate them, is nearly impossible. They are truly
accessible only to the disappearing breed of scholars who have had a
traditional-style education. The same is true for all of the "mandarin
genres"-dissertations, tributes, judgments and other occasional works
which are abundantly represented in the anthologies and collected works
32 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
of individual authors. Because of the huge number of such works that
have been written over the centuries, only a very incomplete picture of
these genres can be presented, with preference given to those which
remain "classical," that is to say, those which are taught in the schools
and read by the public at large in annotated editions often paired with
versions "translated" into modern Chinese.
This seems an ideal place to mention the importance of the
anthologies that followed one after the other from the third century A.D.
until modern times, each piece in which was selected because of its
literary brilliance. The most ancient, that by Du Yu i±ffl (222-284), has
been lost, eclipsed by the Wen xuan (A Selection of Literature)
compiled by Xiao Tong lft.1E (501-531), a work which for a long time
provided many of the texts memorized by mandarins for the examination
competition, and which served as a model for the many anthologies that
included both prose and poetry. The Guwenci leizuan
(Collection by Category of Ancient Prose and Poetry), compiled in 1799
by Y ao N ai tfl5® ( 1 732-1815), and its sequels were enormously successful
with scholars. Together they constitute the finest texts of classical Chinese
prose of the last two millennia, with representative poetic genres also
included.
It was the twelfth century before the first anthologies devoted
exclusively to prose appeared; the pieces they contained were called
sanwen "free" or "dispersed prose," in contrast to the prosodic
regulations of pianwen "parallel" or "harnessed prose." The Songwen
jian (Mirror of Song Prose), for example, by Lii Zuqian §::f_§_iif
(1137-1181), is a collection of the best pieces produced by Song-dynasty
authors (960-1279) during the first two centuries of the Song reign. For
the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), the most important collection is the
anthology compiled by Huang Zongxi ll*ii (1610-1695), the Mingwen
haif!Jj)($ (The Ocean ofMing Prose). The most popular of the anthologies
remaining today was published in 1695 by two cousins named Wu Chucai
Chapter 2. Prose 33
and Wu the Guwenguanzhitl)(fill: (The Major
Works of Ancient Prose), is a limited selection of 220 extracts, of which,
next to the excerpts from Zuo's commentary to the Chun qiu, the work
most often cited is Sima Qj.an's Shi ji.
I. Narrative Art and Historical Records
Besides the Zuo commentary to the Chun qiu, other narrative texts
dating from a time later than the burning of the books in 213 B.C. have
come down to us. Among them are texts which have been labeled early
novels by some modern critics, despite the lack of support for this
classification in traditional assessments. One such book is the Mu Tianzi
(Chronicle of the Son of Heaven Mu), which was discovered
in a tomb in A.D. 279, and which relates the fantastic voyages of its hero.
Many factors ensure these narrative texts an important place in the
history of belles lettres. First, to a certain extent they fill the void caused
by the lack of an epic in Chinese literature. Second, a number of eminent
writers participated in the compilation of these historical works or had
their own pieces included in them. Most often these included pieces were
judgments or elegies, many of which have become widely regarded as
major works of classical Chinese prose. Finally, and most important, the
outstanding model for reconstructing the history of an imperial regime is
a work that has fascinated scholars in the two thousand years since it was
written.
This work is the Shi ji (Records of the Grand Historian),
written by China's Herodotus, Sima Qj.an (ca. 145-ca. 85 B.C.).
Sima Qj.an, however, was able to produce a work quite different from its
obvious Greek counterparts. The Shi ji offers an original organization of
Sima Qj.an's material, which was nothing less than the history of the
world as it was then known. Mter twelve "basic annals," dedicated to the
dynasties of earlier times and the emperors of the more recent Qj.n and
Han dynasties, there are ten "chronological tables," eight "monographs,"
thirty chapters on the "hereditary houses" (including the "house of
34. Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Confucius"), and finally seventy "biographies." Perhaps one should credit
this arrangement to Sima Tan (d. 110 B.C.), the father of the
Grand Historian who began this great enterprise-or blame him, because
the material about one man or one event is often scattered through
several chapters, and because the treatment of some men and events
lacks balance. Allowing for some reorganization, however, this was the
structure followed by all the subsequent official dynastic histories, most of
which after the fifth century A.D. were mostly compiled by bureaus of
history and are thereby devoid of personality.
What Chinese scholars have read between the lines in Sima Qj.an's
history is a deep resentment of imperial tyranny-in 99 B.C. he was sentenced
to be castrated for lese majesty in the defense of his friend, the general Li
who was guilty of having allowed himself to be captured alive
by the barbarian Xiongnu. The reader appreciates in Sima Qj.an's historical
accounts, and in the subtle arrangement of the stories, a resistance masked
by a resonant restraint, and a talent for storytelling that masterfully
combines discourse and narrative.
Thus Xiang Yu the unlucky rival of Liu Bang who
founded the Han dynasty under which Sima Qj.an lived, was given a
"basic annals" although he never ruled the empire. The passage recounting
the final battle between Xiang Yu and Liu Bang at Gaixia and the pathos
of Xiang Yu's last stand are particularly celebrated accounts, repeated in
the theater and in a number of other popular genres.
The historian's "elegy" that closes the long biographical account of
Xiang Yu is a piece fit for an anthology:
I have heard Master Zhou say that Shun [our model emperor] has
eyes with double pupils, and I have also heard that Xiang Yu had eyes
with double pupils. Could it be that Xiang Yu was his descendant? How
sudden was his rise! When Qj.n lost control of the government, Chen
She was the first to cause difficulties, and men of power and distinction
rose like a swarm of wasps, struggling with each other in numbers too
Chapter 2. Prose
great to count. Xiang Yu, without even an inch of territory, took advantage
of the situation and rose in arms from the farming fields. Within three
years he led the five feudal lords to annihilate Qj.n, divide up the world,
and enfeoff kings and marquises. All political power emanated from
Xiang Yu, who proclaimed himself Hegemon King. Even though he
was unable to hold this position until the end, his deeds are unprecedented.
Then Xiang Yu turned his back on the "land within the Passes" to
embrace Chu. He banished the Righteous emperor and enthroned
himself, full of resentment for the feudal lords rebelling against him.
What difficulties he put himself in! He made a show of his own knowledge,
never learning from the ancients. He called his enterprise that of a
Hegemon King, intending to manage the world by means of mighty
campaigns. After five years he finally lost his state. Even when he died
alone at Dongcheng, he did not come to his senses and blame himself.
What error! To excuse himself by claiming "Heaven destroyed me, it
was not any fault of mine in employing troops." Is this not madness?
35
The pathos of the storyteller Sima Qj.an reappears in many of the
biographies in the fmal seventy chapters of the Records of the Grand Historian.
It also figures notably in the chapters devoted to foreign countries or
peoples. The most remarkable example is the treatment of minor figures-
in collective biographies under labels such as "The Harsh Officials',''
"The Redressers of Wrongs," and "Favorites and Minions." There has
never been a Chinese historian who was not also very nearly a novelist.
This can be clearly seen in one of the biographies collected in the chapter
on assassins, which recounts Jing Ke's near-assassination of the future
First Emperor of Qj.n (r. 221-210 B.C.) in 227 B.C.
The Records of the Grand Historian also made room for the comedians
who often played the role of jester for the princes, masking their criticisms
with witty remarks. The historian's preface to the chapter on jesters justifies
the inclusion of such a chapter:
36 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
"The Six Classics," said Confucius, "aim at the same goal-to govern
well. The (Classic of) Ritual is employed to control the people, the (Classic
of) Music works toward developing harmony, the (Classic of) Documents
works toward guiding affairs of state, the (Classic of) Poetry works toward
expressing one's ideas, the (Classic of) Changes works toward uplifting
the soul, and the chronicle of Spring and Autumn works toward
righteousness." "Vast is the Way of Heaven," said the Grand Astrologer
(and chronicler, Sima Tan, father of Sima Qj.an). "Isn't it huge? And yet
the 'trifling words' [of the jesters] can sometimes hit the mark."
No document is as revealing of Sima Qj.an's personality as his "Letter in
Reply to Ren An," one of the most famous works of the epistolary genre,
a vehicle used by the most eminent writers in China to address serious
subjects, often for an intended audience far beyond a single addressee:
It is not easy to explain the affair [that led to my castration] to
ordinary people point by point. My father did not reach the stage of
holding the seals and investitures of a high dignitary. Chronicles and
the calendar placed him close to fortune-tellers, among those with whom
the sovereign took his pleasure-the comedians whom he nourished and
whom the common people hold in contempt. If I had submitted to the
law and suffered execution, it would have made no more difference
than the loss of a hair from a herd of cows, no more difference than the
death of an ant. The world would not compare me with those who died
to retain their honor; it would simply consider that, having exhausted
every clever method, I would not be able to escape from the enormity
of my crime and that in the end I had no choice but to die. Why is this?
It is so because of the modesty of the position I had established myself
in. Every man assuredly has only a single death. A death is sometimes
more weighty than Mount Tai, sometimes lighter than a goose feather-the
difference lies in the use to which it is put. ...
Lacking the power to make their concept of the Way prevail, let all
these authors report the events of the past while thinking about their
Chapter 2. Prose
posterity .... Before my draft was completed, I was struck by misfortune.
Regretting that it was incomplete caust;d me to confront without
indignation the most ignominious of tortures. If I truly get to finish
writing it, it will be hidden in a "famous mountain" and handed on to
those who will appreciate it, so that it can be spread throughout the
cities and the capital, at once atoning for the disgrace of my humiliation.
Even were I to suffer ten thousand humiliations, how could I feel regret
[as long as I complete my history]! But this can only be said to those
who understand [the situation]. It is difficult to make a common person
understand.
37
Although few, if any, Chinese women left letters, the epistolary genre was
one of the most open, allowing the writer to broach all subjects, from the
most serious to the most intimate.
The famous painter of bamboo Zheng Xie ~ ~ {best known by his
hao Banqiao ; f & ~ , 1693-1765) left a series of famous letters addressed to
his younger brother:
Having been able to have a son only at age fifty two, how could I not
love him? It is rather a question of loving him in a good way. Even in
games and amusements it is necessary to make him honest and kindly,
to prevent him from being cruel and irascible. There is nothing in life
which displeases me as much as keeping birds in a cage. We look for
pleasure while they are in prison. What is the point of vexing the nature
of these creatures to please our own? As for tying a dragonfly to a hair
or attaching a thread to a crab to make a plaything for a child, this is
merely to condemn them to be mutilated and die in a moment. Heaven
and earth have begot these creatures, transformed and nourished them
with great effort .... The Emperor on High also cherishes them with his
heart. But if we men, who are the most noble of creatures, are incapable
of embodying the compassionate heart of Heaven, on whom can the
ten thousand creatures rely?
38 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
II. The Return of the "Ancient Style"
"Family instruction manuals" were written in the style of letters to
the family. The most representative of these works is by Y an Zhitui
fit (531-ca. 590). The simplicity of the style of his Yanshi jiaxun
(Family Instructions for the Y an Clan) heralded the return of "ancient-style
prose," which modem critics have made into a "movement," guwen yundong
(the ancient-prose movement). This work, divided into twenty
sections, is comprehensive, illustrating its advice with anecdotes and
adopting a personal tone. It begins with the education of children, which
is deemed indispensable for everyone but prodigies, who can be excused
from it, and morons, who would not profit from it.
Y an Zhitui, who proclaimed the necessity of faith, devoted an
entire section to the defense and illustration of the doctrines of Sakyamuni,
who, according to Y an, perfected the ideas of Confucius. This was in
marked contrast to the opinions espoused by Han Yu (768-824),
the first advocate to call for a return to ancient-style prose. Han was one
of the forerunners of a philosophical movement known as Neo-
Confucianism that blossomed in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, and
he was violently hostile to Buddhism, which in his eyes was as useless as
Taoism, but with the added detriment of having barbarian origins.
The principal argument of the report that Han Yu submitted to
Emperor Xianzong (r. 806-820) in 819, reproaching him for honoring a
relic of the Buddha, reads as follows:
I hear that Your Majesty has ordered Buddhist monks to accompany
a [finger-joint] bone of the Buddha from Fengxiang, and that you aim to
observe the procession which will bring the relic into the palace from a
tower. Further, orders have been given to all the monasteries to go in
succession and offer sacrifices to it. While I am only your ignorant
servant, I am convinced that Your Majesty neither has been beguiled
by the Buddha nor would worship him in order to seek blessings, but
that [this celebration] is because of the joy among the people at the
Chapter 2. Prose
plentiful harvest. Your Majesty is complying with the people's heartfelt
wishes to set up this unusual spectacle for the populace of the capital as
a means of amusement. How could such a sage, enlightened ruler believe
in such affairs?
However, the common people are ignorant, easy to beguile and
difficult to enlighten. If they see Your Majesty act like this, they will say
that you are serving the Buddha with a sincere devotion .... For
Buddha was originally a barbarian who did not speak the languages of
China; nor was his dress similar to ours.
If the Buddha were still alive today, and had received the orders of
his state to come to the capital as an envoy to court, and Your Majesty
would have granted to receive him, it would be by no more than a
single audience in the Reception Hall for Foreign Guests, and the present
of a suit of clothes, seeing that he was provided with guards until he left
our borders so as not to allow him to beguile the masses. Not to mention
that he has been dead for so long-how could [this bone] be allowed to
enter the palace? ... I would beg that this bone be handed over to the
authorities, to be thrown into water or fire, to forever destroy its root
and base, so that the doubts in the empire are resolved, the beguilement
of future generations nipped in the bud ....
39
It can be assumed that his remonstrance exceeded normal limits: after
having nearly been executed for his lese majesty, Han Yu was banished
to the extreme southeastern part of China; he took fewer risks in his exile
in Chaozhou by asking that the crocodiles evacuate the local river under
his domain:
Though weak and feeble, I lower my head to the crocodiles, my
heart crushed, trembling in fear, in order to barely manage to survive,
thereby dishonoring myself before the people and my subordinates.
Moreover, I have received orders from the Son of Heaven to come here
and carry out the duties of the prefect. Under these circumstances I
cannot but discuss the situation with the crocodiles. If they are endowed
with intelligence, may they listen to the warning of the prefect.
40
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
The ocean is located to the south of Chaozhou, "the prefecture of
the Tides." The vast sea can give life and nourishment to all who return
to it, from the largest being like the whale and the rock, to the smallest
shrimp or crab. By departing in the morning, the crocodiles would
arrive in the evening. Let me make a pact with them: before three days
have passed, they must take their horrible mob south to the sea, so as to
avoid the officer appointed by the Son of Heaven. If this is not possible
in three days, it shall be in five. If it is not possible in five days, they
shall be accorded seven. If seven days are not sufficient, it will be clear
that they refuse to move and have not accepted the presence of the
prefect or listened to his entreaties. Or that the crocodiles are ft{olish
animals, without intelligence, who neither listen to nor understand the
words of the prefect. Now, then, whoever scorns the officer appointed
by the Son of Heaven, neither obeying him nor moving away to avoid
him, as well as the unintelligent beasts, harmful to the people and to
other creatures, all these may be put to death ....
This petition that accompanied the offerings to the crocodiles is to be
read with tongue in cheek, as Han Yuhas revealed elsewhere, including
his satirical biography of a certain Mao Ying :f;;f][, "Tip of the Brush," in
which he compares the emperor's casting away a worn-out brush that
served him long and loyally to the abandonment of a loyal official who
grows old and begins to lose his hair. In the piece that follows, Han
allows us to savor the ironic ambiguity of an allegory also aimed at the
sovereign and his scholars:
The dragon exhales a sigh which turns into clouds, clouds which
assuredly are no more efficacious than the dragon. But the dragon
mounts this exhalation, which exhausts the immensity of the celestial
mystery, which veils the sun and the moon, glistening between the
darkness and the light; he emits lightning and thunder, and through
divine transformations causes water to fall on the earth, drenching hills
and valleys. Could it be that the clouds themselves are also efficacious?
Chapter 2. Prose
The clouds are that which the dragon is able to make efficacious.
As for the efficacity of the dragon, it is not that which the clouds have
made. Nevertheless, if the dragon were not able to reach the clouds, he
would have no means to deploy his divine power. He would certainly
not know what to do without this support. Strange! For this support is
his own emanation. As the Classic of ~ h a n g e s says, "The clouds follow
the dragon;" that is to say, "The dragon is that which follows the clouds."
41
The epitaph and the funeral inscription that Han Yu composed for
Liu Zongyuan ;fPP*:JC (773-819), the other influential ancient-style prose
advocate of the Tang dynasty (618-907), have had enduring fame. Han
Yu and Liu Zongyuan head the list of "eight great prose writers of the
Tang and Song dynasties" and form a pair that critics have enjoyed
juxtaposing and comparing. Holding to a much less militant brand of
Confucianism, Liu Zongyuan was as open to Taoist and Buddhist ideas
as he was to those of Legalism. In disgrace after the abdication of Emperor
Shunzong (r. 805), whom he had strongly supported, Liu Zongyuan was
exiled almost continually to minor posts in the far south. Ironically, some
were sinecures that allowed him the time to foster his literary career. His
best-known works come from this period. The anti-Confucian, pro-Legalist
campaign of the last phase of the Great Cultural Revolution (1966-1976)
valued him highly, giving him star billing and particularly praising his
discourse on the feudal regime, Fengjian lun MJiffifH (On Feudalism). This
discourse supports an evolutionary thesis inspired by a rather unorthodox
Confucianism. Necessity pushes humans to organize themselves into
societies for survival and self-protection, but it is not in response to
human will that society is carried toward a confederacy of chiefdoms and
finally devoted to a supreme authority in the person of the Son of Heaven
(or emperor). The prefectural system is superior to the feudal society that
it eliminated. The crises of those governments that employed the prefectural
system were caused not by the system, but by other factors. Confucius
did not choose the feudal system, he merely survived it. Liu concludes:
42
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Now, the Way of the governing throughout the world generates
either order or chaos among the people. Only after causing those who
are worthy to occupy the positions above; and those who are unworthy
those below, can you achieve order and peace. Now, the feudal regime
achieves order through the hereditary succession of positions. To achieve
order through hereditary succession, do not those above indeed have to
be worthy and those below indeed unworthy? Yet how order and chaos
are generated in men is something that cannot be understood. If one
desires to profit the altars of a state, one must unify that which the
people of that state see and hear; if there are furthermore hereditary
nobles living from the emoluments of hereditary fiefs, the grantable fiefs
will be exhausted. When sages and worthies are born in this time, there
is indeed nowhere to establish them [with fiefs]-this is the result of the
feudal system. How could it be that what the Sage [Confucius] determined
for governing was reached in this? I would claim, "The feudal system
was not the Sage's concept, it was his situation."
It is in his fables, his descriptions of excursions, that Liu Zongyuan appears
more captivating than the severe Han Yu; for example, the distressing
story of the fawn of Liujiang:
In the course of a hunt, a native of Liujiang [in modern Jiangxi]
captured a fawn which he decided to raise. As they entered through his
gate, a pack of dogs approached, salivating and wagging their tails. The
man was angry and rebuffed them. Thenceforth he would carry the
deer to the dogs, so they would get used to his showing it to them, while
he forbade them to move. Gradually, he let them play with it. After a
time, the dogs all did what the man wanted. As the fawn slowly grew
up, it forgot it was a deer and believed the dogs were its good friends. It
would butt heads with them and lie down with them, becoming
increasingly intimate. The dogs feared their master and were docile and
friendly to it. But from time to time they would lick their chops.
Chapter 2. Prose
After three years, the deer went outside the gate. Seeing a large
pack of dogs along the road, it ran to play with them. When they saw it,
these other dogs went into a frenzy, joining together to kill and devour
it, strewing the remains along the road. The fawn went to its death
without being enlightened.
43
The statesman Ouyang Xiu W \ ~ f ~ (1007-1072), the third of the
"eight prose masters," was also the person who "rediscovered" Han Yu's
writing, which had been eclipsed by a revival of the parallel-prose style
(especially at court) in the late ninth and tenth centuries. Ouyang's
"discourses" are among the most appreciated of his prose works, especially
those in which he justified the formation of political factions (through
which the good could drive away the bad) and that on the eunuchs,
which appeared in the dynastic New History of the Five Dynasties that he
edited, revealing the difficult position of the scholars:
That eunuchs have brought chaos to states since ancient times has
its origins deep in the misfortunes caused by women. Women are no
more than sexual objects. The noxiousness of the eunuchs, however,
does not arise from a single cause. It may be that in being employed in
official positions they are close to the sovereign and become familiar
with him or that in their thinking they are single-minded and patient.
They are able to win favor because of a small talent, to secure affection
. because of a small act of faith. They wait until they are completely
trusted and maintain this trust by frightening the ruler with omens.
Although the ruler has loyal ministers and eminent scholars arrayed in
his court, he finds them too distant and prefers to rely on those intimates
with whom he spends his daily life and takes his meals, those who are
before and behind him, to his left and his right. For this reason, those
who are before and behind him, to his left and his right, daily become
more familiar, the loyal ministers and eminent scholars daily become
more estranged, and the ruler's position daily becomes more isolated.
44 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Examiner-in-chief for the "doctoral examinations" of 1057, Ouyang
Xiu promoted three of the other "eight great prose writers:" his friend
Zeng Gong (1019-1063), whose "severe style" has not served him
well in the opinion of posterity; Su Shi ( 103 7-11 01); and Su' s younger
brother Su Che (1039-1112). Numbers seven and eight on the list
are the father of the precocious geniuses, Su Xun (1009-1055), and
the politician Wang Anshi (1021-1086), most famous for his radical
reforms and related prose writings, which, because of their topicality, are
of little interest to the modern reader. It is clear, however, that on the
literary stage, Su Shi eclipsed them all, including his patron Ouyang Xiu.
The question is how to evaluate Su's vast and varied collected works, in
which superb poetry vies with his prose writings. The shackles of a rigid
Confucianism were cheerily ignored by a spirit enamored with moral
and intellectual freedom. This can be seen in the following passage from
the dissertation entitled "Xing shang zhong hou zhi zhi lun" JfU:i:Ji!;,Jlj[iL
(On the Penalties and Rewards of Perfecting Loyalty and Generosity),
which distinguished the examination papers of Su Shi, scarcely twenty
years old, in the view of his "master" Ouyang Xiu. The passage, about a
sage ancient ruler contains what seemed a certain allusion to one of the
classics. This greatly intrigued the examiners, because they did not
recognize the allusion, but they would not admit to the gap in their
memories. After allowing Su Shi to pass high on the list of graduates,
they questioned the laureate about his source, and Su Shi acknowledged
that the anecdote about the largesse of the sage king Y ao was his own
invention!
.As the commentary says, "When there is doubt about giving rewards,
they should be given widely to demonstrate the royal grace; when there
is doubt about giving penalties, they should be widely avoided, to
demonstrate the care with which punishments are applied."
In Emperor Yao's time, Gao Yao was the Minister ofjustice. He
was going to kill a man. Gao Y ao said, "Kill him" three times. Y ao said,
!
t
I
i
i
I
Chapter 2. Prose
"Pardon him" three times. For this reason the people of the world
feared the firmness with which Gao Yao enforced the law and delighted
in the leniency with which Y ao applied punishments.
45
Su Shi might also be considered the precursor of a genre in which
the original character of Chinese civilization at its best was depicted-the
xiaopin wen 1hrbJc or "essay on minor subjects"-as the opening passage
from his "Chaoran Tai ji" (Notes on the Terrace of
Transcendence) illustrates:
All things merit observation, and since they merit it they are all
sources of potential joy. It is not necessary that they be rare or marvelous,
beautiful or imposing. A simple beverage of fermented rice is enough to
make one feel good; fruits and vegetables can satisfy the appetite. To
follow this line of reasoning, where could I go that I would not be
happy?
ill. The Golden Age of Trivial Literature
Scorned by the ancients as well as the moderns, the free essays in
the xiaopin wen form enjoyed their greatest popularity during the sixteenth
and seventeenth centuries. The genre could nevertheless claim a respectable
ancestry, having commenced with a narrative about Confucius which
closes chapter 11 of the Analects:
Zilu, Zeng Xi, Ran You, and Gongxi Hua were seated in attendance
on Confucius. The Master said, "Forget for a moment that I am your
elder. You say among yourselves, 'No one appreciates my talents.' If
you did find someone to appreciate them, what would you wish to
do?'»
3
The implied subject of "appreciating talents" would be the lord of a state
46 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Zilu quickly responded: "Give me a country of one thousand chariots
situated between two great countries, ravaged by famine under the
pressure of enemy troops. If I were in charge, within three years I
would give its people courage and put them back on their feet."
The Master sighed and said, "Ran You, what about you?"
Ran You replied, "Give me a state of twenty to thirty miles square,
or even fifteen to twenty miles square. If I were in charge, within three
years the people would be well off. As for rites and music, however, that
would have to await a gentleman."
"And you, Gongxi Hua?"
"I cannot say that I already have the ability [to rule], but I am ready
to learn. In carrying out the affairs of worship in the ancestral temple or
in diplomatic gatherings, I am ready to serve as a minor assistant."
"Zeng Xi, what about you?"
A final note died from his lute, then Zeng Xi put the lute aside,
stood up [in respect], and replied, "My choice differs from those of the
other three."
The Master said, "What harm is there in that? After all, each is
expressing his own ambition."
"At the end of spring, in the clothes appropriate to that season, I
would like to go to bathe in the river by five or six men
and six or seven youths, to enjoy the breeze, and to return home singing."
The Master heaved a sigh of approval: "I am with you."
The spirit of xiaopin wen existed long before the term was applied
to the literary mode that prevailed among scholars at the end of the
sixteenth century. Witness the Zazuan *IE. (Miscellanies), attributed
incorrectly to the poet Li Shangyin $J:llilll (ca. 813-858), a work which
toward the year 1000 perhaps inspired the celebrated Pillowbook of the
Japanese authoress Sei Shonagon ii:Y%il'!§, as the following examples
from the Miscellanies suggest:
who would then employ the man he saw as talented.
Chapter 2. Prose
I. Incongruities: 1. A poor Persian. 7. A butcher reciting sutras.
VIII. Resemblances: 4. Like a tiger, whenever a magistrate moves, he
injures people.
XVII. Annoying things: 1. Cutting with a blunt knife. 4. Building a wall
that hides the mountains.
XIX. Spoiling the fun: 3. Spreading a mat on moss. 8. Carrying a torch
in the moonlight.
XX: Cannot bear to hear: 2. The filthy talk of the marketplace. 4. A
young wife mourning her husband.
XXIV: (The Power of) Suggestion: 1. Wearing green gauze in winter
makes one feel cold. 4. Heavy curtains suggest someone lurking.
XXX: Contemporary crazes: 6. Adults flying kites. 8. Women cursing
in public.
XXXIII: Unlucky: 1. To eat lying down. 5. To write bareheaded.
XXXIX: Lapses: 2. Scolding another's servants. 9. Raising chopsticks
before the host asks people to start eating.
47
The return of ancient-style prose in the eleventh century was a
straightforward demand for liberty and spontaneity; it emerged "as water
surges forth," in the words of Su Shi. Technique (fa$) was servant to
inspiration (yi this a result of the trauma of thejurchen and then
Mongol incursions from the eleventh through the thirteenth centuries?
Under the Mongols (Yuan dynasty, 1279-1368), the entire country was
for the first time entirely under the rule of alien conquerors.
After the restoration of Chinese rule in the Ming dynasty
(1368-1644), the new capital at Beijing again became the focus of power
under the reign of the Yongle emperor (1403-1424). But it was not the
center of culture or intellectual activity, which was increasingly found in
the Lower Yangtze Valley, around the traditional centers of Nanjing,
Suzhou, and Hangzhou. Cliques formed among these intellectuals,
polarized by the question of whether to imitate the ancients. Adherents of
the type of straightforward prose that Han Yu and Liu Zongyuan advocated
now revived the earlier arguments. They advocated seeking inspiration
"
t
I
'"
" ''"
·.,
..

l
48 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
among the ancients,. but opposed imitation of any kind. This statement
by Yuan Zongdao's Jlt*m: {1560-1600) is typical:
This is why Confucius said of prose that it sufficed if it made itself
understood. Intelligibility is the measure of quality literature .... As our
contemporaries do not immediately fathom the ancient works that they
read, they find "ancient prose" of a marvelous profundity and proscribe
the simplicity of modem writers. The ancient and modem prose works
were both appropriate to their times and to their language. The rare
words and obscure phrases that have aroused the astonished admiration
of today's reader-can one know that they were not in their time part of
the language of the streets?
The logical response to this argument would have been to adopt the
spoken language of each era as the medium of prose. Such pleas had
little effect until nearly 1920, however, and the vernacular was then
introduced as the medium of elite literature only with great difficulty-it
still seemed natural for scholars involved with this linguistic revolution to
write their pleas in the classical language.
Yuan Zongdao and his two well-known brothers, Yuan Hongdao
Jlt*m: {1568-1610) and Yuan Zhongdao {1570-1624), fell into
neglect for several centuries after their works were banned by the Manchus
who conquered China and set up the Qj.ng dynasty {1644-1911). In the
late Ming, however, Yuan Hongdao was the best-known writer in the
family. Yuan Hongdao was originally from Gong'an 01i:, in the green
and mountainous meridional province of Hubei, and when he was assigned
to the capital in an official capacity, he rediscovered the joy of the landscapes
surrounding his beloved hometown through literature in his "Wenyi Tang
ji" {Record of the Hall of Literary Ripples):
I rented a house where I laid out a small room to the right of the
hall to read books in .... Above the gate I hung an inscription that read
Chapter 2. Prose
"The Hall of Literary Ripples."
Someone said: "Here in the capital the noise and the dust hide the
sky to the point that it is hazy the whole day long. Yet in this 'hall' there
is not anything which could be called a wave or even a pond. Where
will you get the ripples to be displayed before you?"
I laughed and said, "It is not a matter of water in the strict sense,
not real water. However, there is nothing under heaven which resembles
water more than literature. It hurtles down all at once, then suddenly
changes course. It returns to heave in dark clouds covering in an instant
thousands of miles .... I close my gate and arrange my thoughts. My
bosom swells and, as if I have bumped into something, I suddenly see a
surge of waves, eddies, and ripples rise up like those I saw in former
days. And when I take up a book by Sima Qjan, Ban Gu, Du Fu, Po
Juyi, Han Yu, Ouyang Xiu, Su Xun, or SuShi, the metamorphoses and
wonders of water are all displayed before me .... Everything supple
and sinuous is water. That is why in my eyes all literature is related to
water. Not that I would deny that mountains are as beautiful as literature,
but they have a height which cannot be lowered, a rigidity which cannot
be made pliable. They are something dead. But water, no .... "
49
Officials were normally transferred to a new post every three years,
so scholars were by force of necessity great travelers. It should come as
no surprise, therefore, that travel literature was established as early as the
second century B.C., in the narratives by Zhang Qj.an i}N. about his
exploration of countries to the west. Later, Ouyang Xiu kept a journal of
his mission to a barbarian court in the eleventh century. But the case of
Xu Xiake {the hao of Xu Hongzu 1586-1641) seems
exceptional: he sacrificed his ambitions for an official career to his passion
for long treks in the mountains. His famous journals focus on the object
of his observations, but are of a precision that ftlls modern-day geographers
with joy. The following passage is from his "You Wutai Shan riji" m11.-1:
LlJ B {A Diary of Roaming through the Five Terrace Mountains):
50 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
The sixth of the eighth month (31 August 1623): a windstorm arose,
but each drop of rain that fell changed into ice. When the wind fell, the
sun appeared, like a bead of fire, looming suddenly through the jade-blue
leaves. When I followed the mountain toward the southwest about a
mile, I crossed a ridge and could first see Southern Terrace [one of the
Five Terrace Mountains] before me. Ascending further, I found the
Lamp Monastery. Along this way the road gradually grew steep. About
three miles farther, I climbed the highest peak on the Southern Terrace,
where a stupa containing a relic of Maiijusri stood. Facing north, the
other terraces were arrayed in a circle; only to the southeast and the
southwest was there a little open space.
This passage gives only a slight indication of the wealth of detail in the
diary which vies with even the best modern guides to the Five Terrace
Mountains in modern Shanxi.
Chen Jiru (1558-1639), a friend of the Xu family who
composed a biography for Xu Xiake's father, is perhaps the most
representative of the new type of literati who managed to live from what
he earned with his writing brush rather than lowering himself to enter an
official career. His varied, largely ignored corpus of works includes pithy
epigrams such as the following:
A bachelor is as timid as a young virgin. When he begins his
official career, he must treat his superiors as a daughter-n-law does her
husband's parents. When he retires, like a mother-in-law, he takes pleasure
in dispensing advice liberally.
Pardon the offenses of your servants-those in which you are the
victim, not those which others have complained about.
It is difficult to truly know others. And those who allow themselves
to be known easily are not worth the trouble of getting to know.
After the collapse of the Ming dynasty in 1644, many scholars
refused to serve the new masters-the Manchus-because of their loyalty
Chapter 2. Prose 51
to the fallen regime. Was this the case with Li Yu ( 1611-1680? An
admirer of the renowned novelist and dramatist Chen Jiru, Li was also
without doubt the most original essayist China has ever produced.
An impenitent hedonist, Li Yu seems to have preferred the
independence of a life devoted to pleasure to the servitude of an official
life. He gave up his career and resorted to patrons to supplement the
income, always insufficient, that he earned from his publications,
shamelessly pirated, and also from his theater troupe, to which he
contributed his own concubines. It is true that the "poverty" of which he
often complains in his correspondence did not prevent him from keeping
a household of fifty people. The title that he gave to the successive
collections of his works in classical Chinese is significant: Liweng yijia yan
(Words from the Unique School of Liweng)-Liweng, "the
old [fisherman] in a straw hat," was his zi or "style." His defense of
novelty and a spirit of invention is not without ironic nuances:
One looks for the old only in people; in things it is only the novel
that holds interest. "Novel" is a laudatory qualifier for everything in the
world. It is doubly so when it comes to literary art. [As Han Yu wrote:]
"How difficult it is to apply oneself to eliminating cliches!" (I, 3).
Recent works sacrifice everything to novelty. They change what
can be changed without- examining it. But they also trade what should
be preserved at all costs to appear innovative. I think the novelty of
writing is internal and should not apply to external aspects.
Li Yu's admirable Xianqing ouji (Occasional Notes
Occasioned by Feelings of Idleness) is a seemingly modest compilation
that skillfully intertwines some three hundred essays. It is evident from
his letters, however, that Li Yu was perfectly aware that the publication
of this collection was his crowning achievement. In his claim that he was
expressing the self, xingling 'tili (the efficacy of [one's own] nature), the
innovative power of the Yuan brothers can certainly be seen. But no one
52 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
else had the know-how to assume this power so wholeheartedly. Art was
supposed to chase away tedium: the expression of the self is the necessary
condition, but by itself is not sufficient. A work of art must sustain the
interest of others and elicit pleasure. In this Li Yu agreed with Yuan
Hongdao on the importance of qu /00, amusement. He took pleasure in
employing paradox, with respect to style or situation, and indeed in
shocking the reader. As an example, witness the section of his Xianqing
ouji devoted to the "art of sweeping:"
A stylish house requires the greatest care in sweeping. But this
demands a higher skill than simple servants have. To eliminate dust, it
is necessary to begin by splashing water lightly about. This is a method
that the ancients have transmitted to us. Not more than one or two
people in ten practice it today. The servant boy, naturally lazy, contents
himselfto sweep-when in fact the one doesn't work without the other.
The poet Yuan Mei R;f)(: ( 1716-1797) might be called the "Chinese
Julia Child" because of his wonderful cookbook entitled Shidan ~ l ! i !
{Menus, 1796), but no one knew better how to communicate the passions
of the gourmand than Li Yu; here he relates the art of savoring crabs
with an infectious fervor:
As for the pleasures of the table, I can talk about them all, and my
imagination is inexhaustible. But it is only crabs that will not allow me
to detail their wonders in full. My spirit savors them with so much
delight that I will never forget the taste on my palate until the last day of
my life. Why? All my eloquence does not suffice to explain ....
Each year before they appear in the marketplace, I hoard my pennies
in expectation. As my family pokes fun at me by saying that I hold
crabs more dear than life, I call this money "the vital ransom."
There is no better medicine than a good humor and the pleasures, large
and small, that sustain one. Li Yu recounts for us how, during an epidemic
Chapter 2. Prose 53
in 1630, which had struck his entire family, and him more gravely than
the others, the doctor had advised against the consumption of arbutus
berries, which he was very fond of:
I then began to question .my family. They set the words of the
doctor against me. "A charlatan who knows precious little about it! Go
buy them for me with all due speed!" I grumbled. The juice of the
berries had scarcely flowed into my mouth when the knot of melancholy
that had gripped my breast completely loosened. When what I swallowed
reached my stomach, it restored the harmony to my five organs. I fully
regained the use of my four limbs. I no longer knew what illness it was I
had suffered from. With this spectacle, my family understood that the
doctor's warning had proved false, and they allowed me to eat the
berries to my heart's content.
To attempt to treat his melancholy by forcing himself to have
sexual relations would have been "like compelling a sad person to laugh."
But Li Yu admitted that he was incapable of following the good advice of
"just exercising more moderation than was his habit" (XVI, 4, 2). On the
other hand, there is no better remedy for amorous languor than satisfying
thwarted desire:
Every young boy or young girl, when the desire for love has already
. begun but they are not yet married, falls ill thereby, not soon to recover.
Only this one thing can cure them. Even if the patient is too weak to
endure intimate embraces, it suffices to have his beloved come and go
before him, to thereby make known to him that [his beloved] already
belongs to him. This can relieve most of the lovesickness. It is like
someone who obtains a medicine but doesn't take it. Only inhaling its
odor still makes him feel better .... The filial and charitable sons who
care for their parents, the strict fathers as well as the sweet mothers who
love their sons, all must prepare this remedy in advance, so as to prevent
the illness. (XVI, 6, 3}
54 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
When Li Yu speaks of beds in his chapter on furniture, he calls to us with
irrefutable eloquence:
A man lives one hundred years, half of which he passes occupied
with the day and the other half occupied with the night. The days he
spends in indeterminable places: a hall, a room, a boat, or a carriage.
But the nights he knows only to spend in bed. Beds are therefore things
in which we have company half the night and which have precedence
over our companions. So there is nothing that merits more of our attention.
I am always amazed with my contemporaries who, when looking
for a place to live, inquire after a house as if their lives were at stake, but
ostensibly neglect the quarters where they would take their rest under
the pretext that they are places one does not show to others. But would
it then be necessary for our wives, concubines, and servants to go about
in rags, with tousled hair and dirty faces, because these human beings,
like our beds, are reserved for our view and not that of others? (X, 1, 4)
Of all the pleasures of life, there were few that Li Yu placed above
a hot bath, in summer or winter. To the Taoists, who had forbidden such
baths in order to "nourish the vital principle," Li Yu replied by likening
man to plants, which are believed to give thanks for the rain and the dew
(XV, 1, 11). Yet among all of his passions and his aversions, Li Yu
confides to us at the end of his work, his maniacal obsession has been the
love of writing, a remedy for depression as for anger or a bad mood. Is it
not a kind of sickness that causes one to persevere until a literary work is
completed?
What pushes me to this? Most often the hand of the little imp of creation.
It is obvious that Li Yu's defense and illustration of what are viewed by
the Confucian tradition as trifling matters, which he manages with so
much brilliance, are not as trivial as they may appear. His ideas on
literary art provide further demonstration of this situation. They agree
Chapter 2. Prose
55
with so many Western conceptions that they run the unfair risk of seeming
banal to us.
IV. Literary Criticism
Of an inventive mind, Li Yu was a creative craftsman of fiction ,
according great importance to plot and diction. These emphases were a
paradox for Chinese traditional criticism, which usually focused on musical
aspects of the opera-theater, a relatively late genre that originated in the
twelfth century. For the most part, works devoted to literary criticism
were concerned mainly with poetry, specifically the effect of poetry rather
than its genesis. The art of literary composition in prose is treated only
marginally in the anthologies that gave rise to the revised system of
examinations starting in the twelfth century.
With respect to evaluation and classification, the preferred theories
were expressed in terse formulae. These tendencies were already apparent
in the earliest treatise that has been handed down, that by Cao Pi Wf/F
(187-226), the Lun wen Jffia)( (Discourse on Literature), a fragment preserved
in A Selection of Literature by Xiao Tong (501-531). Breakingfor the first
time from the moral and utilitarian point of view, this little work
contemplates literature in its aesthetic aspects, for the "wen possessed a
common trunk that does not differ 'from its branches," which are the
various classical genres, each having its own requirements.
The Wen fo :ZM or "Fu on Literature" by Lu Ji (261-301)
celebrated the mysteries of inspiration, but the most elaborate survey of
this dominant current in Chinese literary criticism is the Wenxin diaolong
(The Heart of Literature Carves Dragons) by Liu Xie (c.
465-520). The work consists of fifty chapters which treat literary theory
and its applications ecumenically, integrating the Confucian tradition with
elements of Buddhism. The title of the work conjures up this
program-'heart' in the title might also be understood as '[literary]
mind"'-artistic works are a product of the spirit of literature. The first
chapter treats the "Original Dad' or Way:
,,,
I
,!
56
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Great is the strength of wen! ... When the spirit [the heart] is born,
the word is established, and through the establishment of the language,
wen [literature] shines forth. It is the Way of a spontaneous nature ....
After the first five chapters, which develop the idea that literature
is in the nature of things, Liu Xie devotes the nineteen following sections
to an examination of literary genres, divided up between those which are
wen )( {ornate/belletristic), requiring rhythm and/or rhyme, and those
which are bi. {brushwork/utilitarian), inclined toward simple clarity of
expression. The third part examines, with much finesse, literary
composition, literary techniques, and literary sensibilities. The penultimate
chapter recaptures the parallel with music in its title, Zhiyin 5;Dtf
{Understanding Sound); it treats the critical comprehension that must
initially take six points of view into consideration:
1) Style, 2) Rhetoric, 3) Communicability and flexibility, 4) Rectitude
and the fantastic, 5) Events and meaning, and 6) Musicality
The fiftieth and final chapter is a postface in which Liu Xie pays homage
to his precursors and justifies his enterprise, ending with this distich of
praise:
Literature is indeed a vehicle of the spirit
And my spirit has been raised in its domicile.
Comparable in importance to the Wenxin diaolong, the Shi pin "iii'fdb
{Evaluation of Poetry), composed between 513 and 517 by Zhong Rong
is devoted principally to the pentasyllabic poems of 122 authors of
the third to fourth centuries. The most accomplished collected works
strike a balance between "description," fu, and the xing-bi, the stimulating
evocation and comparison that transcend the literal sense. The influence
of Taoism and Buddhism is even more marked in the Ershisi shi pin = +
Chapter 2. Prose 57
[!J"iii'fdb {Evaluations of Poetry in Twenty-four (Poems]) by Sikong Tu R]
{837-908).
For Yan Yu j()j)j, who lived at the turn of the twelfth to the
thirteenth century, the primary role of poetry was to communicate the
knowledge of a transcendental reality beyond words. He borrowed a
good deal of terminology from the Chan sect {Zen, in Sinojapanese). His
Canglang shihua {Remarks on Poetry by (the Hermit] of the
(River] Canglang) had a decisive influence on the innumerable shihua
{remarks on poetry) that followed his. A related genre is the benshi ;zjs:$
{the facts themselves), works that endeavored to divulge the circumstances
under which poems were produced. All these works, including anthologies,
testify to the preeminence that poetry has always had in the eyes of the
Chinese.
58 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Suggested Further Reading
There is a detailed general survey of Chinese prose in Indiana Companion,
1: 93-120. The relevant sections ofjames R. Hightower's Topics in Chinese
Literature(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1950), though somewhat
dated, are still useful. David Knechtges's ongoing translation of Wen xuan
or Selections of Refined Literature (3 vols. to date; Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 1982-) is an excellent source on early Chinese prose. A
full survey of landscape depiction is presented in Richard E. Strassberg,
trans., Inscribed Landscapes: Travel Writing from Imperial China (Berkeley:
University of California Press, 1994), including selections from most of
the writers introduced above. In Indiana Companion, see also entries for
these writers as well as ''Ku-wen kuan-chih" r!t)(fill::. and ''Ku-wen tz;'u
lei-tsuan"r!t)(Wf!J@i., 1: 500-501 and 501-503, respectively.
Narrative Art and Historical Records
Dawson, Raymond. Historical Records. Oxford: Oxford University Press,
1994.
Durrant, Stephen. The Cloudy Mirror: Tension and Conflict in the Writings of
Sima Qjan. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995.
Nienhauser, William H.,Jr., ed. Nienhauser et al., trans. The Grand Scribe's
Records. Volume 1: The Basic Annals of Pre-Han China. Volume 7:
The Memoirs of Pre-Han China. Bloomington: Indiana University
Press, 1994.
Pohl, Karl-Heinz. Cheng Pan-ch'iao: Poet, Painter and Calligrapher. Nettetal:
Steyler Verlag, 1990.
Watson, Burton. Records of the Grand Historian: Han Dynasty I and Il
Revised ed. 2 vols. Hong Kong and New York: Renditions-
Columbia University Press, 1993.
Chapter 2. Prose
59
_.Records of the Grand Historian: Qjn Dynasty. Vol. 3. Revised ed. Hong
Kong and New York: The Research Centre for Translation, The
Chinese University of !fong Kong and Columbia University Press,
1993.
The Return of the ''Ancient Style"
Ch'en, Jo-shui. Liu Tsung-yuan and Intellectual Change in T'ang China,
773-879. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.
Chen, Yu-shih. Images and Ideas in Chinese Classical Prose: Studies of Four
Masters. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1988. Studies of Han
Yu, Liu Zongyuan, Ouyang Xiu, and SuShi.
Egan, Ronald C. The Literary Works ofOu-yang Hsiu (1007-72). Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press, 1984.
_. Word, Image and Deed in the Life of Su Shi Cambridge: Council on
East Asian Studies and the Harvard-Yenching Institute, 1994.
Hartman, Charles. Han Yu and the T'ang Search for Unity. Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 1985.
''Ku-wen. "In Indiana Companion, 1: 494-500.
Nienhauser, William H.,Jr. etal. Liu Tsung-yuan. Boston: Twayne, 1973.
The Golden Age of Trival Literature
"Chang Tai" 5:&111. In Indiana Companion, 1: 220-221.
"Li Yii" *:i'J.. In Indiana Companion, 1: 557-559.
Literary Criticism
"Literary Criticism." In Indiana Companion, I: 49-58.
Liu,Jamesj. Y. Chinese Theories of Literature. Chicago: University of Chicago
Press, 1974.
Owen, Stephen, trans. Readings in Chinese Literary Thought Cambridge:
Harvard University Press, 1992.
Rickett, Adele, ed. Chinese Approaches to Literature from Confucius to Liang
Ch'i-ch'ao. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1978.
:::
60
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Wong, Siu-kit, trans. Early Chinese Literary Criticism. Hong Kong: Joint
Publishing, 1983.
Chapter 3. Poetry
The preeminence of poetry in the Chinese tradition owes much to
a language and writing system that from early times was closely associated
with music and painting. The installation of the first imperial regime, the
~ n {221-207 B.C.), favored this evolution, since the ~ n rulers preferred
the carefully constructed formulae and irrefutable citations of verse to the
more threatening eloquence of the rhetoricians and their prose. The
triumph of ritualism in the succeeding Han dynasty (206 B.C.-220 A.D.)
solidified the position of poetry, which had been tied from the beginning
to rituals and ceremony.
Long written anonymously as popular or ritual verse, poetry did
not begin to become personalized-and professionalized-until the third
century A.D.; many of the early personal poems used new forms which
had emerged from the fertile ground of popular literature. It was the
sixth century before the most characteristic form of Chinese poetry
appeared: a rhymed quatrain of heptasyllabic or pentasyllabic lines that
took its rhythm from tonal opposition and that adhered to a strict parallelism
in the first distich. The ideal was to express the most with the least. Poetic
language strove for ambiguity while reducing the number of grammatical
words-which the Chinese call "empty words"-to the minimum required
for intelligibility. An effect of richness was obtained through implicit
images and literary allusions. To this were added the graphic evocations
of a writing system autonomous from the language itself. Over the centuries,
detailed commentaries have sometimes attempted to impose a word-for-
word interpretation, something to which a Chinese poem can rarely be
reduced. Would not the critic inspired by Buddhism say that great beauty
is inexpressible? Poetic language, laden with tradition, prefers to allude to
this beauty rather than speak of it, which lends itself to multiple readings.
The most important verse forms in China, in rough chronological
order, have been the ancient shi tff of the Shi jing (twelfth-sixth centuries
62
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
B.C.); the sao (laments) of the state of Chu in the third and fourth
centuries B.C. and its successor, the fu l!fi:t (rhapsody) of the Han dynasty
and after; yuefo (music bureau) poetry and its continuation, guti shi
(ancient-style verse), from the Han dynasty to the sixth century
A.D.;jinti shi (modern-style verse), including lii shi (regulated,
eight-line verse) and jueju (quatrains), which flourished in the Tang
dynasty; the ci (lyric), which began as a quasi-oral genre in the Tang;
and the qu fffi (arias), which developed in conjunction with the opera-theater
and were first popular during the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368).
I. The Two Sources of Ancient Poetry
We have seen above the role that Confucius assigned to the Classic
of Poetry, the Shi jing. This classic was memorized by all literati and was
essentially the source of a type of poetry designed to "express the intention"
!Janz:fzi through a poetic text based in nature which offers an implicit
comparison with a human situation. But the Shi jing was primarily a
source of inspiration, rather than a model, as so much of its language
quickly became "archaic" and its prosody, viewed from later times, peculiar.
1. The Songs of Chu. The Chu ci (Words of the State of
Chu) offer another source of inspiration, that of unbridled and despairing
lyricism. Compiled with commentary by Wang I (d. 158 A.D.) in
the second century A.D., the collection consists of seventeen distinct works
written by authors from various eras, works that include nearly one hundred
poems, each composed on one of two distinct prosodic models. These
models involve longer lines (usually with six syllables), with the caesura
or line break punctuated by the archaic exclamation "xi!'' (pronounced at
that time, it is thought, like "ah!"). The final piece, ]iu si flJGJ, (Nine
Thoughts), is a sort of pastiche by the commentator himself which attributes
the first seven poems to the quasi-legendary figure Qu Yuan lffi)]l: (ca.
340-278), a loyal minister of the large southern state of Chu who was
rejected by a sovereign incapable of recognizing his merits. His suicide
Chapter 3. Poetry 63
by drowning is commemorated by the riverine festivals of the summer
solstice (the fifth day of the fifth lunar month) in South China. Most of
these poems are laments, sao the longest of which is the first, Li sao
l.§i (Lament for the Separation [from the King of Chu ]) , the only one of these
poems that modern criticism still attributes to Qu Yuan.
The Li sao is also regarded as the first poem in Chinese literature to
have been intended for a reader (rather than a listener) and to have been
based on personal inspiration. The poet expresses himself in the first
person in order to launch himself on an ecstatic quest, filled with
mythological allusions that are often quite obscure to the modern reader;
he moves through the heavens, seeking a divinity that the commentators
identify as his sovereign. The texts seem to be imitations of shamanistic
declamations, echoes of the culture of the meridional states of South
China, whose traditions were lost when Qj.n unified the empire in the
late second century B.C. Here is a passage from the Li sao:
I watered my horse at the Pool of Heaven,
Tied my reins to the Daybreak Tree,
Broke off a branch to strike the sun [which rose there],
And freely I wandered at my ease. (lines 193-196)
The Nine Songs, ]iu ge which follow the Li sao, seem to call for
interpretation as dialogues between a medium, a priest or sorcerer, and a
divinity. Thus the celebrated Princess of the River Xiang (Xiang foren
A) whom the poet's persona encounters:
In the morning I drive my horses along the River,
In the evening I ford the waters toward western cliffs;
I hear the beautiful one call me to her,
And together we depart, driving the horses up ....
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
The Heavenly Qyestions, Tian wen :Kr"', {not "Heaven Questioned"
as it is sometimes understood-Heaven, the commentator rightly tells us,
is presented as a series of sarcastic riddles attributed to Qu Yuan but with
no connection to the tone or the prosodic form of the elegies), refer to
ancient myths and legends, as in the following:
The sun came out of the Valley of Warm Waters, then took his rest
at Murky Cliff. How many miles had he [the sun] gone from morning
until dusk?
Kunlun has Hanging Gardens; where are they situated? How many
miles high are its nine-fold walls? Who passes through the gates in its
four sides?
Why are the flowers of the Daybreak Tree bright before Xi He, the
sun's charioteer, has risen?
The snake that swallowed an elephant-how big was it?
One comes back to poetry in the Nine Declarations, ]iu ;jzang of
which The Elegy on the Orange,]u in eighteen lines, is commonly
considered a youthful work:
Among the fine trees of Mother Earth and August Heaven,
The orange made itself at home here;
Receiving their orders not to move, it grows in this southern state.
Its roots deep and firm, hard to transplant, making it more constant.
The fifth piece, Yuan you {Distant Journey), in which the
persona is again off on a heavenly quest, is thought to be a Taoist-inspired
imitation of the Li sao of a relatively late date.
The Nine Arguments, ]iu bian iL¥/i¥, traditionally attributed to Song
Yu *.:E, a direct disciple of Qu Yuan, heralds the style of the fo through
I
Chapter 3. Poetry 65
an exuberant lyricism that defies translation.
The fo l!Jt\ {rhapsody or prose-poem), in rhythmic prose and rhymed,
was meant to be recited and is difficult to distinguish from the sao. Since
the sao was of southern origins, it is not surprising that the first dated fo
{174 B.C.), a meditation on the evil auspices of the owl, Funiao fo
was also written in that region by Jia Yi If[§[ (200-168 B.C.). In another
fo, titled Diao Q,u Yuan (Grieving for Q,u Yuan),]ia Yi made clear
his personal identification with Qu Yuan. In the Seven Exhortations, Qj fa
by Mei Sheng ;f:Q:* (d. 141 B.C.), the genre reached new heights by
abandoning the mode of complaint seen in works such as Grievingfor Q_u
Yuan in favor of a positive lyricism expressed indirectly under cover of
what were claimed to be moral admonitions.
2. Poetry of the Han Court. With the unequaled works of Sima
Xiangru (ca. 177-119), fo (rhapsodies) became part of the
literature and splendor of the second-century Han dynasty imperial court
under Emperor Wu :lf:t (r. 140-87 B.C.), demanding of its audience a
frightening amount of erudition. It is understandable that Sima Xiangru's
youthful elopement with a rich widow from his home area of Shu touched
the popular imagination more than the interminable lyrical flights of the
major works he wrote years later at court, Zixu fo -1- !!!If:l!Jt\ (Rhapsody of the
Hunting Parks of the Sovereigns of Qj and of Chu) and Shanglin fo l:.#l!lt\
(Rhapsody of a Hunt in the Party of the Son of Heaven).
From the celebrated fo of Ban Gu rJI[gj (32-92) on the two capitals
of the Han, Luoyang and Chang' an, Liangdu fo l1¥i.Wl!lt\, through the end
of the imperial regime in the early twentieth century, a number of authors
distinguished themselves in this difficult genre that depicts the grandeur
and history of a location in rhymed prose.
At the other extreme of the spectrum of Chinese poetics are found
short poems of a rugged simplicity that could be called "emotional
improvisations"; we know a small number of them thanks to Sima Q!an's
Records of the Grand Historian, which recalls most notably the song by the
66 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
founder of the Han dynasty, Liu Bang ~ J . f ~ (256-195 B.C.). Liu had
begun life as a peasant, but wrote this when as an old man he stopped by
his home town after becoming emperor of all of China:
A great wind arises, the clouds fly up!
My majesty increases within the seas as I return to my old village.
How will I obtain fierce warriors to guard the four directions?
Simple language, often directly accessible to the modern reader,
characterizes the most elaborate of the poems closely related to these
"improvisations," the yuefu ~ } f i f or "music bureau" poems. Said to be
compositions of the "Music Bureau," which was founded in 177 B.C. to
collect folk songs and present them at court as a means to convey the
mood and desires of the citizenry, more than five hundred of these
poems exist today. Scholars soon applied themselves to composing poems
with the same titles and in the same style on a huge range of themes,
from war to love. These poems, known as "literary yuefu," were handed
down along with the original folk songs through anthologies compiled
many centuries later (the major collection dates from the twelfth century
A.D.). They often pose irresolvable problems of dating, attribution, and
interpretation, since the most ancient texts and those which are the most
authentically "popular" do not seem to be homogenous, but were created
rather by combining several songs with the same theme and title.
Such is not the case for the famous ancient-style poem on a fan
titled "A Song of Remorse" (Yuan ge xing ?d?d[Xfr) attributed to Lady Ban
:FJI, the great-aunt of the historian and favorite of Emperor Cheng RIG (r.
33-7 B.C.), who soon (in 16 B.C.) was supplanted in the emperor's eyes
by the singer Zhao, popularly called "Flying Swallow:"
A newly tom strip of fine white silk
As unsullied as frost and snow.
Cut into a "shared-pleasure" fan,
Chapter 3. Poetry
Carefully rounded like the full moon.
No matter where the lord goes, tucked into his sleeve,
When moved, it stirs him a light breeze.
Often feared, the arrival of the autumn season
The cool winds that carry off the fiery heat,
Causing it to be tossed into the bamboo hamper-
Favor and love cut off before they run their course.
67
The shared-pleasure fan was made of two silk faces sewn together,
combining Chinese characters that suggested a happy union, a relationship
which the perfect roundness of the fan suggests will be unending. Aside
from the poetic depiction of the fan, however, the poem offers several
subtexts. The first is an implicit comparison of Lady Ban to the fan. As
she approaches the autumn of her years, she too has been cast off by the
emperor. But the first six lines are also reminiscent of Flying Swallow, the
"newly torn strip of fine white silk" who is now "tucked into the emperor's
sleeve." This poem in pentasyllabic verse was possibly written by a scholar.
The yuefu, on the other hand, preferred tetrasyllables or irregular lines, as
in the following song, "West Gate" (Hsi men xing lffi1r,1T), composed in an
epicurean tone:
Passing the gate to the West,
With each step I think of him.
If we don't take our pleasure today,
What are we waiting for?
Take your pleasure!
Take your pleasure when the proper time arrives!
Why sit suffering anxious thoughts?
Should we again wait for "next time?''
Brew fine wine!
Grill fatty beef!
Shout out that which your heart desires-
Why try to resolve worrisome concerns!. ..
68 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Although the twenty-four lines of this poem (only the first half is presented
above) vary from three to seven the following poem, the last of
the "Nineteen Ancient Poems" ( Gu ski shijiu shou, §),returns to
a regular pentasyllabic rhythm. This famous series of anonymous poems
is probably a remnant of a type of verse written during the first and
second centuries A.D.:
The full moon, how clear,
Shining on my gauze bed-curtains.
Troubled, sorrowful-I cannot sleep;
I take up my robe, rise to pace.
Though they say traveling is a joy,
There's nothing better than coming home early!
Outside I walk about anxiously-
Whom should I tell of my sorrowful longing?
I crane my neck, then return t9 my chamber
As tears fall, soaking my clothes.
Following the example of the "airs of the states" in the Classic of
Poetry, these popular songs, adopted for use at court and reworked by
scholars, would become a genre favored by poets, including the best-known
Chinese bards. The early literati yuefu were merely imitations of the
originals, but during the eighth and ninth centuries, some of the major
Tang poets used the form in combination with themes critical of
contemporary society to create a new genre: "new yuefii' (xin yuefu
Jff). These new yuefu also appealed to the literati, because they allowed
them to escape the rigid prosodic rules of the prevailing poetic genres.
Before we leave the early yuefu, however, it is important to
acknowledge the role of erotic themes in yuefu written in the South,
themes that expanded rapidly into a mode of writing at the courts of the
southern regimes between the fourth and sixth centuries A.D.
Chapter 3. Poetry
69
3. Erotic Poetry. Under the veil of modesty, which allowed sexually
suggestive poems to be read as political allegories, eroticism is absent
from the high literature of the Chinese. Because of Confucian propriety
and bigotry, scholars could not commit themselves openly to the erotic.
It was not without difficulty that the French businessman, diplomat, and
sometimes author, George Soulie de Morant (1878-1955) managed around
1920 to get his hands on an anthology by LeiJin published in 1914,
Wubaijia xiangyan ski Poems of Perfumed Lascivity by Five
hundred Authors (Anthologie de l'amour chinois. Poemes de lasciviti parfumie.),
not less than 2,318 works from more than 400 poets of the seventeenth
century or earlier. What we have been able to learn of the ancient folk
literature, however, indicates that singers and authors of common origin
ignored these restrictions against the portrayal of the erotic. In the poems
and songs of these free spirits there is no lack of the erotic, which they
admired as natural and spontaneous. It is often explained that with the
eclipse of Confucianism and the swing to Taoism between the third and
sixth centuries, eroticism was afforded a place in high literature as part of
the "court style" (gongti '§ft), a place it never relinquished. Whatever the
case, the Yutai xinyong (New Songs from the jade Terrace) is the
classic anthology of these poems. Compiled around 545 by Xu Ling
(507-583), it consists of 656 poems, some by approximately 100 poets
from as early as the third century B.C., but many simply anonymous
"ancient poems" or yuefu. Among the best of these is the dramatic "Mulberry
Tree along the Path" (Mo shang sang This narrative poem tells of
Luofu Mit, a young woman "more than fifteen, but less than twenty,"
who is picking mulberry leaves to feed to silkworms-a typical female
task. Surprised by an imperial envoy on horseback while at work, she
repulses his advances by reminding him that he has a wife and she a
husband. Some commentators believe the amorous envoy was none other
than her husband, Qj.u Hu f:)(i!if.l, who had been away on official duty and
did not recognize his own wife.
The poetess known as Ziye ("Midnight," d. 386) seems much
70
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
less inclined to resist any advances, as the following poems from her
legacy-all titled "Midnight"-illustrate:
Holding my skirt about me, the sash untied
I paint my brows and come to the front window.
My gauze skirts are easily blown around;
If they open a little, blame the spring breeze.
Women were to remain in the back rooms of the house. Thus the erotic
image of a woman seductively dressed is enhanced by her to
come to a front window. The spring breeze and her gauze skuts also
figure in the next poem:
In the spring grove, blossoms so seductive,
For the spring birds, thoughts so sad.
The spring breeze redoubles desire
As it blows open my gauze skirts.
The final example is a steamy account of love fulfilled:
For many nights I've not put up my hair,
Silky strands drape across my shoulders.
As I wind myself around my lover's lap,
What place is there on him I cannot love?
IT. The Golden Age of Chinese Poetry
The important place accorded erotic themes revealed the
attitudes toward life that were beginning to develop as early as the chaotic
last years of the Han dynasty (202 B.C.-A.D. 220). The Jian'an era
(196-220) heralded the birth of a poetry that to
emotions rather than-as with the Shi jing-to express the mtentwns.
According to the formula devised by LuJi (261-303) in his Wenfu
Chapter 3. Poetry 71
J<::M (Rhapsody on Literature), "poetry consisted of patterns of verbal
splendor which were founded in sentiment."
1. From Aesthetic Emotion to Metaphysical Flights. Cao Zhi
WHH (192-232), the estranged younger brother of the reigning emperor
of the new Wei dynasty, Cao Pi j!.J/f= (187-266), was the most gifted
member of a family that was equally distinguished in warfare and literature.
When Cao Pi attempted to fluster his younger brother by ordering him
to compose some lines of verse as he was walking, Cao Zhi shamed his
elder by coming up with his "Poem Written within Seven Steps" (Qjbu shi
--l::;*"iii!il Whether or not the story behind the poem is authentic, this little
allegory should have perplexed and embarrassed his suspicious brother:
Boiling beans over burning bean-stalks
The strained salty juice will do for a sauce.
Bean-stalks beneath the pot burning,
Beans in the pot weeping.
Originally both sprang from the same root,
So what is the great urgency to simmer us?!
The Caos served as patrons for the pleiad of literary men of the Jian'an
era, of which the best-known poet is probably Wang (177-217).
His evocations of the miseries of the times, compiled in a series entitled
"Qj: ai shi" --!::;:RiFf (Seven Lamentations), are poignant; the third stanza
of the fust poem reads thus:
Along the road there is a woman starving,
Who abandons the child in her arms among the grasses.
She turns back hearing its tearful cries,
But wipes her tears and moves on alone ....
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
"Eighteen Stanzas on the Barbarian Reed-Whistle" (Hu jia skiba
pai J\ts), written in a style similar to the Chu ci and attributed to
Cai Y (b. ca. 178), the daughter of the noted poet Cai Yong
(133-192), tells of her eighteen-year exile among the Xiongnu barbarians,
from which she returned in about 192; her complaint had a strong influence
on subsequent writings on themes related to banishment.
In the following generation, because of their penchant for escaping
from society through mysticism and drink, the major poets were grouped
together by later scholars under the rubric "The Seven Sages of the
Bamboo Grove" (Zhulin qi zi ¥r#-t:-T). Ruanji and Xi
Kang fit'* (223-262), the most celebrated of the group, left some hermetic
works and Ruan's very difficult "Songs of What Is in My Heart" (Yonghuai
ski a series of eighty-two poems. Here, for example, is number
fourteen, which depicts the poet languishing through the night:
To open autumn the cool breezes begin,
The crickets cry through the bed curtains.
Things of nature move me to great sorrow-
Grief so strong it causes the heart to mourn.
I have much to say, but whom can I tell?
Many words, but no one to whom to lay forth my plaint.
A slight breeze blows my silken sleeves,
The bright moon shines with a clear brilliance.
The cock at dawn cries in the tall tree,
I order my carriage to tum around and go back.
Next was Tao Yuanming ilWJVflj!Yj (later ming Qj.an lf!T, 365-427),
highly admired by the poets of the Golden Age because he demonstrated
that one could write more profound verse using simple words. From an
old family that had fallen into obscurity, he embodied the idea of the
middle class of literati, who both sought and were repulsed by the idea of
an official career. His hedonism accented with stoicism led him to sing of
Chapter 3. Poetry 73
wine and the country life. It seems that his dialogue of "body, shadow
and soul" in three poems, Xing ying shen, san =§,was influenced
by Buddhism; the word which is translated here as "body" is literally
"form" and seems to render the Sanskrit rupa, which designates the
illusionary reality of the senses. To the "body's" argument that it is better
to benefit from each day as it passes rather than to search for an impossible
immortality, the shadow opposes nobler aspirations, a Confucian reply to
a Taoist point of view. The soul calms their quarrel through the aloofness
of wisdom:
Although we are different entities,
In life we are dependent on each other.
Bound to share the same good and evil-
How could I refrain from speaking to you on this?
The Three Emperors of old, the Great Sages,
Where are they now?
Peng Zu loved his long life,
But even he wanted to stay when he had to go.
In old age or youth, death is the same,
For the wise or the stupid, there's really no difference.
By drinking daily you might be able to forget,
But won't that shorten your allotted years?
To do good always brings pleasure,
But there's often no one to praise you for it.
To dwell on this will harm my life-
Just follow fate as you go ahead,
Ride the waves of the Great Change,
Not happy, but also not afraid.
When it is time to go, then you must go-
No need to be overly concerned.
What Chinese hasn't heard of Tao's Record of Peach Blossom Fount (Taohua
yuan ji a tale of the goodness and purity of a lost village
74
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
nestled in a ring of mountains that had escaped time and the agents of
the state? The village was discovered by a fisherman who had lost his
way. After spending some time in this idyllic valley, he returned to his
home, never again to find the entryway. Tao Qj.an often celebrated the
"spirits" these immortals brewed from fermented cereals. Indeed, wine
was a major part of the culture of the Period of Disunion, both as a
means to escape the pressures of service to the state and as a method of
transcendence. Nevertheless, Tao pondered putting an end to his drinking
in a poem entitled "On Stopping Wine" (Zhi jiu 11::.1@), in which he
cleverly includes the word "stop" in each of the twenty pentasyllabic
lines. It ends thus:
Day after day I was on the point of stopping it-
but my pulse stopped beating regularly;
I only knew there was no pleasure in stopping,
I didn't yet know stopping could benefit me!
Gradually I realized that stopping would do me good.
This morning I actually did stop.
Through this single stop,
I will stop atop the immortal cliffs of Fusang.
Will my bright face stop on this old visage?
How can it stop for a myriad years?
The point is that immortality without pleasure is perhaps not what Tao
was seeking.
Finally, Tao sang of the pleasures of the return from officialdom to
country life in his "Guiqu lai xi ci" (Rhapsody on Returning,
Going Back), written in 405:
Return, go back!
Though fields and gardens are filled with weeds-why not go back?
It was I who made my mind servant to the body.
Why should I be devastated and sorrow alone!
Chapter 3. Poetry
Suddenly I see that what has passed cannot be remedied,
But understand that the future can be pursued.
Actually I haven't gone that far along the wrong way,
And am aware that today's rights can put aside yesterday's wrongs.
75
In contrast to Tao is the great poet of the mountains and tormented
nature, Xie Lingyun (385-443). Xie was an aristocrat whose verse
pleaded for enlightenment and sudden illumination. He died stoically as
a confirmed Buddhist, condemned for his part in a rebellion against the
government. Only about one hundred poems remain from what was
once a much larger corpus, all known for their difficult diction; here are
the opening lines from his "Spending the Night on the Cliff over Stone
Gate" (Shimen yanshan su E F5 :!6- _t 1l':!):
In the morning I pick orchids from the park,
Fearing that they will wither in the frost;
In the evening I return to sleep at the edge of the clouds,
Where I sport with the moon upon these rocks.
The singing of the birds tells me they are settling for the night,
As leaves drop from trees, I know the wind has risen ....
The pseudonym Hanshan (Cold Mountain) perhaps hid a
g_roup of poets inspired by Chan Buddhism who were active during the
stxth century. The following is one of their typical untitled poems:
My heart resembles the autumn moon:
A pool of jade green, clear, bright, and pure.
What other object would sustain this metaphor-
Tell me, what should I say?
At the other end of the spectrum of sixth-century verse, Shen Yue tfct.0
(441-553), a courtier, was working on a system of tonal rules for poetic
composition which eventually led to a greater role for form in verse as
well as the greatest poems of the Tang dynasty (618-907).
76
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
2. The Age of Maturity. The complete collection of Tang
dynasty (618-907) poetry, which was published in 1707 at the order of
the emperor Kangxi, contained nearly 50,000 poems by some 2,200
different authors who lived almost a thousand years ago. The Tang remains
almost unrivaled in both the quantity and the quality of poetic production.
This production was enhanced because the most highly esteemed of the
various examinations leading to official careers was the poetry exam;
oddly enough, this was an examination that some of the most illustrious
poets failed. But the Tang was also a privileged moment in which the
literary culture, poised between tradition and creation, attained a certain
maturity, in particular the eighth-century or "high Tang," which was seen
as the apogee. It was preceded by "early Tang" verse of the seventh
century and followed by the "middle and late Tang'' poets of the ninth.
Meng Haoran (689-740) was the first major name to emerge
from the intense poetic activity concentrated around the court in the
seventh century. Shortly after his ascension, however, three of the greatest
poets that China has ever produced came on the literary scene: Wang
Wei .=Ei.ll (701-761), Li Bai $8 (701-762), andDu Fu (712-770).
Like Wang Wei, with whom he associated, Meng Haoran was a
protege of a statesman, Zhang Jiuling (678-740), himself a
distinguished poet. The personality of Meng Haoran has been somewhat
eclipsed by his friend Wang Wei, but the following poem, "Spring Dawn"
(Chun xiao made famous through its selection by anthologists and
translators alike, demonstrates Meng's poetic talent:
Spring slumber won't awake to dawn,
Everywhere I hear the sound of birds calling.
During the night, sounds of wind and rain-
1 wonder how many flower petals have been falling?
Wang Wei was both painter and poet. His landscape paintings are
said to have included poetry and his verses to be filled with lovely
Chapter 3 .. Poetry 77
scenes. In his time, he was better known as an artist. But none of his
paintings remain, whereas more than four hundred poems have survived.
"Red Peony" (Hong Mutan MUR-), though not one of his best known,
suggests the delicate and artistic touch of his brush:
A voluptuous green, but calm and sedate;
Dressed in a faded red which deepens in places.
The blossom's about to break apart, its heart crushed-
How could it understand the beauties of springtime?
Li Bai and Du Fu form a pair at once complementary and
opposed-the first a fantastic genius, tempted by esoteric Taoism, who
allowed himself to follow spontaneity and inspiration; the second classical
and practical, animated by a Confucian concern for society and tormented
by the problems of his personal relationships.
Li Bai's origins remain a subject of controversy. The preferred
account is that he was ethnically a Han Chinese, descended from a clan
that had been exiled to Central Asia. Despite the legends which surround
Li Bai's personality like a halo-a much different case from that of Du
Fu-he was actually a connoisseur of barbarian writings, texts that were
inaccessible to the jealous buffoons at the Chinese court. In fact, the poet
was frequently in the company of Emperor Xuanzong (r. 712-756) between
742 and 744. Soon after, however, he was expelled from court, probably
at the instigation of his envious colleagues, and dismissed from his position
as archivist. From that time on he was almost constantly on the move,
until a few years after the onset of the catastrophic rebellion of An
Lushan in 755, when he was imprisoned for a time, wrongly accused of
treason. More than one thousand poems in a great variety of forms and
styles are attributed to him. Li Bai invented some of the forms himself (or
perhaps borrowed them from foreign sources). Although he had met
most of the great poets of the times, he was best understood by his junior
colleague Du Fu, who clearly recognized his genius; Li's reputation,
78
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
however, did not begin to shine until the following generation, thanks in
particular to the then immensely popular poet Baijuyi (772-846),
who showed such admiration for Li Bai's verse.
Li Bai composed perhaps the most popular poem in Chinese
literature-at the very least, the most popular among the overseas Chinese-
'jingye si" (Thoughts on a Quiet Evening):
Before the bed, how clear the bright moonlight,
As if it were frost covering the ground.
I raise my eyes toward the moon which gleams,
Then lower my head, midst thoughts of my native place.
This pentasyllabic quatrain does not contain a single word which is not in
common usage today. The same simplicity is found in the most celebrated
of Li Bai's four ancient-style poems, titled "Yuexia du zhuo" .Fl Tj;E¥J
(Drinking Alone under the Moon). It is important to note that in China
past-as well as China present-drinking was usually a festive group activity,
each member of the party expected to toast and encourage the others:
A jug of wine, midst the flowers-
With no close friend I pour my own wine;
Raising my cup, I toast the bright moon,
Facing my shadow, we make a threesome.
The moon doesn't understand how to drink,
My shadow vainly follows me along.
To be companions for a while,
We take our pleasure to celebrate spring.
As I sing, the moon prances about,
As I dance, my shadow becomes lost.
When sober, we share each other's joy,
Once drunk, each goes his own way.
Forever bound to emotionless entertainment,
Let us arrange to meet in the Milky Way.
Chapter 3. Poetry 79
The misery of the warfare that followed the Rebellion of An Lushan, in
which Li Bai became involved, left only a few echoes in his works. His
famous poem in irregular verse on the "Hard Road to Shu" (Shu dao nan
IJllift) or modern Sichuan province, where the former emperor fled
and took refuge some years later, was wrongly interpreted as an allusion
to these events. Here Li Bai depicts the rigors of passage:
... at the highest point, the six dragon-like steeds reach the place where
the sun returns;
At the lowest, the twisting river breaks back in crashing waves.
At heights that the immortal crane cannot fly across,
The gibbons anguish as they pull themselves up!
How many hairpin turns of black mud?
In a hundred steps, nine bends wind the rock face.
One feels Orion in passing The Well, the eyes raise, the breath short,
And sits down with a deep sigh, hands rubbing panting chests.
Du Fu Hffi {712-770) met the elder poet Li Bai toward 745.
Almost immediately Du pledged to Li admiration without limits, which
was made famous in several of Du's poems. Perhaps the best known of
those is the first of two poems titled "Dreaming of Li Bai" (Meng Li Bai
$8), written about 758; Du Fu expresses in these sixteen five-syllable
lines his anxiety for Li Bai, then condemned to exile, and imagines that
the soul of the elder poet comes to visit him:
Since you may have died and left me, I've already swallowed my tears;
If we're separated in life, the anguish is constant.
From South of the Jiang in the pestilential territories,
There is no news of the banished one.
My old friend has entered my dreams,
Clearly I have long been thinking of him.
Now that you are held by a prisoner's bonds,
What use is it that you have wings?
80 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
I fear that this is not the soul of a living being-
The road is so long it cannot be known.
As the soul arrived, the maple grove was green,
When the soul went back, the pass was black.
The setting moon spreads its light across the rafters of the room,
Seeming almost to illuminate your face.
The waters are deep and the waves broad,
They will not let you be caught by a kraken!
Nearly 1,500 poems by Du Fu have come down to us, representing
only a small portion of an <:Euvre which must have been much larger.
During the eleventh century he became the prince of Chinese poetry, yet
he does not figure in any anthology prior to the tenth century, having
failed the civil service examinations and enjoyed only a brief and obscure
career at court. His biographies distinguish three periods in his life: his
youth (731-745), the sojourrr in the capital (746-756), and then the exile
and his many travels through the South until his death in 770. The last
period is the richest. One finds in it many more evocations of his youth
than of the period he spent in Chang'an. It seems Du Fu gradually
developed an interest more retrospective than prospective.
One of the earliest works by Du Fu to become famous was his
"Ballad of the Army Carts" (Bingju xing :%$1'J), written in 750, a few
years before the empire sank into the miseries of the war that followed
the rebellion, which began in 755. This poem of irregular length-twenty-five
lines-depicts the sufferings of the conscripts required to combat the menace
of the emerging power of the Tibetans in the Sichuan region. This is
accomplished in a speech the poet imagines one of these soldiers making:
The carts creak and grind, the horses whinny and blow,
Marching men each with a bow and arrows at his waist;
Fathers and mothers, wives and children, rush to see them off;
Dust rises until the Xianyang Bridge can no longer be seen.
Chapter 3. Poetry
They cling to their clothing, stamp their feet, and block the road weeping,
The sound of their rises up into the clouds.
Those they pass along the way question the marching men;
The men simply reply, "We've been recruited so often
That some have gone to guard the River to the north at fifteen years of
age,
And at forty are still living there in the camps, cultivating their own
fields ...
You have questioned us well, chief,
But do conscripts dare to express resentment?
Thus as in the winter of the year
Before the soldiers are dismissed from the Western Passes,
The prefectural officials urgently collected taxes-
Where do they expect us to provide these taxes?
We know that it is misfortune to give birth to a boy,
On the contrary it is good to have a girl.
The girl can still be married to the neighbors,
But the boy will only be buried beneath the scattered grasses."
81
The equally famous "Ballad of Beautiful Women" {Liren xing BA
1T) of 753 seems to allude to the new chief minister, Yang Guozhong t ~
I ~ L ~ , cousin of the famous imperial favorite, Lady Yang Guifei :m:IJC.:
The third day of the third month
Along the waterways in Chang' an are many beauties.
Haughty and distant, pure and upright,
Their flesh taut, their skin fine, their bodies well proportioned ...
Warm your hands in his unrivaled powers,
But guard against approaching too near, the Chief Minister may get
angry.
But it is not only emotion that occupies the central place in a poem; Du
Fu often relies on a visit to a site or the spectacle of a landscape. This
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
eight-line pentasyllabic poem entitled "Writing Down My Feelings While
Traveling at Night" (Lii ye shu huai from 765 or 768, can serve
as an example:
Fine grasses, slight winds on the bank,
A tall mast, my boat, alone in the dark.
The stars droop, the level plain seems more vast,
As the moon gushes, the Great River sets in motion.
How can writings bring me fame-
l've resigned my post in illness and old age.
Drifting and drifting, what do I resemble?
A single sand gull between heaven and earth.
Baijuyi (772-846) may have enjoyed a popularity among
his contemporaries transcending that of any other poet throughout history.
During Bai's lifetime and for several centuries after his death, his glory
eclipsed that of his fellow graduate and lifetime friend Yuan Zhen
(779-831), to the point that many of Yuan's poems were attributed to
Bai. Even without these false attributions, Bai was by far the most prolific
Tang poet, leaving nearly three thousand poems in a variety of poetic
genres in addition to a large corpus of prose works. Few writers of so
long ago appear to have transmitted an ceuvre so complete, one that
could provide so much material for a precise biography and that includes
so many details of a committed official career. Thus it is no wonder that
Arthur Waley's The Life and Times of Po Chil-i [Bai]uyi}, although written
in the 1940s, remains one of the most successful Western studies of a
Tang poet.
Bai Juyi himself took great care to ensure the preservation of his
works. They were the first literary texts in the world to be printed. Bai
paid great attention to the aural effects of his verse, to the point that
many of his works could almost be considered "oral poetry" -he enjoyed
attempting to employ the speech of the humble peasant. Duan Chengshi
Chapter 3. Poetry 83
(ca. 800-863), maintains that he saw a man working in the street
who had had himself tattooed with the texts of Bai's poems. Bai was no
less appreciated in foreign lands, especially Japan, where he remains the
most popular of the classical Chinese poets. Literary critics have tended
to feel uncomfortable with this precocious genius who was understood by
and accessible to nearly every reader. To some extent, Bai played the
role of a journalist of opinion, reporting on periods and places of crisis,
and therefore he was endangered by the struggles of opposing factions,
and placed at the gravest risks for supporting his friends, in particular
Yuan Zhen, whose career in the government was much more successful
than Bai's. Bai's satire, hidden in allegories that are sometimes obscure
today, added to the reputation of a poet whose collected works also
contain the most intimate and personal poems. Moreover, his two most
famous poetic works are elegies. The first, "The Song of Eternal Regret"
(Changhen ge :RtrHfX), depicts the tragic love between Emperor Xuanzong
(r. 712-7 56) and his favorite, Lady Yang. The second, "The Ballad of the
Pipa" (Pipa xing relates the emotions the poet felt on hearing an
aging courtesan sing the story of her life in the capital. Now married to a
wealthy merchant, her tale was told to the strumming of the pipa, an
instrument resembling a mandolin with four strings, imported from Central
Asia, that was especially favored by female popular entertainers. This
second ballad of more than six hundred lines was written in 817, while
Bai was serving as marshal ofjiangzhou ¥I1'i'[. The concluding lines read:
"Don't refuse to sit back down and play another song,
Play for me again the 'Ballad of the Pipa';"
Moved by these words of mine, she stood there a long time,
Then sat down and rapidly plucked the strings with a greater urgency.
With a chill sadness, not in her voice before,
All who sat and heard were moved to tears.
But who wept the most?
The marshal ofjiangzhou, his blue tunic soaked.
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
This theme has inspired a play centered on an imaginary plot in which
the poet Baijuyi, in his declining years, reveals his long-time love for this
woman, about which he has remained silent for years. But the parallels in
this ballad between the situation of the discarded courtesan and that of
BaiJuyi-in exile when he overheard her lament-make it likely that this
poem also has political overtones.
Another emotional poem (one of several on the subject) was written
in 812 about the loss of his only daughter,Jinluan literally "Golden
Bell." The piece is entitled "Weeping for Little Golden Bell While I Was
Ill" (Bing;Jwng ku]inluan zi
Having a daughter is truly a burden,
But without a son, how can one help becoming attached to her?
It was scarcely ten days that she was ill,
And we had already nourished her for three years ....
Her old clothes still hang from the rack,
What's left of her medicine yet at the head ofthe bed.
I went with the coffin far into the village lanes,
Saw the mound of her little grave in the fields.
Don't say she's only a mile or so away-
She and I are separated by eternity!
Aside from such personal verse, Bai also had a number of favorite
exotic subjects that he treated in his poetry. Parrots, it would seem, were
one. But was it a secret passion for parrots that BaiJuyi portrayed in the
number of poems he dedicated to the bird, or did he have satiric intentions?
The following poem, "The Red Parrot" (Hongying;wu written in
815, suggests the latter:
Tribute from far-off Annam-a red parrot,
Its colors like the peach blossoms, its speech like men's.
So it always is for essays and arguments of us officials-
When will we be allowed to leave our cage?
Chapter 3. Poetry 85
Bai Juyi offered some well-known advice about this time in the form of
an eight-line poem entitled "Presented to Secretary Yangjuyuan" (Zeng
Yang Mishu]uyuan had taught poetry to his friend
Yuan Zhen. It concludes: "It is pointless to teach poetry too well, I For
it's well known that it will ruin a career." This may be the case, since Bai
is acknowledged as the better poet, but Yuan Zhen rose to much higher
office. BaiJuyi held a complicated set of beliefs: a loyal Confucian, he
encouraged Buddhist compassion, and was sometimes tempted by the
alchemical aspects of Taoism. His politics were more consistent: he never
stopped denouncing injustices or trying to relieve the suffering of those
under his administration. Among the ten "songs" of Qjn (modern Shaanxi)
composed during the winter of 809, the ninth, "Dances and Songs" (Gewu
llfX.), ends in the following lines:
Those guests arrives in horse-driven carriages from their mansions,
To the storied towers of red candles, songs, and drums.
Happily tipsy, they pull their seats closer together,
Warmed by too much drink, they shed their fur cloaks.
The minister of justice is the host,
The president of the court in the seat of honor.
Music all the day long,
Deep in the night they cannot stop.
Who is aware that in the prisons of W enxiang
Prisoners are dying from the cold?
The cold and snow of the winter of 813-specifically during the traditional
calendric period known as the "Great Cold," which takes place in the
final lunar month of the year, around 20 January-depicted more vividly
the poverty of the peasants of his native village in a poem called "Suffering
from the Cold While Living in My Home Village" (Cunju kuhan HliS=iS
*).The image of bamboo and pine draws on the belief that these plants
are noted for their ability to remain vibrant through the winter:
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
It's the twelfth month of 813,
For five days the snow has drifted down.
Even the bamboo and pine have all frozen to death,
How could the peasants avoid it?
As I tum and look through the village gates,
Of ten families, eight or nine are poor.
The northern winds are sharp as swords,
Their cotton clothes won't cover their bodies.
They can bum only fires of wormwood thorns,
Sorrowfully sit through the night awaiting the dawn.
As I come to realize that the Period of Great Cold has arrived,
The farmers' suffering is especially bitter.
When I think of how I pass this day,
Deep in my straw hut, the door drawn shut,
In padded clothing covered by an embroidered shawl,
Whether sitting or sleeping I have more than enough warmth.
I'm fortunate to avoid famine and frostbite,
Not to be subjected to the arduous work in the fields.
When I think of this I am deeply ashamed,
And ask myself, Who am I to escape such a fate?
A good number of his final poems are lost. But the following, written in
842, four years before his death, might serve as an epitaph-it is titled
"Dazai Letian xing" ("On Getting the Point of Taking Joy in
Nature"-Letian, "TakingJoy in Nature," is also his zi). The poem seems
mockingly addressed to those who were hoping to inherit something
from him, and it expresses the spirit in which Bai spent most of his life.
The mention of "the springs of night" in the fifth line from the end may
refer indirectly to the "Yell ow Springs" to which Chinese souls go after
death:
You've got it, got it you have, Bai
Dispatched to serve in the Eastern Capital for thirteen years!
Chapter 3. Poetry
Seventy years old before you hung up your official's cap,
Your pension not begun, you suspend your right to a government carriage.
Sometimes with fellow hikers you roam through spring's joys,
Other times with monks in the mountains you sit all night in Zen
meditation.
For two years you've forgotten to inquire about household affairs-
The kitchen stove is seldom lit, grasses cover gate and courtyard.
This morning the cook's lad said the salt and rice are gone,
This evening the serving maids complained that their dresses were in
tatters.
My wife and children are not pleased, my nieces and nephews depressed,
Yet I, lying filled with wine on my bed, am the picture of content.
Let me get up and sketch out my plans for you!
My schedule for disposing of my meager legacy.
First I shall sell those few acres of orchard in the Southern Ward,
Next those several hundred acres of fields by the Eastern Wall.
After that I'll sell the residence in which we live,
And obtain in all something near two million cash!
Half of this shall go to you to cover the cost of food and clothing,
Half to me to provide money for meat and wine.
This year I am already seventy-one-
My eyes dimmed, my hair white, my head dizzy.
So I am afraid I'll never use up my share of the money,
But will, like the early morning dew, return to the springs of night.
Still as I get ready to return, I certainly won't be unpleasant,
I'll dine when hungry, drink when joyful, and sleep soundly.
In both life and death there are things which just must be-
you've got it, got it you have, Bai Letian!
87
A display of "realistic criticism" in the spirit of BaiJuyi distinguishes
the work of eminent contemporaries such as ZhangJi (ca. 776-829),
Yuan Zhen, and Liu Yuxi (772-842). Du Mu H!J:£ (803-852),
although classified as one of the poets of the "late Tang," often exploits
this same vein.
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
3. The Late Tang. The Late Tang is the period of Chinese
poetry most highly valued by a number of modern connoisseurs; the era
saw the development of a kind of baroque style in contrast to the classical
revivals of the Mid-Tang. This decadent age began with the brilliance of
(791-817).
Although he was a protege of Han Yu (768-824) and from an
aristocratic family, Li He was unable to pursue an official career and died
prematurely at age 26. His career and works have often been compared
with those ofjohn Keats. Li left only 240 poems. Charged with a strange
imagery, with a bitter and morbid sensuality, a new voice in the concert
of Chinese poetry can be heard in these poems, a voice only recently
discovered by modern critics. There are some works, echoing The Songs of
Chu, which are almost impenetrable to the modern reader, even with the
help of commentaries. Li He preferred the relatively free form of the
irregular yuefo verse; his "The Tomb of Little Su" (Su Xiaoxiao mu J..t1jvj'
;i;), written in three-word lines, about a famous courtesan of the Tang
capital, may serve as an example:
Dew on secluded orchids
Like tear-filled eyes;
Where have the love tokens gone-
Here only flowers in the mist I can't bear to cut.
The grasses seems like her carriage mat,
The pine tree like the canopy.
The breeze could be her skirts,
The river her jade girdle-pendants.
In her canvas-covered carriage
She awaits the dusk;
The cold green candles
Labor to cast their shadows.
Beneath the western mound
The wind wafts the rain.
Chapter 3. Poetry 89
Li He visualizes here the departed courtesan reborn out of the natural
surroundings of her grave-perhaps in the mist, perhaps in his mind. He
suggests that he would have a love token for her, too, if he could bring
himself to cut flowers from her grave-mound. As Li He stares through the
mist, the poet's imagination transforms the natural scene of the tomb into
one of the oil-cloth carriages courtesans used, complete with grass floor-mats
and an evergreen top, awaiting the night when her soul can wander more
freely. In the breeze, as soft as her skirts, and the river's rippling, he finds
reminders of Su herself and confirmation of his vision. The cold green
candles may be the copse of trees near the grave. Wind and rain can be
merely descriptions of the weather conditions, but are also a standard
euphemism for physical love between men and women. Since this figure
of speech originally denoted sexual relations between a goddess and a
king, and since Li He was fond of the Songs of the South, which depicted
many surreal joinings, he may imply an eerie, surrealistic tryst here.
Scarcely less baffling is the work ofLi Shangyin (ca. 813-858),
the poet whom Mao Zedong was said to have preferred. He left nearly
six hundred poems, of which the hardest to decipher are those labeled
"Without Title" (Wu ti ifll€m!), including the following, the second of a
series of four:
The east wind howls, as a fine mist arrives;
Beyond the hibiscus dike, the faint sound of thunder.
The golden toad bites the latch where the burning incense enters;
The jade tiger pulls the silken thread, to draw water from the well.
Lady Jia from behind peeked curtains at Clerk Han;
Consort Fu left a pillow for the talented Prince of Wei.
My thoughts of spring will not struggle with the flowers to blossom,
For each inch of love in my heart becomes an inch of ashes.
In the first poem of this series, a male persona longs for a woman
from whom he is separated by a great distance. Here we have the affair
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
from the woman's point of view. The east wind and light rain are reminders
to the woman of a rendezvous-wind and rain again. The second line
continues to depict the natural scene (perhaps the place where the lovers
first met), but also suggests that she is thinking about the man-hibiscus,
Jurong, is a homophone for "his face," and thunder, possibly imagined, is
often compared to the sounds of a chariot which would bring her lover
home to her. Lines three and four depict the luxury of her lonely life.
The incense burner shaped like a toad could be used to scent her clothing
before a tryst. The next couplet contains two allusions. Lady Jia was able
to catch a glimpse of the handsome Han Shou ••• secretary to her
father,Jia Chong JfJE {217-282); later she had an affair with Han, which
was ended when her father detected a rare scent he had given his daughter
on Han's clothes. Consort Fu alludes to a woman loved by both the poet
Cao Zhi and his elder brother, Cao Pi {see section II.1 above), who was
also emperor of the Wei dynasty. Forced to marry the emperor, when
she died she left her pillow to Cao Zhi. Cao Zhi then fulfilled his desire
by meeting Consort Fu in a dream. Unlike these lovers, however, the
lady of this poem, though fllled with the erotic thoughts of spring, remains
unfulfilled-"ash-hearted" suggests despair.
There are also a number of works in Li Shangyin's corpus which
focus on non-human subjects, such as his "Elegy on a Cicada" (Chan !lt'ii'!):
Always perched so high, it can satisfy itself only with difficulty,
In vain it labors, regretting its wasted song.
Toward dawn the cicadas break off singing one by one,
The verdant trees remain indifferent.
As a lowly official, my branch wavers even more,
In my old garden, the weeds are already equally high.
"I've troubled you, cicada, to awaken me,
So that I and my whole family will remain pure."
Chapter 3. Poetry
91
In summer, cicadas fill the trees in China, droning their songs all night
long. Chinese poets early on associated their song with the sadness that
often afflicts the pure of heart. The poet here empathizes with the cicada,
and can "understand his sound" -a euphemism for friends who truly know
one another. The first line refers to the belief that the cicada maintains
this purity by consuming only dew, and so it thirsts in its preferred lofty
seat. Line two reveals that the cry of the cicada has failed to find it a
mate-its song is thus wasted. Lines three and four suggest that as the
cicada's "audience" is not moved by its song, Li Shangyin has similarly
failed to impress his superiors. Lines five and six continue this line of
thinking, with the poet realizing that retirement to his old home {garden)
might be possible; but the final couplet reveals that he, like the cicada,
will not compromise himself but will continue to sing his pure verse in
the vain hope of finding an appreciative listener.
From more or less free verse to the strictly regulated poem, from
the long ballad to the brief quatrain, whether popular or reserved for the
initiated, Chinese poetry seems to have exhausted all the resources of the
genre by the tenth century, all the themes permitted by then-current
ideologies. The only possibility was to move in the direction of the popular
genres. Through the medium of the courtesan's songs in the demimonde,
perhaps as early as the eighth century; a new type of poem intended to
be sung, the ci {lyric) was revealed to the scholars. By this time the
new yuefu had essentially lost the music of its popular origins. The ci
imposed on the composer a choice of many hundreds of melodic tonal
patterns, which he had to "fill in" by finding the words, some of them
from the colloquial language, which could better translate his emotions
than those of the artificial, literary language.
ill. The Triumph of Genres in Song
Li Bai and Bai Juyi figure among the best of those literati who
chose to compose poems to be sung according to the popular ci {lyric)
form. Wen Tingyun {812-870) was the first to achieve his literary
92 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
glory through this new genre. The first great master of ci, however, was
Li Yu (937-978), the last .prince of an ephemeral dynasty that
reigned from Hangzhou over a statelet of the South during the fragmented
Five Dynasties era (907-960). Captured by the victorious Song-dynasty
armies, Li Yu spent his final years under house arrest in the Song capital,
far from his beloved Hangzhou. Li Yu's collected works consist of scarcely
more than forty lyrics, mostly evocations full of nostalgia for the splendors
of his past life spent with his courtesans, such as his "To the Tune 'A
Casket of Pearls"' (Yihu zhu-Mli*):
Her evening toilet just completed,
she adds a few light drops of sandalwood stain to her lips,
barely revealing a clove on the end of her tongue.
A single song in a clear voice
for a moment breaks the line of her cherry red lips ....
The sadness of his captivity colors his final works, as in "To the
Tune 'The Broken Formation"' (Pochen zi
Forty years I have passed in my country and my home-
A thousand miles of mountains and rivers.
Phoenix pavilions and dragon belvederes towered to the Milky Way;
Jade trees with jasper branches created a misty dream.
When had we knowledge of weapons of war?
One morning I surrendered, a slave-like prisoner,
I wither away, hair turned white and waist narrowing;
The worst was to suddenly take leave of the temple of my ancestors,
The Academy of Music played a farewell song,
As I wept before my palace women.
Among the many other poets who gained fame through the practice
of this genre, the renowned musician Liu Yong WD7k (987-1053) should
Chapter 3. Poetry
93
be mentioned. He introduced a longer form of inspired by a popular
genre called yunyao (ditties [which developed] like the clouds). His
"To the Tune 'Fresh Are the Flowers of the Chrysanthemum"' (Juhua xin
may serve as example:
About to lower the perfumed curtain and express her love,
She first knits her moth-like eyebrows, worried that the night will prove
too short.
She urges her youthful lover
to go to bed first
and warm the mandarin-duck quilts.
A little later she abandons her uncompleted needlework,
removes her gauze-like skirts
to give rein to a passion unlimited.
"Let me leave the lamp before the bed-curtains
so that from time to time
I may see her lovely face!"
. Even Ouyang Xiu (1007-1072), a serious essayist and
statesman, risked scandal in this genre, winning fame by not
av01dmg some of its more risque themes. Witness his "T
0
the Tune
'Night after Night"' (Yeyequ
The floating clouds spit forth a bright moon;
Its flowing shadows darken the jade steps.
Although separated by a thousand miles, it shines on us both;
How can I know what's in your heart, night after night?
The ci attained its full maturity with Su Shi i*$3: (1037-1101),
known under his literary name, Dongpo Jl:[:f:E( (Eastern Slope). His
cz, however, were only a small part of the poetic corpus of one of the
greatest figures of Chinese literature-350 out of a total of nearly 3,000
94 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
poems. He based his lyrics on a style that he created, which came to be
called haofang (heroic and unrestricted). A sense of humor and a
positive state of mind distinguish these works. His opposition to the
powerful reform politician Wang Anshi .:E*E (1021-1086) earned Su
Shi many exiles to the South; these exiles were difficult for the poet, but
they seem to have been a source of renewal from which he drew inspiration
for poems on themes such as nature, wine, and social demands. The
following poem was originally "written on the yamen wall" during his
first exile to Hangzhou in 1071. It lacks a formal title, but was belatedly
given the following descriptive title when Su Shi returned to the city in
1090 and wrote another poem to the same rhyme: "On New Year's Eve I
was on duty in the yamen, which was filled with prisoners in chains; the
sun set and I was still unable to return to my quarters, so I wrote a poem
on the wall." The poem reads:
New Year's Eve, I should have gone home early,
but I've been detained by official matters.
I take up my brush and face them in tears-
grieving for these prisoners in chains.
Petty men preparing for life's necessities,
they've fallen into the law's net without understanding their disgrace.
As for me, I'm so in love with my meager salary
I follow along and miss my chance to retire at ease.
There's no need to discuss who is wise and who foolish,
each of us has schemed so that we can eat.
Who could set them free for a short time at New Year's?
silently I feel shamed by those worthies of old.
The implication of the final lines is that in ancient times prisoners were
freed at New Year's. SuShi, however, who sees that he shares much in
common with these men, admits that he is more worried about his job
(his meager salary) than about doing what would be compassionate.
Chapter 3. Poetry
95
The most remarkable of Su Shi's poems are those which relate to
the of the literati, as he shows in the following pentasyllabic
quatram on "The Snail" (Gua niu .'l!i%4)-a poem stamped with a sardonic
humor, since it likely also refers. to everyman's (or some particular man's)
struggles:
Its harsh slime doesn't fill the shell
there's just enough to moisten it. '
It climbs so high, not knowing how to get back down,
And ends up a dried-out husk stuck to the wall.
In lines, composed in 1087 about a painting of flowers, Su
Sht ]Oms hts conceptions of poetic art and pictorial art in his "Written on
the Sprig of Flowers Painted by Secretary Wang of y anling, 4f 1" (Yanling
Wang Zhubu suo hua ;:he ;:hi, di ,
To argue that a painting must resemble what it depicts
Is to see it almost as a child does.
When a poem is composed, you must go by the poem's words
You certainly don't need to know the poet. '
Poetry and painting basically follow the same rules-
Heaven-given skill and originality ....
. One of SuShi's last poems, composed in 1100, was written to tell
hts dog, Black Snout that the poet had been released from final exile to
the southernmost island of Hainan The title wh· h 1
. , 1c a so serves as a
preface of sorts, "After I came to Dan'er I got a barking dog named
Black Snout whtch was quite fierce but basically tame; it accompanied
me when I was transferred to Hepu, and when we passed Zhengmai it
swam with great strokes across the river. My fellow travelers were all
startled by its actions, and thus I wrote this poem in jest:"
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Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Black Snout, you canine of the Southern Seas,
How was I so fortunate to become your master?
By eating leftovers, you're already round as a melon,
After all, you don't have to worry about delicacies in offering.
During the day you are tame, recognizing my friends and guests,
At night ferocious, you guard the gate.
When you learned that I was to return to the North,
Wagging your tail, you were so happy you almost danced!
Leaping about, chasing the servant boys,
Your tongue hanging out, panting, raining sweat.
Unwilling to tread the long bridge,
You went straight across the clear, deep river;
Paddling and floating like a duck or goose,
Climbing on shore as rapidly as an angry tiger.
Your stealing meat was also a small fault-
So my bamboo whip had to indulge you;
You bowed repeatedly to express your gratitude;
Heaven has not given you the power of speech.
When it is time for me to send a letter home,
I know Old Yellow Ears must have been your ancestor!
The poem ends with Su Shi's tongue-in-cheek reference to Old Yellow
Ears, Luji's (261-303) dog who carried messages back and forth between
Lu and his family.
Li Qj.ngzhao *ft!fm (1085-after 1151) is unanimously considered
the greatest of Chinese poetesses, although she left us only one hundred
poems, about three-fourths of them ci, and although she rarely treated
themes other than the life of the cultivated woman in high society. Struck
continually by bad luck, she expressed her emotions and her sorrows
with a force previously unequaled by male or female poet. Married to
Zhao Mingcheng (1081-1129) in 1101, she shared her husband's
tastes in art and literature. The fall in 1127 of Kaifeng, the capital of the
Song dynasty, brought ruin and desolation, at a time when the couple
Chapter 3. Poetry 97
was separated. She was inconsolable after the death of her husband in
1129; her remarriage in 1131, a painful failure. Her best poems, such as
"To the Tune 'Declaration of My Intimate Feelings"' (Su ;:,hong qing
which follows, delicately evoke the joy of love for her former husband:
Night has come, and deep in drink I'm slow to undress myself-
plum petals stuck on a dead branch;
Sobering up, the bouquet of wine shatters my spring sleep,
My dream cut short, I was not able to go back.
Everyone is silent,
The moon lingers above,
The azure blinds are drawn.
Still I rub the remaining buds,
Still I finger their lingering scent,
Still I want to hold to this moment.
The poems of sadness are her most celebrated, in particular that to
the tune "Each Word in Slow Tempo" (Shengsheng man Jt!l'l'f), in which
each character of the first three lines is repeated, creating an intensity of
expression that defies translation:
Searching and searching, again and again,
cold and clear, clear and cold,
it's bitter, cruel and lonely.
That time of year when it's suddenly warm, then cold again,
and it's hardest to breathe.
Three cups or a couple of bowls of thin wine,
How can they resist it-
the violence of the wind since darkness?
But just the passing of the wild geese
is what struck me the hardest,
though they are acquaintances from long ago.
98 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Chrysanthemum blossoms pile up, covering the ground,
spoiled by a wan and sallow look-
as they are now, who could bear to pick them?
I keep vigil at the window;
alone how can I bear it getting dark?
and the wutong and at the same time a fine rain?
Until dusk bit by bit, drop by drop,
one thing follows another-
how can the single word "sorrow" convey it all?
Two images require some comment here. First, the wild geese,
which long ago symbolized letters from her first husband when they were
separated, have now become reminders that since his death no more
letters are possible. Second, in the final stanza, the comparison between
the blossoms and the spoiled by a wan and sallow look-is
certainly intended. Third, the wutong tree (for which there is no Western
equivalent, although one translator has recently rendered it as "beech") is
noted for its large leaves that produce a mournful sound in the rain.
Although concern with sound and its manipulation is evident in Li
Qjngzhao's works, in the hands of the literati the ci generally became a
purely poetic form, increasingly disassociated from music. The "tunes,"
melodies that had been lost, became arbitrary but demanding forms,
requiring a great technical virtuosity. Consequently, poets began to feel a
need to renew their genre by borrowing once more from the popular
sources of the song. It was in this way during the twelfth century, it
seems, that the qu e±l (aria) originated, a verse form that also made up the
sung part of the opera-theater. The qu in its non-dramatic form was
. described as san "occasional;" a short form, called xiaoling a
simple strophe or refrain, was distinguished from the suites, santao
which could be quite lengthy. Considering the difficulty of the tunes, to
be sung in variable "modes," and the meaningless syllables needed to
"pad" lines to fit a rhythm, the form could be written only by trained
Chapter 3. Poetry
99
musicians, and was rarely composed by literati from the best social circles.
Therefore, the themes, in which "thwarted love affairs" were often
expressed, remained primarily in a popular vein. Not surprisingly, the
names of the most famous dramatists were linked to these works. Thus
"Springtime" (Chun fl., part of a series title "Songs of Great Virtue" [Dade
ge by Guan Hanqing (ca. 1220-1320), who has been
called by some "China's Shakespeare:"
The cuckoo cries,
"Go home, go home,"
But in fact, though spring returns,
my beloved hasn't.
Several days of anxiousness have made me gaunt,
As light and unstable
as the willow fluff that flies.
All spring there has been no word by land or sea.
I see only
a pair of swallows,
their beaks filled with mud,
building a nest.
For the Chinese the cuckoo is a poignant creature, its call seeming to
echo the words "Why not go back home?" The willow fluff is a conventional
image associated with the instability or ephemeral nature of a condition
or situation. Here it suggests that the speaker feels adrift without her
lover. The line translated as "no word by land or sea" literally refers to
geese and fish, two traditional symbols for "news from someone far away,"
especially a loved one (see the last poem cited above by Li Qjngzhao).
As this woman languishes, she sees before her the bliss of a pair of
swallows preparing their nest for their lovemaking.
In the long form of the aria, the freedom of language, which
approaches the vernacular, allowed the absorption of some terms borrowed
from the conquering Mongols (who ruled under the dynastic title of
100
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Yuan from 1260 to 1368). This brought a lot of verve to the burlesque
themes, which sometimes evoked life in the amusement quarters of the
demimonde with a facetious realism.
For the last five hundred years no classical poetry has been produced
that deserves to be raised to the height of its illustrious predecessors
examined above. Neither the diversification of poetic production nor its
amplitude was the cause of this decline. It was rather that the freshness of
popular inspiration was an ideal constantly pursued and never attained ..
In traditional China, poetry was everywhere. It blended well w1th
prose in the majority of fictional and dramatic works, which were about
to spread throughout various literary milieus.
Chapter 3. Poetry 101
Suggested Further Reading
A succinct incisive survey of Chinese poetry <:an be found in "Poetry," in
Indiana Companion, I: 59-74. Entries in the Indiana Companion on the
numerous other poets mentioned above should also be consulted. James
J. Y. Liu's The Art of Chinese Poetry {Chicago: University of Chicago Press,
1962) and Stephen Owen's Traditional Chinese Poetry and Poetics: Omen of
the World {Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985) are fine
introductions to the general subject. Burton Watson's Chinese Lyricism:
Shih Poetry from the Second to the Twelfth Century (New York: Columbia
University Press, 1971) traces the history of the shi genre through its
major developments and is supported by excellent examples in Watson's
fluent translations. The following anthologies also contain excellent
translations of the major genres: Jonathan Chaves, ed. and trans., The
Columbia Book of Later Chinese Poetry (New York: Columbia University
Press, 1986); Wu-chi Liu and Irving Lo, eds., Sunflower Splendor: Three
Thousand Years of Chinese Poetry {Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor, 1975); Victor
Mair, ed. and trans., The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature
{New York: Columbia University Press, 1994); Stephen Owen, ed. and
trans., An Anthology of Chinese Literature: Beginnings to 1911 (New York: W.
W. Norton, 1996), and Burton Watson, ed. and trans., The Columbia Book
of Chinese Poetry: From Early Times to the Thirteenth Century (New York:
Columbia University Press, 1984).
Two Sources of Ancient Poetry
Allen, Joseph R. In the Voice of Others: Chinese Music Bureau Poetry. Ann
Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, 1992.
Birrell, Anne, ed. and trans. Popular Songs and Ballads of Han China.
Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1988.
Hawkes, David, trans. The Songs of the South: An Anthology of Ancient Chinese
102 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Poems by Qy Yuan and Other Poets. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1985.
Levy, DoreJ. Chinese Narrative Poetry: The Late Han through T'ang Dynasties.
Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1988.
Waley, Arthur, trans. The Nine Songs: A Study of Shamanism in Ancient
China. London: Allen and Unwin, 1955.
The Golden Age of Chinese Poetry
Chang, Kang-i Sun. Six Dynasties Poetry. Princeton: Princeton University
Press, 1986.
Graham, Angus, trans. Poets of the Late T'ang. Baltimore: Penguin, 1965.
Owen, Stephen. The End of the Chinese ''Middle Ages:" Essays in Mid- T'ang
Literary Culture. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996.
_. The Great Age of Chinese Poetry: The High T'ang. New Haven: Yale
University Press, 1980.
_. The Poetry of the Early T'ang. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977.
Yoshikawa K6jir6. Introduction to Sung Poetry. Burton Watson, trans.
Cambridge: Harvard-Y enching Institute and Harvard University
Press, 196 7.
Yu, Pauline. The Reading of Imagery in the Chinese Poetic Tradition. Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 1987.
The Triumph of Genres in Song
Chang, Kang-i Sun. The Evolution of Chinese Tz'u Poetry from Late T'ang to
Northern Sung. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980.
"Ch 'ii" i±E. In Indiana Companion, I: 220-221.
Crump, James Irving. Songs from Xanadu: Studies in Mongol-Dynasty Song-
Poetry (san-ch'ii). Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies,
University of Michigan, 1983.
Landau, Julie, trans. Beyond Spring: Tz'u Poems of the Sung Dynasty. New
York: Columbia University Press, 1994.
Lin, Shuen-fu. The Transformation of the Chinese Lyrical Tradition: Chiang
K'uei and Southern Tz'u Poetry. Princeton: Princeton University
Chapter 3. Poetry
103
Press, 1978.
Liu,JamesJ. Y. Major Lyricists of the Northern Sung, A.D. 960-1126. Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 1974.
In Indiana Companion, I: 220-221.
Yu, Pauline, ed. Voices of the Song Lyric in China. Berkeley: University of
California Press, 1993.
Chapter 4. The Literature of Entertainment:
The Novel and Theater
Toward the year A.D. 1000, two major factors changed the
relationship between "elite" and "popular" literature, the first intelligible
to and appreciated by educated people, the second more often oral than
written and aimed at for the illiterate or semi-literate. These factors were
the growing divergence between the literary language and the spoken
language, augmented by the increased printing of popular books, and the
controversial but undeniable role of Buddhist proselytizing in seeking
"access to the common people."
On the margins of the "honorable" genres-history, the essay, and
poetry-emerged a printed literature of entertainment dominated by fiction.
The new genre was condemned_ by adherents of orthodox literature. It
was only in the aristocratic milieu that surrounded the conquering Mongols
in the thirteenth century that these new writings were given the status of
"noble literature." Near the end of the sixteenth century, some literati,
among them the most prominent writers, defended the value of this new
literature among themselves, but they were unsuccessful in persuading
their peers. It was not until the beginning of the twentieth century, under
the undeniable influence of Western literary values, that these works
were seen as worthy of scholars' attention. The absence of an epic and of
an ancient drama in the Chinese literary tradition deprived these new
genres of the kind of scholarly validation that might have raised them to
the level of poetry and prose essays. Nevertheless, their place in the
literature of the people was at least equal to that of their Western
counterparts.
I. Narrative Literature Written in Classical Chinese
There is a vast narrative corpus in the classical language whose
themes and subjects are often considered fictional. But one hesitates to
il:
ill[
106 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
apply the adjective "fictional" to them, because their origins differ so
much from the mainstream of Chinese fiction in the vernacular. Although
they are referred to as xiaoshuo Jj\]ill., a term which in modern times is the
Chinese equivalent of "fiction," the origin of this term, which translates
literally as "little talks" or "minor discourses," is not suggestive of the
Western concept of fiction. Xiaoshuo was able early on to extend itself to
include all narrative that did not aspire to the level of the major genres.
The term itself was used in Zhuang Zi more than two thousand years ago
and now covers an immense literature which ranges from amusing stories
to anecdotes, notes, or records of varied and novel events, much like the
German "short story." The fact that this originally even larger corpus of
materials was partially preserved can be explained, barring some fortuitous
discovery in the future, by a historicist attitude on the part of scholars,
who saw in these narratives sources of information, albeit not of the
highest reliability, worthy of preservation. This fact, and the weakening
of Confucian orthodoxy that followed the disintegration of the Han empire
in the third century, emboldened some well-known scholars to "waste
their time" collecting and editing such narratives.
These two factors seem to have figured in the compilation of an
anthology of five hundred "volumes" of "minor discourses" published
under the direction of Li Fang *BJJ (925-996), entitled Taiping guangji X
.IfLlfij§C (Vast Records Made during the Era of Great Peace [976-983]).
Printed in 981, it became a major source for the partial reconstruction of
a number of ancient short narratives.
The third and fourth centuries were the golden age for the serious
scholarly recording of anecdotes. These records are of two major types:
collections of bizarre events, (dtiguai iit'l'£ (records of the strange), and
collections of stories about eccentric persons, dtiren iiS':A. (records of
[strange] persons).
The two most famous works of the first sub genre are the Soushen ji
(Records of Searching for Spirits), attributed to Gan Baa -=fJf (fl.
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
107
320), and the Bowu dti iW!Jo/Jiit (Record of All Things), compiled by
Zhang Hua 7.R$ (232-300). Although the original texts of most Six Dynasty
collections of these narratives were lost, editors in the Ming dynasty
began to reconstruct them (an effort that continues even today); the most
complete extant edition of the Soushen ji contains nearly five-hundred
brief anecdotes and tales, some of which were clearly written after the
fourth century. These notes on the strange or the supernatural, which
won the admiration of generations of scholars for their concision,
occasionally gave way to narratives of greater length and complexity.
From the supernatural we move to the extravagant in this story of
the dog from Yang, transmitted in the Soushen houji (Sequel to
Records of Searching for Spirits) and attributed to Tao Q!.an (365-427).
A young man in Yang had a dog which he liked very much and
always took with him. One day, when he got drunk, he walked into the
grass around a large marsh and passed out, unable to move. Winter had
just arrived. A grass fire started, and the wind was very strong. The dog
circled his master and barked, but the young man, being drunk, did not
wake up. There was a pit filled with water up ahead, so the dog went
there and got into the water. When it came back, it shook the water off
its body onto the grass around the young man. It did this several times,
circling its master in small steps, thereby wetting all the grass. When the
fire came, the young man thus escaped being burned. He saw this only
when he woke up.
Some time later, the young man fell into an empty well as he was
walking in the dark. The dog howled until dawn. Someone came by.
Thinking it strange that the dog was barking at the well, he went over to
it and saw the young man. The young man said, "Could you let me out?
I shall repay you generously." The man said, "If you give me this dog, I
will let you out." "This dog has rescued me from death," the young man
replied, "thus I cannot give it to you. I would gladly give you anything
else." "In that case," the man said, "I will not let you out."
The dog accordingly lowered its head and cast a meaningful glance
108
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
at the well. The young man understood its meaning and then said to the
passerby, "I will give you the dog."
The man then let him out. He tied the dog and then left. Five days
later, the dog fled into the night and returned to its master.
The Bowu ;dli lives up to its title by treating everything, especially
myths and legends-for example, this version of the story of Prince Dan
_§_ of Yan the man behind a failed assassination attempt on the First
Emperor of Qin:
Dan, the heir apparent of Yan, was a hostage in Qjn. Since the
King of Qjn (the future First Emperor) did not treat him with respect
and he could not obtain what he wanted, the heir decided to return to
Y an and sought the permission of the King of Qjn. The king refused,
declaring absurdly, "If you can cause the crows' heads to tum white and
horses to grow horns, you can leave." Dan looked up and sighed, and
the crows' heads turned white. He bowed his head and lamented, and
the horses grew horns. The King of Qjn had no alternative but to send
him back. He had a bridge built with a mechanism intended to trap
Dan. Dan galloped over the bridge without the mechanism firing. Dan
fled and reached the pass [where Qjn's territory ended], but [it was too
early and] the gate was not open. Dan crowed like a cock, and then all
the cocks crowed. He thereupon returned to Yan.
The subgenre associated with memorable conduct by men and
women in their private lives is represented by the Shishuo xinyu
(A New Account of Tales of the World), a collection of more than one
thousand anecdotes, compiled around 430 by the prince Liu Yiqing
(403-444). This evocation of a vanishing aristocratic world has fascinated
generations of scholars seduced by the novelty of an allusive style drawing
liberally from vernacular expressions in what was then the spoken language.
A vast gallery of historical personages parades through these short
narratives, which are classified under headings that reflect a general theme
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 109
in thirty-six chapters. For example, the fourth chapter, "Letters and
Scholarship," contains a number of anecdotes on these subjects. The
preceding chapter presents narratives related to "Affairs of Government,"
and that following, those which exemplify the concept of "Squared and
Correct." The following brief anecdote, the fifteenth in chapter 4, reveals
clearly the witty tone of this collection.
Yu Zisong [Yu Ai (262-311)] began to read the Zhuang
Zi. When he had unrolled the first fascicle a foot or so, he put it down
and said, "This is not a bit different from what I have always thought."
These anecdotes exhibit an economy of discourse reminiscent of
the methods of the scholarly tradition in Chinese painting-both are the
enemy of "completeness." The "emptiness" of these narratives is carefully
managed by their authors, who intentionally leave spaces and things
unsaid which by suggestion give life to the subject, as in the following
(Chapter VII.2):
Contemporaries depicted Li Ying $!!If (110-169) as "brisk and
bracing," like the wind beneath the sturdy pine.
What they lack is the suspense of carefully structured narratives. This
step was taken with the appearance in the seventh century of "transmissions
of the extraordinary" {chuanqi It is said that candidates taking the
competitive examination required to obtain for official posts, which were
promoted from the late seventh century on, were the first to write these
tales as a stylistic exercise designed to establish their reputation and to
attract the patronage of influential officials or even the examiners
themselves. However, this theory cannot explain the diversity of forms
and themes among the complete corpus of chuanqi (which ranges, according
to the authority consulted, from a little over fifty tales to more than three
hundred). The presence of some well-known names, such as the poet and
llO Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
friend of BaiJuyi, Yuan Zhen 51;. {779-831), among the many obscure
authors of chuanqi implies that the negative attitudes toward imaginative
literature held by traditional Confucians no longer prevailed in the
revitalized Confucianism of the Tang dynasty. One of the earliest scholars
to take an interest in these narratives, Hu Yinglin {1551-1602),
felt that their fictional qualities were deliberate on the part of the authors.
In other words, even when the authors seemed to be reporting actual
events, their imaginations shaped and structured the narration, and their
literary talents gave it a refined style. Their subtlety of observation enabled
the "extraordinary" to become part of human psychology, revealing
problems that were sometimes further expounded in the conclusion of
the tale or in the author's comments often appended to it. The major
works of this genre struck a unique balance between form and depth of
emotion. The term for the genre, chuanqi, provided the title of a collection
by Pei Xing *1T {825-880), but it became widely used to refer to these
tales only during the Song dynasty.
"Gujing ji" {Story of an Ancient Mirror) relates how a
mirror disappeared from its case "with the roar of a dragon or the growl
of a tiger on the fifteenth day of the seventh lunar month in the thirteenth
year of the Daye era {617);" it is considered the earliest chuanqi tale and is
attributed to Wang Du Not long after "Gujing ji" appeared, an
anonymous tale titled "Baiyuan zhuan" {The Story of the White
Ape) began to circulate, satirizing the scholar and calligrapher Ouyang
Xun {557-641), whose father was said to have simian features.
ShenJiji {ca. 740-800) was the author of two notable tales.
The first, "Zhenzhong ji" {The Story of the Inside of a Pillow),
takes place in 719 and exposes the vicissitudes of a long official career
that turns out to have been only a dream that took the time it takes to
cook a bowl of yellow millet. Li Gongzuo $012'1: {ca. 770-848) treated a
similar theme in his "Nanke Taishou zhuan" "f¥jfPJ:k'1'1$ {Biography of
the Governor of the Southern Branch), linking dream tales with this
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
lll
formula of the futility of official life. The other tale by ShenJiji, "Renshi
zhuan" {f:_fl;;f$ {The Story of Lady Ren), is a marvellous account of the
tragic destiny of this fox-courtesan .whose fidelity nevertheless puts the
actions of the male characters in the story to shame. The return to moral
values gives a sharp edge to "Li Wa zhuan" $l!'Ef$ {The Story of Baby
Li), by the younger brother of BaiJuyi, Bai Xingjian 81'Jf'lll {775-826).
This narrative is guided by the hand of a master-realistic details so
thoroughly conceal the supernatural motifs that one searches vainly for
clues that this tale was inspired by an oral account which had been
elaborated through the art of a professional storyteller and based on
actual events.
"Yingying zhuan" :iUitf$ {The Story of Yingying), composed by
the famous poet Yuan Zhen, is known to have had an immense literary
impact. The "extraordinary" of this chuanqi is no longer the supernatural,
but the femininity of the heroine, who vigorously rejects a suitor, only to
join him a little later for a nigh! of pleasure. She shows herself again only
ten days thereafter, touched by a long poem which her lover decided to
address to her. She returns to him each night from then on, leaving just
before dawn, and invariably responding to his questions about why she
does so by saying, "I am not able to act otherwise." When her lover
announces his imminent departure for the capital to sit for the examinations,
she easily allows him to leave, raising no objections. His repeated failures
inthe examinations prolong their separation and arouse her to send him
letters about her burning love that the hero is proud to show to his close
friends. Yet, frightened by such a passion, he decides not to return to
Yingying and marry her. He justifies himself as follows:
All of Zhang's friends who became aware of this affair were astonished
by his strange conduct, but Zhang's decision was firm. As I [Yuan Zhen]
was on particularly good terms with him, I asked him for an explanation:
"Those beautiful creatures who have been so endowed by Heaven tend
to bring misfortune to others, if not to themselves. Had Miss Cui
litl:::
112
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
encountered riches and honor, she could have gained favor with her
charm, and if she had not become clouds or rain, she would have
become a kraken or a dragon: I cannot imagine all her transformations.
... My virtue is too feeble to overcome her evil spell; for this reason I
have contained my passion.
A year later Yingying becomes the wife of another, and Zhang also
marries. He nevertheless attempts to see her again, but she refuses to
receive him and manages to secretly send him this poem:
As I have lost weight, the radiance of my beauty has diminished,
I tossed and turned thousands of times, too weary to leave my bed.
It's not because of those in the household that I am ashamed to rise,
For you I pine away, still too ashamed to see you.
A number of other themes have been tackled by chuanqi, from the
detective story involving a female avenger of wrongs in "Xie Xiao'e"
1]\ffl by Li Gongzuo, to the strange story of "Qjuran ke zhuan"
(The Story of the Curly-bearded Stranger) by Du Guangting tf:J\:;JM
(850-933), which gives a part to Li Shimin who was later to
found the Tang dynasty.
In the fourteenth century, the tale in the classical language enjoyed
a brilliant renaissance with the publication of a collection attributed to
Qu You JfJfi (1341-1427), ]iandeng xinhua (New Tales Told
While Trimming the Lamp). Among these "new tales" we find only
twenty-two pieces, most of them sentimental love tales. Around 1420, Li
Zhen (1376-1452) composed a sequel, also with twenty-two pieces,
titled]iandeng yuhua (Supplementary Tales Told While Trimming
the Lalnp). This series concluded with the eight tales in Shao Jingzhan's
Mideng yinhua (Tales Written While Searching for a
Lamp), published in 1592. Dramatists and short-story writers drew on
this rich material, which was appreciated by a rather large audience, who
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 113
also supported many commercial editions of the Taiping guangji. The
success that these works found in Japan and Korea saved them from
obscurity, since they seem to have been considered part of the milieu
that precipitated the rapid fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644 and the
ideological reaction that followed, a time when many such works were
censored and lost. It was not political conditions, but the futility of a
genre of classical-language tales at the height of the popularity of vernacular
fiction, that led to the exclusion of these works from the Siku quanshu [9
"complete" catalogue of the writings relative to the "four treasuries"
(i.e., the classics, histories, philosophical works, and belles lettres),
completed in about 1772 at the order of the Qjanlong emperor.
Another factor might explain the decline of the chuanqi: in 1766
the first edition of the Liao:dtai :dtiyi (Records of Unusual Stories
from the Leisure Studio) by Pu Songling (1640-1715) appeared.
This was a collection of "strange" stories and anecdotes which had
previously circulated only in manuscript. A scholar of some local note in
a little village in Shandong province, Pu Songling, assuming the title
"chronicler of the strange," had produced nearly five-hundred compositions
based on events that came from his imagination or on conversations he
had held in the course of many decades of a life in which he labored as a
tutor and a secretary. Written in a refined classical Chinese, the work has
enjoyed unprecedented popularity. It corrected the dryness of style of the
"records of the strange" (:dtiguaz) of the third and fourth centuries with the
· relative prolixity of the chuanqi In short, the chronicler always yields to
the temptations of the story writer. We understand the fantastic of Pu
Songling better than we do the realities of the time: through these voyages
to the world beyond, he suggests an ironic vision of our own world.
The Liao;dtai :dtiyi inspired a number of literary emulators during
the final years of the nineteenth century. Zi bu yu .Y/ftm (What the
Master [Confucius] Did Not Speak Of) is a collection of irony-filled short
stories in which the great poet Yuan Mei :R;& (1716-1798) displayed the
114
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
charms of an unsophisticated style.Ji Yun {1724-1805) intended to
oppose the Liaodtai dziyi with more laconic narrations in his Yuewei
Caotang biji {Notes from the Cottage of Meticulous Reviews),
gathered from collections published from 1789 to 1798. The stories of
Wang Tao .:Eii {1828-1897), into which he incorporated romanticized
memories of his voyages to the West, were popularly known by the
flattering title "Sequel to Liaodzai dziyi with Illustrations and Explanations"
(HouLiao;dzai dziyi tushuo
Those interested in the commercial side of letters took advantage
of the opportunity to appeal to a much larger public by translating much
of this literature of entertainment from classical Chinese into the vernacular.
But these classical works were only one of the sources of theater and the
novel. Their characteristics cannot be adequately explained without taking
into account the rich panoply of oral literary genres.
II. The Theater
Although some modem Chinese critics have suggested that Chinese
theater originated in the seventh century, it is impossible to trace operatic
dramas, the mainstay of the Chinese tradition, back that far. These works
seem to have begun in earnest in the twelfth century, especially in the
burgeoning populous cities, which had amusement quarters where
permanent theater halls were established. It is necessary to distinguish
playbooks intended to be performed, which were of concern only to the
professionals, from those which were meant to be read like novels. The
playbooks were prone to reduce plot suspense in favor of lyrical outbursts.
The later practice of performing only one or two acts of a drama only
reinforced this tendency.
1. The Opera-Theater of the North. The origins of this type of
drama are well known. Beginning in the twelfth century, a genre of
"variety" entertainment known as zaju W!EJ!lU {variety plays) began to appear.
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 115
Zaju had four acts, in which one of the actors played a leading role. In
the following century, it was the only dramatic form to retain a single
role that was sung, following the example of recitation in a roughly
contemporaneous kind of ballad called dzugongdiao term that
has been translated as "potpourri," but approximates the chantefable of
the West. In the golden age of Mongol rule {1276-1367) the zaju assumed
its canonical form: four acts {literally ;jze tfT or "breaks") and an optional
prologue, which was rarely placed at the beginning, giving rise to its
name of xiezi the "inserted wedge." The astonishing flowering of
the opera-theater in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries is explained,
no doubt, by the conjuncture of two factors-first, a sort of "precocious
modernity," which some scholars have seen in the growth of cities, the
spread of printing, the increasing mobility of the population, and the
development of the coal and iron industries at this time; and second, the
appreciation of operatic qualities shown by the conquering Mongols,
who had little passion for formal Chinese literature {poetry and prose),
but were fervent lovers of popular entertainment. There were important
zaju dramatists throughout the Yuan dynasty and into the early Ming,
including one member of the imperial family of the newly restored Chinese
regime. But the preservation of this genre owes more to the renewal of
scholarly interest in zaju, marked by the publication in 1616 of an anthology
of one hundred Yuan dramas edited by Zang Mouxun {d. 1621).
Partly because of Zang's efforts, there are 167 extant zaju from the Yuan
era, and 300 of the 500 produced by the Ming dynasty are still available.
Among the 108 dramatists of the Yuan whose names are known to
us, a good third were from the area around the Mongol capital, Dadu 7:.
ti) {modem Beijing). That was no longer the case in the Ming; only 2 of
this dynasty's 125 dramatists were from that region. The language clearly
confirms the more popular nature of the Yuan pieces, despite the attempts
of later editors to reduce the vulgarisms in these works. Three names
stand out among the pleiad of the most famous dramatists of the Yuan:
116 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Guan Hanqing, Ma Zhiyuan, and Wang Shifu.
The fact that little more is known of Shakespeare than about his
Chinese counterpart, Guan Hanqing (ca. 1240-1320), is not mere
coincidence, but a measure of the low esteem in which serious scholars
held all the entertainment genres. Of the sixty-odd pieces attributed to
Guan, a native of Dadu, only a third are extant. In these remaining
pieces, curiously, the principal role is most often entrusted to a woman.
Should we grant Guan Hanqing a propensity for social satire? The most
famous of his pieces, Dou E yuan (The Resentment of Dou E),
denounces a judiciary error. A young widow is executed for a murder
that was actually committed by a suitor of hers who wants to compel her
to marry him.
Ma Zhiyuan (ca. 1260-1325), also from Dadu, was less
prolific than Guan. There are only seven known pieces by him, the most
famous of which is Han gong qiu 1J'§:tk (Autumn in the Palace of Han).
The piece is actually a retelling of a well-known story about a lady of the
Han court, Wang Zhaojun who had to leave China to marry a
northern barbarian chief. Paradoxically, it is the emperor, duped into
selecting her to go, who has the principal role, which is sung. The repertoire
of Ma Zhiyuan's plays reveals a predilection for Taoism, and in fact Ma
belonged to one of its sects. Another of his best-known pieces, Huang
liang (Yellow-Millet Dream) (translated into Western languages
early in this century), was based on the tale "Zhenzhong ji" (The Story of
the Inside of a Pillow) by the Tang writer Shenjiji
The third member of this famous trio, Wang Shifu .:E.Jfffi (thirteenth
century), was also a native of Dadu. His masterwork, Xixiang ji
(The Story of the Western Pavilion), the most famous of the traditional
dramas, was translated into French even earlier (1872-1880) by one of
the most renowned sinologists of the nineteenth century, Stanislas Julien.
This single work, which is actually a series of five zaju, each in four acts,
is the only one left from Wang Shifu's corpus. This version of the famous
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
117
"Story of Yingying" by Yuan Zhen retains the modifications introduced
by Dongjieyuan ii/W:JC (fl. 1200) in his ;:/lugongdiao of the same title: a
happy ending and moral justification of the young woman's conduct
deprives Yuan Zhen's tale of its edge while strengthening the lyricism of
the story, which charmed generation after generation of young readers,
men and women alike. The twenty acts of Xixiang ji are well below the
average number of acts for the pieces in the repertoire of the Southern
dramatic tradition. These plays were called chuanqi 1-'-i'it, undoubtedly
because they naturally drew on the sentimental themes of the artistic
tales of the Tang, which were also called chuanqi. The longest chuanqi
contained 130 chu lfiJ "exits," a term that, not surprisingly, scholars have
preferred to translate as "scenes." To this was added a complete disdain
for the Western rule of three dramatic unities, a failure to distinguish
even comedies and tragedies, and, finally, the absence of even the slightest
bit of realistic scenery, symbolism taking the place of realism, so that an
actor could simulate riding a horse by brandishing a riding crop as he
moved about the stage. All of these factors contribute to the impression
of a lack of dramatic vigor, which often troubles Western audiences and
readers.
2. The Opera-Theater of the South. The which descended
from the nanxi l¥ilf)t (drama of the South) and originated at least as early
as the zaju of the North, was characterized by music both sweet and
languorous, costumes in more strident colors, and the predominance of
sentimental themes. From the turning point in the middle of the sixteenth
century, scholars participated openly in the theater and, until the eighteenth
century, no longer hesitated to sign their works with transparent
pseudonyms. A separate place should be accorded to Pipa ji
(Story of the Lute) by Gao Ming j%'jf!Jj (ca. 1305-1370), a work in forty-two
acts that exalted filial and conjugal piety. The most eminent men of
letters engaged in a lively controversy at the onset of the eighteenth
118 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
century, in which one.side opposed the immorality of Xixiangji and the
other glorified the musicality of Pipa ji. Gao Ming's Story of the Lute is
unquestionably the most refined of the "four great chuanqf' (Sida chuanqi
[9:;*:1$1'lt) of the fourteenth century, but each of the four found its own
eulogist.
The musical style brought to the fore by Wei Liangfu toward
the middle of the sixteenth century, the kunqu!tffl:l, owes its name to its
place of birth in Kunshan !tLlJ, near Suzhou, the economic and cultural
center of the region at that time. Nearly all of the scholarly dramatists
composed kunqu, beginning with Liang Chenyu (ca. 1510-1582).
Li Kaixian *lm7t (1502-1568) had previously introduced the rules
proper to the zaju in his notably in his magnum opus, Baojian ji
(The Story of the Precious Sword), inspired by an episode from
the saga Water Margin (see below).
As for the eccentric painter and poet Xu Wei (1521-1593),
his reputation as a dramatist lies in four works of original form- The Four
Cries of the Gibbon (Sisheng yuan ll9l!:1N)-considered zaju because of their
brevity.
The eminent scholar Tang Xianzu (1550-1617) is regarded
as the most well-known dramatist of the Ming dynasty, and his Mudan
ting U:P:T-'; (The Peony Pavilion), in fifty-five scenes, is considered the
most famous of his five chuanqi. Each of these plays masterfully exploits
motifs of dreams, and they are still performed today as kunqu, a style that
Tang Xianzu did not like at first.
The jesuit father Matteo Ricci (1551-1610), who landed in China
at the end of the sixteenth century, deplored the immoderate passion of
Chinese for the theater. Officials at the highest level became involved in
the theater and it would be impossible to cite all those who decked
themselves so brilliantly in scandal by founding literary coteries ready to
enter into the most acerbic polemics.
Shen Jing 1Jt:EJ ( 1533-161 0) went so far as to rewrite The Peony
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
119
Pavilion in order to adapt it to the Suzhou dialect (the poetic passages had
to be re-rhymed, etc.). The most eminent of the Suzhou dramatists, Li Yu
*.:E. ( 1591-16 71 ), produced over thirty pieces, primarily satiric and
didactic, most of them lost-only the titles remain to suggest their content.
The essayist Li Yu *i#.l (1611-1680)-whose name in its romanized
form seems identical to that of the dramatist mentioned just above, but
whose given name is written with a different Chinese character-is the
author of ten chuanqi. Li's comedies exhibit a tone and a concern for
dramatic structure unmatched in the Chinese tradition. In practice he
paid little attention to the stipulations he made in his virtual treatise on
dramaturgy contained in his Xianqing ouji (Notes Thrown Down
to Pass the Time). These notes distinguish themselves from the corpus of
Chinese dramatic criticism, which bogs down in inventories and rankings
of dramatists and dramas or in lyric technicalities. Li Yu speaks to us as
an author and director of dramas about the training of actors, having first
treated the art of writing for the stage; then he concerns himself with
style. The work does not slight song and music; but it is to the spoken
parts of the drama that the most attention must be paid, as well as to the
performance and the witticisms. A drama must be tightly knit-a necessary
condition, but not in itself sufficient to sustain the interest of an audience
which came to enjoy the music as well as the plot. The suspense of a
carefully organized dramatic structure should be animated by a master
idea and brought to life through the novelty of the theme, a liveliness of
language, and the rejection of cliches. One must know how to mete out
fiction and reality, how to guard against cliches and the improbable, and
how not to abuse satire. It is necessary to avoid stuffing the dramatic
composition with citations and allusions, or at least to avoid those which
are not familiar to every member of the audience:
Drama ought to be able to be read by the learned as well as by those
who are not, by women and children. It is also necessary to prize
fluency rather than depth. I have been told that for men of letters there
120 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
is no difference between composing a dramatic work and writing other
types of literature; they apply themselves to show their talent; how
could they achieve this easily? I would say that the ability to write a
play belongs only to the greater wri.ters.
To the tricks of the plot should be added the salt of the dialogues and the
pepper of the situation, though the plot itself should flow naturally, as
from a fountain; if not, it would be like
... setting out in quest of pleasure by going to find a prostitute. To
search for someone to sell him smiles can only result in something
false : you can only draw a bitter sensuality from it.
Does a literature of entertainment merit such care? Li Yu argues that it
does in his introduction:
Confucius said, "Are there not the board games of bo and weiqi? To
play them is surely better than doing nothing" (Lunyu XVII.22). Although
dramatic composition can be only a minor art, isn't it still better than
checkers? In my opinion, there is no major or minor art: what is important
is to excel in your art ....
Li Yu well knew that inspiration is beyond all formula:
To those to whom the spirit appears, the writing brush also comes. This
is the measure of the man. If the brush appears, it is because the spirit
has guided it there. But the man is not entirely master, because the
brush conducts the spirit there or it has not wanted it at all. It is as if
some supernatural creature manipulates their relationship. Can one still
say of this written work that it is deliberate? Literary art is truly
communication with the gods; this is not a figure of speech. The immortal
works are products not of men, but of gods and demons. Man is only
their plaything.
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
121
Li Yu took the Chinese theater in a new direction. After him the chuanqi
produced two masterpieces before dying out, yielding its place to troupes
of professional players who performed according to playbooks written by
anonymous authors, playbooks that were rarely printed. This final period
of dramatic development, which saw the birth of what is called in English
"Peking/Beijing Opera" {jing xi J?:ll\:, literally "drama of the capital"),
belongs more to the history of entertainment than to the history of literature.
Hong Sheng's m¥f!. ( 1645-1704) Changsheng dian (The Palace
of Eternal Youth), completed in 1688) dealt with the popular but tragic
love story of Emperor Xuanzong (r. 712-755) of the Tang and his favorite,
Yang Guifei. In a pattern that was repeated often at the beginning of the
Manchu dynasty, Hong Sheng had his characters, who were ostensibly
living in the Tang dynasty, comment on events that were clearly more
related to the late Ming dynasty, and the play was therefore judged
"indecent" {read "seditious) by the Kangxi emperor (r. 1662-1722) himself;
the official career of the author was ruined, on the technicality that Hong
had presented the premiere during a period of mourning for a member
of the imperial family.
4
Despite the ban, the piece was acclaimed for its
lyricism.
Even when simplified, the plot of Taohua (Peach-blossom
Fan), with its forty scenes {not counting the prologue and epilogue), is too
complex to be laid out here. By Kong Shangren (1648-1718), it is
the most representative work of the trend toward a preference for quasi-
contemporary themes in the novel and drama at the time of the fall of
the Ming dynasty. The events surrounding the collapse of the Ming
4
Another, more recent example of a conflict between politics and drama
can be seen in the PRC government's refusal to allow a new production of The
Peony Pavilion to be performed or travel abroad because it was "feudal, superstitious,
and pornographic" (see the series of articles on this in The New York Times, 25
June-ljuly 1998).
122
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
furnished the context and the framework for the play. The author, a
descendant of Confucius in the seventy-fourth generation, had been
working on this piece for nearly fifteen years when it was first performed
in 1699. From its portrayal of the hated dictatorship of the eunuch Wei
Zhongxian (1568-1627), which lasted from 1620 to 1627, to its
depiction of the rivalries that tore apart the refugee court of the Ming
dynasty in South China several decades later, the work was a powerful
evocation of the imperiousness of the defeated, who, despite their failure,
did not lack men of valor. The Kangxi emperor, who asked Kong for a
preliminary reading of the play, found it only of lukewarm interest: without
proscribing the piece, he decided to dismiss the author from his services,
since Kong Shangren had made too clear his attachment to the defunct
Ming regime. The title of the play is an allusion to the fan that Hou
Fangyu (1618-1655), then a young militant scholar, offered to the
beauty Li Xiangjun *'*B· Forced to join the house of a corrupt high
official as a concubine, Li attempted to commit suicide by bashing her
head in; her blood splattered onto the fan, and one of her artistically
gifted friends transformed these bloodstains into peach-blossom petals.
In the in contrast to the zaju, all of the roles are likely to
participate in the singing. The chantefable thus seems to be the common
origin of both these great dramatic genres, which still entertain audiences,
albeit select audiences, even today.
ill. The Novel
There is not a work of Chinese novelistic literature in the vernacular
that does not preserve some of the conventions of the professional
storyteller. The modern reader of the novel, of course, pays little attention
to these devices, such as direct address to the reader. The clear bond with
oral literature would seem to merit further research into this relationship,
a direction for research that has recently been found to be fruitful. This
work has dispelled the accepted notion that the conquering Mongols
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 123
brought the two new genres of drama and the novel to the Chinese from
outside China.
The use of the vernacular in the theater, a necessity because classical
Chinese is not intelligible to the ear, led to the spoken language becoming
"literary" after a time. In the novel, the bond between proto-forms of the
novel and orality justified its use.
1. Oral Literature. Oral literature was not simply the "threepenny
opera," inexpensive entertainment that even the lowest class of peasant
could afford. It existed long before this kind of entertainment. Moreover,
Chinese oral literature catered to the elite as well. If we can perceive in
oral literature an antiquity and a diversity, it is only in that part of it
which has been passed on by writing and even printing. Written texts in
the colloquial language m_ay have been meant to be read aloud to the
illiterate. Yet the proportion of totally illiterate people in China was
probably much lower than in the West. They formed, nevertheless, a
crushing majority of China's people, in particular of its women. Besides
those who were illiterate, there remained a large semi-literate population,
even though China enjoyed a common language and writing system.
Writing was a method of transmission of oral literature and allowed
amateurs and professional performers, often only marginally literate, to
restore these texts to their proper function, which was to be heard.
A major archaeological discovery at the end of the last century,
which was made entirely by chance, yielded the history of more than a
thousand years of oral literature. More than one-hundred texts known as
bianwen were discovered among some thirty-thousand fascicles taken
from a grotto-library which had been sealed by monks in 1035. This
discovery in grottos known as the "Thousand Buddhas" near the
northwestern city of Dunhuang essentially restructured the field of early
"oral" Chinese literature. The majority of these texts are chantefables, but
there are also examples written entirely in verse or prose. The language
124 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
used ranges from a vulgarized classical Chinese to something approaching
the spoken language. The themes are sometime profane, and for the most
part are common to the subjects of numerous other popular literary
forms. It has been shown that the term bianwen, long interpreted as "texts
changed" or "transformed" {into vernacular Chinese), actually means "texts
on the scenes [of the life of Buddha] in pictures." The bian were "rolled,"
z:ftuan ;ff, in a way that allowed them to be shown as the story was told.
One of the most characteristic and best-articulated texts is a long version
of the story ofMaudgalyayana {Mulian Chinese), whose impious
mother fell into the depths of the final and most terrible of hells. Instead
of passing into nirvana, the pious disciple of Buddha, left to search for his
mother and extracted her deliverance from the Great Sympathetic One.
Following the example of Theodor Benfey {1809-1881) and
subsequent scholars, it was tempting to take up again, mutatis mutandis,
the thesis that these marvelous stories had their origin in India. China's
intelligentsia-which in the early part of this century was made up largely
of occidentophiles, a situation that resulted from the continuous adulation
of all things Western during the "May Fourth Movement" {4 May 1919
until about 1942)-enthusiastically supported the idea that the corpus of
imaginative literature in the colloquial languages had foreign origins, an
idea they believed improved the image of these genres. Near the end of
the 1950s, however, the Chinese regime ofMao Zedong, denounced the
error of this position of national denigration. The question remains
controversial; it has received only qualified responses to date.
Over the course of the one-thousand-year history of Chinese oral
literature, most of its genres have disappeared, giving way to new forms
that developed under new names. Each genre was able to find its audience,
some in the numerous popular milieus of town and countryside, some in
more affluent circles, even those of the imperial court. Certain genres
have been able to inspire admirers, and learned imitators have left texts
for us. It is significant that the professional storytellers, originally called
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
125
shuohuaren "tellers of stories," became in the seventeenth century
shuoshude "tellers of books." Telling tales had by then become an
art that people worked at full-time. The techniques used were not merely
spoken; there were also genres that displayed the talents of singers and
musicians. These talents were sometimes combined in a performance by
a single person; at other times the performance group would include two
or even {less commonly) three people. As a general rule, storytellers
worked from memory, but they might be helped by a synopsis, by a text
from another literary genre which served as the primary material, or by
notes on prepared passages and formulaic expressions. As soon as a text
by an author of a certain genre-a text that might never have been
performed-approached something like a novel, it was characterized as a
narration in the popular language composed for a silent reader. Such
seems to have been the case for some tanci {ballads [accompanied
by stringed instruments] strummed), a genre completely in verse, composed
and performed by women for a female audience. But tanci were also
intended to be read, as with Zaisheng {Ties for the Next Life),
the masterpiece by Chen Duansheng {1751-ca. 1796) consisting
of more than 500,000 words, or with Tianyu hua 7(ffi:ft {Flowers Falling
in the Rain), composed in thirty volumes by Tao Zhenhuai during
the nineteenth century.
In short, though the novel reached higher levels among the public,
it still touched the lower strata. These oral genres, on the other hand,
which lacked vocal and musical support when they were read silently,
often found themselves reduced to fictional narratives that approached
the novel. This "neutralization" through writing led to other distinctions
within the novel based on the dimensions and thematics of the work.
2. Stories and Novellas. The birth of the novel in the vernacular
seems tied to the origins of the inexpensive "popular" book. The invention
of printing responded to this demand, as well as to the needs of the
126
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Buddhist proselytizers. The extremely rare surviving examples of ancient
woodblock printing are primitive in appearance, mostly short fascicles
revealing a clumsy technique. The thesis that has long prevailed would
have us believe that some of these small booklets were produced as
prompts called huaben (base of the narration or story), for the
storytellers, which were then imitated by writers for the reading audience.
In fact, certain texts, among the most ancient extant, seem to be clumsy
attempts to reproduce a session by a teller of xiaoshuo.
From various types of ancient evidence, we know that specializations
in storytelling had developed by the twelfth century. "Little talks" (xiaoshuo)
were the least prestigious, but the most popular. Their strong point was to
be able to offer the public a complete narrative in one session and a
varied range of themes. Perhaps the tellers took turns according to their
specialties, with those who specialized in romantic subjects narrating to
the accompaniment of a flute.
In the amusement quarters, where such short stories were produced,
bookstores published the texts of stories or ballads, as well as the scripts
of successful dramatic works, in thin, "disposable" booklets. None of the
originals have come down to us, but a few of them may appear in
re-edited form in the San yan ==§ (Three Words), an anthology of 120
stories published by Feng Menglong (1574-1646) from 1620 to
1625. Some of the stories gathered early in this century by Miao Quansun
(1844-1919) in a collection that is probably apocryphal may have
originated as such texts; the publication of these stories in 1915, under
the title]ingben tongsu xiaoshuo (Short Stories Which Could
Be Understood by Common People in the Capital Edition), caused a
sensation, by bringing the nobility of a venerable ancestor to the trend
toward using the spoken language in literary works.
The ]ingben tongsu xiaoshuo contains texts of astonishing maturity
with respect to the art of storytelling and the handling of the spoken
language. An introduction to the principal narrative, usually an anecdote
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 127
or a series of poems, left the audience time to settle into their seats and
created suspense that was skillfully maintained by the tempo of the
narration. Although claiming provenance in the Song dynasty, the work
seems much later.
The most ancient extant collection of huaben$ dates to the Ming
dynasty. Titled Liushi jia xiaoshuo ;\ (Stories of Sixty Tellers), it
brings together sixty xiaoshuo and seems to mark the first scholarly interest
in the genre of "popular" short stories. It was compiled from 1541 to
1551 by Hong Pian #Hffl.!, a descendant of Hong Mai (1123-1282),
the editor of the Yijian z:/li the largest collection of anecdotes ever
gathered. Hong Pian published a series of six volumes, containing ten
stories each. Only twenty-nine pieces remain, two of them in fragments.
Eleven more were recovered from later collections. These are narratives
that stem from different oral genres; none are divided into chapters or
sections. Jacques Dars has recently provided a complete French translation
(Paris: Gallimard, 1987) under the alternate title Contes de la Montagne
sereine (Qjngping Shantang huaben referring to the name
that Hong Pian gave his publishing house, "Hall of Mount Qingping"
(Qingping Shan Tang m.3f LlJ':§t), perhaps alluding to a place in the environs
of Hangzhou.
From 1620 to 1625, Feng Menglong published an anthology of
three volumes containing 120 xiaoshuo in Suzhou and Nanjing. With four
stories in each, the three volumes purported to have an edifying aim and
were known collectively as the Three ''Yan".=:.§, or "three words," because
each of the titles ended in yan. Feng's publication ensured the huaben a
popularity that lasted only until the end of the seventeenth century. Feng
was left the task of sometimes repairing original texts and sometimes
concealing his creation of new stories-thus he referred to the works in
the collection as both "ancient and modern."
Ling Mengchu (1580-1644) profited from Feng's commercial
success, and published, in 1628 and 1633, two other volumes of the same
128
Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
dimensions as the San yan. Unlike Feng, however, he openly portrayed
himself as their creator. The title of these two volumes, Pai'an jingqi
.iij- (Striking the Table in Amazement at the Wonders), also dismisses
the pretense of edification in favor of a new concept of the "extraordinary"
in daily life. From the two hundred total stories in these five collections
by Feng and Ling, forty were chosen for the anonymous anthology ]ingu
qiguan (Wonders of the Present and Past), which appeared in
about 1640 and attempted to take advantage of the popular taste of the
day. Portions of this collection have frequently been translated into various
Western languages. It was the great and lasting popular success of these
forty stories that hastened the sources of the collection into an oblivion
from which they emerged only in the twentieth century. The forty works
chosen for inclusion may be debated, but]ingu qiguan includes some
stories that are incontestably "modern" masterpieces. "The Courtesan's
Casket" (more precisely "Du Shiniang nu chen baibao xiang"
msWm [Du the Tenth in Anger Sinks the Casket with One Hundred
Treasures]) develops a powerful drama that recalls one of the themes of
The Idiot by Dostoevsky, when N astasia throws a large packet of bank
notes (the price offered for her hand by a suitor) into the fire. The
courtesan Du, flouted and betrayed, throws herself into the waves after
the casket. She has hidden its existence and its treasures from her lover, a
young scholar from a good family. He hopes to kill two birds with one
stone by jilting her: to escape from the displeasure of his father and to
earn one-thousand taels of silver by giving her up to a rich salt merchant.
This tragic denouement, exceptional in the Chinese narrative tradition,
seems characteristic of the period of transition from oral storytelling to
literati imitations of these tales. The ending occurs suddenly, at the end
of a long description of the psychological behavior of the partners. The
lover can decide to reveal his "excellent plan" to Du only after having
. passed a part of the night sighing in her arms. Is she taken in by her
lover's despair, which is really only a cover for his bad conscience? She is
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 129
not duped, but feigns agreement, before throwing into the waves drawer
by drawer, the treasures of her casket, thereby denouncing the of
the salt merchant and the venality of the young scholar; finally, she
follows her treasures into the waters.
The first story of Ling Mengchu's Pai'an jingqi opposes this moral
and psychological "extraordinariness" to a "relativized extraordinariness"
on the.me of luck that turns. A son goes into business to help his
family avmd financial ruin. Bad luck pursues him in each of his ventures
however. He finally decides to go abroad and forget about his failures fo;
a while, taking with him only a crate of a local variety of tangerines,
known as "red delicious of Dongting Lake," to quench his thirst. At one
port, where each person is left to attend to his own affairs, the young man
remains on board the boat:
He was sitting in melancholy; suddenly the oranges returned to his
mind: "This crate of oranges, which I have not opened since we left, has
probably become spoiled in the heavy atmosphere of my cabin .... Let
me take advantage of the others' absence to have a look at them!" [He
decided to spread them out on the deck.] The entire boat became a
brilliant red; from afar one would say there were a thousand lights, a
sky filled with stars .... Passersby on land approached and formed a
crowd .... (The most curious were bold and offered a piece of silver) ...
· Hardly had he opened it when a delicious perfume titillated their
nostrils and drove those pressed around him to exclamations of surprise.
The buyer, who had watched Wen eat his orange, peeled it as he had.
But, not knowing any more about how to eat them, he stuffed the whole
thing into his mouth rather than separating it into quarters. His throat
filled with juice; he swallowed it without spitting out the seeds. "Marvelous,
marvelous!" he exclaimed with a huge sigh. (Pai'an jingqi, Ill; ]ingu
qiguan, 9)
As a result of his trip, Wen earns a fortune selling the tangerines and goes
on to become a successful exporter.
130 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
The majority of such "modern stories" were free expansions on
sources in the classical language. That was no longer the case in many
later collections, which did not enjoy such sustained popularity. One
sometimes suspects another type of source: various facts and scandals
which were the object of "handwritten stories," possibly distributed in the
form of printed sheets of paper. At the time of the fall of the Ming, the
short story became more overtly involved in the politics and conflicts of
the times. West Lake in Hangzhou offered a geographic framework for
many of these works. The technique of the Decameron of Boccaccio, with
the plot of each story relating to the main theme of the collection, so
common in Indian literature, was used in only a single known Chinese
collection, the Doupeng xianhua (Idle Talk under the Bean Arbor),
an anonymous work.
The essayist Li Yu (1611-1680) also wrote innovative works of
this type, employing them in defense of his right to be inventive in
constructing plots related to a central theme. Their artifice is revealed in
the skillful use of irony, through which the creator makes fun of himself
and his creation, and in the clarity of a style in which Li fully masters the
resources of the spoken language. Published between 1654 and 1658, Li's
first collection of stories bore the significant title Wusheng xi (Silent
Dramas), which fell unjustly into oblivion in the eighteenth century. Several
of these twelve pieces, followed later by sequels, furnished subjects for his
dramas. They were eclipsed by the lasting success of his Shi'er lou + =:fl
(Twelve Towers), novellas each developed over several chapters.
The Rou putuan (Prayer Mat of Flesh), the masterpiece of
the erotic novel, exhibit the qualities and manner typically associated
with the Chinese novelist. We will not attempt to recount the plot, as
clever as it is extravagant, apart from emphasizing the Buddhist framework
that gives the narrative the allure of a sort of Tantric initiation. This work
shows the hand of a connoisseur in matters of lovemaking, not the work
of a simple drudge. In chapter 6 the hero discusses his "projects" with his
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
131
mentor and sworn brother, Rival of Kunlun-that is to say, rival of the
protagonist of the Tang tale "Kunlun nu" (The Slave from Mount
Kunlun), written by Pei Xing (825-880). The Kunlun slave, endowed
with extraordinary powers, abducts for his master a beautiful woman
with whom the latter has fallen in love. But the go-between for the hero
in Rou putuan is scarcely a measure of the hero's ambitions:
"Big brother, don't worry about that too much. The other day I
bought an excellent aphrodisiac, which I have here. Right now the only
problem is that I have no woman. That leaves a hero without a place to
display his arms. If only a 'happy event' can be arranged, before
undertaking the job I will do a little rubbing and smearing; then I will
not be afraid that it won't last long."
Rival of Kunlun replied, "The aphrodisiac can only make this thing
last longer, but it cannot make it bigger. If those whose 'capital' is big
and thick use the aphrodisiac, they will be like those talented candidates
who took ginseng tonic before taking the official examination. After
they enter the examination hall, they will surely be full of energy and
able to write good compositions. As for those whose 'capital' is tiny,
they are just like those who have passed the qualifying examinations but
have nothing in their bellies. Even if they had taken tons of ginseng,
they still could not do a good job upon entering the examination
hall .... "
In twenty chapters, Rou putuan is a typical example of the kind of
"short novel" that appeared at the end of the sixteenth century; this also
became the favorite length of the sentimental novel, referred to as fiction
in the caizi jiaren :;t.Y{*A. "men of talent and beautiful women" mode.
In vogue from the middle of the seventeenth century until the middle of
the following century, its conventional situations, embellished by
polygamous "happy endings," titillated Western taste. Novels in this
subgenre were accordingly among the first Chinese literary works to be
translated.
132 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
The version of Haoqiu dluan (The Fortunate Union) published
by Thomas Percy in 1761 showed the Western public how much the
mysterious Chinese were like the Europeans in their sentimentality.John
Francis Davis offered a less distorted translation of the novel in 1829.
This eighteen-chapter work succeeded· in China because of entertaining
characters such as Tie Zhongyu .rf:l.:E {Jade within Iron), despite the
Confucian "puritanism," not typical of the caizi jiarennarratives,
surrounding the courtships in this tale. Haoqiu zhuan inspired the
unfinished novel Kyokaku den (Stories of Heroism) by the prolific
Japanese novelist Takizawa Bakin (1767-1848).
Yu]iao Li (ca. 1660) is considered the model of sentimental
fiction. The title of this anonymous work, like that of]in Ping Mei
is formed from the names of the three heroines. Arcade Huang,
Montesquieu's informant on matters of the East, began a translation that
Abel Remusat finished in 1826 and that Stanislas Julien revised and
published under the title Deux cousines (Two Cousins) in 1842. In 1860
Julien published a careful version of another sentimental novel, Ping Shan
Leng Yan (here again each of these syllables is taken from the
name of a character in the novel), under the title Les deux jeunes filles lettres
(Two Young Women of Letters).
However, it was not in these works, said to be of "medium length,"
that Chinese readers of the novel were able to satisfy their passion-a
passion so widespread that the eminent scholar Qj.an Daxin
( 1728-1804) denounced xiaoshuo, claiming that it was as destructive as
the heterodox sects of Buddhism and Taoism. This passion could be
satisfied only in those lengthy works of fiction, often of composite
authorship, known as "long novels" or sagas.
3. The "Long Novel" or Saga. More than a hundred chapters, a
million or more characters-such is the finalized form to which traditional
editions of the long novel aspired at its peak. The long novel could pride
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 133
itself on having put onto the market the "four great extraordinary books,"
sida qishu in the first quarter of the seventeenth century, each
chapter of which was illustrated by two full-page woodblock prints. Next
to these long novels, the Confucian "Four Books" cut a poor figure.
These four masterpieces of the long novel at the end of the Ming dynasty
also represent the major subgenres of the form: the historical novel, as
seen in the Sanguo dli yanyi (The Three Kingdoms); the
swashbuckling novel, typified by Shuihu dluan (Water Margin);
the fantastic novel, as defined by Xiyou ji ]ffi {Journey to the West);
and, finally, the novel of behavior and morals, such as]in Ping Mei
:m.
The origin of the long novel seems to hark back to the most
honored category of professional storytellers-the historical narrative related
in cycles told over long periods of time. The distinction was maintained
throughout the long history of this art, so that oral narrators of the "major
books," dashu which celebrated the important historical affairs of
China's past, were opposed to those of the "minor books," xiao shu
which related the domestic events of daily life. Because the oral historical
narratives were never accompanied by songs or musical instruments,
they were called ping [hua] "plain [narratives]," although some
scholars prefer the term "narratives with commentary" or "commenting
narratives." Pinghua designates an oral genre that is still alive today, but it
has also served for many centuries as a synonym for the novel. Japanese
libraries have preserved five printed texts from the fourteenth century,
each a separate popularized version of a history of a different Chinese
era, re-edited from originals of the preceding century. In these texts,
characterized as "completely illustrated plain narratives" (quanxian pinghua
there are illustrations at the top of each page. The Sanguo dli
pinghua (Plain Narrative on the Records of the Three
Kingdoms) is only three chapters long, but some of its passages are more
popularized than the corresponding sections of the long novel The Three
:::1111
134 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Kingdoms. This novel, in 120 chapters, was attributed to one Luo Guanzhong
Kilt$, who some have argued should be identified with a fourteenth-
century dramatist by the same name. The large number of novels attributed
to this obscure figure, however, raises suspicion. We do not have any
evidence of an edition prior to 1494 of the longer version-i.e., the
novel-titled The Three Kingdoms. This text, moreover, is not thought to
derive directly from the pinghua account of the same period. Nothing
enables us to confirm the hypothesis that the cihua (narratives
interspersed with poems to be sung) is an intermediate stage between the
pinghua and the long novel. The fact remains that pinghua reveal a scholarly
concern for the greatest conformity with the "official" historical sources,
themselves often considerably "folklorized." The pinghua were then
presented in a more civilized style approaching that of classical Chinese.
Thus, for example, in the pinghua on The Three Kingdotmperiod, one cannot
find the legendary account (as it appears in the prologue to the novel)
claiming that the parties who struggled for hegemony in the tripartite
division of third-century China were headed by reincarnations of the
companions who helped found the dynasty (in 206 B.C.) and who were
unjustly executed at the instigation of Empress Lii g (r. 195-188 B.C.).
In short, the amplification-yanyi (development of the sense)-of
the novel The Three Kingdoms, although reputed to be "seven-tenths fiction,"
offers an example of the historical novel much different from our own:
history is not the framework, but the subject of the fiction; the latter
insinuates itself into the text only to give more color and life to the
narratives, a popularized chronicle of the past.
The "first" of the four great long novels-there is a known edition of
1522-The Three Kingdoms was the last to receive its definitive form in the
hands of Mao Zonggang =B*F.i

1 shortly after 1660. This restructured
version of the novel with new commentaries superseded all previous
editions and remains much more popular than the edition prepared by Li
Yu (1611-1680), who strove to be more faithful to earlier versions. It is
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
135
impossible to summarize here the struggles and intrigues of this novel as
the three powers search to reunify China, each for its own profit.
Innumerable works of opera-theater and other genres of
entertainment have drawn on material from The Three Kingdoms. Cunning
occupies a place as important as warfare in this colorful novel, the most
popular Chinese work in other East Asian cultures. The character who
exemplifies cunning is Zhuge Liang the wise counselor of Liu Bei
Zhuge's disappearance foretells the ruin of his master. A proverb
puts the reader on guard: "In youth, do not read any of Water Margin; in
old age, stay away from The Three Kingdoms."
The action of Water Margin is set in the thirteenth century: not one
of the great novels takes place in a contemporary setting. Nevertheless,
no one considers Water Margin to be a historical novel, because the story
does not belong to "history" as such. Its subject matter, rebellion, was
often eschewed in official writings. Various extrapolations lead us to
conclude that the nucleus of the novel took its form from what were
called xinhua "new narratives," used by storytellers to present recent
events. It is generally accepted that Water Margin was compiled in the
fourteenth century and directed against the Mongols who then controlled
China. We have been unable to confirm this. On the contrary, since the
end of the fourteenth century, eccentric scholars have read it as a
denunciation of the Chinese imperial government's abuse of power. The
novel is structured around a chain of events and permits almost any
interpretation: versions of Water Margin range from 71 to 124 chapters,
and the debate over precedence between the fuller-text versions and the
simpler-text versions remains unresolved. Paradoxically, the simpler texts
generally include a greater number of episodes. But the strength of the
novel is in the ability of its author to strike a style appropriate to the
theme of rebellion: never before had the vigor and resources of the
spoken language been handled with such mastery.
Was Water Margin an expression of the presumed author's indignation
136 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
against the incompetence of the constituted powers, as Li Zhi $Jil
(1527-1602), the accursed philosopher, would assure us, or was it an
exercise in literary style, asjin Shengtan (1610-1661) attempted
to demonstrate in his admirable commentaries? The fascination exerted
by the novel fit precisely with its resistance to any too-coherent
interpretation. The band of outlaws that swelled through the course of
the narrative was not made up of choir boys. The pleasure of reading the
novel is precisely its length, a feeling no excerpt can convey. It does not
matter if only about 40 of its 108 heroes are memorable: what is important
is the long-range view of the swirling world of the novel. Various episodes
or "mini-cycles" have inspired dramas and works in many other popular
genres. Considered an incitement to banditry, in 1642 Water Margin was
the first of the great novels to be officially banned The band of outlaws
ends the novel by joining with the imperial regime to combat other
rebels.Jin Shengtan, arguing that the novel should be appreciated primarily
as a literary monument, eliminated a good third of the final part in such a
way that the epilogue became a dream predicting the imminent massacre
of the outlaws; critics have condemned the commander-in-chief of the
rebels, Song Jiang 71':1I, even though he rallied his comrades to the ideals
of "fidelity and justice." The Shuihu <}tuan in 70 chapters (or 71 and a
prologue) has eliminated rival editions for nearly three centuries. Inspired
Marxist critics in the People's Republic attempted to make the work an
epic of peasant revolt, although in the strictest sense peasants are
distinguished by their absence among the outlaws of Shuihu <}tuan. At the
turning point of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in 1972, the
novel emerged from the global negation of classical literature to be
denounced for its "revisionist" theme and to have its "traitorous" main
character, Song Jiang, opposed to the impulsive Li Kui the Black
Whirlwind and the "true revolutionary" in the work.
The first great novel to have been re-edited in this last phase of the
Cultural Revolution was the Xiyou an apparent paradox, since the
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment 137
theme of the extravagant journey to the West was the quest for salvation
through the Buddhist faith. Inspired Marxist critics read this story of an
ape endowed with supernatural powers who led a troupe of pilgrims west
out of China in search of Buddhist scriptures and concluded that the
"Promethean side" of the main character, Monkey, should be interpreted
as the reincarnation of the revolutionary spirit of the Chinese people. In
the past a number of scholarly commentaries have sought to systematize
the allegory in this novel, especially within a Taoist framework. In fact,
this work is like the other three great classical novels: it is possible to
assume a coherent allegory only in a novel written by a single author ex
nihilo, but these sagas were the creations of a "composite authorship"
and evolved over a long period of time. This resistance to systemization
by critics is undoubtedly the secret of the long-term popularity enjoyed
by these vast novelistic creations, works that readers immersed themselves
in without ever being sure that they had grasped the key to the story. It
would be somewhat tedious to continue the joke over one hundred chapters,
but the laugh brings salvation; besides, the extravaganzas are related with
unmatched gusto. Nevertheless, a conscious mastery in structuring the
whole underlies an apparently reckless story.
Here also the point of departure is historical: the pilgrimage of the
monk Xuanzang (602-664) in quest of the Buddhist scriptures, the
most famous of a number of such trips. Departing the Tang capital of
Chang'an in 629 without authorization, he was received with the highest
imperial honors upon his return in 645. Xuanzang was able to get an
important team appointed to translate the Sanskrit texts that he had
brought back-nearly a third of the entire Chinese Buddhist canon an
'
undertaking without parallel from the point of view of both quality and
quantity. In]ourney to the West, Monkey, the hero of this enterprise, is
only the protege of the four monsters or animal spirits who have become
Buddhist converts, converts arrayed against the covetousness of the demons
along the way who seek to devour a piece of flesh from this completely
138 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
abstinent holy monk, since one mouthful would make them immortal. Of
these four animal spirits, the horse-dragon speaks in only a single episode,
and Sandy remains most often a secondary partner. The emphasis is on
Pigsy and Monkey, the first being _a kind of Sancho Panza to the second.
But there is no doubt that Monkey attracts all of the footlights. The first
seven chapters are devoted entirely to him, from his birth out of a rock
"impregnated" by Heaven, to his capture and confinement under a
mountain. The central role was already allotted to Monkey in an earlier
printed version of the story dating to the twelfth or thirteenth century,
which may in tum derive from a ninth-century text, a shihua "W'"iffi, narrative
interspersed with poems, composed in the style of Buddhist gillha poetry.
Could it be because the monkey is the animal associated with the west in
East Asia? Or because it symbolizes the unrest of the human spirit? The
most complete edition of journey to the West, dating to the end of the
sixteenth century, is also the earliest version of the story in the novel
format; it insists on the latter interpretation without managing to sustain
the allegory of "monkey = troubled human spirit" from beginning to end.
Critics still face an insoluble textual problem concerning the priority of a'
"full" version of the novel and an "abridged" one. The literary superiority
of the first over the other versions, however, is uncontested; the reliability
of the attribution of]ourney to the West to Wu Cheng'en (ca.
1500-1582) remains unconfirmed. Was it a work which did not take itself
seriously but was received as a serious work, or just the opposite? Should
one enjoy the humor in it or bring out its irony? This ambiguity makes
the novel a unique work, without parallel in world literature. An example
of the humor so characteristic of the narrative comes from chapter 98,
when just before meeting the Buddha, the monk Tripitika sees his mortal
remains floating in the river, Monkey having pushed them into a boat
without a bottom:
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
The patriarch gently punted the small boat away from the shore,
when they turned to find a corpse floating down the stream. Seeing that
the venerable monk was terrified by this view, Monkey laughed and
said, "Master, do not be afraid at all! In fact, that is you!" "It is you, it's
you," Pigsy joined in chorus. In his turn Sandy then applauded: "It's
you, you!"
The boatman uttered a cry and also exclaimed, "But that's you!
Congratulations, congratulations!"
All three joined in a single voice to offer their congratulations.
139
In the penultimate chapter, Guanyin, while glancing through the
reports of the protective deities, notices that the number of terrible trials
that the Chinese monk must undergo is not complete.
In Buddhism, nine times nine is necessary to find the truth. Since the
holy monk has suffered eighty tests, he still lacks one. We did not know
he had spared himself of completing the number.
The object of the quest-seeking Buddhist texts-seemed derisory in
relationship to the merits accumulated through the eighty-one tests and
to the brilliant arrival at their goal, the Western paradise ....
At first examination, nothing could be more different from]ourney
to the West than the ]in Ping Mei (Plum Flower in a Vase of Gold),
other than that they share the same number of chapters, one-hundred. In
fact, some other similarities could be pointed out, such as the limited
number of principal characters in both novels or the use of the cycle of
the seasons as a chronological reference in the narrative. We know,
through the correspondence of a coterie of scholars, including some of
the most prominent of the time, that the originality of the novel dazzled
the few privileged persons who had access to the incomplete manuscripts
at the tail end of the sixteenth century. Many Chinese critics of the May
Fourth Era (1919-1942) vaunted the modernity they found in this novel.
111
140 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Drawn from an episode narrated in chapters 23-27 of Water Margin, the
]in Ping Mei in effect is of the dimensions of a saga or long novel. As a
result, in spite of various developments in subplots and digressions, the
main plot, with a number of hidden links, resembles that of the shorter
novel. The "realism" of ]in Ping Mei does not lie simply in the "little
details that are true;" it translates the passion of the teller of "minor
stories" or xiaoshuo into the tiny details that organized daily life, suspends
the action, and brings out the feelings of things and people. The wealth of
erotic descriptions is elevated more by curiosity than by indulgence.
These descriptions have caused the first great novel of Chinese morals to
be forbidden, inaccessible to the public at large, although it has been
recognized throughout Chinese literary history as a masterpiece. The
career of the huckster who is the protagonist of this work, Ximen Qjng
[ffi F5!:1, a collector of women, reaches its apogee exactly at the middle of
the novel. If the last quarter of the narrative carries on without him, it is
because the true center of interest is that emphasized by the title, which
contains the names of two of his concubines and a temperamental
maidservant.
The edition refined and commented upon by Zhang Zhupo
1
71H'r!&:
near the end of the seventeenth century is a long-unrecognized masterpiece
of literary criticism; the concept of alternating "hot and cold" is developed
remarkably by the commentator, who, following the example of his
predecessor,Jin Shengtan, denounces the treachery of Song Jiang and
condemns the principal wife of the Ximen Qj.ng, Golden Lotus ~ r i , as
abusive, reprehensible, and weak.
In the 1930s, an old printed edition dating to 1618 was discovered.
Labeled a cihua (narrative interspersed with verse to be sung), a primitive
stage of the novel, the text has no prologue, but rather employs a brief
"oblique" tale on a related theme to open the narrative in the age-old
style of the storyteller. These clues weaken the generally accepted thesis
that this work was the first creation of a single author (albeit an unknown
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
141
author) in the realm of the novel. The vigor of the editing and the
structure seems to preclude the notion of one personality who might
have imposed on this work a vision of the world close to that of Xun Zi,
the Confucian philosopher of antiquity who felt that human nature was
fundamentally bad; did human nature not find in the corrupt society of
that time, conveniently re-situated in the thirteenth century, that with
which to satisfy its worst tendencies? Yet a careful examination of the
text reveals that the author presumed to leave a manuscript that was
incomplete. His breathtaking erudition touches the domain of
entertainment literature, particularly that in the vernacular, from which
he has selected and skillfully employed a good thousand fixed expressions.
One finds in the novel a marquetry of texts cleverly joined and adapted
to the needs of the narration. Quarrels and problems occupy a large
place in the text, along with t:l).e "schemes" of the master of the house to
crush the weakest of those who oppose his designs. ·Inspired Marxist
critics take pleasure in using, or abusing, the qualifier "naturalist" to
condemn this work, which otherwise embarrasses them by honoring no
taboos, as we can see in the following excerpt from chapter 72, depicting
Ximen Qj.ng in bed with one of his concubines just after they have made
love:
Ximen Qjng felt the need to get down from the bed to urinate. But
the young woman refused to let go of [the penis which she had kept in
her mouth].
"My dear," she said to him, "piss in me, if that is troubling you. I
will swallow it all! It's good to stay warm, you should avoid the cold. It
would be better than getting down and freezing your balls off."
"My dear little cookie, no one loves me like you do!" Ximen Qjng
exclaimed, immensely happy with such attention.
At this he pissed to his heart's content into her mouth. She actually
drank it, slowly, mouthful after mouthful, without losing a drop.
"Is it good?" Ximen asked her?
142 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
"A little bitter. If you have some jasmine tea, it would help to make
that taste go away .... "
Dear readers, let me tell you that such is in general the conduct of a
concubine, who will resort to anything to bewitch her husband. She will
have no shame before the most humiliating indulgences. Never would a
legitimate wife, who prides herself on her eminent position, stoop to
such practices.
The reputation that has resulted from such passages should not cause us
to forget the other facets of the novel, an incomparable source of information
on society at the end of the Ming. The work marks a turning point in
novelistic technique in the coherence of its vision and the meticulousness
of its descriptions. It explains the appearance in the following century of
works that became indisputable modes of individual expression. Chief
among such works is the Honglou meng ?.IT:fi?J {Dream of the Red Chamber),
a search for a lost time which was no more than a dream of the splendors
of a life spent among girls in the women's quarters of an aristocratic
Manchu residence.
The work was published for the first time in 1791-1792 in 120
chapters. But it had circulated since 1754 in a half-dozen unfinished
manuscripts presenting numerous variants, none of which went beyond
chapter 80. The authenticity of the 40 final chapters remains a subject of
controversy. The wealth and variety of the commentaries have not ceased
to feed critical studies of sprawling proportions. The identification of the
author, Cao Xueqin W ~ : F F {1715-1763), is in the end the 'only point on
which there is unanimity, rightly or wrongly. Was the novel a sort of
"sentimental education" or, as Mao Zedong, who boasted of having read
it five times, would have it, an "encyclopedia of Chinese feudal society in
its decline?" One could hardly put it better than the major commentator,
a relative of the author, who claimed in a marginal note that the novel
was inspired by the fin Ping M e ~ but explored the sentimental rather than
the erotic side of love. The novel shows the same predilection for the
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
143
closed world of what seems to be a heavenly garden. The allegorical and
marvelous framework brings a coloring more Buddhist than Taoist to the
work, playing on the reality and fiction underlying the sufferings that
threaten when the enjoyment of life in the enchanted world of childhood
and adolescence comes to an end. It goes without saying that this seems a
radically original novel to the Western reader: the development of feelings
of love in a doomed and unauthentic world, a position in a sense
diametrically opposed to that of the ]in Ping Me; where sensual passion
destroys. It is also the outcome of an intellectual current descended from
the preceding centuries. The prologue explains this:
Mter having heard this sort of discussion [on the originality of this
work, which completely differed from the little sentimental or erotic
novels], the Taoist monk Vanitas was lost in thought. He reread carefully
the Story of the Stone ... noting that in it one spoke only in general of
the sentiments of love, and that it held to a faithful relationship with
facts, without even attempting to reproach or harming morals and inciting
to debauchery .... From this time on the Taoist monk Vanitas realized
that from emptiness sensuality emerged, from sensuality love was born,
through love one entered sensuality, and from sensuality one awoke to
[the true meaning ofj emptiness [that all nature is illusory]; in consequence
he changed his name from Vanitas to Amor and modified the title of
the Story of the Stone to A Record of the Amorous Monk. Kong Meixi, from
the homeland of Confucius, suggested calling it Precious Mirror for Lovers
in the Breeze and Clarity of the Moon. Later, Cao Xueqin, having worked
on it for ten years in his study "Nostalgia for the Red," reworking the
text five times and establishing a table of contents and a chapter division
for it, titled it The Twelve Beauties of Nanjing and added an introductory
quatrain:
Pages filled with words insane,
Handfuls of harsh, bitter tears.
All say the author is crazy,
But who can understand its true flavor?
144 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
The alternate title Story of the Stone (Shitou ji is explained
by the fact that the hero of the novel,Jia Baoyu JBl.3S., was born with a
piece of jade in his mouth, which was his life itself; Baoyu means "precious
jade," and his family name "unauthentic." Baoyu spends his last years
among the young women of the residence, girls whose purity is that of
"clear water," as he puts it, whereas he; like other young men, is "fashioned
of mud." He is insanely in love with his sensible and sickly cousin Lin
Daiyu 1*1i.3S., who dies in despair when Baoyu is compelled to marry
another cousin, the wise and saintly Xue Baochai A number of
other subplots are linked to this general line of the narrative, peopling
the novel with memorable characters who are depicted in pure spoken
language, reputed to be close to Pekingese, with an unaffected style of
incomparable poetic power.
This maturity in the art of the novel, set, however, in a language
closer to that of the vernacular of N anjing, can be found in an unfinished
work left byWujingzi (1701-1754), Rulin waishi 1$1*:7f.5t: (An
Indiscreet Chronicle of the Mandarins [better known under the title The
Scholars}). The earliest extant edition of this satiric masterpiece dates to
1803. Its fifty-five chapters constitute an episodic structure that exercised
a decisive influence on this sub genre at the end of the nineteenth and the
start of the twentieth centuries. Although The Scholars has a sarcastic tone
completely different from that of the Dream of the Red Chamber, the two
works share the characteristic of being a mode of individualized expression
for literati to leave reality in a way that previously had been seen only in
literary criticism. The principal theme of the novel is a devastating criticism
of the "system of examinations," the key to the vault of the imperial
regime and to the bureaucratic Chinese society we commonly refer to as
"feudal."
[In chapter three the wretched scholar Fan Jin has finally received
the "baccalaureate," which qualifies him to participate in the highest
examinations to qualify for an official position; however, he must pay
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
the costs of the trip to the provincial capital. His father-in-law, Butcher
Hu, whom he has asked for financial help, retorts sharply:]
"Don't waste your time! You think of yourself already as a 'gentleman,'
although you are only a leprous toad dreaming of eating the flesh of a
wild swan. I have heard it said that your success was based not on your
compositions, but on your advanced age-the chief examiner accorded
you the title out of pity. Now, poor fool, you imagine yourself 'His
Lordship!' All those who achieve such status are stars in the literary
constellation in heaven. Haven't you remarked that the 'lords' of the
Zhang family in the village possess a fortune worth millions, and that
each is endowed with a square face and large ears [suitable for high
rank]? With your beak-like mouth and ape's chin, you would do better
to piss on the ground and view your reflection in that pool!." .. But Fan
Jin became, contrary to all expectations, "His Lordship,"
and-literally-deliriously happy: the shock of the announcement of his
success rendered him unconscious. His father-in-law at first dared not
lay a hand on this eminent person, but, after much prompting, decided
to give him a "congratulatory slap."
145
The nineteenth century witnessed the birth of other subgenres of the
novel. Among the most curious of these is that labeled "the scholarly." It
is represented by the masterpiece by Li Ruzhen (ca. 1763-1830),
]inghua yuan (The Destiny of the Flowers in the Mirror), a novel
of a fantastic journey, subtly structured, and known especially for an
episode in which the hero lands in a country where the positions and
duties of men and women are reversed.
The most lively popular successes were reserved for novels of the
so-called "Wuxia" (chivalric or martial-arts) school and for those of
the judiciary-case school (a kind of detective novel featuring well-known
judges from history), both containing fantastic adventures. The proliferation
of the novel testifies to its increasing numbers, but it must be added that
none of these products could aspire to the standards reached by the
146 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
masterpieces of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The reading of
novels, an activity primarily of women, children, and young men, was
more than ever considered unworthy of a mature scholar during the
nineteenth century. The literary influence of the West was necessary
before the vernacular novel could be rehabilitated among the literati.
Thus it was in classical Chinese that Lin Shu #f.lf (1852-1924)
brought nearly two hundred works of fiction to the notice of the public,
having first published his version of La Dame aux camilias in 1899.
Meanwhile, the abolition of the traditional examination system in 1905
sounded the death knell for this language of the scholars. The diffusion of
the old-fashioned entertainment genres facilitated the triumph of the spoken
language, referred to as "modern Chinese," in literature beginning about
1920. But the modern novel, modeled on its Western counterpart, although
written in the language of the people, long remained confined to educated
circles. Does this mean that classical literature will henceforth be a thing
of the past? No one would dare affirm that the crisis of cultural identity in
China would be reduced by shelving classical literature. At the very least,
one could claim that the quality of modern or contemporary production
has not eclipsed that of the past.
The recent renewal of interest in traditional literature, the "search
for roots," shows that the rupture between the modern and traditional
literatures is much less complete than it appeared, that the bonds which
unite the two are even more solid and more numerous than those which
connect the literatures of the West to their Greek, Latin, and other ancestors.
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
147
Suggested Further Reading
The essays on "Drama," "Fiction," and "Popular Literature" in the Indiana
Companion(!: 13-30,31-48, and 75-92, respectively) provide ready access
to more information on the subjects of this chapter. Individual entries on
the numerous other novelists, story writers, and dramatists, their genres,
and their works can also be found in the Indiana Companion.
Narrative Literature Written in Classical Chinese
Dudbridge, Glen. The Tale of Li Wa. London: Ithaca Press for Oxford
University, 1983.
Kao, Karl, ed. Classical Chinese Tales of the Supernatural and the Fantastic:
Selections from the Third to the Tenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana
University Press, 1986.
The Theater
Birch, Cyril. Scenes for Mandarins: The Elite Theater of the Ming. New York:
Columbia University Press, 1995.
Chang, Hsin-chang. Chinese Literature: Popular Fiction and Drama.
Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1973.
Crump, James I. Chinese Theater in the Days of Kublai Khan. Ann Arbor:
Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, 1990.
Dolby, William. A History of Chinese Drama. London: Paul Elek, 1976.
Idema, Wilt, and Stephen West. Chinese Theater from 1100-1450: A Source
Book. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1982.
Johnson, David, ed. Ritual Opera, Operatic Ritual: "Mulien Rescues His Mother"
in Chinese Popular Culture. Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies,
1989.
148 Chinese Literature, Ancient and Classical
Mackerras, Colin, ed. Chinese Drama: A Historical Survey. Peking: New
World Press, 1990.
Shih, Chung-wen. The Golden Age of Chinese Drama. Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 1976.
The Novel
Dudbridge, Glen. The Legend of Miao-shan. London: Ithaca Press for Oxford
University, 1978.
Hanan, Patrick., trans. The Carnal Prayer Mat. Honolulu: University of
Hawaii Press, 1996.
_. The Chinese Short Story: Studies in Dating, Authorship and Composition.
Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1973.
_. The Chinese Vernacular Story. Cambridge: Harvard University Press,
1981.
Hawkes, David, trans. The Story of the Stone. 5 vols. Harmondsworth:
Penguin, 1973-1986.
Hegel, Robert E. The Novel in Seventeenth-Century China. New York:
Columbia University Press, 1981.
Hsia, C. T. The Classic Chinese Novel: A Critical Introduction. New York:
Columbia University Press, 1968.
Idema, Wilt L. Chinese Vernacular Fiction: The Formative Period. Leiden: E.
J. Brill, 1974.
King, Gail Oman. The Story of Hua Guan Suo. Tempe: Center for Asian
Studies, Arizona State University, 1989.
Ma, Y. W., and joseph S. M. Lau, eds. Traditional Chinese Stories: Themes
and Variations. New York: Columbia University Press, 1978.
Mair, Victor H. Tun-huang Popular Narratives. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, 1983.
Plaks, Andrew H. The Four Masterworks of the Ming Novel: Ssu ta ch 'i-shu.
Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987.
Roberts, Moss, trans. Three Kingdoms: A Historical Novel, Attributed to Luo
Chapter 4. Literature of Entertainment
149
Guandwng. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.
Rolston, David. Traditional Chinese Fiction and Fiction Commentary. Stanford:
Stanford University Press, 1997.
Shapiro, Sidney, trans. Outlaws of the Marsh. 2 vols. Bloomington: Indiana
University Press, 1981.
Sung, Marina. The Narrative Art ofTsai-sheng yuan. San Francisco: Chinese
Materials Center, 1994.
"Wu-hsia hsiao-shuo." In Indiana Companion, II: 188-192.
Yang, Hsien-yi, and Gladys Yang, trans. The Scholars. Peking: Foreign
Languages Press, 1973.
Yu, Anthony C., trans.journey to the West. 4 vols. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1976-1983.
_. Rereading the Stone: Desire and the Making of Fiction in a Dream of the Red
Chamber. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997.
INDEX
A
allegory .......................................................................................... 40, 137, 143
Analects ofConfucius(see also Lunyu ....................................... 20, 26, 45
ancient-style prose (see also guwen) ............................................................. .47
anti-Confucian, pro-Legalist campaign ....................................................... 41
B
Baijuyi 8,®£ (772-846) ................................................. 78, 82, 84, 91, 111
Bai Xingjian 81'JM (775-826) .................................................................. 111
"Baiyuan zhuan" Er 3Rft (The Story of the White Ape) .......................... 110
"Ballad of Beautiful Women" (Liren xing HA 11') ...................................... 81
"Ballad of the Army Carts" (Bingju xing ........................................ 80
"Ballad of the Pipa" (Pipa xing ....................................................... 83
Ban Gu l'JfiE!I (32-92) ..................................................................................... 65
(The Story of the Precious Sword) ............................... 118
bi.l:t ................................................................................................................. 25
bianwen on scenes of the life of Buddha in pictures) ...... 123, 124
Boccaccio ..................................................................................................... 130
Book of Historical Documents (see also Shu jing) ............................................. 26
Book of Rites. .................................................................................................... 19
Bowu (Record of All Things) ................................................... 107
Buddhism .................................................................... 38, 39, 41, 75, 137, 138
c
Cai Yan (b. ca. 178) .............................................................................. 72
Cai (133-192) ............................................................................. 72
"men of talent and beautiful women" ............ 131, 132
Canglang shihua .............................................................................. 57
Cao Pi \!f::::f (187-226) .................................................................................. 55
152 Index
Cao Xueqin {1715-1763) ............................................................... 142
Chan Buddhism ............................................................................................. 7 5
Changhen ge fiH.IHfX {The Song of Eternal Regret) ...................................... 83
Changsheng dian {The Palace of Eternal Youth) ........................... 121
"Chaoran Taiji" {Notes on the Terrace of Transcendence) ... .45
Chen Duansheng {1751-ca. 1796) ................................................ 125
Chenjiru !*f.lfm {1558-1639) ............................................................... 50, 51
Chinese Buddhist canon ............................................................................. l37
Chu ci {Words of the State of Chu, see also Songs of the Soutlf} ... 62, 72
chuanqi'f.WiD- {drama) .......................................................... 117-118, 121-122
chuanqi 1$ iD- {tales) ............................................................................... ! 09, 112
Chun qiu {Spring and Autumn) ................................................ 17, 26, 33
{lyric) ............................................................................. 62, 91, 93, 96, 98
cihua {narratives interspersed with poems to be sung) ............ 134, 140
Classic of Poetry (see also Ski jinm ............................................... 25, 26, 62, 68
Confucian "Four Books" ............................................................................. 133
Confucian Classics .................................................................................. 16, 23
Confucianism ................................................................................................. 41
Confucius ........................................ 7-8, 13, 17, 20-22, 24, 26, 31, 41, 45, 62
Contes de la Montagne sereine ( Qjngping Shantang huaben m 3¥ . 12 7
"court style" (gongti '§B) .............................................................................. 69
critics of the May Fourth Era {1919-1942) ............................................... 139
D
Da xuej;:}l< {Grand Study) ........................................................................... 19
da ya :*.3! ....................................................................................................... 25
"Dances and Songs" ( Gewu ................................................................ 85
Dao {Classic of the Way and ofPower) ............................... 13
"Dazai Letian xing" {On Getting the Point ... ) ................... 86
Index 153
De dao {Classic of Power and the Way) ................................... 14
Decameron ............................................................ .......................................... 130
"description" lfu) ............................................................................................ 57
Diao QJl Yuan }ffi }Jjt {Grieving for Qu Yuan) ........................................... 65
Doctrine of the Mean (see also Zhongyonm ....................................................... 20
Dongjieyuan ifJWjG {fl. 1200) .................................................................. 117
Dong Zuobin if{'fj{ {1895-1963) ................................................................ 6
Dostoevsky ................................................................................................... l28
Dou E yuan {The Resentment of Dou E) ...................................... 116
Doupeng xianhua {Idle Talk under the Bean Arbor) ................ 130
Dream of the Red Chamber (see also Honglou meniJ ..................................... 144
"Dreaming of Li Bai" (Meng Li Bai 8) ................................................ 79
Du Fu i±ffi {712-770) ................................................................ 76, 77, 79, 80
Du Guangting if:J\::&g {850-933) ............................................................... 112
Du Mu {803-852) ................................................................................. 87
"Du Shiniang nu chen baibao xiang" • ....................... 128
Du Yu i±ffl {222-284) .................................................................................. 32
Duan Chengshi {ca. 800-863) ..................................................... 82-83
Dunhuang ..................................................................................................... 123
dynastic histories ........................................................................................... 34
E
"Each Word in Slow Tempo" (Shengsheng man !l:!l:'lt) ............................. 97
Edouard Biot .................................................................................................. l8
eight great prose writers {of the Tang and Song dynasties) ....................... 44
eight prose masters ........................................................................................ 43
"Eighteen Stanzas on the Reed-Whistle" (Hu jia skiba pai M9Fti+ /\tB) . 72
"Elegy on a Cicada" (Chan !l!fi!) ...........•....•.•.•..•.•.......•........................•.•........ 90
Er ya'm.3t ................................................................................................. 24, 26
erotic poetry ................................................................................................... 69
Ershisi ski pin= 6'6 {Evaluations of Poetry in 24 Poems) ............... 57
154
Index Index 155
"GuiingJ"i" +{>ai;::J (St f An · t M" ) 110 o ory 0 an cten uror ..................................... .
essay .............................................................................................................. 105
" h . . "(y 62 express t e tntentwn • s ,c,, .......................................................... .
Guliang z}tuan .............................................................................. 17, 26
Guo Xiang (d. 312) ............................................................................... 14
guofeng .................................................................................................... 25
F
guti shi (ancient-style verse) .............................................................. 62
fantastic novel .............................................................................................. 133
Guwen guanz}ti (The Major Works of Ancient Prose) ................ 33
Feng Menglong (1574-1646) ................................................ 126, 127
Fengjian (On Feudalism) ........................................................... .41
Festivals and Songs of Ancient China ................................................................ 24
First Emperor of Qjn ................................................................................... 108
Four Books (see also Confucian "Four Books" and Sishu) ..................... 19, 23
Four Cries of the Gibbon (Sisheng yuan ............................................ 118
"four great chuanqi' (sida chuanqi ll9::k'ftii'f) .............................................. 118
"four great extraordinary books" (sida qishu ll9::kii'tilf) ........................... 133
fuM (rhapsody or prose-poem) ............................................................. 31, 62
............................................................................................ 65
Guwenci lei,zuan (Collection by Category ... ) ....................... 32
H
Han Fei Zi (ca. 280-233) ................................................................. 12
Han gong qiu rJ;'§f'.k (Autumn in the Palace of Han) ............................... 116
Han (768-824) ........................................................ 38, 39-42,48,88
Hanshan (Cold Mountain) .................................................................. 75
haofangjf(1/J.. (heroic unrestricted) ......................................................... 94
Haoqiu z:huan (The Fortunate Union) ............................................ 132
"Hard Road to Shu" (Shu dao nan !Vllift) .................................................. 79
The Elegy on the Orange,]u song:fill1il'i ............................................................. 64
G
Heavenly Qyestions, Tian wen ................................................................. 64
Gan Bao (fl. 320) .......................... , ............................................... 106-107
hexagrams ...................................................................................................... 17
Gao Ming 1'3JEY=I (ca. 1305-1370) ................................................................ 117
giithii poetry .................................................................................................. 138
George Soulie de Morant ( 18 78-1955) ....................................................... 69
Gongsun (also known as Shang Yang ........................ 12
Gongyang z}tuan 0$-ft ............................................................................ 17, 26
"Goodness," ren t ........................................................................................ 22
historical novel. ............................................................................................ 135
Hong Mai (1123-1282) ...................................................................... 127
Hong Pian #f;ffll.! ........................................................................................... 127
Hong Sheng's (1645-1704) ................................................................ 121
Honglou (Dream of the Red Chamber) ................................ 142
Hou Fangyu (1618-1655) .............................................................. 122
Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-76) ............................. .41, 136
Hu Yinglin MI!!M (1551-1602) ................................................................ 110
Guan Hanqing (ca. 1220-1320) .............................................. 99, 116
Guan Zi 11f-T (Master Guan) ........................................................................ 11
huaben (base of the narration or story ....................................... 126, 127
Huang liang (Yellow-Millet Dream) ..................................... 116
Guanyin ........................................................................................................ 139
"Guiqu lai xi ci" (Rhapsody on Returning, Going Back) ..... 74
Huang Zongxi ( 161 0-1695) ............................................................. 32
Hui .................................................................................................... 9
hundred schools of thought.. .................................................................... 7, 15
156
Index Index 157
kunqu ]i! e±! .................................................................................................... 118
I
Kunshan ]i! Ill .............................................................................................. 118
'I'he Idiot ...................................................................................................... 128
Kyokaku den (Stories of Heroism) .................................................. 132
inspiration ........................................................................................... 47
L
J
Jacques Dars ................................................................................................. 127
James Legge (1815-1897) ................................................................. 17, 18,20
Ji Yun *Eil:'a (1724-1805) ........................................................ .................... 114
Jia Baoyu W!lf.3S., ........................................................................................ 144
Jia Yi Will! (200-168 B.C.) ........................................................................... 65
jiandeng xinhua (New Tales Told ... ) ....................................... 112
jiandeng yuhua (Supplementary Tales Told ... ) ....................... 112
]inPingMeifti'/fN.W (Plum Flower in a Vase ofGold) ...... l32-133, 139, 142
Jin Shengtan (1610-1661) ...................................................... 136, 140
jingfJJ! (the warp of a fabric) ......................................................................... 16
jingben tongsu xiaoshuoEJ:;2js:jjlffitj\m (Short Stories which Could ... ) ... 126
]inghua yuan (The Destiny of the Flowers in the Mirror) ............ 145
]ingu qiguan (Wonders of the Present and Past) ............... 128, 129
"Jingye si" fli1?t,%f, (Thoughts on a Quiet Evening) .................................... 78
jinti ski mfttf,f (modern-style verse) ............................................................ 62
]iu si 11.,,%1- (Nine Thoughts) ........................................................................... 62
La Dame aux camilias ................................................................................... 146
Lady Ban F,J.I ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••.••••.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•• 66, 67
laments, sao Ill, .............................................................................................. 63
Lao Zi (Master Lao or "The Old Master") ......................................... 13
Legalism .................................................................................................... 11, 41
LeiJin ............................................................................................................. 69
Li Bai *8 (701-762) ....................................................................... 76, 77,91
Li Fang *IVJ (925-996) ............................................................................... 106
Li (ca. 770-848) .................................................... 110, 112
LiHe*Jf (791-817) ............................................................................... 88-89
Lijiiltr3 (see also Book ............................................................. 19, 26
LiKaixian*009G (1502-1568) ................................................................ 118
Li Kui • the Black Whirlwind ............................................................. 136
Li ................................................................................................... 34
Li Qj.ngzhao (1085-after 1151) ............................................ 96, 98-99
(ca. 1763-1830) ............................................................ 145
Li sao MH (Lament for the Separation [from the King of Chu]) ..... 63, 64
John Francis Davis ...................................................................................... 132
John Keats ...................................................................................................... 88
journey to the West(see also Xiyujz) ...................................................... 138-139
jueju f.l§iiT (quatrains) ..................................................................................... 62
Li Shangyin (ca. 813-858) .................................................. .46, 89, 91
"Li Wa zhuan" *t€E1$ (The Story of Baby Li) ......................................... 111
Li Xiangjun ..................................................................................... 122
Li Yu *.3S. (1591-1671) .............................................................................. 119
Li Yu (937-978) .................................................................................... 92
K
Li Yu *rH.t (1611-1680 .................................... 51-52,54, 119, 120, 130, 134
Kong Shangren :rlf.lrrff: (1648-1718), ........................................................ 121
"Kunlun nu" ]l!Wtl)( (The Slave from Mount Kunlun) ........................... 131
Li Zhen (1376-1452) .......................................................................... 112
Li Zhi *:JI (1527-1602) ............................................................................. 136
Liang (ca. 1510-1582) ..................................................... 118
158 Index
.......................................................................................... 65
Liaomai (Records of Unusual Stories ... ) ....................... 113
Lie Yukou 37U '!t.l{!Jtg; •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••.•.•••••••••••••••.•••••••.• 16
Lie Zi 37Ur (Master Lie) ................................................................................ l6
Lin Daiyu *f\.3S. ........................................................................................ 144
Lin Shu *f\f.lf (1852-1924) .......................................................................... 146
Ling Mengchu (1580-1644) .................................................. 127, 129
literary yuefo ................................................................................................... 66
literature of entertainment .......................................................................... l05
"Little talks" (xiaoshuo ,J,"IDl) ........................................................................ 126
Liu Bangi!Jn (256-195 B.C.) ............................................................... 34, 66
Liu Xiangi!JrnJ (77-6 B.C.) .......................................................................... 10
Liu Xie (c. 465-520) ............................................................................. 55
Liu Xin IJJW\: (50 B.C.-23 A.D.) ................................................................... 24
Liu Yiqingi!J•m (403-444) ..................................................................... 108
Liu Yang W117.i< {987-1053) ........................................................................... 92
Liu Yuxi (772-842) .......................................................................... 87
Liu Zongyuan Wll*5C (773-819) .................................................... .41, 42, 48
Liushi jia xiaoshuo ;, (Stories of Sixty Tellers) .......................... 127
Liweng yijia yan (Words from the Unique School of ... ) ...... 51
Logicians, and Mo Zi. ..................................................................................... 8
LuJi Wim {261-301) ..................................................................................... 55
lu (regulated, eight-line verse) ........................................................ 62
LiiZuqian (1137-1181) .................................................................... 32
Lun (Discourse on Literature) ...................................................... 55
Lunyu (see also The Analects of ConfUcius) ............................................ 26
Luo Guanzhong .............................................................................. 134
Luofu ;!I J.B( ..................................................................................................... 69
l
j
Index 159
M
Ma Zhiyuan (ca. 1260-1325) ......................................................... 116
"major books," dashu .......................................................................... 133
Manchus ......................................................................................................... 48
Mao Heng =§ 1jr ............................................................................................. 24
Mao Ying .............................................................................................. 40
Mao Zedong ............................................................................ 16, 89, 124, 142
Mao Zonggang =B* Wfl ................................................................................ 134
Marcel Granet ................................................................................................ 24
Matteo Ricci (1551-1610) ........................................................................... 118
Maudgalyayana (Mulian in Chinese) ............................................... 124
Mawang Dui ::E:tl ..................................................................................... 10
"May Fourth Movement" (4 May 1919 until about 1942) ...................... 124
Mei (d. 141 B.C ......................................................................... 65
Mencius (see also Meng Zi) .......................................................................... 23
Meng Haoran {689-740) ................................................................. 76
Meng Zi :tlh:r (Master Meng, ca. 390-305 B.C.) ................................. 23, 26
Miao Quansun {1844-1919) .......................................................... 126
Mideng yinhua (Tales Written while Searching for a Lamp) ... 112
Mingwen hai l!§::)(w (The Ocean of Ming Prose) ....................................... 32
"minor books," xiao ...................................................................... l33
...................................................................................................... 8
Mo Zi (Master Mo) ................................................................................. 8
Monkey ................................................................................................ 137-138
Mu Tianzi 2}tuan (Chronicle of the Son of Heaven Mu) ............ 33
Mudan ting!j±ft.y (The Peony Pavilion) .......................................... 118, 119
"Mulberry Tree along the Path" (Mo shang ........................... 69
N
Naito Kanan I"J§mlm (1866-1934) ............................................................. 5
"Nanke Taishou zhuan" l¥WlJ7.;:vf!f (Biography of the Governor ... ) . 110
160
Index Index
161
ping [hua] (plain narratives) ....................................................... 133, 134
(drama of the South) ................................................................ 117 Pipa ji (Story of the Lute)' .............................................................. 117
N eo-Confucianism ........................................................................................ 38 poetry ................................................................................................ 31, 61, 105
New History of the Five Dynasties .............................................................. 43 "popular" literature ..................................................................................... 1 05
"new yuefii' (xin yuefu ................................................................. 68, 91 Prince Dan .E!. of Y an ............................................................................. 108
Nine Arguments,]iu bian fL?ii¥ ..................................................................... 64 Princess of the River Xiang (Xiangfuren #§te;A) ............................................. 63
Nine Declarations,]iu dtang ................................................................ 64 professional storyteller ................................................................................ 122
Nine Songs,]iu ge fLllfA: ................................................................................. 63 Pu Songling ( 1640-1715) .............................................................. 113
"Nineteen Ancient Poems" (Gu shi shijiu shou, §) ..................... 68
novel ............................................................................................................. 122 Q
novel, of behavior and morals ........................................................... 133, 140
"Qj . h"" (S L . )
1 at s 1 -w-Rn>J even amentahons .................................................... 71
novella .......................................................................................................... 125 Qj.an Daxin (1728-1804 ................................................................ 132
Qj.u Hu f)(M .................................................................................................. 69
0 "Qj.uran ke zhuan" (The Story of Curly-bearded Stranger) .. 112
"On Stopping Wine" (Zhi jiu ll:j§) ............................................................. 7 4 Qu You IHtl {1341-1427) .. : ....................................................................... 112
opera-theater .................................................................................................. 62 Qu Yuan Jffi)Jj( (ca. 340-278) .................................................................. 62, 64
Opera-Theater of the North ....................................................................... 114 qu E!E (aria) ................................................................................................ 62, 98
oral genre ..................................................................................................... 133 qu /®( {amusement) ......................................................................................... 52
oralliterature ........................................................................................ 123, 125
Ouyang Xiu (1007-1072) ............................................. 43, 44, 49, 93 R
Ouyang Xun (557-641) ................................................................. 110 Rebellion of An Lushan ................................................................................ 79
Record of Peach Blossom Fount {Taohua yuan ............................. 73
p
Records of the Grand Historian (see also Shi jz) ............................................. 65
Pai'an (Striking the Table in Amazement at ... ) ... 128, 129 "records of the strange" (dtiguaz) ................................................................ 113
parallel prose-pian ........................................................................ 31 "The Red Parrot" (Hong yingwu ...................................................... 84
Pei Xing {825-880) ..................................................................... 110, 131 "Red Peony" (Hong Mutan f.U:!l±ft) .............................................................. 77
Peking/Beijing Opera" (jing literally "drama of the capital") ... 121 "Renshi zhuan" 1:E.B:;ft (The Story of Lady Ren) .................................... 111
pianwen'fj,)(, "parallel" or "harnessed prose." .......................................... 32 Rites des Tcheou (Rites ofZhou) ....................................................................... 19
Pigsy .............................................................................................................. 138 Rou putuan (Prayer Mat of Flesh) .......................................... 130, 131
Ping Shan Leng Yan }jL !l1 ...................................................................... 132 Ruanji .................................................................................. 72
Rulin waishi {fm;ffJi- (The Scholars) ........................................................ 144
162
Index
Index 163
s
short story ............................................................................................. 125, 130
saga ............................................................................................................... 132
Sanyan53_§ (Three Words) ............................................................... 126, 127
Sancho Panza ............................................................................................... 138
Sandy ............................................................................................................ 138
Sanguo Qzi yanyi (The Three Kingdoms) ....................... 133, 134
santao ...................................................................................................... 98
sanwen "free" or "dispersed prose," ................................................... 32
(laments) ........................................................................................ 62 65
Sei Shonagon ?11i':'P*f'I§ .............................................................................. :.46
"Sequel to Liao2)zai Qztjiwith Illustrations and Explanations" ................ 114
Seven Exhortations (Qjfa ....................................................................... 65
"The Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove" (Zhulin qi zi tJ:fft.Y) ........... 72
Shangjun shu (The Book of Lord Shang) ........................................ 12
Shanglin fo --.t*i'M (Rhapsody of a Hunt in the Party ... ) ........................ 65
ShaoJingzhan's ............................................................................... 112
Shenjiji ¥.tllJ£m (ca. 740-800) ................................................... 110, 111, 116
ShenJing ttf!f (1533-1610) ....................................................................... 118
Shen Yue (441-553) ............................................................................. 75
shengren ................................................................................................... 21
Shi ji 9:: (Records of the Grand Historian) .............................................. 33
Shi jingfj!j#!fi (Classic of Poetry) ........................................................ 20, 24 26
Shi pin (Evaluation of Poetry) ............................................................ .'. 56
shifj!j ......................................................................................................... 31 61
Shidan (Menus) .................................................................................... :. 52
Shi'er lou+ -=1'1 (Twelve Towers) ............................................................. 130
shihua (narrative interspersed with poems) ...................................... 138
2)zush_,_u +53.%Iiff:Wlt (The Thirteen Classics Commented ... ) .. 24
Shzshuo (A New Account of Tales of the World) ........... 108
Shu jingi!Ji#!fi (Classic of Documents) ................................................ 7, 17, 26
M . ) 118 133 135 136 140
Shuihu 2)zuan {Water argm ...... .. ............ ... ' ' ' ' 2
shuohuaren (tellers of stories) .......................................................... 1 5
shuoshude {tellers of books) ............................................................. 125
Si shu [9:]1 {The Four Books) ....................................................................... 19
SikongTu {837-908) ........................................................................ 57
S'k h m1 F.E2>..- ................................. 113 t u quans u er ............................................... ·
Sima Qj.an 145-ca. 85 B.C.) ............................................... 33, 65
Sima {d. 110 B.C.) .................................................................... 34
SimaXiangru {ca. 177-119) ........................................................ 65
"The Snail" ( Gua niu !lli%4) ........................................................................... 95
SongJiang *1I .................................................................................. 136, 140

Songs of the South (see also Chu ci) ................................................................ 89
Songwen jian *:Z£ {Mirror of Song Prose) ............................................... 32
Soushen {Sequel to Records of Searching for Spirits) ...... 107
Soushen {Records of Searching for Spirits) ................................
"Spending the Night on the Cliff over Stone Gate" ................................... 7
6
"Spring Dawn" (Chun xiao .................................................................. 7
"Springtime" ( Chun :§') ................................................................................. 99
StanislasJulien ..................................................................................... 116, 132
Story of the Stone (Shitou ji .............................................................. 144
"Story of Yingying" ..................................................................................... 117
storytellers .................................................................................................... 125
Su Che {1039-1112) ............................................................................. 44
{1037-1101) ............................................................ 44, 47, 93,
Su Xun {1009-1055) ............................................................................. 4
"Suffering from the Cold While Living in My Home Village" ............... 85
164 Index Index
165
Wang (177-217) ........................................................................... 71
T Wang Du ............................................................................................. 110
Taiping guangji ............................................................................. 106 Wang (d. 158 A.D.) ............................................................................ 52
Takizawa Bakin (1767-1848) .................................................... 132 Wang Shifu .:EJ.fffi (thirteenth century) ................................................... 116
tanci5!flj'ji'IJ (strummed ballads) .................................................................... 125 Wang Tao (1828-1897) ..................................................................... 114
Tang Xianzu (1550-1617) ............................................................. 118 Wang Wei .:E*l (701-761) ........................................................................... 76
Tao Qj.an llWJM or Tao Yuanming (365-427) .................. 72, 74, 107 (1845-1900) ................................................................ 6
Tao Zhenhuai ................................................................................. 125 Wang Zhaojun .:EBR::ef ................................................................................ 116
Taohua (Peach-blossom Fan) ................................................ 121 "Weeping for Little Golden Bell While I Was Ill" ..................................... 84
Taoism ................................................................................................ 13, 38, 41 Wei Liangfu .................................................................................... 118
technique lfa $) ............................................................................................ 4 7 Wei Zhongxian (1568-1627) ........................................................ 122
Theodor Benfey (1809-1881)
Wen fu )(Jllf:t (Fu on Literature) ..................................................................... 55
thirteen classics .............................................................................................. 26 Wen Tingyun (812-870) .................................................................. 91
Thomas Percy .............................................................................................. 132 Wen xuan (A Selection of Literature) .................................................. 32
Tianyu huaxffi:ft (Flowers Falling in the Rain) ...................................... 125 wen)( ............................................................................................................. 31
Tie Zhongyu .rp_=li (Jade within Iron) .................................................... 132 Wenxin (The Heart of Literature Carves Dragons) .... 55
"To the Tune 'A Casket of Pearls"' (Yihu dtu .............................. 92 "Wenyi Tang ji" ::ZM'¥:'ilB (Record of the Hall of Literary Ripples) ....... 48
"To the Tune 'Declaration of My Intimate Feelings"' .............................. 97 "West Gate" (Hsi men xing®1Flfi) .............................................................. 67
"To the Tune 'Fresh Are the Flowers of the Chrysanthemum"' .............. 93 "Writing Down My Feelings While Traveling at Night" .......................... 82
"To the Tune 'Night after Night"' (Yeyequ :nz{§zli!l) .................................... 93 "Written on the Sprig of Flowers ... " ......................................................... 95
"To the Tune 'The Broken Formation"' (Pochen zi ....................... 92 Wu Cheng' en (ca. 1500-1582) ...................................................... 138
"The Tomb of Little Su" ( Su Xiaoxiao mu if*;J vJ 'm) ................................. 88 (1701-1754) ................................................................... 144
trivial literature .............................................................................................. 45 Wubaijia xiangyan ............................................................ 69
Wusheng (Silent Dramas) ............................................................ 130
u Wuxia (Chivalric or Martial-arts) School of Fiction) ....................... 145
utilitarian conception of literature ............................................................... 31
X
w Xi Kang (223-262) ............................................................................... 72
Wang Anshi (1021-1086) ......................................................... .44, 94 Xiang Yu :IJ'-[3j)j •.•.••.•.•..•.•..•.•.•..•.....•.•...•...••.•.•.•.•..........•.•.••.•.•.....•..•.•.••.•..• 34, 35
Wang Bi .3:.585 (226-249) ............................................................................... 14 Xianqing ouji (Notes Thrown Down to Pass the Time) ........... 119
Xiao (Classic of Filial Piety) .................................................... 24, 26
166
Index
Index 167
Xiao (501-531) ..................................................................... 32, 55
xiao ya tj'ft .................................................................................................... 25
................................................................................................... 98
xiaopin wen th\it)( (essays on minor subjects) .................................... .45, 46
xiaoshuo tN!)l (the Chinese equivalent of "fiction") ......... 106, 126, 127, 132
Xie Lingyun litlfil (385-443) .................................................................... 75
"Xie Xiao'e" li[tJ,Mlt .................................................................................... l12
xiezi (inserted wedge, a dramatic interlude) ..................................... 115
Ximen Qjng ............................................................................ l40, 141
xing$ ................................................................................................... : ......... 25
xingling'l'i.li (the efficacy of [one's own] nature) ....................................... 52
xinhua (new narratives) ...................................................................... 135
Xixiangjiffitffitftl (The Story of the Western Pavilion) ............................ 116
XiyoujiffiJbltitl aourney to the West) ................................................ 133, 136
Xu Ling (507-583) ............................................................................... 69
Xu Weif*m (1521-1593) .......................................................................... 118
Xu (i.e., Xu Hongzu f*;gtll, 1586-1641) ..................... 49, 50
Xuanzang (602-664) .......................................................................... 137
Xue Baochai M!lflil\Z .................................................................................... 144
Xun Qjng liJUI!P, ca. 300-230 ....................................................................... 12
Xun Zi tfi-T (Master Xun) .................................................................... 12, 141
y
Yao Nai (1732-1815) ........................................................................... 32
Yao

Yi jing (Classic of Changes) ·························:·························· ... ····
17


Yi li'(lif (The Book of Etiquette and Ceremoma) .............................. l9,
1 7
v.· . . -1. . =t;r eiV __,_ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 2
.1. yzan "'" 7'l!"E'Ci' •••••••••.•••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••
"Y" · h " &&lffi (The Story of Yingying) ................................. Ill mgymg z uan I'<'J' •
"You Wutai Shan riji" Jbf1i§ W 8 iftl (A Diary of Roammg · · .) ········ 49-50
Yu Ai )J[!f& (262-311) ................................................................................. 109
· L · ::r:ftl!i:21i: •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 132 Yu]zao z .................................................... .
Yuan (1568-1610)
Yuan Mei i\ttlc (1716-1798) ................................................................ 52,
Yuan (Distant journey) ................................................................... 64
Yuan Zhen jGJ{ (779-831) .................................... 82, 85, 87, 110, 111, 1
Yuan Zhongdao iJtr:j:lit! (1570-1624) ..........................................................
8
Yuan Zongdao (1560-1600) ........................................................... .4
(music-bureau poetry) ....................................... 62, 66, 67, 68, 88
· C (Notes from the Cottage ... ) ............ 114
Yuewez aotang
· d h " 1=1 (Drinking Alone under the Moon) .............. 78 "YueX1a u z uo n ,.::T!I!JI"l:J
• • (N w Songs from thejade Terrace) ..................... 69 Yutaz xznyong .:JS.:¥:.>1'JIW.l' e
z 125
z · h ng yuan (Ties for the Next Life) .......................................... .
(variety plays) ..................................................... 114, 115, 116, 122
Yan Yu,B:5J3] .................................................................................................. 57
(531-ca. 590) ................................................................. 38
Yan Zi chunqiu (Springs and Autumns of Master Yen) ............. 11
Yang Guifei ....................................................................................... 81
Yang ................................................................................ 81
(development of the sense) ....................................................... l34
Zang (d. 1621) ................................................................. 115
Zazuan •• (Miscellanies) ···········································:······························· 46
Zeng (1019-1063) ...................................................................... 44
Zhang Hua ill¥ (232-300) ........................................................................ 107
Zhangji (ca. 776-829} ......................................................................... 87
Zhangjiuling (678-740) ...................................................................
Qj ?J'i.!$ ••••••••••••••••.•••••••.•••••• 9 Zhang tan :JJJ<::$ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • 4
Zh ?J"-M.-.f.d? ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 0 Zhang upo :JJJ<::TJ >tx. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
168 Index
Zhanguo ce (Intrigues of the Warring States) ................................... 10
Zhao Mingcheng 1m ( 1081-1129) ........................................................ 96
"Zhenzhong ji" tt (The Story of the Inside of a Pillow) .......... 11 0, 116
:dliguai;t{_•'(£ (records of the strange) .......................................................... 106
;dliren ;(§__A {records of [strange] persons) .................................................. 106
Zhiyin (Understanding Sound) ............................................................ 56
Zhong Rong .......................................................................................... 56
Zhong yong $ Ji' .............................................................................................. 20
Zhou li fi!il:fl .............................................................................................. 18, 26
Zhu Xi*:!: (1130-1200) ....................................................................... 19. 24
Zhuang Zhou !ttfi!il (see also Zhuang Zi) ..................................................... 14
Zhuang Zi !ttr (Master Zhuang) ............................... 9, 14. 15-17, 106, 109
:dlugongdiao ( chantefable) ........................................................ 115, 11 7
Zi bu yu r/flm {What the Master [Confucius] Did Not Speak ....... 113
Zixuforl!mM {Rhapsody of the Hunting Parks) ...................................... 65
Ziye r1Y<. ("Midnight," d. 386) ..................................................................... 69
Zuo Qj.uming tr:.O:G!Yj .................................................................................... 18
Zuo ;dluantl':Vf!. (Zuo Commentary) ................................................. 18, 26, 33

This book is a publication of Indiana University Press 601 North Morton Street Bloomington, Indiana 47404-3797 USA www.indiana.edu/-iupress

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© 2000 by Andre Levy All rights reserved No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in .writing from the publisher. The Association of American University Presses' Resolution on Permissions constitutes the only exception to this prohibition. The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of American National Standard for Information Sciences~Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials, ANSI Z39.48-1984. Manufactured in the United States of America Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Levy, Andre, date [La litterature chinoise ancienne et classique. English] Chinese literature, ancient and classical I by Andre Levy ; translated by William H. Nienhauser, Jr. p. em. Includes index. ISBN 0-253-33656-2 (alk. paper) I. Chinese literature~History and criticism. I. Nienhauser, William H. II. Title. PL2266.L48 2000 895.1 '09~dc21 99-34024 I 2 3 4 5 05 04 03 02 01 00

For my own early translators of French, Daniel and Susan

Contents
ix Preface Introduction 1 Chapter 1: Antiquity 5 I. Origins II. "Let a hundred flowers bloom, Let a hundred schools of thought contend!" 1. Mo zi and the Logicians 2. Legalism 3. The Fathers of Taoism III. The Confucian Classics Chapter 2: Prose 31 I. Narrative Art and Historical Records II. The Return of the "Ancient Style" III. The Golden Age of Trivial Literature IV. Literary Criticism Chapter 3: Poetry 61 I. The Two Sources of Ancient Poetry 1. The Songs of Chu 2. Poetry of the Han Court II. The Golden Age of Chinese Poetry 1. From Aesthetic Emotion to Metaphysical Flights 2. The Age of Maturity 3. The Late Tang III. The Triumph of Genres in Song Chapter 4: Literature of Entertainment: The Novel and Theater 105 I. Narrative Literature Written in Classical Chinese II. The Theater 1. The Opera-theater of the North 2. The Opera-theater of the South III. The Novel 1. Oral Literature 2. Stories and Novellas 3. The "Long NoveY' or Saga Index 151

I proposed the book to John Gallman. this one was set aside. I was sure I would prove the exception. I immediately thought about translating parts of the book for my graduate History of Chinese Literature class at the University of Wisconsin. Although I respectjohn's experience and knowledge in publishing. after finding it in a bookshop in Paris. Professor Levy had originally written a. which was to be published as a supplementary volume to Odile Kaltenmark-Ghequier's La Litterature chinoise (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. 1948)1 in the Qjle sais-je? (What Do I Know?) series. and john approved it almost immediately-but. 1991). what kind of trouble could a little book of 125 pages cause? I soon found out. 1964). when the panel on our field's desiderata headed by David Rolston at the 1998 Association for Asian Studies Meeting pronounced that one of the major needs was for a concise history of Chinese literature in about 125 pages (the exact length of Professor Levy's origi~al text). was soon abandoned. a class in which the importance of dynastic change was also downplayed. This concept.Translator's Preface I first became·interested in translating Andre Levy's history of Chinese literature. which was modeled on literary genres rather than political eras. much longer manuscript. I revived my interest in this translation. in 1996. Last spring. La litterature chinoise ancienne et classique (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. Director of Indiana University Press. 1Several . however. After all. not before warning me that this kind of project can take much more time than the translator originally envisions. however. and it decades ago Anne-Marie Geoghegan translated this volume as Chinese Literature(New York: Walker. Like many plans. I read sections and was intrigued by Professor Levy's approach.

Here in Madison. Ms.French. If there is a literary style to this translation. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.!:§. As a result. who stood behind this project from the beginning. among the many people who helped with this translation. Shang Cheng [.16I¥. using Professor Levy's French versions as a guide wherever possible. All this was done with the blessing and cooperation of the author. Cao also helped by pointing out problems in my interpretation of the original . it is due to her efforts." So I have translated almost all of the more than 120 excerpts of original works directly from the original Chinese. Professor Levy was then asked to cut his manuscript by one-third. Judith. I also discovered that re-translating Professor Levy's French translations of Chinese texts sometimes resulted in renditions that were too far from the original. undergraduate students or interested parties with little background in Chinese literature-may not have. Without his assistance the translation would never have been completed. Jane Lyle of Indiana University Press. however. For this reason. They saved me from innumerable errors and did their work with interest and high spirits. I would like to especially thank Professor Andre Levy for his unflinching interest in and support of this translation. and especially to John Gallman. was unrelenting in her demands on behalf of the general reader. Cao Weiguo i!Jf!j~. he was sometimes forced to presume in his audience certain knowledge that some readers of this book-for example. I have added (or revived) a number of contextual sentences with these readers in mind. to the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation which supported me in Berlin through the summer of 1997 when I first read Professor Levy's text. More information on many of the authors and works discussed in this history can be found in the entries in The Indiana Companion to Traditional Chinese Literature (volumes 1 and 2. Indeed. Wisconsin. Galer of Ricks College read the entire manuscript and offered a number of invaluable comments. Mr. The most careful reader was. Huang Shu-yuang i\:rf~. Scott W. a trio of graduate students have helped me with questions about the Chinese texts: Mr. 1986 and 1998). 16 February 1999 (Lunar New Year's Day) . Mr. working carefully with Professor Levy. My thanks. Detailed references to these entries and other relevant studies can be found in the "Suggested Further Reading" sections at the end of each chapter (where the abbreviated reference Indiana Companion refers to these two volumes). Professor Levy has read much of the English version. and Mr. My wife. and offered comments in a long series of letters over the past few months. including all passages that I knew were problematic (there are no doubt others!). who painstakingly copy-edited the text.X Translator's Preface Translator's Preface xi was decided to publish the Levy "appendix" as a separate volume-in 125 pages. Madison. too. even in this age of "distance education.

Chinese Literature. Ancient and Classical .

" placed it above history-anthologies. Moreover. but the prestige of wen )(. nor to supplant the excellent summary by Odile Kaltenmark-Ghequier which had the impossible task of presenting a history of Chinese literature in about a hundred pages. Our desire would be rather to complement the list by presenting the reader with a different approach. before the Chinese themselves-to produce histories of Chinese literature. compilations. it is a picture-inevitably incompleteof Chinese literature of the past that this little book offers. "Introduction. There has been some spectacular progress and some foundering. one more concrete. 296. We might see the classical art of writing as the arranging. signifying both "literature" and "civilization. the popular side of literature-fiction. Rather than a history. p. Not that the Chinese tradition had not taken note of an evolution in literary genres." La litterature chinoise (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. 10dile . Chinese "high" literature is based on a "hard core" of classical training consisting of the memorization of texts. something Kaltenmark-Ghequier. beginning at the start of the twentieth century. drama. and oral verse-because of its lack of "seriousness" or its "vulgarity.Introduction Could one still write. less dependent on the dynastic chronology." no. and catalogues were preferred. At any rate. it was Westerners who were the first -followed by the Japanese. long neglected by the Occident. "Que sais-je. 1948}. of lines recalled by memory. which preceded this book. Our goal is not to add a new work to an already lengthy list of histories of Chinese literature. that "the study of Chinese literature." was not judged dignified enough to be considered wen. in an appropriate and astute fashion. 5. nearly a half-million characters for every candidate who reaches the highest competitive examinations. is still in its infancy?" 1 Yes and no. as Odile Kaltenmark-Ghequier did in 1948 in the What Do I Know series Number 296.

inevitably abridged but sufficient. avoiding hao ~(literary name or nickname). We conclude by pointing out that educated Chinese add to their surnames. not to establish a history of it. hie hao 55U~ (special or particular literary name). standard language comparable to Latin in the West. which might result in a lengthy catalogue of works largely unknown today. also labeled "vulgar. This "classical" language persisted by opposing writing to speech through a sort of partial bilingualism. which can be disconcerting at times. We are compelled to sacrifice quantity to present a limited number of literary "stars. The chronological approach will be handled somewhat roughly because of the need to follow the development of the great literary genres: after the presentation of antiquity. The goal here is to enable the reader to form an idea of traditional Chinese literature. the system that existed nearly until the end of the imperial period in 1911 was known as the jinshi ~±or "presented scholar" examination (because successful candidates were "presented" to the emperor). It required the writing of poetry and essays on themes set by the examiners. The standard given name (ming i.2 Chinese Literature. Although there were earlier tests leading to political advancement. which were recognized as such and qualified as "classics" only a few decades ago. we hope. of elements of the spoken language. thus Tao Qjan ~M is often referred to by his zi . (residential name) whenever possible: When other names are used. which brings together the novel and the theater. is undermined by grammars that are appreciably different. and literature in general. poetry. The goal of these writers was not solely literary. These examinations. classical and vernacular. the standard ming will be given in parentheses. They hoped through their writings to earn a reputation that would help them find support for their efforts to pass the imperial civil-service examinations and thereby eventually win a position at court. and was developed during the late seventh and early eighth centuries A. then the description of the art most esteemed by the literati.) is often avoided out of decorum. Thus the memorization of a huge corpus of earlier literature and the ability to compose on the spot became the major qualifications for political office through most of the period from the eighth until the early twentieth centuries. and eloquent vigor on the other. the most discredited but nonetheless highly prized.':_f: (stylename) as Tao Yuanming ~VIl!Eijj.D. We will retain only the best known of these names. comes an examination of the prose genres of "high" classical literature. and by the fact that these languages hold to diametrically opposed stylistic ideals: lapidary concision on the one hand. and shi ming ~i. a great variety of personal names. to evoke the content of the original. The final section treats the literature of diversion. which share the same fundamental structure. The strict proscription of vulgarisms." and to reduce the listing of their works to allow the citation of a number of previously unpublished translations. the period in which the common culture of the educated elite was established. Successful candidates were then given minor positions in the bureaucracy. from the examinations has helped to maintain the purity of classical Chinese. which are always given first. The unity of the two languages. . were composed in a classical. The spoken language. Ancient and Classical Introduction 3 that came almost automatically to traditional Chinese intellectuals." has produced some literary monuments of its own.

has been carefully preserved since earliest times and has become the basis of Chinese lettered culture. The hypothesis that modernity began early. recorded by the scribes of a rapidly evolving warlike and aristocratic society. was developed by N ait6 Kanan I*JJ]i#J] l¥.C.. when political unification brought about the establishment of a centralized but "prefectural" government under the Legalists. a periodization which distinguishes Archaic Chinese of High Antiquity (from the origins of language to the third century) from Ancient Chinese of Mid-Antiquity (sixth to twelfth centuries).Chapter 1. and Recent Chinese (18401919) from Contemporary Chinese (1920 to the present). which collapsed in 1911. conveyed by Marxism. It is with this in mind that one must approach the evolution of literature and its role over the course of the two-thousand-year-old imperial government. This idea has no want of critics or of supporters. It is opposed to the accepted idea in the West. as well as the famous burning of books opposed to the Legalist state ideology. . and attempt to understand the importance (albeit increasingly limited) that ancient literature retains today. The indigenous tradition had placed the break around 211 B. that China. then Middle Chinese of the Middle Ages (thirteenth-sixteenth centuries) from Modern Chinese (seventeenth-nineteenth centuries). Yet to suggest that antiquity ended so early is to minimize the contribution of Buddhism and the transformation of thought that took place between the third and seventh centuries. Antiquity Ancient literature." has neither entered modern times nor participated in "the global civilization" that started with the Opium War of 1840.i (1866-1934). in the eleventh or perhaps twelfth century in China. a "living fossil. Nor is there unanimity concerning the periodization proposed in historical linguistics. The term "antiquity" applied to China posed no problems until certain Marxist historians went so far as to suggest that it ended only in 1919.

000 inscriptions extending over the period from the fourteenth to the tenth centuries before our era. the for. 6). An echo of certain pieces transmitted by the Confucian school can be seen in some texts. which record the motivation for the diviner's speech. covers the scapula of an ox and extends even over the supporting bones. 220). Dong Zuobin ii1'Fj{ (1895-1963) proposed a periodization for them and distinguished within them the styles of different schools of scribes. which are clearly related to the system of writing used by the Chinese today-these were certainly not primitive forms of characters." The purpose of these ancient archives. Let a hundred schools of thought contend!" This statement by Mao Zedong. but this scriptural evidence causes one to consider whether the Shu jing -~ (Classic of Documents).D.C. the Western or Early Han dynasty (206 B. discovered recently.).ms of which often seem to be more archaic than those of the inscriptions on bones and shells. These eras are the early Chou dynasty (eleventh century-722 B.).D. Antiquity 7 In the area of literature. his identity.C.D. The oracular inscriptions are necessarily short-the longest known text. Many collections of inscriptions on "stone and bronze" have been published in the intervening eras.2 but to honor them would be to fall into the servitude of a purely chronological approach. cannot be considered part of literary patrimony in the strictest sense. did not offer a more extensive surface.C. The most ancient inscriptions indicate nothing more than the person to whom the bronze was consecrated or a commemoration of the name of the sponsor. was inspired by an exceptional period in Chinese cultural history (from the fifth to the third centuries . Origins Since the last year of the last century. Archaeology has elevated our knowledge of more ancient writings toward the beginning of the second millennium B. the shell of a southern species of the great tortoise. The longest texts extend to as much as five-hundred signs. Accounts of this archaic period are traditionally divided into six eras.:E'ii\~ (1845-1900) compiled the first collection of inscriptions written on bones and shells. Toward the tenth century B. of a hundred or so characters. was based in part on authentic texts. the texts evolved from several dozen to as many as a hundred signs and took on a commemorative character. and went out of fashion in the second century B.6 Chinese Literature. and sometimes the result. made to launch a liberalization movement that was cut short in 1957.C. They attracted the attention of amateur scholars from the eleventh century until modern times.C.C. I.). supposedly "revised" by Confucius but often criticized as a spurious text. also used to record divination. the increasing number of archaeological discoveries has allowed the establishment of a corpus of nearly 50. The presence of an early sign representing a bundle of slips of wood or bamboo confirms the existence of a primitive form of book in a very ancient era-texts were written on these slips. solemn texts is not always easily discernible because of the obscurities of the archaisms in the language. Of another nature are the inscriptions on bronze that appeared in about the eleventh century B.C. has been ignored.). the Warring States (481-256 B. the Spring and Autumn era (722-481 B. Scholars have managed to decipher a third of the total of some 6.C. and the Eastern or Latter Han dynasty (25-A. 2 II. the Ch'in dynasty (256-206 B. the beginning of the end of antiquity could perhaps be placed in the second century A. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1.C. which were then bound together to form a "fascicle. when Wang Yirong . Whether a literature existed at this ancient time seems rather doubtful. The inspiration for these simple.000 distinct signs.. but this archaic period.-A. "Let a hundred flowers bloom. but their opacity has disheartened many generations of literati.

albeit an unattainable model. in both chronology and importance. regardless of the philosophy they offer. When he learned of this." After the death ofthe Master. the main contribution of which has been to demonstrate in their curious way of argumentation peculiar features of the Chinese language. The work that has come down to us under his name (which appears to be about two-thirds of the original text) represents a direction which Chinese civilization explored without ever prizing. under the Legalist rule of the Qjn dynasty (221-206 B. It has been hypothesized that the name Mo. often political. the material that he made use of died long ago. however.C. They opposed the Taoist solution of a . if not the other way around. Mo Zi and the Logicians. Even the best.. Antiquity 9 B.C. Although we can only speculate about whether Mo Zi was a convict or a commoner. 551-479 B.!. he argued for a kind of bellicose pacifism toward aggressors.:ht!! is known only by the thirty-some paradoxes which the incomparable Zhuang Zi !lfr cites. "Try then to do it again for Us. an obscure personage whom scholars have wanted to make a contemporary of Confucius. He cut it off. discussion. The texts of the masters of the hundred schools. The growth of these schools paralleled the rise of rival states from the time of Confucius (the Latinized version of the Chinese original.) in which there was a proliferation of schools-the "hundred schools. summoned the carpenter Shih and said to him. This era of freedom of thought and intellectual exchange never completely ceased to offer a model. The "hundred schools" came to an end with the unification of China late in the third century B. "Your servant is capable of doing it.:r or Master Kong. "ink. like the wing of a fly.C. in the search for an alternative to the oppressive ideology imposed by the centralized state. then heard a wind: the plaster was entirely removed without scratching his nose." The carpenter responded. without attempting to solve. through a utilitarian process of reasoning. wrote in a style of discouraging weight. and the given name. doing his best to promote. When he passed by the grave of Master Hui he turned around to say to those who were following him: "A fellow from Ying had spattered the tip of his nose with a bit of plaster. Di. ca. (Zhuang Zi 24) 1. Much of what has reached us from this lost world was saved in the wake of the reconstruction of Confucian writings (a subject to which we will turn shortly). Mo Zi Sons of the logicians and the sophists. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1. the necessity of believing in the gods and of practicing universal love without discrimination. The work known as Mo Zi ~-T (Master Mo) is a collection of the writings of a sect founded by MoDi~ II. Kong Fuzi =FL:. as in: There is nothing beyond the Great Infinity.C. on the periphery of orthodox literati culture." The various masters of these schools offered philosophical..).C.) to the end of the Warring States period (221 B. are of uneven quality. as Zhuang Zi attests after the death of his friend Hui Shi: Zhuang Zi was accompanying a funeral procession. indicates the pheasant feathers that decorated the hats of the common people. who are known to us only in fragments. however. Mo Zi's mode of argument has influenced many generations of logicians and sophists. impassive. the sovereign of the country of Song. have not come close to dethroning the "Chinese Socrates." Confucius.). Condemning the extravagant expense of funerals as well as the uselessness of art and music. the first of the great thinkers. The antinomies of reason have nourished Taoist thought. Yuan." referred to the tattooing of a convict in antiquity.8 Chinese Literature. who took his ax and twirled it around. The man from Ying had remained standing. the rhetoricians shared with the Taoists a taste for apologues. I too no longer can find the material: I no longer have anyone to talk to./i:. Hui Shi . He had it removed by [his crony] the carpenter Shi. and the Small Infinity is not inside.

" involved as they were in diplomatic combat. the people of the country constructed a little gate next to the great one and invited him to enter. tell me!" insisted the king. he is not that fond of your nose. and jealousy is her nature. Now. my wife shows her more love than l-it is thus that the filial son serves his parents. but full of shrewdness. Held in contempt by the Confucians for their "Machiavellianism. I am the most unworthy . "She does not like your odor. Yan Zi refused. "I know. Guan Zi .. showed her the most intense affection. a man of small stature but great ability who was prime minister to Dukejing ~of Qj. In short. the most ancient "Legalist" would be the artisan of Qj." 2. Guan Zi ~T (Master Guan).C.tl in 1973. Antiquity ll detached "non-action. She responded. A great variety animates these accounts. (547-490 B. However. of which this one is representative: When Master Yan was sent as an ambassador to Chu.. Whether or not he should be considered a Legalist.)." "But then why have you been sent?" "The practice in~ is to dispatch a worthy envoy to a worthy sovereign." Therefore. but that it was to Chu that he had come on assignment. the queen. and it would rain if they shook off their perspiration-so dense is the population." "Even if it is unpleasant. The chamberlain had him enter by the great gate. some have often been selected as anthology pieces. the queen suggested to her rival: "The king appreciates your beauty. the new one did so when she saw His Majesty. for them to have sent you?" "How can you say there is no one in ~' when there would be darkness in our capital of Linzi if the people of the three hundred quarters spread out their sleeves. they are rich in dialogue. anecdote-it is inserted without commentary into the "intrigues" {or "slips") of the state of Chu: The King of Wei offered the King of Chua beautiful girl who gave him great satisfaction. In fact. Without cynicism. who took their name from the idea that the hegemonic power of the state is founded on a system of implacable laws supposing the abolition of hereditary privileges-indeed a tabula rasa that rejects morals and traditions. She chose clothes and baubles which would please her and gave them to her. "Her nose is to be cut off. which cannot be represented by this single. and let no one question my order!" The Yan Zi chunqiu ~-Tlft'< (Springs and Autumns of Master Yen) is another reconstruction by Liu Xiang. these anecdotes do not lack appeal. The diplomatic manipulations and other little anecdotes we have seen in the Yan Zi chunqiu were of little interest to the Legalists. The king asked his wife why his favorite hid her nose in his presence. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1. You would do better to hide it when he receives you." "The brazen hussy!" cried the sovereign.C.'s hegemony in the seventh century B. she gratified her with more attention than the king himself accorded her. It was reconstructed several centuries later by Liu Xiang ~j[Pj (77-6 B. a collection of anecdotes about Y an Ying ~~. declaring that it was suitable for an envoy to a country of dogs. Knowing how much the new woman pleased him. his wife.. historians associate them with all thought that privileges efficacy.:E.)-the state that occupies what is now Shandong.10 Chinese Literature." the Zhanguo ce ~~m (Intrigues of theWarring States) remains the most representative work of the genre.C. although characteristic. that the loyal servant fulfills his duties toward his prince. it was the same for her with rooms in the palace and bed clothes. He congratulated her for it: a woman serves her husband through her carnal appeal. Legalism. The King of Chu received him and said to him: "Was there then no one in~.. both speeches and chronicles. The work that was handed down under his name is a composite text and in reality contains no material prior to the third century B. As she knew that the king did not consider her jealous. From this point of view. understanding how I love the new woman. but the authenticity of these reassembled materials seems to have been confirmed by the discovery of parallel texts in a tomb at Mawang Dui )~.C.

which hardly lighten the weight of his doctrine. like most of the others from antiquity that were attributed to a master. In sum. in fact seem to be rather disparate texts of a school. Xun Zi. Shang jun shu J{ij. 300-230 B.. This is why the order of a sage sovereign consists of multiplying interdictions in order to prevent infractions and relying on force to put an end to fraud. The enlightened lord must take care if he wants to establish order in his country and to be able to turn the population to his advantage. this school was opposed to social and political engagement. The state must devote itself to eliminating the useless. In their polemics against the Buddhists.12 Chinese Literature. It is in the work of Han Fei Zi ~~Fr (ca. Han Fei Zi argues that the art of governing requires techniques other than the simple manipulation of rewards and punishments. Xun Zi's . rhetoricians.C.ng ffiY~P. to hold for intellectuals educated through the rationalism of the Confucians. minister of Qj. deserters. The prince is the cornerstone of a system that is supposed to ensure him of a protective impenetrableness.C. 3. A philosophy of evasion. He is said to have left this "testament" as he departed the Chinese world via the Xian'gu Pass for the West. From the outset Taoism was either a means to flee society and politics or a form of consolation for those who encountered reversals in politics and society. Within the country he must cause the people to consecrate themselves to farming. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1. This series of aphorisms is attributed to Lao Zi ~r (Master Lao or "The Old Master"). who had been converting the barbarians of the West since his departure from China. and merchants (perhaps even artisans). which denounced limits and aphorisms of reason. The "rites" -culture-are necessary for socialization. developed the brilliant theory that human nature inclines individuals to satisfy their egoistic appetites: it was therefore bad for advanced societies of the time. The 1973 discoveries at Mawang Dui in Hunan confirmed what scholars had suspected for centuries: the primitive Lao Zi is reversed in respect to strictness that it fears. knights-errant. The poetic power of its writings. noxious five "parasites" or "vermin:" the scholars. The Dao de jing m:1~~ (Classic of the Way and of Power) remains the most often translated Chinese work-and the first translated.g. (Shangjun shu. The "artifice" of the latter may go back to the Confucianism of Xun Zi ffir (Master Xun. explains the fascination that it continues. Modern scholarship estimates that the Lao Zi could not date earlier than the third century B. whom tradition considers a contemporary of Confucius.). Antiquity 13 embodies the idea that the power of the state lies in its prosperity. and this in turn depends on the circulation of goods.D. The Fathers of Taoism.n in the fourth century. without he must cause them to be singly devoted to warfare. (The Book of Lord Shang). Guan Zi stands for a proto-mercantilism diametrically opposed to the primitive physiocraticism of Gongsun Yang 0T*'~ (also known as Shang Yang j{ij ~). These works. gives the Legalist ideas a particularly brutal form: It is the nature of people to measure that which is advantageous to them. to seize the best. which is attributed to Gongsun Yang. ca. also known as Xun Qj. 280-233) that Legalism found its most accomplished formulation. a school rejected by orthodox Confucianism. The book Han Fei Zi contains a commentary on the Classic of the Way and of Power of Lao Zi in which the ideal of Taoist non-action is realized by the automatism of laws. for the population has at its disposal a great number of means to avoid the argumentation was unprecedentedly elaborate. who happens to have been the teacher of Han Fei Zi. and to draw to themselves that which is profitable. examining every facet of a question while avoiding repetition: In a scintillating style peppered with apologues. the Taoists of the following millennium used this story as the basis on which to affirm that the Buddha was none other than their Chinese Lao Zi. if one counts the lost translation into Sanskrit by the monk Xuanzang I§'~ in the seventh century A. "Suan di") Shang Y aug's prose is laden with archaisms.

The ideas of Zhuang Zi have sometimes been compared to nihilism: Master Dongguo questioned Zhuang Zi: "Where. then!" concluded Zhuang Zi. In fact. it is the first part which gives the most lively impression of an encounter with an animated personality whose mind is strangely vigorous and disillusioned: Our life is limited. (Zhuang Zi 22} The work ends with a critical depiction of the "hundred schools. who cut it from fifty-two to thirty-three sections." and the final ten "miscellaneous chapters. in phrases without head or tail. on high in the temple of his ancestors." "The lowest possible?" "In shit and piss!" Master Dongguo could find no reply. taste the flavorless. (Zhuang Zi. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1.14 Chinese Literature. The Taoist attitude toward life is expressed here in admirably striking formulae. To follow the limitless with that which is limited will exhaust one." "I am waiting for you to tell me more exactly. called "the inner chapters. written by Zhuang Zhou )/±)jlfj or Zhuang Zi (Master Zhuang). which emphasizes his sense of humor: He expressed himself in extravagant discourses. "Let me drag my tail in the mud. was apparently abridged at about the same time as the Lao Zi. Scholars cannot agree whether the seven initial sections. Practice non-action. attend to the useless. small words prattle. Whatever it was." Without raising his line or turning his head. Govern a great state as you would fry small fish! (#60}. is found this thing you call the Way (the Tao}?" "It is everywhere. 2} 15 ours: a De dao jing 1!&ffi~ (Classic of Power and the Way)." (Zhuang Zi 17} The Zhuang Zi )1±-=f.000 characters and is divided into 81 sections (9 x 9). the text that is preferred today runs a little over 5. Antiquity Great knowledge encompasses. small knowledge discriminates." "Still more lowly?" "In the shards of tiles." "Get along with you. for (Zhuang Zi. he who speaks does not know (#56}. called "the outer chapters. but at the hands of the commentator Guo Xiang ~~~ (d. (#63} Passages and apologues familiar to every Chinese scholar abound as well in the "outer chapters:" Zhuang Zi was fishing with rod and line in the river Pu when two great officers sent by the King of Chu came toward him: "His majesty hopes to put you in charge of interior affairs. It is curious to read there an evaluation of Zhuang Zi himself." "In the ants. 312). but knowledge is without limit. then. Zhuang Zi replied: "I have heard it said that there is a tortoise sacred to Chu. 3} . wrapped in linen cloth. but without partiality. which is greatly admired for its obscure concision." "More lowly?" "In the millet. Would it rather be dead with honors accorded to its bones or alive but dragging its tail through the mud?" The two great officers replied. "It would rather drag its tail through the mud. Thus it is tenable that the primitive Lao Zi was a work of military strategy." It is in the final ten that we find a characteristic arrangement of reconstructions from the first century. Great words glitter. which lend themselves to many esoteric interpretations: He who knows does not speak. works of one school attributed to one master." are from the same hand of Zhuang Zhou as the sixteen following. seems to owe much to the repair work of the commentator Wang Bi . The king has stored it away in a casket. To go unrelentingly after knowledge is exhausting and can only cause one to rush to his ruin. dead for three thousand years. Its style." parallels of which are found in the Xun Zi and the Han Fei Zi. often too freely.:£585 (226-249). in strange words.

Antiquity 17 The Lie Zi 3/Ur (Master Lie). such as-thanks to Mencius-the anarchists who refused to exploit the work of others and. Ancient and Classical he did not espouse any particular point of view.n (r. which was most violently persecuted during the ephemeral Legalist reign of the Qj. are similarly dated to the eleventh to seventh centuries B. ill. the tuan ~(verdict)." certain commentaries in which have been attributed to Confucius himself. tradition assures us. It was the examination system. has expanded its empire only progressively. harangues. Neither the one nor the other was much concerned with literature in the pure sense. it is first a book of divination. It is no less than a treasury of well-known apologues. a modern version of which was propagated by Mao Zedong. The scholarly doctrine. Over the passage of time. and finally thirteen.C. to whom chapter 32 of the Zhuang Zi is consecrated.C. and not without fits and starts. explains each of the lines of the hexagram. The extant text is the version written in ancient-style characters in fifty chapters. they endeavor to show the . metaphysical considerations of a profound obscurity are sometimes developed. translated by James Legge (1815-1897) under the title The Book of Historical Documents. The Chun qiu '§:tk (Spring and Autumn) is a chronicle of the years 722 to 481 B. the "bible" of a binary method that permits the construction of sixty-four hexagrams derived from the eight basic trigrams. but only in the seventh or eighth century A. the school seems to have assumed from the outset the role of transmitter of The Tradition. nine. The same term designates the Buddhist sutras. according to modern scholarship. arranged in chronological order. The work has fascinated a number of scholars who have been able to satisfy their taste for mystery in it without deserting orthodoxy. The Confucian Classics The word jing f. moral.). later the "Marxist Classics. produced everything with their own hands. Confucius is said to have hidden his judgments in it through the subtle choice of words. can be explained by political. a second paragraph.. a work divisible into 8 parts and nearly 150 sections..iill. The first paragraph following each hexagram. in the state of Lu." which were certainly later additions. reveals the network of meanings. (Zhuang Zi 33) Chapter l. The "Six Classics" are mentioned in the Zhuang Zi.). however.n (221-206 B. Two commentaries. The Yi jing ~f. is of a most heterogeneous character. The documents preserved in the Shu jing wf.16 Chinese Literature. Although this book is written in an extraordinarily laconic style. It has added "ten wings. A number of other schools have left nothing but allusions or fragmentary descriptions which can be discovered in the writings of their adversaries. full or broken-this is the technical part. The world is too muddy to endure serious talk. such as that of "the faith that raised mountains" (see part five. Its attribution to the legendary Lie Yukou 3/Ul!JTI. the classics grew in number to seven.iill means the warp of a fabric: on the woof of the Confucian Classics is woven the cultural unity of China. where Confucius lived. discourses. that made the Confucian school the official ideology of the state. the only work that was not proscribed by the First Emperor of Qj. is unique. 221-210 B...C.C. instituted in the seventh century A. But the work of reconstructing a worn-out tradition was energized from the second century B.D. section three). of which twenty-two are forgeries dating from the third or fourth century B. are said to have been written by individuals named Gongyang and Guliang respectively. is not worthy of serious consideration. The triumph of the Confucian school.C. .iill (Classic of Changes).dluan ~~f$. and social reasons. about whom little else is known.C.D. The book is a collection of memorable speeches. twelve. which appeared toward the end of the second millennium B.C. so it is said. Numerous philosophical or divinatory glosses have been incorporated into it. by the sort of literary influence exercised by these Confucian texts on all cultivated spirits in China for more than two thousand years. In these "wings." With an impetus from Confucius. Gongyang dwan 0$1$ and Guliang . the yao :)t. and instructions. perhaps of a popular nature.

of a fantastic prolixity compared to the dryness of the Chun qiu chronicle itself. or at least it has been so judged by generations of reformers of the imperial regime in search of a utopian model. but it nevertheless occupies a place in literary history for having provided two of the Four Books or Si shu 12. is a composite work nearly three times the size of the Yi li. semiliterate readers. three of which differ from our current text of the Li ji. posthumously Duke] of Huai.C. Each of these commentaries is considered a classic. extracted from this a work of forty-six treatises. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1. The reconstruction of three ritual books. These texts have been the foundation of Chinese primary education since the fourteenth century.~ or Grand Study. This system of rules presented in a series of narratives does not seem to go back beyond the third century B. she angrily said. this book. The Zhou li )jlf]~. attributed to Zuo Qiuming :b:Ji13f!EI and titled Zuo . Dai the Younger. a little-known figure.:ftuan. the ruler of the state of Jin. A dispute with his wives occupies a considerable part of this account-here is an episode: The Earl of Qjn gave five women to him [Chong'er]. Its forty-six chapters are the result of an abridgment of a primitive collection by Dai ~ the Elder. appears to be older. In the first century B. Indignant.911=.. he signaled to her [to retire] when he had finished [with h~s hands still wet]. The first of the Four Books. The principal interest of the Li ji is clearly not literary.. often has only the most distant relationship to the text upon which it comments and is probably composed of fragments of chronicles of other kingdoms. exiled son of Duke Xian l:k.dluan. Together they constitute a systematic description of the social and political organization of the upper classes in ancient society. Why do you treat me in this contemptuous fashion?" The son of the duke was so afraid that he took off his clothes and put on the garb of a prisoner. The Zuo .C. a cousin. The text developed a typically .D.18 Chinese Literature. which is divided into twenty-seven chapters. At the same time. A concern for detail is evident here that presages the Chinese novelists of some two-thousand years later. Dai combined eighty-five treatises on ritual. translated by Edouard Biotin 1851 under the title Rites des Tcheou (Rites of Zhou). describes in detail the ceremonies that punctuated the life of the noble houses. The glosses in these two works appear to date to the third century B. Antiquity 19 positive or negative values in these judgments.. following a brief formal commentary. When she presented him with a pitcher to wash his hands and rinse his mouth. translated with the Chun qiu under the title Spring and Autumn Annals and Tso chuan by James Legge. they were popular books and forbidding texts to their youthful. each of a quite different character. is essentially the treatise that appears as chapter 39 of the Li ji. The Li ji ~~c. Thus the simple mention of the death of a prince of Qi in the eleventh month of the twenty-third year of the reign of Duke Xi {:g of Lu (636 B. translated by James Legge in 1885 (Oxford: Clarendon) under the title Book of Rites.C. can be attributed to the Confucian school. the Da xue lc.) provides an occasion. although it does include some older material. which was edited by the eminent scholar and Neo-Confucian philosopher Zhu Xi*~ (1130-1200). Rules of savoir-faire are expressed with a wealth of impressive detail. is a systematic description of an ideal administration. The Yi li fi~ (rendered as the Book of Etiquette and Ceremonial in the 1917 translation byJohn Steele) is the only one of these three "ritual books" which merits that label from cover to cover. that is to say. Completely different as well from a work such as Leviticus. what adults were intended to study (according to Zhu Xi's interpretation).C. to retrace at length the career of Chong'er ££+.:ftuan :b:~. among them Ying [widow of Yu ofjin. which was edited and reshaped in the second century A. "Qjn andjin are states of the same rank. The third commentary. Traits common to the majority of these anecdotes are the importance attached to the rites which governed the "civilized" peoples of the Early Chou dynasty states and the warfare so often recalled by the Zuo .

Whoever wished to harmonize his family. different versions were recorded in different states. Here Confucius speaks to us in person (although he is referred to simply as "the Master"). 17) The Master said. "Zilu. began by making his will sincere. and that in ancient-style characters). The Confucius that one discovers in the Analects inspired enthusiasm among the rationalist philosophers of the Enlightenment era in the West. to which we will soon return. I am going to teach you what it is to know. Perfecting one's knowledge consists in investigating things and beings. To know is to know what you know and what you do not know." He did not speak of this himself: ~A. based on the edition from the state of Lu (the editors taking into consideration two others versions. first set out to perfect his knowledge. It is only when the will is sincere that the heart and spirit are rectified . The famous response of the Master to Zilu is dictated only by his concern for consecrating his teachings to the conduct his disciples ought to follow in order to serve mankind in serving the state. thus. that of the state of Qj. Legge's translation is based on the inspired commentary of Zhu Xi and returns in the text to the most ancient interpretation of the "true Mean. Whoever wished to rectify his heart and his spirit. not a tyrant: (XI. where "things and beings are examined." The Zhong yong abounds in allusions and citations taken from the other Confucian classics. still not understanding life. even though traditional Confucius advocated modesty rather than agnosticism: (II. It is entitled Zhong yong if:! II. It is only when knowledge is perfected that the will is sincere. when one still doesn't know how to serve man?" "Can I question you about death?" "How could I. began by ordering the reigns in their own states. From the Son of Heaven to the common people. The third of the Four Books. began by cultivating his person. Confucius expresses in this book a grassroots wisdom. . Whoever wished to cultivate his person. in particular from the poetry of the Ski jing. Though he is the patron of the orthodox doctrines of Chinese imperial regimes.D. revered in all of East Asia. It is only after investigating things and beings that knowledge is perfected. began by harmonizing his family. This is knowledge!" Posterity has exalted Confucius to the point of making him a shengren a term without religious implications that could be translated as "saint. Antiquity 21 Confucian reasoning in the form of a sorites. the version used today was established only in the third century A. translated by James Legge as the Doctrine of the Mean. all should apply themselves to cultivating their persons. . Whoever wished to order the reign of his own state. It is only when the state is well governed that the world is at peace. which gives substance to the atheism shared by the majority of Chinese scholars throughout history. as a benevolent ruler. 12) Asked by Zilu about the service of the gods and demons. Those [of the princes] from the past who wished to make their virtue shine brightly under heaven.. the Analects of Confucius or the Lunyu rnH "iiN (Words [of the Master] Arranged in Order). [thus it follows until the conclusion]. is the most prestigious of the Confucian Classics. know of death?" The second of the Four Books comes from chapter 28 of the Li ji.. offered in lively dialogues. of which the second and third part. Whoever wished to make his will sincere. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1. it is not excessive to see a parallel to the Gospels. and that the last five of its "books" are of a separate origin.20 Chinese Literature. began by rectifying his heart and his spirit. Chinese critics have shown that the collection could not have been put together until a generation or more after the Master died. the Master replied. "How can one be adept in this." depict Confucius as similar to a defender of the natural sciences in the nineteenth century. Although these "texts" were probably passed on orally at first.

not of the murder of a sovereign. With whom else should I associate if I give up the company of men? If the world had the Way. "is like swirling water. Confucius].l) "Human nature. ca. but never with a net. There is no more happy formula illustrating the position of Confucius than the following: (VIII. who sighed and said: "One doesn't know how to flock with the birds and beasts. because it held that in some cases tyrannicide was justified: (I. teach them without tiring. It would be good enough to encounter an "honest man. A robber or a violator is only an ordinary person. "virtue." jun::::. if a passage were opened to the west.A." Gao Zi responded.). "The world is everywhere carried along by a wave so powerful that nothing can change its course. The last of the Four Books contains the words of Meng Zi j&-=f {Master Meng. If a passage is opened for it to the east... but is it the same for high and low? Human nature seeks the good as water heads for a low point.Jieni." The moral ideal is that of the "son of the sovereign or lord. If it is shameful to live in poverty and scorn in a country following the good Way. is the jun::::. an ordinary person. .' I call a robber. one of whom. 390-305 B. "Water indeed does not distinguish east from west. He who violates the moral. is supple in the lively discourses presented in the form of dialogues. The "petty man.) to be considered part of the corpus of thirteen works known as the Confucian Classics. talks with Zilu here as he hoes his garden: (XVIII. Its style." (VII." The text of Mencius is probably the most ancient of the philosophic works.8) King Xuan of Qj asked: "Is a subject allowed to assassinate his sovereign?" "He who robs 'goodness." xiaoren 1]\A.is opposite. I would not seek to change it. hide yourself. Legge's rendering of this term as "gentleman" has been followed by most English translators.e.D.i :S-T. I call a violator.. is the cardinal virtue advocated by Confucius. The disciple reported his words to Confucius." how can I claim them? The most that can be said is that I apply myself to them without lassitude." Mencius replied. Human nature does not distinguish good and evil. He did not shoot at perching birds. 6) . The Meng Zi is the only text to have been temporarily excluded from the classics after it had become a part of the corpus-in the fourteenth century it was banned for a time. It has been argued that it is best translated by "altruism. Rather than follow a scholar who keeps fleeing from men [i." But he rejects the extreme inferences that are drawn from the ideas of the hermits. Ancient and Classical (VII. 26) A "saint" I have not had the good fortune to see. if not. wouldn't it be better to follow someone who flees from the world?" Jieni responded to Zilu without ceasing to hoe. Chapter 1. 27) The Master fished with a line.B. But it could flow out as well to the west. There is no man who would not be good. to be rich and honored in an inhumane country is even more so. this work was also the last {seventh century A. I have heard tell of the punishment inflicted on the tyrant Zhou. 23 "Goodness. who is better known by his Latinized title of Mencius. show yourself.C. 13) lfthe world follows the good Way." ren 1=. it rushes there." "humanity.22 Chinese Literature. devoid of archaisms." or. 34) As for the question of "saintliness" or "goodness. Antiquity Not that the "goodness" of the Master did not extend beyond mankind: (VII. very simply. and its argumentation is sustained by the colorful comparisons: (VI.

Long or short the duck-weed: I To the left and right let us take it.000. They also mark the three hundred poems in this collection. according to certain critics.C.-23 A.D. played a completely different role in . one of the most ardent defenders of the classics in ancient characters. The maiden goes into retirement.. preserve for the most part a popular. I Bells and drums welcome her! 25 Completely different from the Analects in its style.@ {Classic of Filial Piety). I Guitars and lutes welcome her! Long or short the duck-weed: I To the left and right let us gather it. a lexicon that classifies words into nineteen categories and can be considered the most ancient Chinese dictionary extant today.@ {Classic of Poetry). fo M. and are sometimes still perceptible when the poems are recited in modern Chinese pronunciation. The same is true when men are pushed to evil. song~ {nos. 235-265)." da ya :k. The maiden goes into retirement. on the rocks. Ask for her. who later became the paragon of orthodoxy: + The 160 poems in the section devoted to the "airs of the [fifteen] states. Long or short the duck-weed: I To the left and right let us seek it." guofeng ~}j\. bi l:t.iffrt {The Thirteen Classics Commented and Expanded Upon). The standard version. Ancient and Classical no water that would not flow downward. but they are often examined in greater depth here. and the description. I A fit mate for the prince. . xing ~. Repetition. There are only three more classics in the thirteen of the standard edition titled Shisan jing z}tushu . Ah! what pain! Ah! what pain! I This way and that we toss and tum. and including odes. introduce some processes recognized as fundamental in the Chinese prosodic tradition. the Er ya 'm _ffi. The hymns. which bookish scholars in subsequent centuries sometimes regarded as primarily a means of enriching their vocabulary of flora and fauna. the Mencius is no less tied to the richness of ideas which Mencius's master Confucius had treated. if it is forced. The "greater odes. seem to have been part of religious rituals. Remaining to be discussed is the most important of the classics from a literary point of view. But the Classic of Poetry. . But is this the nature of water? It adapts itselfto circumstances. Antiquity The Ospreys In harmony the ospreys cry I In the river. if it is struck." xiao ya 1}_ffi {numbers 161-234). and love songs. or the comparisons drawn from nature. which is also the only complete text to have reached us. Of course. The first of these is the Xiao jing ~f. songs of minor celebrations. it will climb hills. useless quest.C. and assonance are the common characteristics of popular songs throughout the world. stretching.. includes a commentary of moral and political interpretations attributed to a certain Mao Heng =§-? in the third century B.C. 1911). I Day and night let us think of her. The maiden goes into retirement.. water will splash higher than the forehead. refrain. rhythm. celebrate the major occasions. The 305 poems in this anthology were said to have been chosen by Confucius from among more than 3. Recourse to metaphorical evocation. oral tradition. the Shi jing ~f. The edition is said to have been transcribed by Liu Xin ~jj'JX {50 B. Love is the theme of the first poem in the collection {here the rendering is based on the French of Marcel Granet's Festivals and Songs of Ancient China {Fetes et chansons anciennes de laChine]. particularly the accompanying war dances. in some of the prestigious poems. The maiden goes into retirement. which also seems to be the case for the "lesser odes. from the twelfth to the fifth centuries B. 266-305).ffi {nos. hymns. a relatively late pamphlet which does not have much more literary importance than the second of this trio.24 Chinese Literature.::=:#&B:. I Day and night let us ask for her.). The anthology contains pieces of greatly differing dates and genres. the interpretation here goes back to that of Zhu Xi {1130-1200)." Chapter 1.

allow you to protest. and trees. . One time when I found him alone and I was hurrying across the courtyard. 1962. William Theodore deBary and Irene Bloom (2"d ed. trans. Antiquity 27 antiquity. this is a good. was already emphasizing the double role of the Classic ofPoetry as both a literary and a diplomatic sourcebook in the Analects: (XVII. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. basic introduction. The appropriate sections of Sources of Chinese Tradition. Kierman. and Er ya. Berkeley: University of California Press. New York: Ballantine Books. 1965. sino. Early Chinese Literature. Chun qiu-Zuo <}zuan. contain nearly a half-million words-the basis of a literary training that should not be underestimated. Yi li. ed. it was a treasure-trove of much of the culture common to the Chinese "confederation" and was often cited by gentlemen in ancient times to make a political point. as if the Master was already aware that he was transmitting a common cultural fund. Cho-yun. Although sections are dated. Gongyang <}zuan. Indiana Companion in the entries below refers to The Indiana Companion to Traditional Chinese Literature. "No.htm) and the Internet Guide for Chinese Studies. volumes 1 and 2 (Bloomington: Indiana University press. uniheidelberg. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Lunyu. Ski jing. the texts themselves. Li ji. Zhou li. The Cradle of the East.de/igcs). are also highly recommended. Watson. 'Not yet. Filled with moral and political allusions.26 Chinese Literature. 1975. And you will learn there the names of a good number of birds. Yi jing. The Origins of Chinese Civilization.' I responded. 1978. 13} Chen Kang asked the son of Confucius if his father had given him special instructions. World-Wide Web Virtual Library sponsored by Australia National University and Heidelberg University (http:/ I sun. Guliang </luan. 1986 and 1998). trans. New York: Columbia University Press. Sun-tzu: The Art of Warfare. plants. Henri. New York: Columbia University Press. Burton.aasianst. China in Antiquity. 1993. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. . 1983."' Suggested Further Reading A number of on-line resources of relevance can be found by consulting the Association for Asian Studies "Asia Resources on the World Wide Web" (http:/ /www. Confucius. Hsii.. Meng Zi. 9} My children. Frank A. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1. We are assured that Confucius did his best to cite the Poems without recourse to his dialectal pronunciation. why do you neglect studying the Poems? The Poems will allow you to stimulate. Xiao jing. the thirteen classics. 1998). allow you to observe. which every candidate for the civil service examinations after the fourteenth century had to know by heart. Keightley. he asked me if I had studied the Poems. Ancient China in Transition. Ping-ti. Shu jing. allow you to keep company. David N. 'Without studying them. in fact. Roger. total nearly six million characters. With the glosses and regulation commentaries. (XVI. The Hundred Schools of Thought Ames.org/asiawww. Maspero.. beasts. Antiquity Ho. you will not know how to express yourself..

i: Political. 1994. .i. 1994. Robert. Allyn. D. The Chinese Classics. Penguin: Harmondsworth. London: Allen and Unwin. 1985. LeBlanc. Legge. trans. Stockholm: Institute of Oriental Languages. The Confucian Classics Brooks. Watson. Tao Te Ching: The Classic Book of Integrity and the Way-An Entirely New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Manuscripts. trans. Bernhard. In Indiana Companion. 1934. Waley. Watson. RichardJohn. Four. Burton. New York: Ballantine Books. D. Lundahl. 1994. Hsiin tzu. "Ching"(Classics). trans. 1998. Michael. C. and Han-fti tzu. 1985 and 1997. 1997. In Indiana Companion.:. 4. C. trans. Before ConfUcius: Studies in the Creation of the Chinese Classics. _. John S. The Analects. Antiquity 29 "Chuang Tzu. University of California. 1993. Bertil. 1967. trans. 1950. Berkeley. New York: Columbia University Press. New York: Columbia University Press. Tao and Method. Han Fei Zi. Charles. trans. "Tso chuan"(Tso Documentary). 1992. trans. Huai-Nan Tzu: Philosophical Synthesis in Early Han Thought. Oxford: Clarendon Press. The Analects ofConfocius. I: 804-806. Ancient and Classical Chapter 1. Chuang t.. Rickett. Te-Tao Ching. Albany: SUNY Press. 1979. Arthur. 3 vols. trans. Waley. Loewe. 1937. Stockholm: Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. The Classic ofChanges: A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi. New York: Columbia University Press. "Chu-tzu pai-chia" (The Various Masters and the Hundred Schools). Mair. Heaven and Earth in Early Han Thought: Chapters Three. Burton. Bruce. Lao Tzu-Tao Te Ching. The Original Analects: Sayings of ConfUcius and His Successors.u. James. Chichung. New York: Bantam Books. The Book of Odes. The Way and Its Power. 1992. trans. Early Chinese Texts: A Bibliographic Guide. In Indiana Companion. Economic and Philosophical Essays from Early China-A Study and Translation. Michael. Karlgren.:.Harmondsworth: Penguin. Guan. trans. 1993. I: 692-694. the Man and the World. Xunzi: A Translation and Study of the Complete Works. New York: Columbia University Press. In Indiana Companion. Knoblock. Edward L. "In Indiana Companion. trans. _. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Lynn. II: 20-26. 1968. New York: Macmillan. W. 1997. Taeko Brooks.The Book of Songs. 12990. Shaughnessy. "Shih ching"(Classic of Poetry). I: 336-343. Berkeley: The Society for the Study of Early China and the Institute of East Asian Studies. and Five of the Huainan. trans. A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching. 2 vols. Lau. Vol. E. Lao Tzu. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press. Basic Writings ofMo tzu. The Analects of ConfUcius: A Literal Translation with an Introduction and Notes. Lafargue. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1988. 1990. 1893-1895. 1938. New York: Columbia University Press. with A. trans. Arthur. Major. Stockholm East Asian Monographs. Lao Tzu. 1990. Victor H. Princeton: Princeton University Press. The Tso Chuan: Selections from China's Oldest Narrative History. London: Allen and Unwin.28 Chinese Literature. trans.:. I: 309-316. Albany: SUNY Press... Albany: SUNY Press. 1963. Lau. Huang. Henricks. John..

woven with literary allusions. wen )(. "substance" or "substantial. Was this a coincidence? The same word. Prose "If poetry is intended to express the sentiments and the will while communicating the emotions." Such a literary doctrine could be extracted from the texts transmitted by or commented on by Confucius." and even more to appreciate them. shi ~' which was of necessity "ornate. a descriptive evocation in rhythmic prose-are closer to poetry. or the fo M (rhapsody or prose-poem).D.Chapter 2.!fr#)(. judgments and other occasional works which are abundantly represented in the anthologies and collected works . They are truly accessible only to the disappearing breed of scholars who have had a traditional-style education. The frontiers that separate the two great domains of prose and poetry are poorly defined. To translate such texts.). Rhyme and assonance are also not limited to verse. the role of prose is to communicate ideas. distinguished from it only by the priority accorded the container over the contents." Literary realities respond only imperfectly to this scheme." in opposition to poetry. a time that has come to be called the Period of Disunion {180-589 A. which are overloaded with "ornamentation. is nearly impossible. nothing more." Wen in this latter sense was juxtaposed to dti J!r. Rhythm. tributes. But wen in a restricted sense has come to designate prose dedicated to the simplicity of the "substantial." to become the two lines of opposing force in traditional literary criticism. is essential to artistic prose.D. normally associated with poetry. The same is true for all of the "mandarin genres"-dissertations. This utilitarian conception of literature in the service of morality would be called into question in the third century A." can also mean "ornate" or "refined. when the imperial unity of the Han dynasty disintegrated into a number of statelets. the sense of which has evolved from "writing" to "literature. The genres in parallel prose-pian wen .

an's material.an R]}~}l (ca. many of which have become widely regarded as major works of classical Chinese prose. Prose 33 of individual authors. compiled in 1799 by Yao N ai tfl5® (1732-1815). with representative poetic genres also included. eclipsed by the Wen xuan )(~ (A Selection of Literature) compiled by Xiao Tong lft. was able to produce a work quite different from its obvious Greek counterparts.n and Han dynasties. One such book is the Mu Tianzi z.huanf~~T~ (Chronicle of the Son of Heaven Mu). Most often these included pieces were judgments or elegies. Sima Qj. the Guwenguanzhitl)(fill: (The Major Works of Ancient Prose). the pieces they contained were called sanwen ~)(." The Songwen jian *)(~ (Mirror of Song Prose)." in contrast to the prosodic regulations of pianwen ~)(. 279." dedicated to the dynasties of earlier times and the emperors of the more recent Qj. This seems an ideal place to mention the importance of the anthologies that followed one after the other from the third century A. Many factors ensure these narrative texts an important place in the history of belles lettres.D. I." eight "monographs. Mter twelve "basic annals. there are ten "chronological tables. which was nothing less than the history of the world as it was then known. each piece in which was selected because of its literary brilliance. the outstanding model for reconstructing the history of an imperial regime is a work that has fascinated scholars in the two thousand years since it was written. This work is the Shi ji :. It was the twelfth century before the first anthologies devoted exclusively to prose appeared.an's Shi ji. that by Du Yu i±ffl (222-284). Finally. Because of the huge number of such works that have been written over the centuries. have come down to us.1E (501-531). 85 B. Together they constitute the finest texts of classical Chinese prose of the last two millennia. Sima Qj.32 Chinese Literature.an. the work most often cited is Sima Qj. The most ancient. despite the lack of support for this classification in traditional assessments. 145-ca.e~a (Records of the Grand Historian). the Mingwen haif!Jj)($ (The Ocean ofMing Prose).C." thirty chapters on the "hereditary houses" (including the "house of ." that is to say. and which relates the fantastic voyages of its hero. with preference given to those which remain "classical. until modern times. a number of eminent writers participated in the compilation of these historical works or had their own pieces included in them. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2. "parallel" or "harnessed prose. which was discovered in a tomb in A.C. and most important. has been lost. First. next to the excerpts from Zuo's commentary to the Chun qiu. those which are taught in the schools and read by the public at large in annotated editions often paired with versions "translated" into modern Chinese. other narrative texts dating from a time later than the burning of the books in 213 B. "free" or "dispersed prose. the most important collection is the anthology compiled by Huang Zongxi ll*ii (1610-1695). Among them are texts which have been labeled early novels by some modern critics. to a certain extent they fill the void caused by the lack of an epic in Chinese literature. only a very incomplete picture of these genres can be presented.).D. by Lii Zuqian §::f_§_iif (1137-1181). Second. a work which for a long time provided many of the texts memorized by mandarins for the examination competition. Narrative Art and Historical Records Besides the Zuo commentary to the Chun qiu. written by China's Herodotus. is a limited selection of 220 extracts. The Shi ji offers an original organization of Sima Qj. The Guwenci leizuan tl)(Wf~!HI~ (Collection by Category of Ancient Prose and Poetry). for example. however. and its sequels were enormously successful with scholars. The most popular of the anthologies remaining today was published in 1695 by two cousins named Wu Chucai ~~:ft and Wu Diaohou~Wli]§~. and which served as a model for the many anthologies that included both prose and poetry. of which. For the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). is a collection of the best pieces produced by Song-dynasty authors (960-1279) during the first two centuries of the Song reign.

masking their criticisms with witty remarks. without even an inch of territory. After five years he finally lost his state. What Chinese scholars have read between the lines in Sima Qj. who proclaimed himself Hegemon King. took advantage of the situation and rose in arms from the farming fields. because the material about one man or one event is often scattered through several chapters. Could it be that Xiang Yu was his descendant? How sudden was his rise! When Qj. and men of power and distinction rose like a swarm of wasps. The passage recounting the final battle between Xiang Yu and Liu Bang at Gaixia and the pathos of Xiang Yu's last stand are particularly celebrated accounts.an lived. The historian's preface to the chapter on jesters justifies the inclusion of such a chapter: . The Records ofthe Grand Historian also made room for the comedians who often played the role of jester for the princes. were mostly compiled by bureaus of history and are thereby devoid of personality." There has never been a Chinese historian who was not also very nearly a novelist. He called his enterprise that of a Hegemon King." and "Favorites and Minions. Allowing for some reorganization. full of resentment for the feudal lords rebelling against him. The most remarkable example is the treatment of minor figuresin collective biographies under labels such as "The Harsh Officials'. and because the treatment of some men and events lacks balance. this was the structure followed by all the subsequent official dynastic histories. divide up the world. most of which after the fifth century A. and a talent for storytelling that masterfully combines discourse and narrative. and enfeoff kings and marquises. What error! To excuse himself by claiming "Heaven destroyed me.n lost control of the government.'' "The Redressers of Wrongs. he was sentenced to be castrated for lese majesty in the defense of his friend.). and finally seventy "biographies.n (r." Is this not madness? 35 Confucius").an reappears in many of the biographies in the fmal seventy chapters of the Records of the Grand Historian.n. a resistance masked by a resonant restraint. however. What difficulties he put himself in! He made a show of his own knowledge. Then Xiang Yu turned his back on the "land within the Passes" to embrace Chu. never learning from the ancients. Prose great to count. struggling with each other in numbers too The pathos of the storyteller Sima Qj.C. All political power emanated from Xiang Yu. 221-210 B. Thus Xiang Yu ~3J51. which recounts Jing Ke's near-assassination of the future First Emperor of Qj. the father of the Grand Historian who began this great enterprise-or blame him.an's history is a deep resentment of imperial tyranny-in 99 B. The reader appreciates in Sima Qj. Even though he was unable to hold this position until the end.D. who was guilty of having allowed himself to be captured alive by the barbarian Xiongnu. 110 B. repeated in the theater and in a number of other popular genres. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2. Even when he died alone at Dongcheng. This can be clearly seen in one of the biographies collected in the chapter on assassins." Perhaps one should credit this arrangement to Sima Tan ~'~~ (d. and I have also heard that Xiang Yu had eyes with double pupils. It also figures notably in the chapters devoted to foreign countries or peoples. it was not any fault of mine in employing troops. Chinese Literature. the unlucky rival of Liu Bang ~~*~' who founded the Han dynasty under which Sima Qj. The historian's "elegy" that closes the long biographical account of Xiang Yu is a piece fit for an anthology: I have heard Master Zhou say that Shun [our model emperor] has eyes with double pupils. was given a "basic annals" although he never ruled the empire. intending to manage the world by means of mighty campaigns. He banished the Righteous emperor and enthroned himself.C.34.C.an's historical accounts.) in 227 B. and in the subtle arrangement of the stories.C. Xiang Yu. he did not come to his senses and blame himself. Within three years he led the five feudal lords to annihilate Qj. Chen She was the first to cause difficulties. his deeds are unprecedented. the general Li Ling$~.

The (Classic of) Ritual is employed to control the people. the epistolary genre was one of the most open. Why is this? It is so because of the modesty of the position I had established myself in. to prevent him from being cruel and irascible. What is the point of vexing the nature of these creatures to please our own? As for tying a dragonfly to a hair or attaching a thread to a crab to make a plaything for a child. if any. My father did not reach the stage of holding the seals and investitures of a high dignitary. are incapable of embodying the compassionate heart of Heaven.. the (Classic of) Poetry works toward expressing one's ideas. The world would not compare me with those who died to retain their honor. a vehicle used by the most eminent writers in China to address serious subjects. Sima Tan.. Before my draft was completed.an's personality as his "Letter in Reply to Ren An. Every man assuredly has only a single death. It is difficult to make a common person understand.an). Regretting that it was incomplete caust. it would simply consider that.. allowing the writer to broach all subjects. it would have made no more difference than the loss of a hair from a herd of cows. having exhausted every clever method. who are the most noble of creatures." said the Grand Astrologer (and chronicler." said Confucius. Heaven and earth have begot these creatures.. and the chronicle of Spring and Autumn works toward righteousness." Chapter 2. Even were I to suffer ten thousand humiliations. how could I feel regret [as long as I complete my history]! But this can only be said to those who understand [the situation]. Chronicles and the calendar placed him close to fortune-tellers. But if we men. sometimes lighter than a goose feather-the difference lies in the use to which it is put. Lacking the power to make their concept of the Way prevail.36 Chinese Literature. There is nothing in life which displeases me as much as keeping birds in a cage. Chinese women left letters. Prose posterity . We look for pleasure while they are in prison." one of the most famous works of the epistolary genre. "aim at the same goal-to govern well. this is merely to condemn them to be mutilated and die in a moment. The Emperor on High also cherishes them with his heart. let all these authors report the events of the past while thinking about their Although few. If I had submitted to the law and suffered execution. the (Classic of) Music works toward developing harmony.f&~.d me to confront without indignation the most ignominious of tortures. so that it can be spread throughout the cities and the capital.. the (Classic of) Documents works toward guiding affairs of state. I would not be able to escape from the enormity of my crime and that in the end I had no choice but to die. no more difference than the death of an ant. "Isn't it huge? And yet the 'trifling words' [of the jesters] can sometimes hit the mark. 1693-1765) left a series of famous letters addressed to his younger brother: Having been able to have a son only at age fifty two. from the most serious to the most intimate. A death is sometimes more weighty than Mount Tai. father of Sima Qj. The famous painter of bamboo Zheng Xie ~~ {best known by his hao Banqiao . on whom can the ten thousand creatures rely? .. often for an intended audience far beyond a single addressee: It is not easy to explain the affair [that led to my castration] to ordinary people point by point.. how could I not love him? It is rather a question of loving him in a good way. Ancient and Classical "The Six Classics. Even in games and amusements it is necessary to make him honest and kindly. 37 No document is as revealing of Sima Qj. among those with whom the sovereign took his pleasure-the comedians whom he nourished and whom the common people hold in contempt. the (Classic of) Changes works toward uplifting the soul. . I was struck by misfortune. If I truly get to finish writing it.." "Vast is the Way of Heaven. at once atoning for the disgrace of my humiliation. transformed and nourished them with great effort. it will be hidden in a "famous mountain" and handed on to those who will appreciate it.

. This work. While I am only your ignorant servant. Not to mention that he has been dead for so long-how could [this bone] be allowed to enter the palace? . How could such a sage. This was in marked contrast to the opinions espoused by Han Yu ~~ (768-824).. It begins with the education of children. is comprehensive. which is deemed indispensable for everyone but prodigies. easy to beguile and difficult to enlighten. which in his eyes was as useless as Taoism. 806-820) in 819. enlightened ruler believe in such affairs? However. 39 II.. my heart crushed. Further. I am convinced that Your Majesty neither has been beguiled by the Buddha nor would worship him in order to seek blessings. If the Buddha were still alive today. but that [this celebration] is because of the joy among the people at the It can be assumed that his remonstrance exceeded normal limits: after having nearly been executed for his lese majesty. but with the added detriment of having barbarian origins. they will say that you are serving the Buddha with a sincere devotion ..38 Chinese Literature. nor was his dress similar to ours. reproaching him for honoring a relic of the Buddha. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2." guwen yundong r!:J::Z~liW (the ancient-prose movement). orders have been given to all the monasteries to go in succession and offer sacrifices to it. may they listen to the warning of the prefect. perfected the ideas of Confucius. For Buddha was originally a barbarian who did not speak the languages of China.(3.. it would be by no more than a single audience in the Reception Hall for Foreign Guests. he took fewer risks in his exile in Chaozhou by asking that the crocodiles evacuate the local river under his domain: Though weak and feeble. Han Yu was banished to the extreme southeastern part of China. reads as follows: I hear that Your Majesty has ordered Buddhist monks to accompany a [finger-joint] bone of the Buddha from Fengxiang. I would beg that this bone be handed over to the authorities. seeing that he was provided with guards until he left our borders so as not to allow him to beguile the masses. who can be excused from it. according to Y an. If they see Your Majesty act like this. . divided into twenty sections. trembling in fear. to be thrown into water or fire. the common people are ignorant.. Prose plentiful harvest. who proclaimed the necessity of faith. devoted an entire section to the defense and illustration of the doctrines of Sakyamuni. I lower my head to the crocodiles. Y an Zhitui. in order to barely manage to survive. The principal argument of the report that Han Yu submitted to Emperor Xianzong (r. illustrating its advice with anecdotes and adopting a personal tone. Under these circumstances I cannot but discuss the situation with the crocodiles. and Your Majesty would have granted to receive him." which modem critics have made into a "movement. Moreover. and the present of a suit of clothes. If they are endowed with intelligence. and that you aim to observe the procession which will bring the relic into the palace from a tower. who. The simplicity of the style of his Yanshi jiaxun ~. The Return of the "Ancient Style" "Family instruction manuals" were written in the style of letters to the family. Your Majesty is complying with the people's heartfelt wishes to set up this unusual spectacle for the populace of the capital as a means of amusement. the first advocate to call for a return to ancient-style prose. . Han was one of the forerunners of a philosophical movement known as NeoConfucianism that blossomed in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. so that the doubts in the empire are resolved. and morons. . and had received the orders of his state to come to the capital as an envoy to court. . and he was violently hostile to Buddhism. I have received orders from the Son of Heaven to come here and carry out the duties of the prefect. the beguilement of future generations nipped in the bud.%[11[ (Family Instructions for the Yan Clan) heralded the return of "ancient-style prose. who would not profit from it. The most representative of these works is by Yan Zhitui ~~ fit (531-ca. to forever destroy its root and base. 590). thereby dishonoring myself before the people and my subordinates.

Liu concludes: .. "Tip of the Brush." in which he compares the emperor's casting away a worn-out brush that served him long and loyally to the abandonment of a loyal official who grows old and begins to lose his hair. Nevertheless. who neither listen to nor understand the words of the prefect. he would have no means to deploy his divine power. without intelligence. it shall be in five. as well as the unintelligent beasts. "the prefecture of the Tides. Now. but by other factors. Ironically." that is to say. If seven days are not sufficient. Fengjian lun MJiffifH (On Feudalism). it is not that which the clouds have made. As the Classic of ~hanges says. The prefectural system is superior to the feudal society that it eliminated. "The clouds follow the dragon. This discourse supports an evolutionary thesis inspired by a rather unorthodox Confucianism. Han Yu and Liu Zongyuan head the list of "eight great prose writers of the Tang and Song dynasties" and form a pair that critics have enjoyed juxtaposing and comparing. neither obeying him nor moving away to avoid him.40 Chinese Literature. the crocodiles would arrive in the evening. Ancient and Classical The ocean is located to the south of Chaozhou. as Han Yuhas revealed elsewhere. have had enduring fame.. whom he had strongly supported. the other influential ancient-style prose advocate of the Tang dynasty (618-907). to the smallest shrimp or crab. 805)." The vast sea can give life and nourishment to all who return to it. Could it be that the clouds themselves are also efficacious? The epitaph and the funeral inscription that Han Yu composed for Liu Zongyuan .. clouds which assuredly are no more efficacious than the dragon. As for the efficacity of the dragon. he emits lightning and thunder. Prose The clouds are that which the dragon is able to make efficacious. In the piece that follows. pro-Legalist campaign of the last phase of the Great Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) valued him highly. which veils the sun and the moon. Or that the crocodiles are ft{olish animals. His best-known works come from this period. Liu Zongyuan was as open to Taoist and Buddhist ideas as he was to those of Legalism. including his satirical biography of a certain Mao Ying :f. he merely survived it.. from the largest being like the whale and the rock. But the dragon mounts this exhalation. all these may be put to death . and through divine transformations causes water to fall on the earth. Let me make a pact with them: before three days have passed. if the dragon were not able to reach the clouds. If it is not possible in five days. then. which exhausts the immensity of the celestial mystery. Han allows us to savor the ironic ambiguity of an allegory also aimed at the sovereign and his scholars: The dragon exhales a sigh which turns into clouds. they must take their horrible mob south to the sea. but it is not in response to human will that society is carried toward a confederacy of chiefdoms and finally devoted to a supreme authority in the person of the Son of Heaven (or emperor). glistening between the darkness and the light. so as to avoid the officer appointed by the Son of Heaven." 41 This petition that accompanied the offerings to the crocodiles is to be read with tongue in cheek.f][. Holding to a much less militant brand of Confucianism. The anti-Confucian. some were sinecures that allowed him the time to foster his literary career.fPP*:JC (773-819). it will be clear that they refuse to move and have not accepted the presence of the prefect or listened to his entreaties. The crises of those governments that employed the prefectural system were caused not by the system. He would certainly not know what to do without this support. "The dragon is that which follows the clouds. Necessity pushes humans to organize themselves into societies for survival and self-protection. Strange! For this support is his own emanation. drenching hills and valleys. If this is not possible in three days. Chapter 2. In disgrace after the abdication of Emperor Shunzong (r. whoever scorns the officer appointed by the Son of Heaven. Confucius did not choose the feudal system. Liu Zongyuan was exiled almost continually to minor posts in the far south. giving him star billing and particularly praising his discourse on the feudal regime. By departing in the morning. harmful to the people and to other creatures. they shall be accorded seven.

a pack of dogs approached. his descriptions of excursions. the dogs all did what the man wanted. Only after causing those who are worthy to occupy the positions above. They wait until they are completely trusted and maintain this trust by frightening the ruler with omens. daily become more familiar. becoming increasingly intimate.42 Chinese Literature. Women are no more than sexual objects. When sages and worthies are born in this time. does not arise from a single cause. They are able to win favor because of a small talent. so they would get used to his showing it to them. those who are before and behind him." was also the person who "rediscovered" Han Yu's writing. he let them play with it. It would butt heads with them and lie down with them. those who are before and behind him. which had been eclipsed by a revival of the parallel-prose style (especially at court) in the late ninth and tenth centuries. can you achieve order and peace. the deer went outside the gate. As the fawn slowly grew up. But from time to time they would lick their chops. As they entered through his gate. and those who are unworthy those below. It is in his fables. "The feudal system was not the Sage's concept. To achieve order through hereditary succession. The dogs feared their master and were docile and friendly to it. however. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2. After a time. Although the ruler has loyal ministers and eminent scholars arrayed in his court. a native of Liujiang [in modern Jiangxi] captured a fawn which he decided to raise. the Way of the governing throughout the world generates either order or chaos among the people. The man was angry and rebuffed them. the distressing story of the fawn of Liujiang: In the course of a hunt. 43 Now. the grantable fiefs will be exhausted. do not those above indeed have to be worthy and those below indeed unworthy? Yet how order and chaos are generated in men is something that cannot be understood. especially those in which he justified the formation of political factions (through which the good could drive away the bad) and that on the eunuchs. The noxiousness of the eunuchs. for example. that Liu Zongyuan appears more captivating than the severe Han Yu. the feudal regime achieves order through the hereditary succession of positions. the third of the "eight prose masters. Thenceforth he would carry the deer to the dogs. Now. to secure affection . For this reason. Gradually. revealing the difficult position of the scholars: That eunuchs have brought chaos to states since ancient times has its origins deep in the misfortunes caused by women. Prose After three years. he finds them too distant and prefers to rely on those intimates with whom he spends his daily life and takes his meals. strewing the remains along the road. the loyal ministers and eminent scholars daily become more estranged. How could it be that what the Sage [Confucius] determined for governing was reached in this? I would claim. these other dogs went into a frenzy. The fawn went to its death without being enlightened. to his left and his right. it ran to play with them. salivating and wagging their tails. while he forbade them to move. there is indeed nowhere to establish them [with fiefs]-this is the result of the feudal system. which appeared in the dynastic New History of the Five Dynasties that he edited. Ouyang's "discourses" are among the most appreciated of his prose works. Seeing a large pack of dogs along the road." The statesman Ouyang Xiu W\~f~ (1007-1072). and the ruler's position daily becomes more isolated. joining together to kill and devour it. When they saw it. it was his situation. it forgot it was a deer and believed the dogs were its good friends. If one desires to profit the altars of a state. It may be that in being employed in official positions they are close to the sovereign and become familiar with him or that in their thinking they are single-minded and patient. to his left and his right. one must unify that which the people of that state see and hear. because of a small act of faith. . if there are furthermore hereditary nobles living from the emoluments of hereditary fiefs.

A simple beverage of fermented rice is enough to make one feel good. 45 Examiner-in-chief for the "doctoral examinations" of 1057. and Gongxi Hua were seated in attendance on Confucius. they should be widely avoided. are of little interest to the modern reader. Zeng Xi. He was going to kill a man. including his patron Ouyang Xiu.' If you did find someone to appreciate them. whose "severe style" has not served him well in the opinion of posterity. Su Xun ~71IT (1009-1055). Su Shi might also be considered the precursor of a genre in which the original character of Chinese civilization at its best was depicted-the xiaopin wen 1hrbJc or "essay on minor subjects"-as the opening passage from his "Chaoran Tai ji" lm~lf§tl (Notes on the Terrace of Transcendence) illustrates: All things merit observation. that on the literary stage. when there is doubt about giving penalties.As the commentary says. because they did not recognize the allusion. "When there is doubt about giving rewards.(1039-1112). Ran You. fruits and vegetables can satisfy the appetite. For this reason the people of the world feared the firmness with which Gao Yao enforced the law and delighted in the leniency with which Yao applied punishments. they questioned the laureate about his source. This can be seen in the following passage from the dissertation entitled "Xing shang zhong hou zhi zhi lun" JfU:i:Ji!. to demonstrate the care with which punishments are applied. This greatly intrigued the examiners. Ouyang Xiu promoted three of the other "eight great prose writers:" his friend Zeng Gong ~'1: (1019-1063). Gao Yao was the Minister ofjustice. The passage. It is clear. It is not necessary that they be rare or marvelous. The Master said. To follow this line of reasoning. in the view of his "master" Ouyang Xiu. You say among yourselves. Prose "Pardon him" three times. they should be given widely to demonstrate the royal grace. Su Shi ~$:\ (103 7-11 01). After allowing Su Shi to pass high on the list of graduates. The Golden Age of Trivial Literature Scorned by the ancients as well as the moderns. because of their topicality. The genre could nevertheless claim a respectable ancestry. what would you wish to do?'» ! t I i i 3The implied subject of "appreciating talents" would be the lord of a state . 'No one appreciates my talents.Jlj[iL ~Mil (On the Penalties and Rewards of Perfecting Loyalty and Generosity). however. and since they merit it they are all sources of potential joy. Su Shi eclipsed them all. beautiful or imposing.44 Chinese Literature. "Kill him" three times. The shackles of a rigid Confucianism were cheerily ignored by a spirit enamored with moral and intellectual freedom. but they would not admit to the gap in their memories. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2. Gao Yao said. in which superb poetry vies with his prose writings. about a sage ancient ruler contains what seemed a certain allusion to one of the classics. scarcely twenty years old.:£~:0 (1021-1086). Numbers seven and eight on the list are the father of the precocious geniuses." In Emperor Yao's time. and the politician Wang Anshi . most famous for his radical reforms and related prose writings.. and Su's younger brother Su Che ~. The question is how to evaluate Su's vast and varied collected works. which. having commenced with a narrative about Confucius which closes chapter 11 of the Analects: Zilu. which distinguished the examination papers of Su Shi. the free essays in the xiaopin wen form enjoyed their greatest popularity during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. and Su Shi acknowledged that the anecdote about the largesse of the sage king Y ao ~ was his own invention! . "Forget for a moment that I am your elder. where could I go that I would not be happy? ill. Yao said.

Ancient and Classical Zilu quickly responded: "Give me a country of one thousand chariots situated between two great countries. which was increasingly found in the Lower Yangtze Valley. A young wife mourning her husband. XVII. The filthy talk of the marketplace. VIII. what about you?" Ran You replied. "My choice differs from those of the other three. 813-858). and replied. however. Annoying things: 1. To write bareheaded. But it was not the center of culture or intellectual activity. The return of ancient-style prose in the eleventh century was a straightforward demand for liberty and spontaneity. A poor Persian. ravaged by famine under the pressure of enemy troops." "And you. each is expressing his own ambition. Prose I. 7. Incongruities: 1. 8. to enjoy the breeze. the new capital at Beijing again became the focus of power under the reign of the Yongle emperor (1403-1424). within three years the people would be well off. A butcher reciting sutras. Scolding another's servants. To eat lying down. Adherents of the type of straightforward prose that Han Yu and Liu Zongyuan advocated now revived the earlier arguments." The Master heaved a sigh of approval: "I am with you. 47 " tI '" ''" " . Like a tiger." "Zeng Xi. but I am ready to learn. 5. polarized by the question of whether to imitate the ancients. 9. what about you?" A final note died from his lute." in the words of Su Shi. then Zeng Xi put the lute aside." The Master sighed and said.Was this a result of the trauma of thejurchen and then Mongol incursions from the eleventh through the thirteenth centuries? Under the Mongols (Yuan dynasty. I would like to go to bathe in the river accompani~d by five or six men and six or seven youths. ·." The Master said. Women cursing in public. 1279-1368).. XIX. a work which toward the year 1000 perhaps inspired the celebrated Pillowbook of the Japanese authoress Sei Shonagon ii:Y%il'!§. Witness the Zazuan *IE. and Hangzhou.46 Chinese Literature. Carrying a torch in the moonlight. 4. After the restoration of Chinese rule in the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). Cutting with a blunt knife. XXXIII: Unlucky: 1. If I were in charge. attributed incorrectly to the poet Li Shangyin $J:llilll (ca. Adults flying kites. (Miscellanies). As for rites and music. it emerged "as water surges forth. I am ready to serve as a minor assistant. Suzhou." Chapter 2. "Ran You. 4. as the following examples from the Miscellanies suggest: who would then employ the man he saw as talented. around the traditional centers of Nanjing. Building a wall that hides the mountains. "What harm is there in that? After all. Resemblances: 4. If I were in charge. the entire country was for the first time entirely under the rule of alien conquerors. 4. within three years I would give its people courage and put them back on their feet. They advocated seeking inspiration . Raising chopsticks before the host asks people to start eating. Technique (fa$) was servant to inspiration (yi ~). XXX: Contemporary crazes: 6. stood up [in respect]. XXXIX: Lapses: 2. "Give me a state of twenty to thirty miles square." "At the end of spring. Spoiling the fun: 3. whenever a magistrate moves. or even fifteen to twenty miles square. in the clothes appropriate to that season. Gongxi Hua?" "I cannot say that I already have the ability [to rule]. XXIV: (The Power of) Suggestion: 1.. that would have to await a gentleman. Wearing green gauze in winter makes one feel cold. Cliques formed among these intellectuals. 8. Heavy curtains suggest someone lurking. and to return home singing. XX: Cannot bear to hear: 2. In carrying out the affairs of worship in the ancestral temple or in diplomatic gatherings. II~ l~ The spirit of xiaopin wen existed long before the term was applied to the literary mode that prevailed among scholars at the end of the sixteenth century. Spreading a mat on moss. he injures people.

That is why in my eyes all literature is related to water. It hurtles down all at once. I close my gate and arrange my thoughts. "It is not a matter of water in the strict sense. however. The following passage is from his "You Wutai Shan riji" m11. or SuShi. . Intelligibility is the measure of quality literature .-1: LlJ B ~c {A Diary of Roaming through the Five Terrace Mountains): i}N. in the green and mountainous meridional province of Hubei. however.." Someone said: "Here in the capital the noise and the dust hide the sky to the point that it is hazy the whole day long. Prose "The Hall of Literary Ripples. 1586-1641) seems exceptional: he sacrificed his ambitions for an official career to his passion for long treks in the mountains. the metamorphoses and wonders of water are all displayed before me . therefore. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2.C.. It returns to heave in dark clouds covering in an instant thousands of miles ... Yet in this 'hall' there is not anything which could be called a wave or even a pond. " 49 among the ancients.. Du Fu.. Above the gate I hung an inscription that read Officials were normally transferred to a new post every three years. In the late Ming. But water. but they have a height which cannot be lowered. Everything supple and sinuous is water. and when he was assigned to the capital in an official capacity. Ouyang Xiu kept a journal of his mission to a barbarian court in the eleventh century. Ouyang Xiu. Su Xun.. Not that I would deny that mountains are as beautiful as literature. And when I take up a book by Sima Qjan. and ripples rise up like those I saw in former days. but are of a precision that ftlls modern-day geographers with joy.. and the vernacular was then introduced as the medium of elite literature only with great difficulty-it still seemed natural for scholars involved with this linguistic revolution to write their pleas in the classical language. Po Juyi. Ban Gu. Later. However.. The rare words and obscure phrases that have aroused the astonished admiration of today's reader-can one know that they were not in their time part of the language of the streets? The logical response to this argument would have been to adopt the spoken language of each era as the medium of prose.. Yuan Hongdao was originally from Gong'an 01i:. so scholars were by force of necessity great travelers.. As our contemporaries do not immediately fathom the ancient works that they read. but opposed imitation of any kind. in the narratives by Zhang Qj. that travel literature was established as early as the second century B. there is nothing under heaven which resembles water more than literature.48 Chinese Literature. he rediscovered the joy of the landscapes surrounding his beloved hometown through literature in his "Wenyi Tang ji" =z~-g~c {Record of the Hall of Literary Ripples): Jlt*m: I rented a house where I laid out a small room to the right of the hall to read books in . But the case of Xu Xiake 1~!1~ {the hao of Xu Hongzu 1~*tH.. I suddenly see a surge of waves. then suddenly changes course. Yuan Hongdao was the best-known writer in the family. This statement by Yuan Zongdao's {1560-1600) is typical: Jlt*m: This is why Confucius said of prose that it sufficed if it made itself understood. fell into neglect for several centuries after their works were banned by the Manchus who conquered China and set up the Qj.. Yuan Zongdao and his two well-known brothers.. Such pleas had little effect until nearly 1920. They are something dead. eddies. no . not real water.. Han Yu. a rigidity which cannot be made pliable. they find "ancient prose" of a marvelous profundity and proscribe the simplicity of modem writers. It should come as no surprise. Where will you get the ripples to be displayed before you?" I laughed and said. as if I have bumped into something. My bosom swells and. His famous journals focus on the object of his observations. The ancient and modem prose works were both appropriate to their times and to their language...an about his exploration of countries to the west.ng dynasty {1644-1911). Yuan Hongdao {1568-1610) and Yuan Zhongdao Jlt~m: {1570-1624).

is perhaps the most representative of the new type of literati who managed to live from what he earned with his writing brush rather than lowering himself to enter an official career. the other terraces were arrayed in a circle. The title that he gave to the successive collections of his works in classical Chinese is significant: Liweng yijia yan ~~-*§ (Words from the Unique School of Liweng)-Liweng. in things it is only the novel that holds interest. It is doubly so when it comes to literary art. His varied. Ancient and Classical The sixth of the eighth month (31 August 1623): a windstorm arose. where a stupa containing a relic of Maiijusri stood. He gave up his career and resorted to patrons to supplement the income. however. I found the Lamp Monastery. that Li Yu was perfectly aware that the publication of this collection was his crowning achievement. When the wind fell. 3). he must treat his superiors as a daughter-n-law does her husband's parents. "Novel" is a laudatory qualifier for everything in the world.examining it. only to the southeast and the southwest was there a little open space. not those which others have complained about. many scholars refused to serve the new masters-the Manchus-because of their loyalty Li Yu's admirable Xianqing ouji f!l. Li Yu seems to have preferred the independence of a life devoted to pleasure to the servitude of an official life. largely ignored corpus of works includes pithy epigrams such as the following: A bachelor is as timid as a young virgin. looming suddenly through the jade-blue leaves. An impenitent hedonist." His defense of novelty and a spirit of invention is not without ironic nuances: One looks for the old only in people.50 Chinese Literature. And those who allow themselves to be known easily are not worth the trouble of getting to know. Pardon the offenses of your servants-those in which you are the victim. [As Han Yu wrote:] "How difficult it is to apply oneself to eliminating cliches!" (I. Along this way the road gradually grew steep. xingling 'tili (the efficacy of [one's own] nature). I crossed a ridge and could first see Southern Terrace [one of the Five Terrace Mountains] before me. to which he contributed his own concubines. shamelessly pirated. Recent works sacrifice everything to novelty. like a bead of fire. I climbed the highest peak on the Southern Terrace. When I followed the mountain toward the southwest about a mile. When he retires. the sun appeared. Chen Jiru fl*~~ (1558-1639). But they also trade what should be preserved at all costs to appear innovative. to the fallen regime. "the old [fisherman] in a straw hat. In his claim that he was expressing the self. and also from his theater troupe.'l1ff!J§~2 (Occasional Notes Occasioned by Feelings of Idleness) is a seemingly modest compilation that skillfully intertwines some three hundred essays. It is difficult to truly know others. Ascending further. Chapter 2. It is true that the "poverty" of which he often complains in his correspondence did not prevent him from keeping a household of fifty people. Facing north. Prose 51 This passage gives only a slight indication of the wealth of detail in the diary which vies with even the best modern guides to the Five Terrace Mountains in modern Shanxi. I think the novelty of writing is internal and should not apply to external aspects. but each drop of rain that fell changed into ice. When he begins his official career. always insufficient. the innovative power of the Yuan brothers can certainly be seen. a friend of the Xu family who composed a biography for Xu Xiake's father." was his zi or "style. he takes pleasure in dispensing advice liberally. They change what can be changed without. like a mother-in-law. It is evident from his letters. Was this the case with Li Yu *~ 1611-1680? An admirer of the renowned novelist and dramatist Chen Jiru. But no one . Li was also without doubt the most original essayist China has ever produced. ( After the collapse of the Ming dynasty in 1644. About three miles farther. that he earned from his publications.

and indeed in shocking the reader. all must prepare this remedy in advance. When what I swallowed reached my stomach. But this demands a higher skill than simple servants have. but no one knew better how to communicate the passions of the gourmand than Li Yu. The filial and charitable sons who care for their parents. 1796). that sustain one. I hoard my pennies in expectation. Only this one thing can cure them. falls ill thereby. With this spectacle. Art was supposed to chase away tedium: the expression of the self is the necessary condition. but by itself is not sufficient. which had struck his entire family. not soon to recover. But it is only crabs that will not allow me to detail their wonders in full. with respect to style or situation. I no longer knew what illness it was I had suffered from. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2. 6. when the desire for love has already . To eliminate dust. 2). Why? All my eloquence does not suffice to explain . Prose 53 else had the know-how to assume this power so wholeheartedly. In this Li Yu agreed with Yuan Hongdao on the importance of qu /00. I can talk about them all.. large and small. the strict fathers as well as the sweet mothers who love their sons. to thereby make known to him that [his beloved] already belongs to him. which he was very fond of: I then began to question . The servant boy. contents himselfto sweep-when in fact the one doesn't work without the other. I call this money "the vital ransom. (XVI. I fully regained the use of my four limbs. and they allowed me to eat the berries to my heart's content. Li Yu recounts for us how. 3} There is no better medicine than a good humor and the pleasures. On the other hand. there is no better remedy for amorous languor than satisfying thwarted desire: Every young boy or young girl. amusement. Only inhaling its odor still makes him feel better. The poet Yuan Mei R. Each year before they appear in the marketplace. it restored the harmony to my five organs.. As my family pokes fun at me by saying that I hold crabs more dear than life. begun but they are not yet married. A work of art must sustain the interest of others and elicit pleasure. naturally lazy..my family. the doctor had advised against the consumption of arbutus berries. My spirit savors them with so much delight that I will never forget the taste on my palate until the last day of my life.. "A charlatan who knows precious little about it! Go buy them for me with all due speed!" I grumbled. Not more than one or two people in ten practice it today. so as to prevent the illness. As an example. it suffices to have his beloved come and go before him. here he relates the art of savoring crabs with an infectious fervor: As for the pleasures of the table. 4. it is necessary to begin by splashing water lightly about." To attempt to treat his melancholy by forcing himself to have sexual relations would have been "like compelling a sad person to laugh. This is a method that the ancients have transmitted to us. and him more gravely than the others. He took pleasure in employing paradox.f)(: (1716-1797) might be called the "Chinese Julia Child" because of his wonderful cookbook entitled Shidan ~l!i! {Menus..52 Chinese Literature. It is like someone who obtains a medicine but doesn't take it. my family understood that the doctor's warning had proved false. witness the section of his Xianqing ouji devoted to the "art of sweeping:" A stylish house requires the greatest care in sweeping. and my imagination is inexhaustible. during an epidemic .. They set the words of the doctor against me. The juice of the berries had scarcely flowed into my mouth when the knot of melancholy that had gripped my breast completely loosened. in 1630." But Li Yu admitted that he was incapable of following the good advice of "just exercising more moderation than was his habit" (XVI. Even if the patient is too weak to endure intimate embraces. This can relieve most of the lovesickness.

IV. a remedy for depression as for anger or a bad mood. the Lun wen Jffia)( (Discourse on Literature). like our beds. The days he spends in indeterminable places: a hall. Beds are therefore things in which we have company half the night and which have precedence over our companions. there were few that Li Yu placed above a hot bath. each having its own requirements. They agree . Yet among all of his passions and his aversions. because these human beings. integrating the Confucian tradition with elements of Buddhism. with tousled hair and dirty faces. this little work contemplates literature in its aesthetic aspects. Literary Criticism Of an inventive mind. a relatively late genre that originated in the twelfth century. in summer or winter.. The Wen fo :ZM or "Fu on Literature" by Lu Ji ~~ (261-301) celebrated the mysteries of inspiration. he calls to us with irrefutable eloquence: A man lives one hundred years. concubines. or a carriage. that by Cao Pi Wf/F (187-226). which are believed to give thanks for the rain and the dew (XV. who had forbidden such baths in order to "nourish the vital principle. The first chapter treats the "Original Dad' or Way: . and servants to go about in rags. which he manages with so much brilliance. It is obvious that Li Yu's defense and illustration of what are viewed by the Confucian tradition as trifling matters. 465-520). The work consists of fifty chapters which treat literary theory and its applications ecumenically. To the Taoists. These emphases were a paradox for Chinese traditional criticism. 1. Breakingfor the first time from the moral and utilitarian point of view.! Of all the pleasures of life. I am always amazed with my contemporaries who. a boat. but ostensibly neglect the quarters where they would take their rest under the pretext that they are places one does not show to others. the preferred theories were expressed in terse formulae. 1. With respect to evaluation and classification. for the "wen possessed a common trunk that does not differ 'from its branches. works devoted to literary criticism were concerned mainly with poetry. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2. But the nights he knows only to spend in bed. are not as trivial as they may appear. But would it then be necessary for our wives. his maniacal obsession has been the love of writing. These tendencies were already apparent in the earliest treatise that has been handed down. Li Yu was a creative craftsman of fiction ." which are the various classical genres.54 Chinese Literature. a room. His ideas on literary art provide further demonstration of this situation. Is it not a kind of sickness that causes one to persevere until a literary work is completed? What pushes me to this? Most often the hand of the little imp of creation. according great importance to plot and diction. Prose 55 When Li Yu speaks of beds in his chapter on furniture. when looking for a place to live." Li Yu replied by likening man to plants. Li Yu confides to us at the end of his work. inquire after a house as if their lives were at stake. 11). For the most part. are reserved for our view and not that of others? (X. half of which he passes occupied with the day and the other half occupied with the night. I . The title of the work conjures up this program-'heart' in the title might also be understood as '[literary] mind"'-artistic works are a product of the spirit of literature. which usually focused on musical aspects of the opera-theater. The art of literary composition in prose is treated only marginally in the anthologies that gave rise to the revised system of examinations starting in the twelfth century. 4) with so many Western conceptions that they run the unfair risk of seeming banal to us. specifically the effect of poetry rather than its genesis. a fragment preserved in A Selection of Literature by Xiao Tong (501-531). but the most elaborate survey of this dominant current in Chinese literary criticism is the Wenxin diaolong X 1 L'!il~ (The Heart of Literature Carves Dragons) by Liu Xie ~Ung (c. So there is nothing that merits more of our attention.

Liu Xie devotes the nineteen following sections to an examination of literary genres. wen [literature] shines forth. including anthologies. the word is established. He borrowed a good deal of terminology from the Chan sect {Zen. 5) Events and meaning. it treats the critical comprehension that must initially take six points of view into consideration: 1) Style.. which develop the idea that literature is in the nature of things. literary composition.. It is the Way of a spontaneous nature . {brushwork/utilitarian). The most accomplished collected works strike a balance between "description. The penultimate chapter recaptures the parallel with music in its title. A related genre is the benshi . Prose 57 R] [!J"iii'fdb {Evaluations of Poetry in Twenty-four (Poems]) by Sikong Tu ~~~ After the first five chapters.Dtf {Understanding Sound).zjs:$ {the facts themselves).. Chapter 2. Ancient and Classical Great is the strength of wen! . who lived at the turn of the twelfth to the thirteenth century. works that endeavored to divulge the circumstances under which poems were produced. His Canglang shihua l'i!l~"iii'f§Jli {Remarks on Poetry by (the Hermit] of the (River] Canglang) had a decisive influence on the innumerable shihua {remarks on poetry) that followed his. and through the establishment of the language. 3) Communicability and flexibility. inclined toward simple clarity of expression. The third part examines. All these works. with much finesse. in Sinojapanese). 2) Rhetoric. the stimulating evocation and comparison that transcend the literal sense. divided up between those which are wen )( {ornate/belletristic)." fu. and the xing-bi. For Yan Yu j()j)j.. the Shi pin "iii'fdb {Evaluation of Poetry). When the spirit [the heart] is born. The influence of Taoism and Buddhism is even more marked in the Ershisi shi pin =+ . Comparable in importance to the Wenxin diaolong. testify to the preeminence that poetry has always had in the eyes of the Chinese.56 Chinese Literature. and literary sensibilities. 4) Rectitude and the fantastic. the primary role of poetry was to communicate the knowledge of a transcendental reality beyond words. requiring rhythm and/or rhyme.. and those which are bi. The fiftieth and final chapter is a postface in which Liu Xie pays homage to his precursors and justifies his enterprise. composed between 513 and 517 by Zhong Rong ~~' is devoted principally to the pentasyllabic poems of 122 authors of the third to fourth centuries. Zhiyin 5. ending with this distich of praise: Literature is indeed a vehicle of the spirit And my spirit has been raised in its domicile. literary techniques. and 6) Musicality {837-908).

Stanford: Stanford University Press. Egan. Hightower's Topics in Chinese Literature(Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Y. William H. 1988. Chen. 3. though somewhat dated. Pohl.. Watson. Historical Records. Nienhauser. Liu. Boston: Twayne. 1994). 1994. 1950). The Chinese University of !fong Kong and Columbia University Press. Images and Ideas in Chinese Classical Prose: Studies of Four Masters. 1993. etal. ed. Ronald C. Records of the Grand Historian: Han Dynasty I and Il Revised ed. 1982-) is an excellent source on early Chinese prose.. Rickett. see also entries for these writers as well as ''Ku-wen kuan-chih" r!t)(fill::.. I: 49-58. David Knechtges's ongoing translation of Wen xuan or Selections of Refined Literature (3 vols.Jamesj. ::: Narrative Art and Historical Records Dawson. respectively. In Indiana Companion. Albany: State University of New York Press. Karl-Heinz. The relevant sections ofjames R. Prose 59 Suggested Further Reading There is a detailed general survey of Chinese prose in Indiana Companion. and ''Ku-wen tz. Painter and Calligrapher. Ancient and Classical Chapter 2. 1984. _ .58 Chinese Literature. _. Studies of Han Yu. Chinese Theories ofLiterature. Liu Zongyuan. Inscribed Landscapes: Travel Writing from Imperial China (Berkeley: University of California Press. "Li Yii" *:i'J. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Burton. Hong Kong and New York: The Research Centre for Translation. trans. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Nettetal: Steyler Verlag. Adele. 773-879. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1974. Charles. In Indiana Companion. The Return of the ''Ancient Style" Ch'en. 1992. Image and Deed in the Life of Su Shi Cambridge: Council on East Asian Studies and the Harvard-Yenching Institute.. In Indiana Companion. ''Ku-wen.Jr. Revised ed. Cheng Pan-ch'iao: Poet. Liu Tsung-yuan and Intellectual Change in T'ang China. Word. Stephen. Raymond. Hartman. and SuShi. Literary Criticism "Literary Criticism. 1978. . "In Indiana Companion. Jo-shui. 1: 93-120. The Literary Works ofOu-yang Hsiu (1007-72). ed. 1994. Owen.'u lei-tsuan"r!t)(Wf!J@i. 1: 557-559.. Stephen. 1994. 2 vols. The Grand Scribe's Records. Han Yu and the T'ang Search for Unity. Nienhauser et al. Volume 1: The Basic Annals ofPre-Han China. 1993. Readings in Chinese Literary Thought Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Liu Tsung-yuan. Vol. The Golden Age of Trival Literature "Chang Tai" 5:&111.. Strassberg. 1985. 1995. A full survey of landscape depiction is presented in Richard E. are still useful. William H.Jr. Ouyang Xiu.. 1973. 1: 500-501 and 501-503. Volume 7: The Memoirs of Pre-Han China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Durrant. trans." In Indiana Companion.Records of the Grand Historian: Qjn Dynasty. 1992. 1: 494-500. Chinese Approaches to Literature from Confucius to Liang Ch'i-ch'ao. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 1: 220-221. Princeton: Princeton University Press. to date. including selections from most of the writers introduced above. Yu-shih. Nienhauser. trans. Hong Kong and New York: RenditionsColumbia University Press. The Cloudy Mirror: Tension and Conflict in the Writings of Sima Qjan. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 1990. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. Poetic language strove for ambiguity while reducing the number of grammatical words-which the Chinese call "empty words"-to the minimum required for intelligibility. detailed commentaries have sometimes attempted to impose a word-forword interpretation. To this were added the graphic evocations of a writing system autonomous from the language itself. Early Chinese Literary Criticism. have been the ancient shi tff of the Shi jing (twelfth-sixth centuries .-220 A. The triumph of ritualism in the succeeding Han dynasty (206 B. Hong Kong: Joint Publishing. The most important verse forms in China. Over the centuries. something to which a Chinese poem can rarely be reduced. the ~n {221-207 B. Long written anonymously as popular or ritual verse.60 Chinese Literature. The preeminence of poetry in the Chinese tradition owes much to a language and writing system that from early times was closely associated with music and painting. favored this evolution. Poetry Wong.) solidified the position of poetry. The ideal was to express the most with the least. which lends itself to multiple readings.C. trans.D. It was the sixth century before the most characteristic form of Chinese poetry appeared: a rhymed quatrain of heptasyllabic or pentasyllabic lines that took its rhythm from tonal opposition and that adhered to a strict parallelism in the first distich. An effect of richness was obtained through implicit images and literary allusions. prefers to allude to this beauty rather than speak of it. laden with tradition.). in rough chronological order. The installation of the first imperial regime. poetry did not begin to become personalized-and professionalized-until the third century A.C. since the ~n rulers preferred the carefully constructed formulae and irrefutable citations of verse to the more threatening eloquence of the rhetoricians and their prose.D. which had been tied from the beginning to rituals and ceremony. Would not the critic inspired by Buddhism say that great beauty is inexpressible? Poetic language. 1983. Siu-kit. many of the early personal poems used new forms which had emerged from the fertile ground of popular literature..

filled with mythological allusions that are often quite obscure to the modern reader. which developed in conjunction with the opera-theater and were first popular during the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368). that of unbridled and despairing lyricism.n unified the empire in the late second century B. Broke off a branch to strike the sun [which rose there]. including lii shi :fl. the Shi jing. is a sort of pastiche by the commentator himself which attributes the first seven poems to the quasi-legendary figure Qu Yuan lffi)]l: (ca. Tied my reins to the Daybreak Tree.C. the only one of these poems that modern criticism still attributes to Qu Yuan.§i (Lament for the Separation [from the King of Chu ]) . the ci ~"1 (lyric). I hear the beautiful one call me to her. Most of these poems are laments. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. rather than a model. the collection consists of seventeen distinct works written by authors from various eras. The poet expresses himself in the first person in order to launch himself on an ecstatic quest. peculiar. The Songs of Chu.). yuefo ~!ff (music bureau) poetry and its continuation. whose traditions were lost when Qj. And together we depart. Compiled with commentary by Wang I I~ (d. (Nine Thoughts). Here is a passage from the Li sao: I watered my horse at the Pool of Heaven.jinti shi lli:ft~ (modern-style verse).D. 158 A. which flourished in the Tang dynasty. with the caesura or line break punctuated by the archaic exclamation "xi!'' (pronounced at that time. And freely I wandered at my ease. viewed from later times. which began as a quasi-oral genre in the Tang. as so much of its language quickly became "archaic" and its prosody. and a divinity. The Chu ci ~IWF (Words of the State of Chu) offer another source of inspiration. His suicide by drowning is commemorated by the riverine festivals of the summer solstice (the fifth day of the fifth lunar month) in South China.62 Chinese Literature. which follow the Li sao. The texts seem to be imitations of shamanistic declamations. sao .~. from the Han dynasty to the sixth century A..~ (regulated. works that include nearly one hundred poems. the longest of which is the first. . The final piece..D. These models involve longer lines (usually with six syllables). I. Poetry 63 B. seeking a divinity that the commentators identify as his sovereign.. Li sao ~ l. In the evening I ford the waters toward western cliffs. a loyal minister of the large southern state of Chu who was rejected by a sovereign incapable of recognizing his merits. seem to call for interpretation as dialogues between a medium..C. the fu l!fi:t (rhapsody) of the Han dynasty and after. 1. guti shi ilft~ (ancient-style verse). a priest or sorcerer. he moves through the heavens. (lines 193-196) The Nine Songs. and the qu fffi (arias). it is thought. The Two Sources of Ancient Poetry We have seen above the role that Confucius assigned to the Classic of Poetry. each composed on one of two distinct prosodic models.C. 340-278). Thus the celebrated Princess of the River Xiang (Xiang foren #§~ A) whom the poet's persona encounters: In the morning I drive my horses along the River..) in the second century A. like "ah!"). ]iu si flJGJ. eight-line verse) and jueju f. driving the horses up . The Li sao is also regarded as the first poem in Chinese literature to have been intended for a reader (rather than a listener) and to have been based on personal inspiration. But the Shi jing was primarily a source of inspiration.\~{i] (quatrains). and its successor.D. echoes of the culture of the meridional states of South China. This classic was memorized by all literati and was essentially the source of a type of poetry designed to "express the intention" !Janz:fzi §~) through a poetic text based in nature which offers an implicit comparison with a human situation. the sao ~ (laments) of the state of Chu in the third and fourth centuries B. ]iu ge fL~.

Ancient and Classical The Heavenly Qyestions. it grows in this southern state. titled Diao Q. heralds the style of the fo through . a direct disciple of Qu Yuan. of which The Elegy on the Orange. ]iu . Luoyang and Chang' an. Its roots deep and firm.#l!lt\ (Rhapsody ofa Hunt in the Party of the Son ofHeaven). by Mei Sheng .:E. Poetry 65 an exuberant lyricism that defies translation.). The fifth piece. was meant to be recited and is difficult to distinguish from the sao.]ia Yi made clear his personal identification with Qu Yuan. Funiao fo Jl.).64 Chinese Literature. as in the following: The sun came out of the Valley of Warm Waters. Yuan you W~ {Distant Journey). The orange made itself at home here. 141 B. the genre reached new heights by abandoning the mode of complaint seen in works such as Grievingfor Q_u Yuan in favor of a positive lyricism expressed indirectly under cover of what were claimed to be moral admonitions. is thought to be a Taoist-inspired imitation of the Li sao of a relatively late date. Receiving their orders not to move. we know a small number of them thanks to Sima Q!an's Records of the Grand Historian. in rhythmic prose and rhymed. refer to ancient myths and legends. which recalls most notably the song by the One comes back to poetry in the Nine Declarations. With the unequaled works of Sima Xiangru '§]. Zixu fo -1. a number of authors distinguished themselves in this difficult genre that depicts the grandeur and history of a location in rhymed prose.jzang iL~.u Yuan ~@)]{ (Grieving for Q. it is not surprising that the first dated fo {174 B. in which the persona is again off on a heavenly quest. fo (rhapsodies) became part of the literature and splendor of the second-century Han dynasty imperial court under Emperor Wu :lf:t (r.C. 177-119). through the end of the imperial regime in the early twentieth century. Poetry of the Han Court. The fo l!Jt\ {rhapsody or prose-poem). was also written in that region byJia Yi If[§[ (200-168 B. traditionally attributed to Song Yu *.C. The Nine Arguments. I Chapter 3.]u song$~.C. Tian wen {not "Heaven Questioned" as it is sometimes understood-Heaven. How many miles had he [the sun] gone from morning until dusk? Kunlun has Hanging Gardens. the sun's charioteer.!!!If:l!Jt\ (Rhapsody of the Hunting Parks of the Sovereigns of Qj and of Chu) and Shanglin fo l:. ]iu bian iL¥/i¥. Qj fa -t~. making it more constant. has risen? The snake that swallowed an elephant-how big was it? :Kr"'. hard to transplant. At the other extreme of the spectrum of Chinese poetics are found short poems of a rugged simplicity that could be called "emotional improvisations". Liangdu fo l1¥i. then took his rest at Murky Cliff.Wl!lt\.t~l!Jt\. the commentator rightly tells us.~:f§t!D (ca. a meditation on the evil auspices of the owl. is presented as a series of sarcastic riddles attributed to Qu Yuan but with no connection to the tone or the prosodic form of the elegies).u Yuan). Since the sao was of southern origins. 2.C. From the celebrated fo of Ban Gu rJI[gj (32-92) on the two capitals of the Han. in eighteen lines.). In the Seven Exhortations.). where are they situated? How many miles high are its nine-fold walls? Who passes through the gates in its four sides? Why are the flowers of the Daybreak Tree bright before Xi He. demanding of its audience a frightening amount of erudition.f:Q:* (d. is commonly considered a youthful work: Among the fine trees of Mother Earth and August Heaven. In another fo. 140-87 B. It is understandable that Sima Xiangru's youthful elopement with a rich widow from his home area of Shu touched the popular imagination more than the interminable lyrical flights of the major works he wrote years later at court.

combining Chinese characters that suggested a happy union. Poetry Carefully rounded like the full moon. The yuefu. They often pose irresolvable problems of dating. 67 founder of the Han dynasty.C.C. Liu Bang ~J.) was supplanted in the emperor's eyes by the singer Zhao. The first is an implicit comparison of Lady Ban to the fan." This poem in pentasyllabic verse was possibly written by a scholar.C. popularly called "Flying Swallow:" A newly tom strip of fine white silk As unsullied as frost and snow. Often feared. 33-7 B. . How will I obtain fierce warriors to guard the four directions? Simple language. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. the clouds fly up! My majesty increases within the seas as I return to my old village. to collect folk songs and present them at court as a means to convey the mood and desires of the citizenry. attribution. the great-aunt of the historian and favorite of Emperor Cheng RIG (r. "West Gate" (Hsi men xing lffi1r. If we don't take our pleasure today. As she approaches the autumn of her years. With each step I think of him. who soon (in 16 B. composed in an epicurean tone: Passing the gate to the West.66 Chinese Literature. . Aside from the poetic depiction of the fan. characterizes the most elaborate of the poems closely related to these "improvisations. What are we waiting for? Take your pleasure! Take your pleasure when the proper time arrives! Why sit suffering anxious thoughts? Should we again wait for "next time?'' Brew fine wine! Grill fatty beef! Shout out that which your heart desiresWhy try to resolve worrisome concerns!. Such is not the case for the famous ancient-style poem on a fan titled "A Song of Remorse" (Yuan ge xing ?d?d[Xfr) attributed to Lady Ban :FJI. preferred tetrasyllables or irregular lines." the yuefu ~}fif or "music bureau" poems. the "newly torn strip of fine white silk" who is now "tucked into the emperor's sleeve. the poem offers several subtexts. The shared-pleasure fan was made of two silk faces sewn together. known as "literary yuefu. from war to love. more than five hundred of these poems exist today. But the first six lines are also reminiscent of Flying Swallow.). it stirs him a light breeze. No matter where the lord goes." were handed down along with the original folk songs through anthologies compiled many centuries later (the major collection dates from the twelfth century A. but were created rather by combining several songs with the same theme and title. These poems. Liu had begun life as a peasant. Cut into a "shared-pleasure" fan. however. as in the following song.f~ (256-195 B. and interpretation. she too has been cast off by the emperor.). the arrival of the autumn season The cool winds that carry off the fiery heat. but wrote this when as an old man he stopped by his home town after becoming emperor of all of China: A great wind arises. since the most ancient texts and those which are the most authentically "popular" do not seem to be homogenous.). tucked into his sleeve. often directly accessible to the modern reader. on the other hand.1T)." which was founded in 177 B.D. a relationship which the perfect roundness of the fan suggests will be unending.C. Scholars soon applied themselves to composing poems with the same titles and in the same style on a huge range of themes. Causing it to be tossed into the bamboo hamperFavor and love cut off before they run their course. When moved. Said to be compositions of the "Music Bureau..

these popular songs.u Hu f:)(i!if. The early literati yuefu were merely imitations of the originals. Under the veil of modesty. The poetess known as Ziye r~ ("Midnight.l.C. sorrowful-I cannot sleep.: The full moon. It was not without difficulty that the French businessman. 386) seems much .returns to a regular pentasyllabic rhythm. some of the major Tang poets used the form in combination with themes critical of contemporary society to create a new genre: "new yuefii' (xin yuefu fjf~ Jff).D.318 works from more than 400 poets of the seventeenth century or earlier. but less than twenty." who is picking mulberry leaves to feed to silkworms-a typical female task. Shining on my gauze bed-curtains. soaking my clothes. which allowed sexually suggestive poems to be read as political allegories.IUJT~ (New Songs from the jade Terrace) is the classic anthology of these poems. diplomat. Following the example of the "airs of the states" in the Classic of Poetry.68 Chinese Literature. Troubled. These new yuefu also appealed to the literati. adopted for use at court and reworked by scholars. What we have been able to learn of the ancient folk literature. which they admired as natural and spontaneous.3S. Though they say traveling is a joy. Erotic Poetry. themes that expanded rapidly into a mode of writing at the courts of the southern regimes between the fourth and sixth centuries A. rise to pace. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. indicates that singers and authors of common origin ignored these restrictions against the portrayal of the erotic." d. however. but many simply anonymous "ancient poems" or yuefu. including the best-known Chinese bards. it consists of 656 poems. and sometimes author. Surprised by an imperial envoy on horseback while at work. Whatever the case. eroticism is absent from the high literature of the Chinese. then return t9 my chamber As tears fall. There's nothing better than coming home early! Outside I walk about anxiouslyWhom should I tell of my sorrowful longing? I crane my neck. I take up my robe. This narrative poem tells of Luofu Mit. the last of the "Nineteen Ancient Poems" ( Gu ski shijiu shou. who had been away on official duty and did not recognize his own wife. because they allowed them to escape the rigid prosodic rules of the prevailing poetic genres. would become a genre favored by poets. not less than 2. a place it never relinquished. the Yutai xinyong .). eroticism was afforded a place in high literature as part of the "court style" (gongti '§ft). how clear. Qj. Because of Confucian propriety and bigotry. Poemes de lasciviti parfumie. Compiled around 545 by Xu Ling f~ll&: (507-583). Some commentators believe the amorous envoy was none other than her husband. Among the best of these is the dramatic "Mulberry Tree along the Path" (Mo shang sang llBJ:~). the following poem. 3. 15~+11 §). Before we leave the early yuefu. Poetry 69 Although the twenty-four lines of this poem (only the first half is presented above) vary from three to seven syll~bles. Wubaijia xiangyan ski 1ia*Wii~. a young woman "more than fifteen. Poems of Perfumed Lascivity by Five hundred Authors (Anthologie de l'amour chinois. In the poems and songs of these free spirits there is no lack of the erotic. George Soulie de Morant (1878-1955) managed around 1920 to get his hands on an anthology by LeiJin published in 1914. It is often explained that with the eclipse of Confucianism and the swing to Taoism between the third and sixth centuries.D.. This famous series of anonymous poems is probably a remnant of a type of verse written during the first and second centuries A. some by approximately 100 poets from as early as the third century B. it is important to acknowledge the role of erotic themes in yuefu written in the South. however. she repulses his advances by reminding him that he has a wife and she a husband. scholars could not commit themselves openly to the erotic. but during the eighth and ninth centuries.

.. The spring breeze redoubles desire As it blows open my gauze skirts.J/f= (187-266). the third stanza of the fust poem reads thus: Along the road there is a woman starving. Cao Zhi shamed his elder by coming up with his "Poem Written within Seven Steps" (Qjbu shi --l::. She turns back hearing its tearful cries. are poignant. His evocations of the miseries of the times.:RiFf (Seven Lamentations). IT. Beans in the pot weeping. When Cao Pi attempted to fluster his younger brother by ordering him to compose some lines of verse as he was walking. So what is the great urgency to simmer us?! The final example is a steamy account of love fulfilled: For many nights I've not put up my hair. The spring breeze and her gauze skuts also figure in the next poem: In the spring grove. "poetry consisted of patterns of verbal splendor which were founded in sentiment. The Jian'an Jl~ era (196-220) heralded the birth of a poetry that ~~ught to rev~al pe~son~~ emotions rather than-as with the Shi jing-to express the mtentwns. was the most gifted member of a family that was equally distinguished in warfare and literature. the estranged younger brother of the reigning emperor of the new Wei dynasty. blame the spring breeze. From Aesthetic Emotion to Metaphysical Flights. compiled in a series entitled "Qj: ai shi" --!::.D." 1. Cao Zhi Women were to remain in the back rooms of the house. My gauze skirts are easily blown around.. If they open a little. thoughts so sad.70 Chinese Literature. J<::M (Rhapsody on Literature). But wipes her tears and moves on alone . blossoms so seductive. Poetry 71 less inclined to resist any advances. Cao Pi j!. of which the best-known poet is probably Wang Can±~ (177-217). Originally both sprang from the same root. the sash untied I paint my brows and come to the front window. as the following poems from her legacy-all titled "Midnight"-illustrate: Holding my skirt about me.C. What place is there on him I cannot love? The Caos served as patrons for the pleiad of literary men of the Jian'an era. Who abandons the child in her arms among the grasses. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. 220). Thus the erotic image of a woman seductively dressed is enhanced by her d~ring to come to a front window. Silky strands drape across my shoulders.*"iii!il Whether or not the story behind the poem is authentic. For the spring birds. As I wind myself around my lover's lap.-A. According to the formula devised by LuJi ~~ (261-303) in his Wenfu . The Golden Age of Chinese Poetry The important place accorded erotic themes revealed the ne~ attitudes toward life that were beginning to develop as early as the chaotic last years of the Han dynasty (202 B. Bean-stalks beneath the pot burning. this little allegory should have perplexed and embarrassed his suspicious brother: Boiling beans over burning bean-stalks The strained salty juice will do for a sauce. WHH (192-232).

from which she returned in about 192. It seems that his dialogue of "body. Where are they now? Peng Zu loved his long life. the most celebrated of the group. tells of her eighteen-year exile among the Xiongnu barbarians. To the "body's" argument that it is better to benefit from each day as it passes rather than to search for an impossible immortality. a tale of the goodness and purity of a lost village . The bright moon shines with a clear brilliance.was influenced by Buddhism. but whom can I tell? Many words. her complaint had a strong influence on subsequent writings on themes related to banishment. a Confucian reply to a Taoist point of view. written in a style similar to the Chu ci and attributed to Cai Y an~:£~ (b. is number fourteen. left some hermetic works and Ruan's very difficult "Songs of What Is in My Heart" (Yonghuai ski ~·i~W'). The crickets cry through the bed curtains. the word which is translated here as "body" is literally "form" and seems to render the Sanskrit rupa. By drinking daily you might be able to forget. highly admired by the poets of the Golden Age because he demonstrated that one could write more profound verse using simple words. Bound to share the same good and evilHow could I refrain from speaking to you on this? The Three Emperors of old. ca. the shadow opposes nobler aspirations. wine and the country life. For the wise or the stupid. who both sought and were repulsed by the idea of an official career. The cock at dawn cries in the tall tree. the Great Sages. Here. 178). he embodied the idea of the middle class of literati. Things of nature move me to great sorrowGrief so strong it causes the heart to mourn. because of their penchant for escaping from society through mysticism and drink. A slight breeze blows my silken sleeves. Not happy. the major poets were grouped together by later scholars under the rubric "The Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove" (Zhulin qi zi ¥r#-t:-T). Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. for example. shadow and soul" in three poems. which designates the illusionary reality of the senses. Ruanji 1%~(210-263) and Xi Kang fit'* (223-262). Xing ying shen. In the following generation. In life we are dependent on each other. san shouiD~~ =§. the daughter of the noted poet Cai Yong ~!§ (133-192). The soul calms their quarrel through the aloofness of wisdom: Although we are different entities. but no one to whom to lay forth my plaint. His hedonism accented with stoicism led him to sing of What Chinese hasn't heard of Tao's Record ofPeach Blossom Fount (Taohua yuan ji t'5::fti!ff. Ride the waves of the Great Change. which depicts the poet languishing through the night: To open autumn the cool breezes begin.72 Chinese Literature. But even he wanted to stay when he had to go. Next was Tao Yuanming ilWJVflj!Yj (later ming Qj. there's really no difference. But won't that shorten your allotted years? To do good always brings pleasure. When it is time to go. To dwell on this will harm my lifeJust follow fate as you go ahead. death is the same. a series of eighty-two poems. then you must goNo need to be overly concerned. From an old family that had fallen into obscurity. 365-427). I order my carriage to tum around and go back. Poetry 73 "Eighteen Stanzas on the Barbarian Reed-Whistle" (Hu jia skiba pai iif]~o+ J\ts). but also not afraid.an lf!T.~[l). I have much to say. But there's often no one to praise you for it. In old age or youth.

a courtier.0 (441-553).. condemned for his part in a rebellion against the government. . Nevertheless. he returned to his home. The singing of the birds tells me they are settling for the night. Xie was an aristocrat whose verse pleaded for enlightenment and sudden illumination._t 1l':!): In the morning I pick orchids from the park. This morning I actually did stop. both as a means to escape the pressures of service to the state and as a method of transcendence. Tao sang of the pleasures of the return from officialdom to country life in his "Guiqu lai xi ci" mw:t':?!<:~~ (Rhapsody on Returning. I know the wind has risen. was working on a system of tonal rules for poetic composition which eventually led to a greater role for form in verse as well as the greatest poems of the Tang dynasty (618-907). bright. I didn't yet know stopping could benefit me! Gradually I realized that stopping would do me good. It ends thus: Day after day I was on the point of stopping itbut my pulse stopped beating regularly. what should I say? The point is that immortality without pleasure is perhaps not what Tao was seeking. Will my bright face stop on this old visage? How can it stop for a myriad years? In contrast to Tao is the great poet of the mountains and tormented nature. Xie Lingyun ~.. After spending some time in this idyllic valley.an often celebrated the "spirits" these immortals brewed from fermented cereals. The following is one of their typical untitled poems: My heart resembles the autumn moon: A pool of jade green. The pseudonym Hanshan ~W (Cold Mountain) perhaps hid a g_roup of poets inspired by Chan Buddhism who were active during the stxth century. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. here are the opening lines from his "Spending the Night on the Cliff over Stone Gate" (Shimen yanshan su E F5 :!6. and pure. And am aware that today's rights can put aside yesterday's wrongs. in which he cleverly includes the word "stop" in each of the twenty pentasyllabic lines. In the evening I return to sleep at the edge of the clouds. Indeed. Tao Qj. But understand that the future can be pursued. Fearing that they will wither in the frost. Actually I haven't gone that far along the wrong way. go back! Though fields and gardens are filled with weeds-why not go back? It was I who made my mind servant to the body. He died stoically as a confirmed Buddhist. all known for their difficult diction. Tao pondered putting an end to his drinking in a poem entitled "On Stopping Wine" (Zhi jiu 11::. Shen Yue tfct. never again to find the entryway. I will stop atop the immortal cliffs of Fusang. Why should I be devastated and sorrow alone! At the other end of the spectrum of sixth-century verse.. wine was a major part of the culture of the Period of Disunion. Going Back). What other object would sustain this metaphorTell me.1@). As leaves drop from trees. 75 nestled in a ring of mountains that had escaped time and the agents of the state? The village was discovered by a fisherman who had lost his way.74 Chinese Literature. Poetry Suddenly I see that what has passed cannot be remedied. Finally. clear. written in 405: Return. Where I sport with the moon upon these rocks.ti§! (385-443). Through this single stop. Only about one hundred poems remain from what was once a much larger corpus. I only knew there was no pleasure in stopping.

Li Bai's origins remain a subject of controversy. Li Bai invented some of the forms himself (or perhaps borrowed them from foreign sources). In fact. Meng Haoran :ilhn!i~ (689-740) was the first major name to emerge from the intense poetic activity concentrated around the court in the seventh century. But none of his paintings remain. Li Bai $8 (701-762).=Ei. The blossom's about to break apart. its heart crushedHow could it understand the beauties of springtime? Wang Wei was both painter and poet. though not one of his best known. which was published in 1707 at the order of the emperor Kangxi. the poet was frequently in the company of Emperor Xuanzong (r.76 Chinese Literature. three of the greatest poets that China has ever produced came on the literary scene: Wang Wei . in particular the eighth-century or "high Tang. made famous through its selection by anthologists and translators alike. attained a certain maturity. he was best understood by his junior colleague Du Fu. 712-756) between 742 and 744. poised between tradition and creation. It was preceded by "early Tang" verse of the seventh century and followed by the "middle and late Tang'' poets of the ninth. In his time. he was expelled from court. probably at the instigation of his envious colleagues. texts that were inaccessible to the jealous buffoons at the Chinese court. when he was imprisoned for a time. More than one thousand poems in a great variety of forms and styles are attributed to him. andDu Fu H~ (712-770). suggests the delicate and artistic touch of his brush: A voluptuous green. demonstrates Meng's poetic talent: Spring slumber won't awake to dawn. Despite the legends which surround Li Bai's personality like a halo-a much different case from that of Du Fu-he was actually a connoisseur of barbarian writings. descended from a clan that had been exiled to Central Asia. Zhang Jiuling i]. he was better known as an artist. The preferred account is that he was ethnically a Han Chinese. who allowed himself to follow spontaneity and inspiration. however.200 different authors who lived almost a thousand years ago. but the following poem. wrongly accused of treason. The personality of Meng Haoran has been somewhat eclipsed by his friend Wang Wei. Dressed in a faded red which deepens in places. The complete collection of Tang dynasty (618-907) poetry. Shortly after his ascension. But the Tang was also a privileged moment in which the literary culture. however.RJL~ (678-740). sounds of wind and rain1 wonder how many flower petals have been falling? scenes. Meng Haoran was a protege of a statesman. Li's reputation. this was an examination that some of the most illustrious poets failed. animated by a Confucian concern for society and tormented by the problems of his personal relationships. The Tang remains almost unrivaled in both the quantity and the quality of poetic production. His landscape paintings are said to have included poetry and his verses to be filled with lovely Li Bai and Du Fu form a pair at once complementary and opposed-the first a fantastic genius. This production was enhanced because the most highly esteemed of the various examinations leading to official careers was the poetry exam. whereas more than four hundred poems have survived. The Age of Maturity. "Red Peony" (Hong Mutan MUR-). Like Wang Wei. but calm and sedate. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. Although he had met most of the great poets of the times. From that time on he was almost constantly on the move. . contained nearly 50. the second classical and practical. until a few years after the onset of the catastrophic rebellion of An Lushan in 755. Soon after. with whom he associated.000 poems by some 2. Poetry 77 2. Everywhere I hear the sound of birds calling. oddly enough. tempted by esoteric Taoism. During the night." which was seen as the apogee. and dismissed from his position as archivist. "Spring Dawn" (Chun xiao 'ff~).ll (701-761). who clearly recognized his genius. himself a distinguished poet.

I've already swallowed my tears. my shadow becomes lost. One feels Orion in passing The Well. we make a threesome. midst the flowersWith no close friend I pour my own wine. titled "Yuexia du zhuo" . The same simplicity is found in the most celebrated of Li Bai's four ancient-style poems. left only a few echoes in his works. was wrongly interpreted as an allusion to these events.~. the most popular among the overseas Chinese'jingye si" If~. then condemned to exile. When sober. each member of the party expected to toast and encourage the others: A jug of wine.Fl Tj. As I dance. And sits down with a deep sigh.. I toast the bright moon. From South of the Jiang in the pestilential territories. Perhaps the best known of those is the first of two poems titled "Dreaming of Li Bai" (Meng Li Bai ~ $8). the anguish is constant. Facing my shadow. At the lowest. My old friend has entered my dreams. What use is it that you have wings? . did not begin to shine until the following generation. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. Now that you are held by a prisoner's bonds. each goes his own way. nine bends wind the rock face. There is no news of the banished one. This pentasyllabic quatrain does not contain a single word which is not in common usage today. how clear the bright moonlight. As if it were frost covering the ground. where the former emperor fled and took refuge some years later. Almost immediately Du pledged to Li admiration without limits. written about 758. (Thoughts on a Quiet Evening): Before the bed. at the highest point. The misery of the warfare that followed the Rebellion of An Lushan. Let us arrange to meet in the Milky Way. The gibbons anguish as they pull themselves up! How many hairpin turns of black mud? In a hundred steps. Li Bai composed perhaps the most popular poem in Chinese literature-at the very least. thanks in particular to the then immensely popular poet Baijuyi 8!5-~ (772-846). we share each other's joy. If we're separated in life. I raise my eyes toward the moon which gleams. It is important to note that in China past-as well as China present-drinking was usually a festive group activity. My shadow vainly follows me along. the breath short. the six dragon-like steeds reach the place where the sun returns. Once drunk. We take our pleasure to celebrate spring. in which Li Bai became involved. His famous poem in irregular verse on the "Hard Road to Shu" (Shu dao nan IJllift) or modern Sichuan province.78 Chinese Literature. At heights that the immortal crane cannot fly across.. who showed such admiration for Li Bai's verse. Here Li Bai depicts the rigors of passage: . and imagines that the soul of the elder poet comes to visit him: Since you may have died and left me. Du Fu Hffi {712-770) met the elder poet Li Bai toward 745. The moon doesn't understand how to drink. Du Fu expresses in these sixteen five-syllable lines his anxiety for Li Bai. the eyes raise. Raising my cup.E¥J (Drinking Alone under the Moon). Clearly I have long been thinking of him. the moon prances about. which was made famous in several of Du's poems. Forever bound to emotionless entertainment. midst thoughts of my native place. To be companions for a while. hands rubbing panting chests. Poetry 79 however. As I sing. Then lower my head. the twisting river breaks back in crashing waves.

. This poem of irregular length-twenty-five lines-depicts the sufferings of the conscripts required to combat the menace of the emerging power of the Tibetans in the Sichuan region. Seeming almost to illuminate your face. Yang Guozhong t~ I~L~. But guard against approaching too near. the maple grove was green. This is accomplished in a speech the poet imagines one of these soldiers making: The carts creak and grind. which began in 755. This . the horses whinny and blow. the pass was black. Poetry They cling to their clothing.. The waters are deep and the waves broad. Warm your hands in his unrivaled powers. On the contrary it is good to have a girl. their skin fine. Du Fu often relies on a visit to a site or the spectacle of a landscape. The last period is the richest. "We've been recruited so often That some have gone to guard the River to the north at fifteen years of age. The prefectural officials urgently collected taxesWhere do they expect us to provide these taxes? We know that it is misfortune to give birth to a boy. rush to see them off. But the boy will only be buried beneath the scattered grasses. the sojourrr in the capital (746-756). One finds in it many more evocations of his youth than of the period he spent in Chang'an.500 poems by Du Fu have come down to us. Lady Yang Guifei :m:IJC. and then the exile and his many travels through the South until his death in 770. They will not let you be caught by a kraken! Chapter 3. But it is not only emotion that occupies the central place in a poem.. written in 750. the Chief Minister may get angry. cousin of the famous imperial favorite. But do conscripts dare to express resentment? Thus as in the winter of the year Before the soldiers are dismissed from the Western Passes. a few years before the empire sank into the miseries of the war that followed the rebellion. having failed the civil service examinations and enjoyed only a brief and obscure career at court. The equally famous "Ballad of Beautiful Women" {Liren xing BA 1T) of 753 seems to allude to the new chief minister. You have questioned us well. When the soul went back. representing only a small portion of an <:Euvre which must have been much larger. The sound of their rises up into the clouds.. their bodies well proportioned . As the soul arrived. Ancient and Classical I fear that this is not the soul of a living beingThe road is so long it cannot be known. pure and upright. Those they pass along the way question the marching men. The men simply reply.: The third day of the third month Along the waterways in Chang'an are many beauties.80 Chinese Literature. One of the earliest works by Du Fu to become famous was his "Ballad of the Army Carts" (Bingju xing :%$1'J). Their flesh taut. cultivating their own fields ." 81 Nearly 1. wives and children. Haughty and distant. His biographies distinguish three periods in his life: his youth (731-745). Fathers and mothers. Dust rises until the Xianyang Bridge can no longer be seen. and block the road weeping. Marching men each with a bow and arrows at his waist. The setting moon spreads its light across the rafters of the room. yet he does not figure in any anthology prior to the tenth century. During the eleventh century he became the prince of Chinese poetry. The girl can still be married to the neighbors. And at forty are still living there in the camps. It seems Du Fu gradually developed an interest more retrospective than prospective. chief. stamp their feet.

depicts the tragic love between Emperor Xuanzong (r. his blue tunic soaked. an instrument resembling a mandolin with four strings. Baijuyi 85~ (772-846) may have enjoyed a popularity among his contemporaries transcending that of any other poet throughout history. can serve as an example: Fine grasses. Even without these false attributions. to the point that many of his works could almost be considered "oral poetry" -he enjoyed attempting to employ the speech of the humble peasant. Bai was by far the most prolific Tang poet. A tall mast. 712-7 56) and his favorite. Bai Juyi himself took great care to ensure the preservation of his works. the Great River sets in motion. Then sat down and rapidly plucked the strings with a greater urgency. Moreover. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. from 765 or 768. relates the emotions the poet felt on hearing an aging courtesan sing the story of her life in the capital. This second ballad of more than six hundred lines was written in 817. Now married to a wealthy merchant. "The Ballad of the Pipa" (Pipa xing re~ff). hidden in allegories that are sometimes obscure today. that was especially favored by female popular entertainers. Few writers of so long ago appear to have transmitted an ceuvre so complete. not in her voice before. The concluding lines read: "Don't refuse to sit back down and play another song. Bai paid great attention to the aural effects of his verse. Bai was no less appreciated in foreign lands.~ (779-831). 800-863). The stars droop. Lady Yang. to the point that many of Yuan's poems were attributed to Bai. Poetry ~RX:~ 83 eight-line pentasyllabic poem entitled "Writing Down My Feelings While Traveling at Night" (Lii ye shu huai liJH~t-'['J). maintains that he saw a man working in the street who had had himself tattooed with the texts of Bai's poems. Literary critics have tended to feel uncomfortable with this precocious genius who was understood by and accessible to nearly every reader." Moved by these words of mine. remains one of the most successful Western studies of a Tang poet. leaving nearly three thousand poems in a variety of poetic genres in addition to a large corpus of prose works. With a chill sadness. "The Song of Eternal Regret" (Changhen ge :RtrHfX). the level plain seems more vast. she stood there a long time. They were the first literary texts in the world to be printed. and placed at the gravest risks for supporting his friends. . what do I resemble? A single sand gull between heaven and earth. one that could provide so much material for a precise biography and that includes so many details of a committed official career. in particular Yuan Zhen.82 Chinese Literature. reporting on periods and places of crisis. Bai played the role of a journalist of opinion. Thus it is no wonder that Arthur Waley's The Life and Times ofPo Chil-i [Bai]uyi}. his two most famous poetic works are elegies. my boat. The second. especially Japan. imported from Central Asia. Drifting and drifting. To some extent. her tale was told to the strumming of the pipa. added to the reputation of a poet whose collected works also contain the most intimate and personal poems. although written in the 1940s. But who wept the most? The marshal ofjiangzhou. How can writings bring me famel've resigned my post in illness and old age. As the moon gushes. while Bai was serving as marshal ofjiangzhou ¥I1'i'[. Play for me again the 'Ballad of the Pipa'. The first. Duan Chengshi (ca. whose career in the government was much more successful than Bai's. his glory eclipsed that of his fellow graduate and lifetime friend Yuan Zhen 51. During Bai's lifetime and for several centuries after his death. All who sat and heard were moved to tears. and therefore he was endangered by the struggles of opposing factions. slight winds on the bank. Bai's satire. where he remains the most popular of the classical Chinese poets. alone in the dark.

the ninth. Deep in the night they cannot stop. But without a son. Music all the day long. So it always is for essays and arguments of us officialsWhen will we be allowed to leave our cage? The cold and snow of the winter of 813-specifically during the traditional calendric period known as the "Great Cold." The piece is entitled "Weeping for Little Golden Bell While I Was Ill" (Bing. It concludes: "It is pointless to teach poetry too well. in his declining years. how can one help becoming attached to her? It was scarcely ten days that she was ill. about which he has remained silent for years. it would seem. "Dances and Songs" (Gewu llfX.Jt::p§@3iZ~-T): Having a daughter is truly a burden. around 20 January-depicted more vividly the poverty of the peasants of his native village in a poem called "Suffering from the Cold While Living in My Home Village" (Cunju kuhan HliS=iS *). To the storied towers of red candles." which takes place in the final lunar month of the year. And we had already nourished her for three years . but Yuan Zhen rose to much higher office. Poetry 85 This theme has inspired a play centered on an imaginary plot in which the poet Baijuyi. or did he have satiric intentions? The following poem. I For it's well known that it will ruin a career. Saw the mound of her little grave in the fields. But was it a secret passion for parrots that BaiJuyi portrayed in the number of poems he dedicated to the bird. But the parallels in this ballad between the situation of the discarded courtesan and that of BaiJuyi-in exile when he overheard her lament-make it likely that this poem also has political overtones." This may be the case. Its colors like the peach blossoms. Don't say she's only a mile or so awayShe and I are separated by eternity! Bai Juyi offered some well-known advice about this time in the form of an eight-line poem entitled "Presented to Secretary Yangjuyuan" (Zeng Yang Mishu]uyuan ·&~f~iH~litfffi)-Yang had taught poetry to his friend Yuan Zhen.wu #I-~). Another emotional poem (one of several on the subject) was written in 812 about the loss of his only daughter.Jinluan 3iZ~. and drums. he encouraged Buddhist compassion. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. I went with the coffin far into the village lanes. Who is aware that in the prisons of W enxiang Prisoners are dying from the cold? Aside from such personal verse.. The president of the court in the seat of honor.84 Chinese Literature. Among the ten "songs" of Qjn (modern Shaanxi) composed during the winter of 809.. "The Red Parrot" (Hongying. His politics were more consistent: he never stopped denouncing injustices or trying to relieve the suffering of those under his administration. were one. reveals his long-time love for this woman. since Bai is acknowledged as the better poet. The minister of justice is the host. ends in the following lines: Those guests arrives in horse-driven carriages from their mansions. suggests the latter: Tribute from far-off Annam-a red parrot. Her old clothes still hang from the rack.. Bai also had a number of favorite exotic subjects that he treated in his poetry. Parrots. songs.Jwng ku]inluan zi (r. they pull their seats closer together. Warmed by too much drink. literally "Golden Bell.The image of bamboo and pine draws on the belief that these plants are noted for their ability to remain vibrant through the winter: . and was sometimes tempted by the alchemical aspects of Taoism.). written in 815. its speech like men's. they shed their fur cloaks. What's left of her medicine yet at the head ofthe bed. BaiJuyi held a complicated set of beliefs: a loyal Confucian. Happily tipsy.

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It's the twelfth month of 813, For five days the snow has drifted down. Even the bamboo and pine have all frozen to death, How could the peasants avoid it? As I tum and look through the village gates, Of ten families, eight or nine are poor. The northern winds are sharp as swords, Their cotton clothes won't cover their bodies. They can bum only fires of wormwood thorns, Sorrowfully sit through the night awaiting the dawn. As I come to realize that the Period of Great Cold has arrived, The farmers' suffering is especially bitter. When I think of how I pass this day, Deep in my straw hut, the door drawn shut, In padded clothing covered by an embroidered shawl, Whether sitting or sleeping I have more than enough warmth. I'm fortunate to avoid famine and frostbite, Not to be subjected to the arduous work in the fields. When I think of this I am deeply ashamed, And ask myself, Who am I to escape such a fate?

Chapter 3. Poetry
Seventy years old before you hung up your official's cap, Your pension not begun, you suspend your right to a government carriage. Sometimes with fellow hikers you roam through spring's joys, Other times with monks in the mountains you sit all night in Zen meditation. For two years you've forgotten to inquire about household affairsThe kitchen stove is seldom lit, grasses cover gate and courtyard. This morning the cook's lad said the salt and rice are gone, This evening the serving maids complained that their dresses were in tatters. My wife and children are not pleased, my nieces and nephews depressed, Yet I, lying filled with wine on my bed, am the picture of content. Let me get up and sketch out my plans for you! My schedule for disposing of my meager legacy. First I shall sell those few acres of orchard in the Southern Ward, Next those several hundred acres of fields by the Eastern Wall. After that I'll sell the residence in which we live, And obtain in all something near two million cash! Half of this shall go to you to cover the cost of food and clothing, Half to me to provide money for meat and wine. This year I am already seventy-oneMy eyes dimmed, my hair white, my head dizzy. So I am afraid I'll never use up my share of the money, But will, like the early morning dew, return to the springs of night. Still as I get ready to return, I certainly won't be unpleasant, I'll dine when hungry, drink when joyful, and sleep soundly. In both life and death there are things which just must beyou've got it, got it you have, Bai Letian!

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A good number of his final poems are lost. But the following, written in 842, four years before his death, might serve as an epitaph-it is titled "Dazai Letian xing" Ji-ijlt~~1T ("On Getting the Point of Taking Joy in Nature"-Letian, "TakingJoy in Nature," is also his zi). The poem seems mockingly addressed to those who were hoping to inherit something from him, and it expresses the spirit in which Bai spent most of his life. The mention of "the springs of night" in the fifth line from the end may refer indirectly to the "Yellow Springs" to which Chinese souls go after death:
You've got it, got it you have, Bai L~tian! Dispatched to serve in the Eastern Capital for thirteen years!

A display of "realistic criticism" in the spirit of BaiJuyi distinguishes the work of eminent contemporaries such as ZhangJi ~~ (ca. 776-829), Yuan Zhen, and Liu Yuxi @j~~ (772-842). Du Mu H!J:£ (803-852), although classified as one of the poets of the "late Tang," often exploits this same vein.

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3. The Late Tang. The Late Tang is the period of Chinese poetry most highly valued by a number of modern connoisseurs; the era saw the development of a kind of baroque style in contrast to the classical revivals of the Mid-Tang. This decadent age began with the brilliance of
LiHe*~ (791-817).

Although he was a protege of Han Yu (768-824) and from an aristocratic family, Li He was unable to pursue an official career and died prematurely at age 26. His career and works have often been compared with those ofjohn Keats. Li left only 240 poems. Charged with a strange imagery, with a bitter and morbid sensuality, a new voice in the concert of Chinese poetry can be heard in these poems, a voice only recently discovered by modern critics. There are some works, echoing The Songs of Chu, which are almost impenetrable to the modern reader, even with the help of commentaries. Li He preferred the relatively free form of the irregular yuefo verse; his "The Tomb of Little Su" (Su Xiaoxiao mu J..t1jvj' ;i;), written in three-word lines, about a famous courtesan of the Tang capital, may serve as an example:
Dew on secluded orchids Like tear-filled eyes; Where have the love tokens goneHere only flowers in the mist I can't bear to cut. The grasses seems like her carriage mat, The pine tree like the canopy. The breeze could be her skirts, The river her jade girdle-pendants. In her canvas-covered carriage She awaits the dusk; The cold green candles Labor to cast their shadows. Beneath the western mound The wind wafts the rain.

Li He visualizes here the departed courtesan reborn out of the natural surroundings of her grave-perhaps in the mist, perhaps in his mind. He suggests that he would have a love token for her, too, if he could bring himself to cut flowers from her grave-mound. As Li He stares through the mist, the poet's imagination transforms the natural scene of the tomb into one of the oil-cloth carriages courtesans used, complete with grass floor-mats and an evergreen top, awaiting the night when her soul can wander more freely. In the breeze, as soft as her skirts, and the river's rippling, he finds reminders of Su herself and confirmation of his vision. The cold green candles may be the copse of trees near the grave. Wind and rain can be merely descriptions of the weather conditions, but are also a standard euphemism for physical love between men and women. Since this figure of speech originally denoted sexual relations between a goddess and a king, and since Li He was fond of the Songs of the South, which depicted many surreal joinings, he may imply an eerie, surrealistic tryst here. Scarcely less baffling is the work ofLi Shangyin *jl}J~ (ca. 813-858), the poet whom Mao Zedong was said to have preferred. He left nearly six hundred poems, of which the hardest to decipher are those labeled "Without Title" (Wu ti ifll€m!), including the following, the second of a series of four:
The east wind howls, as a fine mist arrives; Beyond the hibiscus dike, the faint sound of thunder. The golden toad bites the latch where the burning incense enters; The jade tiger pulls the silken thread, to draw water from the well. Lady Jia from behind peeked curtains at Clerk Han; Consort Fu left a pillow for the talented Prince of Wei. My thoughts of spring will not struggle with the flowers to blossom, For each inch of love in my heart becomes an inch of ashes.

In the first poem of this series, a male persona longs for a woman from whom he is separated by a great distance. Here we have the affair

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from the woman's point of view. The east wind and light rain are reminders to the woman of a rendezvous-wind and rain again. The second line continues to depict the natural scene (perhaps the place where the lovers first met), but also suggests that she is thinking about the man-hibiscus, Jurong, is a homophone for "his face," and thunder, possibly imagined, is often compared to the sounds of a chariot which would bring her lover home to her. Lines three and four depict the luxury of her lonely life. The incense burner shaped like a toad could be used to scent her clothing before a tryst. The next couplet contains two allusions. Lady Jia was able to catch a glimpse of the handsome Han Shou ••• secretary to her father,Jia Chong JfJE {217-282); later she had an affair with Han, which was ended when her father detected a rare scent he had given his daughter on Han's clothes. Consort Fu alludes to a woman loved by both the poet Cao Zhi and his elder brother, Cao Pi {see section II.1 above), who was also emperor of the Wei dynasty. Forced to marry the emperor, when she died she left her pillow to Cao Zhi. Cao Zhi then fulfilled his desire by meeting Consort Fu in a dream. Unlike these lovers, however, the lady of this poem, though fllled with the erotic thoughts of spring, remains unfulfilled-"ash-hearted" suggests despair. There are also a number of works in Li Shangyin's corpus which focus on non-human subjects, such as his "Elegy on a Cicada" (Chan !lt'ii'!):
Always perched so high, it can satisfy itself only with difficulty, In vain it labors, regretting its wasted song. Toward dawn the cicadas break off singing one by one, The verdant trees remain indifferent. As a lowly official, my branch wavers even more, In my old garden, the weeds are already equally high. "I've troubled you, cicada, to awaken me, So that I and my whole family will remain pure."

In summer, cicadas fill the trees in China, droning their songs all night long. Chinese poets early on associated their song with the sadness that often afflicts the pure of heart. The poet here empathizes with the cicada, and can "understand his sound" -a euphemism for friends who truly know one another. The first line refers to the belief that the cicada maintains this purity by consuming only dew, and so it thirsts in its preferred lofty seat. Line two reveals that the cry of the cicada has failed to find it a mate-its song is thus wasted. Lines three and four suggest that as the cicada's "audience" is not moved by its song, Li Shangyin has similarly failed to impress his superiors. Lines five and six continue this line of thinking, with the poet realizing that retirement to his old home {garden) might be possible; but the final couplet reveals that he, like the cicada, will not compromise himself but will continue to sing his pure verse in the vain hope of finding an appreciative listener. From more or less free verse to the strictly regulated poem, from the long ballad to the brief quatrain, whether popular or reserved for the initiated, Chinese poetry seems to have exhausted all the resources of the genre by the tenth century, all the themes permitted by then-current ideologies. The only possibility was to move in the direction of the popular genres. Through the medium of the courtesan's songs in the demimonde, perhaps as early as the eighth century; a new type of poem intended to be sung, the ci ~'ii] {lyric) was revealed to the scholars. By this time the new yuefu had essentially lost the music of its popular origins. The ci imposed on the composer a choice of many hundreds of melodic tonal patterns, which he had to "fill in" by finding the words, some of them from the colloquial language, which could better translate his emotions than those of the artificial, literary language.

ill. The Triumph of Genres in Song Li Bai and Bai Juyi figure among the best of those literati who chose to compose poems to be sung according to the popular ci ~'ii] {lyric) form. Wen Tingyun 7'EII.~t!§ {812-870) was the first to achieve his literary

a slave-like prisoner. Although separated by a thousand miles.. A single song in a clear voice for a moment breaks the line of her cherry red lips. "Let me leave the lamp before the bed-curtains so that from time to time I may see her lovely face!" The sadness of his captivity colors his final works.000 . Phoenix pavilions and dragon belvederes towered to the Milky Way. She first knits her moth-like eyebrows. barely revealing a clove on the end of her tongue. worried that the night will prove too short. Even Ouyang Xiu ~~1~ (1007-1072). removes her gauze-like skirts to give rein to a passion unlimited. He introduced a longer form of cz~ inspired by a popular genre called yunyao ~~ (ditties [which developed] like the clouds). Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. it shines on us both. risked scandal in this genre. Its flowing shadows darken the jade steps. the last . When had we knowledge of weapons of war? One morning I surrendered. the renowned musician Liu Yong WD7k (987-1053) should The ci attained its full maturity with Su Shi i*$3: (1037-1101). however. mostly evocations full of nostalgia for the splendors of his past life spent with his courtesans. The first great master of ci.prince of an ephemeral dynasty that reigned from Hangzhou over a statelet of the South during the fragmented Five Dynasties era (907-960). Jade trees with jasper branches created a misty dream. How can I know what's in your heart. His "To the Tune 'Fresh Are the Flowers of the Chrysanthemum"' (Juhua xin ~::ffi*'f) may serve as example: About to lower the perfumed curtain and express her love. Captured by the victorious Song-dynasty armies. a serious essayist and em1~~nt statesman. night after night? b~tter known under his literary name. such as his "To the Tune 'A Casket of Pearls"' (Yihu zhu-Mli*): Her evening toilet just completed.. was Li Yu $~ (937-978). far from his beloved Hangzhou. be mentioned. Witness his "T0 the Tune 'Night after Night"' (Yeyequ ~~ff!!): The floating clouds spit forth a bright moon. as in "To the Tune 'The Broken Formation"' (Pochen zi ~~r): Forty years I have passed in my country and my homeA thousand miles of mountains and rivers. Dongpo Jl:[:f:E( (Eastern Slope). I wither away. hair turned white and waist narrowing. winning fame by not av01dmg some of its more risque themes. The Academy of Music played a farewell song. Poetry 93 glory through this new genre. Li Yu spent his final years under house arrest in the Song capital. however.. cz. she adds a few light drops of sandalwood stain to her lips.92 Chinese Literature. As I wept before my palace women. were only a small part of the poetic corpus of one of the greatest figures of Chinese literature-350 out of a total of nearly 3. His Among the many other poets who gained fame through the practice of this genre. The worst was to suddenly take leave of the temple of my ancestors. A little later she abandons her uncompleted needlework. Li Yu's collected works consist of scarcely more than forty lyrics. . She urges her youthful lover to go to bed first and warm the mandarin-duck quilts.

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poems. He based his lyrics on a style that he created, which came to be called haofang ~1tl. (heroic and unrestricted). A sense of humor and a positive state of mind distinguish these works. His opposition to the powerful reform politician Wang Anshi .:E*E (1021-1086) earned Su Shi many exiles to the South; these exiles were difficult for the poet, but they seem to have been a source of renewal from which he drew inspiration for poems on themes such as nature, wine, and social demands. The following poem was originally "written on the yamen wall" during his first exile to Hangzhou in 1071. It lacks a formal title, but was belatedly given the following descriptive title when Su Shi returned to the city in 1090 and wrote another poem to the same rhyme: "On New Year's Eve I was on duty in the yamen, which was filled with prisoners in chains; the sun set and I was still unable to return to my quarters, so I wrote a poem on the wall." The poem reads:
New Year's Eve, I should have gone home early, but I've been detained by official matters. I take up my brush and face them in tearsgrieving for these prisoners in chains. Petty men preparing for life's necessities, they've fallen into the law's net without understanding their disgrace. As for me, I'm so in love with my meager salary I follow along and miss my chance to retire at ease. There's no need to discuss who is wise and who foolish, each of us has schemed so that we can eat. Who could set them free for a short time at New Year's? silently I feel shamed by those worthies of old.

The most remarkable of Su Shi's poems are those which relate to the pa~ntings of the literati, as he shows in the following pentasyllabic quatram on "The Snail" (Gua niu .'l!i%4)-a poem stamped with a sardonic humor, since it likely also refers. to everyman's (or some particular man's) struggles:
Its harsh slime doesn't fill the shell there's just enough to moisten it. '
It climbs so high, not knowing how to get back down, And ends up a dried-out husk stuck to the wall.

In .t~e. foll~wing lines, composed in 1087 about a painting of flowers, Su Sht ]Oms hts conceptions of poetic art and pictorial art in his "Written on the Sprig of Flowers Painted by Secretary Wang of y anling, 4f 1" (Yanling Wang Zhubu suo hua ;:he ;:hi, di yi~~~.:=E±fit?R:iH!f.ti , ~-):
To argue that a painting must resemble what it depicts Is to see it almost as a child does. When a poem is composed, you must go by the poem's words You certainly don't need to know the poet. ' Poetry and painting basically follow the same rulesHeaven-given skill and originality ....

The implication of the final lines is that in ancient times prisoners were freed at New Year's. SuShi, however, who sees that he shares much in common with these men, admits that he is more worried about his job (his meager salary) than about doing what would be compassionate.

. One of SuShi's last poems, composed in 1100, was written to tell hts dog, Black Snout that the poet had been released from final exile to the southernmost island of Hainan . The title , wh· h a1so serves as a 1c preface of sorts, ~eads "After I came to Dan'er I got a barking dog named Black Snout whtch was quite fierce but basically tame; it accompanied me when I was transferred to Hepu, and when we passed Zhengmai it swam with great strokes across the river. My fellow travelers were all startled by its actions, and thus I wrote this poem in jest:"

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Black Snout, you canine of the Southern Seas, How was I so fortunate to become your master? By eating leftovers, you're already round as a melon, After all, you don't have to worry about delicacies in offering. During the day you are tame, recognizing my friends and guests, At night ferocious, you guard the gate. When you learned that I was to return to the North, Wagging your tail, you were so happy you almost danced! Leaping about, chasing the servant boys, Your tongue hanging out, panting, raining sweat. Unwilling to tread the long bridge, You went straight across the clear, deep river; Paddling and floating like a duck or goose, Climbing on shore as rapidly as an angry tiger. Your stealing meat was also a small faultSo my bamboo whip had to indulge you; You bowed repeatedly to express your gratitude; Heaven has not given you the power of speech. When it is time for me to send a letter home, I know Old Yellow Ears must have been your ancestor!

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was separated. She was inconsolable after the death of her husband in 1129; her remarriage in 1131, a painful failure. Her best poems, such as "To the Tune 'Declaration of My Intimate Feelings"' (Su ;:,hong qing m~ 't~), which follows, delicately evoke the joy of love for her former husband: Night has come, and deep in drink I'm slow to undress myselfplum petals stuck on a dead branch; Sobering up, the bouquet of wine shatters my spring sleep, My dream cut short, I was not able to go back. Everyone is silent, The moon lingers above, The azure blinds are drawn. Still I rub the remaining buds, Still I finger their lingering scent, Still I want to hold to this moment. The poems of sadness are her most celebrated, in particular that to the tune "Each Word in Slow Tempo" (Shengsheng man Jt!l'l'f), in which each character of the first three lines is repeated, creating an intensity of expression that defies translation: Searching and searching, again and again, cold and clear, clear and cold, it's bitter, cruel and lonely. That time of year when it's suddenly warm, then cold again, and it's hardest to breathe. Three cups or a couple of bowls of thin wine, How can they resist itthe violence of the wind since darkness? But just the passing of the wild geese is what struck me the hardest, though they are acquaintances from long ago.

The poem ends with Su Shi's tongue-in-cheek reference to Old Yellow Ears, Luji's (261-303) dog who carried messages back and forth between Lu and his family. Li Qj.ngzhao

*ft!fm (1085-after 1151) is unanimously considered

the greatest of Chinese poetesses, although she left us only one hundred poems, about three-fourths of them ci, and although she rarely treated themes other than the life of the cultivated woman in high society. Struck continually by bad luck, she expressed her emotions and her sorrows with a force previously unequaled by male or female poet. Married to Zhao Mingcheng !mBJl~ (1081-1129) in 1101, she shared her husband's tastes in art and literature. The fall in 1127 of Kaifeng, the capital of the Song dynasty, brought ruin and desolation, at a time when the couple

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Chrysanthemum blossoms pile up, covering the ground, spoiled by a wan and sallow lookas they are now, who could bear to pick them? I keep vigil at the window; alone how can I bear it getting dark? and the wutong and at the same time a fine rain? Until dusk bit by bit, drop by drop, one thing follows anotherhow can the single word "sorrow" convey it all?

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musicians, and was rarely composed by literati from the best social circles. Therefore, the themes, in which "thwarted love affairs" were often expressed, remained primarily in a popular vein. Not surprisingly, the names of the most famous dramatists were linked to these works. Thus "Springtime" (Chun fl., part of a series title "Songs of Great Virtue" [Dade ge :f(q~l[X]) by Guan Hanqing rlm¥lg~p (ca. 1220-1320), who has been called by some "China's Shakespeare:"
The cuckoo cries, "Go home, go home," But in fact, though spring returns, my beloved hasn't. Several days of anxiousness have made me gaunt, As light and unstable as the willow fluff that flies. All spring there has been no word by land or sea. I see only a pair of swallows, their beaks filled with mud, building a nest.

Two images require some comment here. First, the wild geese, which long ago symbolized letters from her first husband when they were separated, have now become reminders that since his death no more letters are possible. Second, in the final stanza, the comparison between the blossoms and the poetess~both spoiled by a wan and sallow look-is certainly intended. Third, the wutong tree (for which there is no Western equivalent, although one translator has recently rendered it as "beech") is noted for its large leaves that produce a mournful sound in the rain. Although concern with sound and its manipulation is evident in Li Qjngzhao's works, in the hands of the literati the ci generally became a purely poetic form, increasingly disassociated from music. The "tunes," melodies that had been lost, became arbitrary but demanding forms, requiring a great technical virtuosity. Consequently, poets began to feel a need to renew their genre by borrowing once more from the popular sources of the song. It was in this way during the twelfth century, it seems, that the qu e±l (aria) originated, a verse form that also made up the sung part of the opera-theater. The qu in its non-dramatic form was .described as san '/[~, "occasional;" a short form, called xiaoling 1jv~, a simple strophe or refrain, was distinguished from the suites, santao lilc~, which could be quite lengthy. Considering the difficulty of the tunes, to be sung in variable "modes," and the meaningless syllables needed to "pad" lines to fit a rhythm, the form could be written only by trained

For the Chinese the cuckoo is a poignant creature, its call seeming to echo the words "Why not go back home?" The willow fluff is a conventional image associated with the instability or ephemeral nature of a condition or situation. Here it suggests that the speaker feels adrift without her lover. The line translated as "no word by land or sea" literally refers to geese and fish, two traditional symbols for "news from someone far away," especially a loved one (see the last poem cited above by Li Qjngzhao). As this woman languishes, she sees before her the bliss of a pair of swallows preparing their nest for their lovemaking. In the long form of the aria, the freedom of language, which approaches the vernacular, allowed the absorption of some terms borrowed from the conquering Mongols (who ruled under the dynastic title of

W. Victor Mair.. eds. 1994).. 1996).. N. 1975). James J. The Columbia Book of Later Chinese Poetry (New York: Columbia University Press. For the last five hundred years no classical poetry has been produced that deserves to be raised to the height of its illustrious predecessors examined above. and trans. The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature {New York: Columbia University Press. ed. I: 59-74. University of Michigan. Anne. ed. ed. 1992. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. In traditional China. trans.Y. 1984). It was rather that the freshness of popular inspiration was an ideal constantly pursued and never attained . Hawkes. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 1962) and Stephen Owen's Traditional Chinese Poetry and Poetics: Omen of the World {Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.: Anchor. Popular Songs and Ballads of Han China. Poetry 101 Yuan from 1260 to 1368). In the Voice of Others: Chinese Music Bureau Poetry. Sunflower Splendor: Three Thousand Years of Chinese Poetry {Garden City. Stephen Owen. The following anthologies also contain excellent translations of the major genres: Jonathan Chaves. 1988. Suggested Further Reading A succinct incisive survey of Chinese poetry <:an be found in "Poetry. It blended well w1th prose in the majority of fictional and dramatic works. which sometimes evoked life in the amusement quarters of the demimonde with a facetious realism. and trans. Burton Watson's Chinese Lyricism: Shih Poetry from the Second to the Twelfth Century (New York: Columbia University Press. 1986). and trans. ed. Joseph R. ed." in Indiana Companion.100 Chinese Literature. which were about to spread throughout various literary milieus. and trans. Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies. Wu-chi Liu and Irving Lo. poetry was everywhere. Entries in the Indiana Companion on the numerous other poets mentioned above should also be consulted. Neither the diversification of poetic production nor its amplitude was the cause of this decline. Norton. The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry: From Early Times to the Thirteenth Century (New York: Columbia University Press. and trans.. The Songs of the South: An Anthology ofAncient Chinese . Birrell. Liu's The Art of Chinese Poetry {Chicago: University of Chicago Press.. Two Sources of Ancient Poetry Allen. 1985) are fine introductions to the general subject. and Burton Watson.. 1971) traces the history of the shi genre through its major developments and is supported by excellent examples in Watson's fluent translations. Y. An Anthology of Chinese Literature: Beginnings to 1911 (New York: W. This brought a lot of verve to the burlesque themes. David.

Poets of the Late T'ang.D. I: 220-221. Introduction to Sung Poetry. Arthur. Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies. Lin. Baltimore: Penguin. I: 220-221. Waley. 1978. Yu. Voices of the Song Lyric in China. New Haven: Yale University Press. ed. Liu. London: Allen and Unwin. 1994. 1965. Princeton: Princeton University Press. In Indiana Companion. 1983. Stanford: Stanford University Press. The Golden Age of Chinese Poetry Chang. Julie. 1980. Graham. 960-1126. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Stephen. University of Michigan. Crump. Burton Watson. 196 7. Pauline. Angus. 1987. trans. Y. _. Cambridge: Harvard-Yenching Institute and Harvard University Press. 1985. Berkeley: University of California Press. "Tz'u"~ii). The Evolution of Chinese Tz'u Poetry from Late T'ang to Northern Sung.JamesJ. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Major Lyricists ofthe Northern Sung. Yu. Songs from Xanadu: Studies in Mongol-Dynasty SongPoetry (san-ch'ii). Princeton: Princeton University Press. Yoshikawa K6jir6. Landau. 1974. trans. Pauline. Ancient and Classical Chapter 3. 1977. The End of the Chinese ''Middle Ages:" Essays in Mid. Shuen-fu. Durham and London: Duke University Press. Six Dynasties Poetry. Chinese Narrative Poetry: The Late Han through T'ang Dynasties. Levy. "Ch 'ii" i±E. 1986. Harmondsworth: Penguin. 1988. The Triumph of Genres in Song Chang. Owen. 1955. The Poetry of the Early T'ang.T'ang Literary Culture. 1993. Poetry Press. The Great Age of Chinese Poetry: The High T'ang. The Nine Songs: A Study of Shamanism in Ancient China. _. 103 Poems by Qy Yuan and Other Poets. New Haven: Yale University Press. trans. James Irving.102 Chinese Literature. 1980. DoreJ. A. Beyond Spring: Tz'u Poems of the Sung Dynasty. Kang-i Sun. 1996. trans. Kang-i Sun. New York: Columbia University Press. The Reading ofImagery in the Chinese Poetic Tradition. In Indiana Companion. Princeton: Princeton University . The Transformation of the Chinese Lyrical Tradition: Chiang K'uei and Southern Tz'u Poetry.

Narrative Literature Written in Classical Chinese There is a vast narrative corpus in the classical language whose themes and subjects are often considered fictional." On the margins of the "honorable" genres-history. These factors were the growing divergence between the literary language and the spoken language. some literati. The absence of an epic and of an ancient drama in the Chinese literary tradition deprived these new genres of the kind of scholarly validation that might have raised them to the level of poetry and prose essays. It was only in the aristocratic milieu that surrounded the conquering Mongols in the thirteenth century that these new writings were given the status of "noble literature. But one hesitates to . the second more often oral than written and aimed at for the illiterate or semi-literate. among them the most prominent writers. and the controversial but undeniable role of Buddhist proselytizing in seeking "access to the common people. The new genre was condemned_ by adherents of orthodox literature. the essay. under the undeniable influence of Western literary values. but they were unsuccessful in persuading their peers. and poetry-emerged a printed literature of entertainment dominated by fiction. the first intelligible to and appreciated by educated people. The Literature of Entertainment: The Novel and Theater Toward the year A. defended the value of this new literature among themselves." Near the end of the sixteenth century. Nevertheless. two major factors changed the relationship between "elite" and "popular" literature. their place in the literature of the people was at least equal to that of their Western counterparts.Chapter 4. I. It was not until the beginning of the twentieth century.D. 1000. augmented by the increased printing of popular books. that these works were seen as worthy of scholars' attention.

did not wake up.106 Chinese Literature. which won the admiration of generations of scholars for their concision. worthy of preservation. The dog howled until dawn. Xiaoshuo was able early on to extend itself to include all narrative that did not aspire to the level of the major genres. emboldened some well-known scholars to "waste their time" collecting and editing such narratives. It did this several times. and the Bowu dti iW!Jo/Jiit (Record of All Things). From the supernatural we move to the extravagant in this story of the dog from Yang. "I will not let you out. (dtiguai iit'l'£ (records of the strange). he walked into the grass around a large marsh and passed out. The young man said.R$ (232-300). Someone came by. but the young man. dtiren iiS':A. A young man in Yang had a dog which he liked very much and always took with him. the young man fell into an empty well as he was walking in the dark. There was a pit filled with water up ahead. the young man thus escaped being burned. I would gladly give you anything else. "If you give me this dog. Thinking it strange that the dog was barking at the well. I will let you out. attributed to Gan Baa -=fJf (fl. When the fire came. A grass fire started. This fact. The term itself was used in Zhuang Zi more than two thousand years ago and now covers an immense literature which ranges from amusing stories to anecdotes. transmitted in the Soushen houji :J5lit$1$t~ (Sequel to Records of Searching for Spirits) and attributed to Tao Q!. by a historicist attitude on the part of scholars. because their origins differ so much from the mainstream of Chinese fiction in the vernacular. and the weakening of Confucian orthodoxy that followed the disintegration of the Han empire in the third century. notes. circling its master in small steps. who saw in these narratives sources of information. One day." is not suggestive of the Western concept of fiction. (records of [strange] persons). These two factors seem to have figured in the compilation of an anthology of five hundred "volumes" of "minor discourses" published under the direction of Li Fang *BJJ (925-996). some of which were clearly written after the fourth century." The fact that this originally even larger corpus of materials was partially preserved can be explained." The dog accordingly lowered its head and cast a meaningful glance . it shook the water off its body onto the grass around the young man. being drunk. compiled by Zhang Hua 7. The third and fourth centuries were the golden age for the serious scholarly recording of anecdotes. a term which in modern times is the Chinese equivalent of "fiction. He saw this only when he woke up. Although they are referred to as xiaoshuo Jj\]ill. it became a major source for the partial reconstruction of a number of ancient short narratives. occasionally gave way to narratives of greater length and complexity. albeit not of the highest reliability. "Could you let me out? I shall repay you generously. much like the German "short story. or records of varied and novel events.." The man said. and the wind was very strong. The two most famous works of the first subgenre are the Soushen ji :J5!it$~c (Records of Searching for Spirits). Winter had just arrived." the man said. The dog circled his master and barked. when he got drunk. Some time later. "thus I cannot give it to you. barring some fortuitous discovery in the future." "In that case. Printed in 981.an ~M (365-427). he went over to it and saw the young man. thereby wetting all the grass. the most complete extant edition of the Soushen ji contains nearly five-hundred brief anecdotes and tales. which translates literally as "little talks" or "minor discourses." the origin of this term. unable to move. Although the original texts of most Six Dynasty collections of these narratives were lost. When it came back. 320). editors in the Ming dynasty began to reconstruct them (an effort that continues even today). These notes on the strange or the supernatural. entitled Taiping guangji X . Literature of Entertainment 107 il: ill[ apply the adjective "fictional" to them.IfLlfij§C (Vast Records Made during the Era of Great Peace [976-983]). These records are of two major types: collections of bizarre events. and collections of stories about eccentric persons. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4." "This dog has rescued me from death." the young man replied. so the dog went there and got into the water.

the heir decided to return to Yan and sought the permission of the King of Qjn.108 Chinese Literature. Dan galloped over the bridge without the mechanism firing. He had a bridge built with a mechanism intended to trap Dan. declaring absurdly. but [it was too early and] the gate was not open. the dog fled into the night and returned to its master. and the horses grew horns." like the wind beneath the sturdy pine. reveals clearly the witty tone of this collection. who intentionally leave spaces and things unsaid which by suggestion give life to the subject. The subgenre associated with memorable conduct by men and women in their private lives is represented by the Shishuo xinyu i!t"iiJ?. Dan fled and reached the pass [where Qjn's territory ended]. and the crows' heads turned white. This step was taken with the appearance in the seventh century of "transmissions of the extraordinary" {chuanqi ~i'if). those which exemplify the concept of "Squared and Correct. "I will give you the dog. the heir apparent of Yan. Dan crowed like a cock. he put it down and said. "Letters and Scholarship. He tied the dog and then left. The presence of some well-known names. were the first to write these tales as a stylistic exercise designed to establish their reputation and to attract the patronage of influential officials or even the examiners themselves. It is said that candidates taking the competitive examination required to obtain for official posts. which are classified under headings that reflect a general theme What they lack is the suspense of carefully structured narratives. a collection of more than one thousand anecdotes. Ancient and Classical at the well. The preceding chapter presents narratives related to "Affairs of Government. in thirty-six chapters." The "emptiness" of these narratives is carefully managed by their authors. according to the authority consulted. the fifteenth in chapter 4. and then all the cocks crowed." contains a number of anecdotes on these subjects. "If you can cause the crows' heads to tum white and horses to grow horns. Five days later. Yu Zisong ~T~ [Yu Ai ~~ (262-311)] began to read the Zhuang Zi. especially myths and legends-for example.2): Contemporaries depicted Li Ying $!!If (110-169) as "brisk and bracing. When he had unrolled the first fascicle a foot or so. which were promoted from the late seventh century on. However. He bowed his head and lamented. Literature of Entertainment 109 The Bowu . this theory cannot explain the diversity of forms and themes among the complete corpus of chuanqi (which ranges. this version of the story of Prince Dan _§_ of Yan ~' the man behind a failed assassination attempt on the First Emperor of Qin: Dan. The King of Qjn had no alternative but to send him back. He thereupon returned to Yan. "This is not a bit different from what I have always thought. was a hostage in Qjn. For example.dli lives up to its title by treating everything. This evocation of a vanishing aristocratic world has fascinated generations of scholars seduced by the novelty of an allusive style drawing liberally from vernacular expressions in what was then the spoken language. such as the poet and ." Dan looked up and sighed. compiled around 430 by the prince Liu Yiqing ~j~ ~ (403-444). from a little over fifty tales to more than three hundred). The king refused. you can leave. the fourth chapter." The following brief anecdote. Chapter 4. The young man understood its meaning and then said to the passerby. as in the following (Chapter VII.f]f~ (A New Account of Tales of the World)." and that following. Since the King of Qjn (the future First Emperor) did not treat him with respect and he could not obtain what he wanted." These anecdotes exhibit an economy of discourse reminiscent of the methods of the scholarly tradition in Chinese painting-both are the enemy of "completeness. A vast gallery of historical personages parades through these short narratives." The man then let him out.

llO Chinese Literature. satirizing the scholar and calligrapher Ouyang Xun W\~Jl{j] {557-641). but the femininity of the heroine. provided the title of a collection by Pei Xing *1T {825-880). among the many obscure authors of chuanqi implies that the negative attitudes toward imaginative literature held by traditional Confucians no longer prevailed in the revitalized Confucianism of the Tang dynasty. ShenJiji 1/t~~ {ca. Yet. by the younger brother of BaiJuyi. "Renshi zhuan" {f:_fl. One of the earliest scholars to take an interest in these narratives. Bai Xingjian 81'Jf'lll {775-826). takes place in 719 and exposes the vicissitudes of a long official career that turns out to have been only a dream that took the time it takes to cook a bowl of yellow millet. Not long after "Gujing ji" appeared. The other tale by ShenJiji. He justifies himself as follows: All of Zhang's friends who became aware of this affair were astonished by his strange conduct. The return to moral values gives a sharp edge to "Li Wa zhuan" $l!'Ef$ {The Story of Baby Li).. She returns to him each night from then on. In other words. chuanqi. The first. their imaginations shaped and structured the narration. This narrative is guided by the hand of a master-realistic details so thoroughly conceal the supernatural motifs that one searches vainly for clues that this tale was inspired by an oral account which had been elaborated through the art of a professional storyteller and based on actual events. frightened by such a passion. 740-800) was the author of two notable tales. As I [Yuan Zhen] was on particularly good terms with him. is a marvellous account of the tragic destiny of this fox-courtesan . Their subtlety of observation enabled the "extraordinary" to become part of human psychology. Li Gongzuo $012'1: {ca. raising no objections. even when the authors seemed to be reporting actual events. The "extraordinary" of this chuanqi is no longer the supernatural. 770-848) treated a similar theme in his "Nanke Taishou zhuan" "f¥jfPJ:k'1'1$ {Biography of the Governor of the Southern Branch). "Zhenzhong ji" ttr:J:l~Cl {The Story of the Inside of a Pillow). if not to themselves. The major works of this genre struck a unique balance between form and depth of emotion. His repeated failures inthe examinations prolong their separation and arouse her to send him letters about her burning love that the hero is proud to show to his close friends. who vigorously rejects a suitor. felt that their fictional qualities were deliberate on the part of the authors. touched by a long poem which her lover decided to address to her. only to join him a little later for a nigh! of pleasure. but Zhang's decision was firm. he decides not to return to Yingying and marry her.f$ {The Story of Lady Ren). revealing problems that were sometimes further expounded in the conclusion of the tale or in the author's comments often appended to it. She shows herself again only ten days thereafter. Hu Yinglin MH!~ {1551-1602). Literature of Entertainment lll friend of BaiJuyi. composed by the famous poet Yuan Zhen. I asked him for an explanation: "Those beautiful creatures who have been so endowed by Heaven tend to bring misfortune to others. "Yingying zhuan" :iUitf$ {The Story of Yingying). "I am not able to act otherwise. "Gujing ji" "2:1~§[\ {Story of an Ancient Mirror) relates how a mirror disappeared from its case "with the roar of a dragon or the growl of a tiger on the fifteenth day of the seventh lunar month in the thirteenth year of the Daye era {617). The term for the genre. an anonymous tale titled "Baiyuan zhuan" B~f$ {The Story of the White Ape) began to circulate. Yuan Zhen {779-831). linking dream tales with this 51." When her lover announces his imminent departure for the capital to sit for the examinations. and their literary talents gave it a refined style.. and invariably responding to his questions about why she does so by saying. Had Miss Cui . Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. she easily allows him to leave. formula of the futility of official life." it is considered the earliest chuanqi tale and is attributed to Wang Du . leaving just before dawn. is known to have had an immense literary impact. whose father was said to have simian features. but it became widely used to refer to these tales only during the Song dynasty.:£~.whose fidelity nevertheless puts the actions of the male characters in the story to shame.

philosophical works. he suggests an ironic vision of our own world. a time when many such works were censored and lost. but the futility of a genre of classical-language tales at the height of the popularity of vernacular fiction.JM (850-933). and belles lettres). Written in a refined classical Chinese. This was a collection of "strange" stories and anecdotes which had previously circulated only in manuscript. and if she had not become clouds or rain. For you I pine away. assuming the title "chronicler of the strange. A scholar of some local note in a little village in Shandong province. "complete" catalogue of the writings relative to the "four treasuries" (i. most of them sentimental love tales. from the detective story involving a female avenger of wrongs in "Xie Xiao'e" ~ 1]\ffl by Li Gongzuo.. A year later Yingying becomes the wife of another." had produced nearly five-hundred compositions based on events that came from his imagination or on conversations he had held in the course of many decades of a life in which he labored as a tutor and a secretary.e. she could have gained favor with her charm. the tale in the classical language enjoyed a brilliant renaissance with the publication of a collection attributed to Qu You JfJfi (1341-1427). titled]iandeng yuhua ~1&:~~3 (Supplementary Tales Told While Trimming the Lalnp). also with twenty-two pieces. the classics. who litl::: also supported many commercial editions of the Taiping guangji. she would have become a kraken or a dragon: I cannot imagine all her transformations. since they seem to have been considered part of the milieu that precipitated the rapid fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644 and the ideological reaction that followed.. A number of other themes have been tackled by chuanqi. which was appreciated by a rather large audience.L}~ (1640-1715) appeared. the chronicler always yields to the temptations of the story writer.dtai :dtiyi inspired a number of literary emulators during the final years of the nineteenth century. He nevertheless attempts to see her again. Another factor might explain the decline of the chuanqi: in 1766 the first edition of the Liao:dtai :dtiyi JWP~. I tossed and turned thousands of times. Dramatists and short-story writers drew on this rich material..& (1716-1798) displayed the . . It corrected the dryness of style of the "records of the strange" (:dtiguaz) of the third and fourth centuries with the · relative prolixity of the chuanqi In short. but she refuses to receive him and manages to secretly send him this poem: As I have lost weight. It's not because of those in the household that I am ashamed to rise. Around 1420. In the fourteenth century. to the strange story of "Qjuran ke zhuan" !l!~~~ft (The Story of the Curly-bearded Stranger) by Du Guangting tf:J\:. This series concluded with the eight tales in Shao Jingzhan's :g~:it~ Mideng yinhua jl:f&:tzSI~E (Tales Written While Searching for a Lamp). too weary to leave my bed. It was not political conditions. histories. The Liao. for this reason I have contained my passion. the radiance of my beauty has diminished. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4.Y/ftm (What the Master [Confucius] Did Not Speak Of) is a collection of irony-filled short stories in which the great poet Yuan Mei :R. Li Zhen *t~ (1376-1452) composed a sequel. My virtue is too feeble to overcome her evil spell. Among these "new tales" we find only twenty-two pieces. Zi bu yu . published in 1592. Literature of Entertainment 113 encountered riches and honor.112 Chinese Literature. We understand the fantastic of Pu Songling better than we do the realities of the time: through these voyages to the world beyond. who was later to found the Tang dynasty. completed in about 1772 at the order of the Qjanlong emperor. that led to the exclusion of these works from the Siku quanshu [9 ~~If. which gives a part to Li Shimin *i:l=l:l~. The success that these works found in Japan and Korea saved them from obscurity. still too ashamed to see you.=t-~ (Records of Unusual Stories from the Leisure Studio) by Pu Songling r\i:f. and Zhang also marries. Pu Songling. the work has enjoyed unprecedented popularity. ]iandeng xinhua ~t1UJTi't5 (New Tales Told While Trimming the Lamp).

There were important zaju dramatists throughout the Yuan dynasty and into the early Ming. That was no longer the case in the Ming. but were fervent lovers of popular entertainment. The Theater Although some modem Chinese critics have suggested that Chinese theater originated in the seventh century. from those which were meant to be read like novels. and the development of the coal and iron industries at this time. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. the mainstay of the Chinese tradition. Dadu 7:." but approximates the chantefable of the West.jze tfT or "breaks") and an optional prologue. only 2 of this dynasty's 125 dramatists were from that region. and second. a good third were from the area around the Mongol capital. by the conjuncture of two factors-first. the spread of printing. Partly because of Zang's efforts.dzai dziyi tushuo f~IWPif~~~~~~). which was rarely placed at the beginning. 1. and 300 of the 500 produced by the Ming dynasty are still available. But these classical works were only one of the sources of theater and the novel. including one member of the imperial family of the newly restored Chinese regime. it is impossible to trace operatic dramas. The Opera-Theater of the North. giving rise to its name of xiezi ~-T.114 Chinese Literature.Ji Yun i. It is necessary to distinguish playbooks intended to be performed. These works seem to have begun in earnest in the twelfth century. there are 167 extant zaju from the Yuan era. Beginning in the twelfth century. no doubt. The language clearly confirms the more popular nature of the Yuan pieces. The playbooks were prone to reduce plot suspense in favor of lyrical outbursts. despite the attempts of later editors to reduce the vulgarisms in these works. the increasing mobility of the population. especially in the burgeoning populous cities. the "inserted wedge. gathered from collections published from 1789 to 1798. Their characteristics cannot be adequately explained without taking into account the rich panoply of oral literary genres. In the following century. The origins of this type of drama are well known. were popularly known by the flattering title "Sequel to Liaodzai dziyi with Illustrations and Explanations" (HouLiao. which were of concern only to the professionals. The later practice of performing only one or two acts of a drama only reinforced this tendency. in which one of the actors played a leading role.:Eii {1828-1897). The stories of Wang Tao . II. Three names stand out among the pleiad of the most famous dramatists of the Yuan: . following the example of recitation in a roughly contemporaneous kind of ballad called dzugongdiao ~'§W!l-a term that has been translated as "potpourri. Those interested in the commercial side of letters took advantage of the opportunity to appeal to a much larger public by translating much of this literature of entertainment from classical Chinese into the vernacular. Literature of Entertainment 115 charms of an unsophisticated style. ti) {modem Beijing). But the preservation of this genre owes more to the renewal of scholarly interest in zaju. a sort of "precocious modernity. Among the 108 dramatists of the Yuan whose names are known to us.lc~ {1724-1805) intended to oppose the Liaodtai dziyi with more laconic narrations in his Yuewei Caotang biji im~1¥L~*§c {Notes from the Cottage of Meticulous Reviews). it was the only dramatic form to retain a single role that was sung." The astonishing flowering of the opera-theater in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries is explained. who had little passion for formal Chinese literature {poetry and prose). back that far. 1621). which had amusement quarters where permanent theater halls were established. Zaju had four acts. In the golden age of Mongol rule {1276-1367) the zaju assumed its canonical form: four acts {literally . a genre of "variety" entertainment known as zaju W!EJ!lU {variety plays) began to appear. the appreciation of operatic qualities shown by the conquering Mongols." which some scholars have seen in the growth of cities. marked by the publication in 1616 of an anthology of one hundred Yuan dramas edited by Zang Mouxun !Jf?Z~f)l!j {d. into which he incorporated romanticized memories of his voyages to the West.

The longest chuanqi contained 130 chu lfiJ "exits. denounces a judiciary error. The repertoire of Ma Zhiyuan's plays reveals a predilection for Taoism. the absence of even the slightest bit of realistic scenery. Of the sixty-odd pieces attributed to Guan.Jfffi (thirteenth century). who had to leave China to marry a northern barbarian chief. scholars have preferred to translate as "scenes. His masterwork. This version of the famous "Story of Yingying" by Yuan Zhen retains the modifications introduced by Dongjieyuan ii/W:JC (fl. 1240-1320). the principal role is most often entrusted to a woman." To this was added a complete disdain for the Western rule of three dramatic unities. Another of his best-known pieces. Huang liang mengJi. The piece is actually a retelling of a well-known story about a lady of the Han court. was also a native of Dadu. Wang Zhaojun . and.116 Chinese Literature. 2. so that an actor could simulate riding a horse by brandishing a riding crop as he moved about the stage. and the predominance of sentimental themes. From the turning point in the middle of the sixteenth century. There are only seven known pieces by him. undoubtedly because they naturally drew on the sentimental themes of the artistic tales of the Tang. is not mere coincidence. not surprisingly. is the only one left from Wang Shifu's corpus.~W. The Opera-Theater of the South. The most eminent men of letters engaged in a lively controversy at the onset of the eighteenth .g.~i)l~ (ca. which were also called chuanqi. men and women alike. scholars participated openly in the theater and. until the eighteenth century. This single work. Xixiang ji ®mi~c (The Story of the Western Pavilion). Guan Hanqing mmr:l#~P (ca. a failure to distinguish even comedies and tragedies. All of these factors contribute to the impression of a lack of dramatic vigor. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. a native of Dadu.:E~.:/lugongdiao of the same title: a happy ending and moral justification of the young woman's conduct deprives Yuan Zhen's tale of its edge while strengthening the lyricism of the story. each in four acts. 1260-1325). and Wang Shifu. These plays were called chuanqi 1-'-i'it. Should we grant Guan Hanqing a propensity for social satire? The most famous of his pieces. The twenty acts of Xixiang ji are well below the average number of acts for the pieces in the repertoire of the Southern dramatic tradition. Ma Zhiyuan. The fact that little more is known of Shakespeare than about his Chinese counterpart. A separate place should be accorded to Pipa ji fEf:'!~c (Story of the Lute) by Gao Ming j%'jf!Jj (ca. In these remaining pieces. was less prolific than Guan. which charmed generation after generation of young readers. Ma Zhiyuan . costumes in more strident colors. it is the emperor. no longer hesitated to sign their works with transparent pseudonyms. symbolism taking the place of realism. but a measure of the low esteem in which serious scholars held all the entertainment genres. which often troubles Western audiences and readers. which is actually a series of five zaju. curiously. Dou E yuan ffMX~ (The Resentment of Dou E). Wang Shifu . also from Dadu.:E." a term that. 1200) in his . finally. was translated into French even earlier (1872-1880) by one of the most renowned sinologists of the nineteenth century. was based on the tale "Zhenzhong ji" (The Story of the Inside of a Pillow) by the Tang writer Shenjiji The third member of this famous trio. (Yellow-Millet Dream) (translated into Western languages early in this century). which is sung. Literature of Entertainment 117 Guan Hanqing. and in fact Ma belonged to one of its sects. Stanislas Julien. The chuanq~ which descended from the nanxi l¥ilf)t (drama of the South) and originated at least as early as the zaju of the North. a work in forty-two acts that exalted filial and conjugal piety. the most famous of which is Han gong qiu 1J'§:tk (Autumn in the Palace of Han). duped into selecting her to go. who has the principal role. 1305-1370). Paradoxically. was characterized by music both sweet and languorous. only a third are extant. the most famous of the traditional dramas. A young widow is executed for a murder that was actually committed by a suitor of hers who wants to compel her to marry him.

The most eminent of the Suzhou dramatists. The musical style brought to the fore by Wei Liangfu ft~m toward the middle of the sixteenth century. as well as to the performance and the witticisms. by women and children. but each of the four found its own eulogist. who landed in China at the end of the sixteenth century. Each of these plays masterfully exploits motifs of dreams.The Four Cries of the Gibbon (Sisheng yuan ll9l!:1N)-considered zaju because of their brevity. near Suzhou. the kunqu!tffl:l. (The Peony Pavilion).). In practice he paid little attention to the stipulations he made in his virtual treatise on dramaturgy contained in his Xianqing ouji !Jfl'l~~~c (Notes Thrown Down to Pass the Time). owes its name to its place of birth in Kunshan !tLlJ. but not in itself sufficient to sustain the interest of an audience which came to enjoy the music as well as the plot.118 Chinese Literature. Li Yu 1591-16 71 ). and how not to abuse satire. beginning with Liang Chenyu ~liZ~ (ca. and the rejection of cliches. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. a style that Tang Xianzu did not like at first. most of them lost-only the titles remain to suggest their content. The suspense of a carefully organized dramatic structure should be animated by a master idea and brought to life through the novelty of the theme.:E. One must know how to mete out fiction and reality. but it is to the spoken parts of the drama that the most attention must be paid. A drama must be tightly knit-a necessary condition. It is necessary to avoid stuffing the dramatic composition with citations and allusions. Nearly all of the scholarly dramatists composed kunqu. Gao Ming's Story of the Lute is unquestionably the most refined of the "four great chuanqf' (Sida chuanqi [9:. ( Drama ought to be able to be read by the learned as well as by those who are not. Li's comedies exhibit a tone and a concern for dramatic structure unmatched in the Chinese tradition. The essayist Li Yu *i#. (1550-1617) is regarded as the most well-known dramatist of the Ming dynasty. Officials at the highest level became involved in the theater and it would be impossible to cite all those who decked themselves so brilliantly in scandal by founding literary coteries ready to enter into the most acerbic polemics. Li Kaixian *lm7t (1502-1568) had previously introduced the rules proper to the zaju in his chuanq~ notably in his magnum opus. As for the eccentric painter and poet Xu Wei f~M (1521-1593). is considered the most famous of his five chuanqi. how to guard against cliches and the improbable. 1510-1582). and his Mudan ting U:P:T-'. having first treated the art of writing for the stage. or at least to avoid those which are not familiar to every member of the audience: *. which bogs down in inventories and rankings of dramatists and dramas or in lyric technicalities. in which one. The jesuit father Matteo Ricci (1551-1610). a liveliness of language. I have been told that for men of letters there . the economic and cultural center of the region at that time. produced over thirty pieces. Shen Jing 1Jt:EJ (1533-161 0) went so far as to rewrite The Peony Pavilion in order to adapt it to the Suzhou dialect (the poetic passages had to be re-rhymed. and they are still performed today as kunqu. Literature of Entertainment 119 century.*:1$1'lt) of the fourteenth century. It is also necessary to prize fluency rather than depth. his reputation as a dramatist lies in four works of original form. primarily satiric and didactic. but whose given name is written with a different Chinese character-is the author of ten chuanqi. inspired by an episode from the saga Water Margin (see below). The work does not slight song and music. deplored the immoderate passion of Chinese for the theater.l (1611-1680)-whose name in its romanized form seems identical to that of the dramatist mentioned just above. Li Yu speaks to us as an author and director of dramas about the training of actors. etc. in fifty-five scenes.side opposed the immorality of Xixiangji and the other glorified the musicality of Pipa ji. Baojian ji Jl!Yl!J~c (The Story of the Precious Sword). then he concerns himself with style. These notes distinguish themselves from the corpus of Chinese dramatic criticism. The eminent scholar Tang Xianzu ~mi1£!.

as from a fountain. Yang Guifei. how could they achieve this easily? I would say that the ability to write a play belongs only to the greater wri. 25 June-ljuly 1998). they apply themselves to show their talent. Does a literature of entertainment merit such care? Li Yu argues that it does in his introduction: Confucius said. By Kong Shangren fL~f:f (1648-1718). After him the chuanqi produced two masterpieces before dying out. is too complex to be laid out here.. it is because the spirit has guided it there.. 4Another. Hong Sheng had his characters.22). In a pattern that was repeated often at the beginning of the Manchu dynasty. isn't it still better than checkers? In my opinion. though the plot itself should flow naturally. the plot of Taohua shan#E::ft~ (Peach-blossom Fan). there is no major or minor art: what is important is to excel in your art. Although dramatic composition can be only a minor art. comment on events that were clearly more related to the late Ming dynasty. 4 Despite the ban. To search for someone to sell him smiles can only result in something false : you can only draw a bitter sensuality from it.. the official career of the author was ruined. more recent example of a conflict between politics and drama can be seen in the PRC government's refusal to allow a new production of The Peony Pavilion to be performed or travel abroad because it was "feudal. who were ostensibly living in the Tang dynasty.ters. It is as if some supernatural creature manipulates their relationship.. Literature of Entertainment 121 To the tricks of the plot should be added the salt of the dialogues and the pepper of the situation. which saw the birth of what is called in English "Peking/Beijing Opera" {jing xi J?:ll\:. The events surrounding the collapse of the Ming Li Yu well knew that inspiration is beyond all formula: To those to whom the spirit appears. . with its forty scenes {not counting the prologue and epilogue). If the brush appears. and pornographic" (see the series of articles on this in The New York Times. setting out in quest of pleasure by going to find a prostitute. This is the measure of the man. Chapter 4. The immortal works are products not of men. on the technicality that Hong had presented the premiere during a period of mourning for a member of the imperial family. it is the most representative work of the trend toward a preference for quasicontemporary themes in the novel and drama at the time of the fall of the Ming dynasty. 712-755) of the Tang and his favorite. (1645-1704) Changsheng dian :m:~~ (The Palace of Eternal Youth). This final period of dramatic development. playbooks that were rarely printed. superstitious. belongs more to the history of entertainment than to the history of literature. literally "drama of the capital"). Man is only their plaything. 1662-1722) himself. Hong Sheng's m¥f!. Can one still say of this written work that it is deliberate? Literary art is truly communication with the gods. the piece was acclaimed for its lyricism. if not. the writing brush also comes. Even when simplified. completed in 1688) dealt with the popular but tragic love story of Emperor Xuanzong (r. this is not a figure of speech. and the play was therefore judged "indecent" {read "seditious) by the Kangxi emperor (r. "Are there not the board games of bo and weiqi? To play them is surely better than doing nothing" (Lunyu XVII.. but of gods and demons. Li Yu took the Chinese theater in a new direction. But the man is not entirely master. Ancient and Classical is no difference between composing a dramatic work and writing other types of literature. it would be like . because the brush conducts the spirit there or it has not wanted it at all. yielding its place to troupes of professional players who performed according to playbooks written by anonymous authors.120 Chinese Literature.

even though China enjoyed a common language and writing system. Besides those who were illiterate. such as direct address to the reader. a necessity because classical Chinese is not intelligible to the ear. which was made entirely by chance. to its depiction of the rivalries that tore apart the refugee court of the Ming dynasty in South China several decades later. which lasted from 1620 to 1627. since Kong Shangren had made too clear his attachment to the defunct Ming regime. yielded the history of more than a thousand years of oral literature. Yet the proportion of totally illiterate people in China was probably much lower than in the West. the bond between proto-forms of the novel and orality justified its use. of course. A major archaeological discovery at the end of the last century. This work has dispelled the accepted notion that the conquering Mongols 1. The Kangxi emperor. Moreover. which was to be heard. which still entertain audiences. The modern reader of the novel. In the chuanq~ in contrast to the zaju. It existed long before this kind of entertainment. he decided to dismiss the author from his services. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. The title of the play is an allusion to the fan that Hou Fangyu f~71~ (1618-1655). a crushing majority of China's people. The use of the vernacular in the theater. Literature of Entertainment 123 furnished the context and the framework for the play. They formed. often only marginally literate. found it only of lukewarm interest: without proscribing the piece. the work was a powerful evocation of the imperiousness of the defeated. had been working on this piece for nearly fifteen years when it was first performed in 1699. The language . even today. ill. pays little attention to these devices. it is only in that part of it which has been passed on by writing and even printing. Li attempted to commit suicide by bashing her head in. her blood splattered onto the fan. a direction for research that has recently been found to be fruitful. who asked Kong for a preliminary reading of the play. who." inexpensive entertainment that even the lowest class of peasant could afford. More than one-hundred texts known as bianwen ~)( were discovered among some thirty-thousand fascicles taken from a grotto-library which had been sealed by monks in 1035. did not lack men of valor. In the novel. but there are also examples written entirely in verse or prose. brought the two new genres of drama and the novel to the Chinese from outside China. Oral Literature. despite their failure. *'*B· albeit select audiences. If we can perceive in oral literature an antiquity and a diversity. led to the spoken language becoming "literary" after a time. This discovery in grottos known as the "Thousand Buddhas" near the northwestern city of Dunhuang essentially restructured the field of early "oral" Chinese literature. The chantefable thus seems to be the common origin of both these great dramatic genres. The Novel There is not a work of Chinese novelistic literature in the vernacular that does not preserve some of the conventions of the professional storyteller. Oral literature was not simply the "threepenny opera. Writing was a method of transmission of oral literature and allowed amateurs and professional performers. Written texts in the colloquial language m_ay have been meant to be read aloud to the illiterate.fi (1568-1627). offered to the Forced to join the house of a corrupt high beauty Li Xiangjun official as a concubine. Chinese oral literature catered to the elite as well. nevertheless. a descendant of Confucius in the seventy-fourth generation. all of the roles are likely to participate in the singing. then a young militant scholar. and one of her artistically gifted friends transformed these bloodstains into peach-blossom petals. The clear bond with oral literature would seem to merit further research into this relationship. The author. in particular of its women.122 Chinese Literature. to restore these texts to their proper function. there remained a large semi-literate population. The majority of these texts are chantefables. From its portrayal of the hated dictatorship of the eunuch Wei Zhongxian ~)\L'iS'.

by a text from another literary genre which served as the primary material. One of the most characteristic and best-articulated texts is a long version of the story ofMaudgalyayana {Mulian §~in Chinese). The invention of printing responded to this demand. which lacked vocal and musical support when they were read silently. some in the numerous popular milieus of town and countryside. though the novel reached higher levels among the public. even those of the imperial court. a genre completely in verse. actually means "texts on the scenes [of the life of Buddha] in pictures. These oral genres. whose impious mother fell into the depths of the final and most terrible of hells. It is significant that the professional storytellers. an idea they believed improved the image of these genres. storytellers worked from memory. Such seems to have been the case for some tanci 5l'!i~"l {ballads [accompanied by stringed instruments] strummed). originally called shuohuaren ~~EA. It has been shown that the term bianwen. long interpreted as "texts changed" or "transformed" {into vernacular Chinese). left to search for his mother and extracted her deliverance from the Great Sympathetic One. as well as to the needs of the . The themes are sometime profane. The techniques used were not merely spoken. but they might be helped by a synopsis. The question remains controversial. Certain genres have been able to inspire admirers. The birth of the novel in the vernacular seems tied to the origins of the inexpensive "popular" book. and for the most part are common to the subjects of numerous other popular literary forms. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. or with Tianyu hua 7(ffi:ft {Flowers Falling in the Rain)." Telling tales had by then become an art that people worked at full-time. mutatis mutandis. composed and performed by women for a female audience. China's intelligentsia-which in the early part of this century was made up largely of occidentophiles. As a general rule. Literature of Entertainment 125 used ranges from a vulgarized classical Chinese to something approaching the spoken language. and learned imitators have left texts for us. in a way that allowed them to be shown as the story was told. it was characterized as a narration in the popular language composed for a silent reader." The bian were "rolled. These talents were sometimes combined in a performance by a single person. giving way to new forms that developed under new names. at other times the performance group would include two or even {less commonly) three people. it was tempting to take up again. the Chinese regime ofMao Zedong." became in the seventeenth century shuoshude ~ f!J~. Following the example of Theodor Benfey {1809-1881) and subsequent scholars. "tellers of books. 2. Stories and Novellas. the thesis that these marvelous stories had their origin in India. In short.000 words. it has received only qualified responses to date. Near the end of the 1950s. the pious disciple of Buddha. 1796) consisting of more than 500. a situation that resulted from the continuous adulation of all things Western during the "May Fourth Movement" {4 May 1919 until about 1942)-enthusiastically supported the idea that the corpus of imaginative literature in the colloquial languages had foreign origins. there were also genres that displayed the talents of singers and musicians. Instead of passing into nirvana. it still touched the lower strata.ff. on the other hand. or by notes on prepared passages and formulaic expressions. But tanci were also intended to be read. "tellers of stories. the masterpiece by Chen Duansheng !l*ftffi!~ {1751-ca. Over the course of the one-thousand-year history of Chinese oral literature. Each genre was able to find its audience. as with Zaisheng yuan¥}~#~ {Ties for the Next Life). some in more affluent circles. most of its genres have disappeared. This "neutralization" through writing led to other distinctions within the novel based on the dimensions and thematics of the work. often found themselves reduced to fictional narratives that approached the novel. As soon as a text by an author of a certain genre-a text that might never have been performed-approached something like a novel. however." z:ftuan .124 Chinese Literature. denounced the error of this position of national denigration. composed in thirty volumes by Tao Zhenhuai flW]~·[:I during the nineteenth century.

for the storytellers. The most ancient extant collection of huaben$ dates to the Ming dynasty. With four stories in each. under the title]ingben tongsu xiaoshuo J:it. Feng was left the task of sometimes repairing original texts and sometimes concealing his creation of new stories-thus he referred to the works in the collection as both "ancient and modern.. none are divided into chapters or sections. containing ten stories each.126 Chinese Literature. The extremely rare surviving examples of ancient woodblock printing are primitive in appearance. two other volumes of the same m." because each of the titles ended in yan. which were then imitated by writers for the reading audience. Literature of Entertainment 127 Buddhist proselytizers.{il-lj\~ (Short Stories Which Could Be Understood by Common People in the Capital Edition).3fLlJ':§t~l5. but a few of them may appear in re-edited form in the San yan ==§ (Three Words). Ancient and Classical Chapter 4.:ijs: (base of the narration or story). Some of the stories gathered early in this century by Miao Quansun ~~1* (1844-1919) in a collection that is probably apocryphal may have originated as such texts. An introduction to the principal narrative. the publication of these stories in 1915. Feng Menglong published an anthology of three volumes containing 120 xiaoshuo in Suzhou and Nanjing. where such short stories were produced. None of the originals have come down to us. but the most popular.!. It was compiled from 1541 to 1551 by Hong Pian #Hffl. the largest collection of anecdotes ever gathered. Only twenty-nine pieces remain. These are narratives that stem from different oral genres. seem to be clumsy attempts to reproduce a session by a teller of xiaoshuo. Jacques Dars has recently provided a complete French translation (Paris: Gallimard. the three volumes purported to have an edifying aim and were known collectively as the Three ''Yan".§.~~~ (1574-1646) from 1620 to 1625. Although claiming provenance in the Song dynasty. The ]ingben tongsu xiaoshuo contains texts of astonishing maturity with respect to the art of storytelling and the handling of the spoken language. with those who specialized in romantic subjects narrating to the accompaniment of a flute. a descendant of Hong Mai #!:~ (1123-1282).E. as well as the scripts of successful dramatic works. Hong Pian published a series of six volumes. in thin. bookstores published the texts of stories or ballads. mostly short fascicles revealing a clumsy technique. we know that specializations in storytelling had developed by the twelfth century. In fact. left the audience time to settle into their seats and created suspense that was skillfully maintained by the tempo of the narration. Eleven more were recovered from later collections. Feng's publication ensured the huaben a popularity that lasted only until the end of the seventeenth century. two of them in fragments. usually an anecdote or a series of poems. caused a sensation. 1987) under the alternate title Contes de la Montagne sereine (Qjngping Shantang huaben m. From 1620 to 1625. in 1628 and 1633. the editor of the Yijian z:/li ~~. From various types of ancient evidence. Perhaps the tellers took turns according to their specialties. perhaps alluding to a place in the environs of Hangzhou. it brings together sixty xiaoshuo and seems to mark the first scholarly interest in the genre of "popular" short stories. "Little talks" (xiaoshuo) were the least prestigious. "disposable" booklets. certain texts. The thesis that has long prevailed would have us believe that some of these small booklets were produced as prompts called huaben ~i5.\ +15VJ\~ (Stories of Sixty Tellers). the work seems much later. Titled Liushi jia xiaoshuo .=:.:iJs:) referring to the name that Hong Pian gave his publishing house.3f .:iJs:W. or "three words. and published." Ling Mengchu ~~*JJ (1580-1644) profited from Feng's commercial success. "Hall of Mount Qingping" (Qingping Shan Tang LlJ':§t). by bringing the nobility of a venerable ancestor to the trend toward using the spoken language in literary works. Their strong point was to be able to offer the public a complete narrative in one session and a varied range of themes. among the most ancient extant. In the amusement quarters. an anthology of 120 stories published by Feng Menglong {.

A son goes into business to help his family avmd financial ruin. "The Courtesan's Casket" (more precisely "Du Shiniang nu chen baibao xiang" tl+Y~~ msWm [Du the Tenth in Anger Sinks the Casket with One Hundred Treasures]) develops a powerful drama that recalls one of the themes of The Idiot by Dostoevsky. (The most curious were bold and offered a piece of silver) . From the two hundred total stories in these five collections by Feng and Ling. He finally decides to go abroad and forget about his failures fo." to quench his thirst. He hopes to kill two birds with one stone by jilting her: to escape from the displeasure of his father and to earn one-thousand taels of silver by giving her up to a rich salt merchant. marvelous!" he exclaimed with a huge sigh. she follows her treasures into the waters. Pai'an jingqi tEl~ (Striking the Table in Amazement at the Wonders). Bad luck pursues him in each of his ventures however.. (Pai'an jingqi. . he stuffed the whole thing into his mouth rather than separating it into quarters. Let me take advantage of the others' absence to have a look at them!" [He decided to spread them out on the deck. taking with him only a crate of a local variety of tangerines. also dismisses the pretense of edification in favor of a new concept of the "extraordinary" in daily life. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. a young scholar from a good family. however. She has hidden its existence and its treasures from her lover.. a while. a sky filled with stars .. exceptional in the Chinese narrative tradition. The first story of Ling Mengchu's Pai'an jingqi opposes this moral and psychological "extraordinariness" to a "relativized extraordinariness" on ~he the. before throwing into the waves drawer by drawer.. passed a part of the night sighing in her arms. the treasures of her casket.. at the end of a long description of the psychological behavior of the partners. finally. but]ingu qiguan includes some stories that are incontestably "modern" masterpieces. suddenly the oranges returned to his mind: "This crate of oranges. Portions of this collection have frequently been translated into various Western languages.. 9) As a result of his trip.128 Chinese Literature... Wen earns a fortune selling the tangerines and goes on to become a successful exporter. the young man remains on board the boat: He was sitting in melancholy. Ill. ]ingu qiguan. flouted and betrayed. This tragic denouement. But. when N astasia throws a large packet of bank notes (the price offered for her hand by a suitor) into the fire.me of luck that turns. At one port. which is really only a cover for his bad conscience? She is . The courtesan Du. · Hardly had he opened it when a delicious perfume titillated their nostrils and drove those pressed around him to exclamations of surprise. but feigns agreement. seems characteristic of the period of transition from oral storytelling to literati imitations of these tales. he swallowed it without spitting out the seeds. not knowing any more about how to eat them. which appeared in about 1640 and attempted to take advantage of the popular taste of the day.. which I have not opened since we left. thereby denouncing the le~hery of the salt merchant and the venality of the young scholar. The ending occurs suddenly. Passersby on land approached and formed a crowd . has probably become spoiled in the heavy atmosphere of my cabin . throws herself into the waves after the casket. The lover can decide to reveal his "excellent plan" to Du only after having .. Is she taken in by her lover's despair. It was the great and lasting popular success of these forty stories that hastened the sources of the collection into an oblivion from which they emerged only in the twentieth century. peeled it as he had. The forty works chosen for inclusion may be debated. known as "red delicious of Dongting Lake.. "Marvelous. Unlike Feng. The buyer. The title of these two volumes. Literature of Entertainment 129 dimensions as the San yan. forty were chosen for the anonymous anthology ]ingu qiguan ~~iij-fi (Wonders of the Present and Past). His throat filled with juice.iij- not duped.] The entire boat became a brilliant red. he openly portrayed himself as their creator. where each person is left to attend to his own affairs. who had watched Wen eat his orange. from afar one would say there were a thousand lights.

referred to as fiction in the caizi jiaren :. In chapter 6 the hero discusses his "projects" with his mentor and sworn brother. the masterpiece of the erotic novel. which fell unjustly into oblivion in the eighteenth century. The technique of the Decameron of Boccaccio. "The aphrodisiac can only make this thing last longer. Several of these twelve pieces. Right now the only problem is that I have no woman. they will surely be full of energy and able to write good compositions. employing them in defense of his right to be inventive in constructing plots related to a central theme. Their artifice is revealed in the skillful use of irony. endowed with extraordinary powers.130 Chinese Literature. with the plot of each story relating to the main theme of the collection. We will not attempt to recount the plot.. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. and in the clarity of a style in which Li fully masters the resources of the spoken language." possibly distributed in the form of printed sheets of paper. embellished by polygamous "happy endings. apart from emphasizing the Buddhist framework that gives the narrative the allure of a sort of Tantric initiation. If only a 'happy event' can be arranged. Literature of Entertainment 131 The majority of such "modern stories" were free expansions on sources in the classical language.t. furnished subjects for his dramas. then I will not be afraid that it won't last long. This work shows the hand of a connoisseur in matters of lovemaking. but it cannot make it bigger.Y{*A. The essayist Li Yu (1611-1680) also wrote innovative works of this type. That was no longer the case in many later collections. They were eclipsed by the lasting success of his Shi'er lou =:fl (Twelve Towers). as clever as it is extravagant.l!t (Silent Dramas). not the work of a simple drudge. which did not enjoy such sustained popularity. was used in only a single known Chinese collection. they will be like those talented candidates who took ginseng tonic before taking the official examination. The other day I bought an excellent aphrodisiac. followed later by sequels. novellas each developed over several chapters." + In twenty chapters. West Lake in Hangzhou offered a geographic framework for many of these works. abducts for his master a beautiful woman with whom the latter has fallen in love. written by Pei Xing (825-880). But the go-between for the hero in Rou putuan is scarcely a measure of the hero's ambitions: "Big brother. the Doupeng xianhua RtiDIOO~! (Idle Talk under the Bean Arbor). Rou putuan is a typical example of the kind of "short novel" that appeared at the end of the sixteenth century.. the short story became more overtly involved in the politics and conflicts of the times. That leaves a hero without a place to display his arms. before undertaking the job I will do a little rubbing and smearing. "men of talent and beautiful women" mode. which I have here. At the time of the fall of the Ming. Even if they had taken tons of ginseng. Published between 1654 and 1658. so common in Indian literature.. an anonymous work. As for those whose 'capital' is tiny. its conventional situations. exhibit the qualities and manner typically associated with the Chinese novelist. One sometimes suspects another type of source: various facts and scandals which were the object of "handwritten stories. If those whose 'capital' is big and thick use the aphrodisiac. they still could not do a good job upon entering the examination hall . The Kunlun slave." Rival of Kunlun replied. The Rou putuan ~rill! (Prayer Mat of Flesh). they are just like those who have passed the qualifying examinations but have nothing in their bellies." titillated Western taste. don't worry about that too much. Rival of Kunlun-that is to say. . this also became the favorite length of the sentimental novel. Novels in this subgenre were accordingly among the first Chinese literary works to be translated. In vogue from the middle of the seventeenth century until the middle of the following century. through which the creator makes fun of himself and his creation. After they enter the examination hall. rival of the protagonist of the Tang tale "Kunlun nu" ~~~)( (The Slave from Mount Kunlun). Li's first collection of stories bore the significant title Wusheng xi ~~/.

but some of its passages are more popularized than the corresponding sections of the long novel The Three . typified by Shuihu dluan 7}.rf:l. However.~$ (ca. The Sanguo dli pinghua ::::~~}jL~ (Plain Narrative on the Records of the Three Kingdoms) is only three chapters long. were opposed to those of the "minor books. despite the Confucian "puritanism. 1660) is considered the model of sentimental fiction. and. under the title Les deux jeunes filles lettres (Two Young Women of Letters). Yu]iao Li . said to be of "medium length. itself on having put onto the market the "four great extraordinary books. they were called ping [hua] }jL~§.f§}jL~§).~1$ (Water Margin).::E. characterized as "completely illustrated plain narratives" (quanxian pinghua ~." that Chinese readers of the novel were able to satisfy their passion-a passion so widespread that the eminent scholar Qj. the fantastic novel.J~fr& (here again each of these syllables is taken from the name of a character in the novel). These four masterpieces of the long novel at the end of the Ming dynasty also represent the major subgenres of the form: the historical novel. re-edited from originals of the preceding century.. Ping Shan Leng Yan }jLLi. Haoqiu zhuan inspired the unfinished novel Kyokaku den {~~it (Stories of Heroism) by the prolific Japanese novelist Takizawa Bakin ~JIL~~ (1767-1848). Japanese libraries have preserved five printed texts from the fourteenth century. in the first quarter of the seventeenth century.132 Chinese Literature." dashu :k~. Next to these long novels. In 1860 Julien published a careful version of another sentimental novel. Literature of Entertainment 133 The version of Haoqiu dluan frf~1$ (The Fortunate Union) published by Thomas Percy in 1761 showed the Western public how much the mysterious Chinese were like the Europeans in their sentimentality. The title of this anonymous work." Pinghua designates an oral genre that is still alive today. each chapter of which was illustrated by two full-page woodblock prints." sida qishu 12." although some scholars prefer the term "narratives with commentary" or "commenting narratives.an Daxin ~:kB. Because the oral historical narratives were never accompanied by songs or musical instruments. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. known as "long novels" or sagas. is formed from the names of the three heroines. The distinction was maintained throughout the long history of this art.:E {Jade within Iron). such as]in Ping Mei ~fm :m. the swashbuckling novel. often of composite authorship. like that of]in Ping Mei ~tm:m. there are illustrations at the top of each page. as seen in the Sanguo dli yanyi =~~~~ (The Three Kingdoms). which celebrated the important historical affairs of China's past. 3. Arcade Huang. finally. each a separate popularized version of a history of a different Chinese era." xiao shu 1j\~' which related the domestic events of daily life. a million or more characters-such is the finalized form to which traditional editions of the long novel aspired at its peak. the Confucian "Four Books" cut a poor figure. began a translation that Abel Remusat finished in 1826 and that Stanislas Julien revised and published under the title Deux cousines (Two Cousins) in 1842. The long novel could pride The origin of the long novel seems to hark back to the most honored category of professional storytellers-the historical narrative related in cycles told over long periods of time. This eighteen-chapter work succeeded· in China because of entertaining characters such as Tie Zhongyu . the novel of behavior and morals. claiming that it was as destructive as the heterodox sects of Buddhism and Taoism. as defined by Xiyou ji ]ffi ~~ {Journey to the West).IT (1728-1804) denounced xiaoshuo. surrounding the courtships in this tale. so that oral narrators of the "major books. In these texts. The "Long Novel" or Saga.John Francis Davis offered a less distorted translation of the novel in 1829. Montesquieu's informant on matters of the East. This passion could be satisfied only in those lengthy works of fiction. it was not in these works." not typical of the caizi jiarennarratives. "plain [narratives]. More than a hundred chapters. but it has also served for many centuries as a synonym for the novel.9:kiit~.

a popularized chronicle of the past. but the subject of the fiction." The pinghua were then presented in a more civilized style approaching that of classical Chinese. the simpler texts generally include a greater number of episodes. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4.C." used by storytellers to present recent events." offers an example of the historical novel much different from our own: history is not the framework. however. Thus. was attributed to one Luo Guanzhong Kilt$. On the contrary. because the story does not belong to "history" as such. raises suspicion. the latter insinuates itself into the text only to give more color and life to the narratives. although reputed to be "seven-tenths fiction. one cannot find the legendary account (as it appears in the prologue to the novel) claiming that the parties who struggled for hegemony in the tripartite division of third-century China were headed by reincarnations of the companions who helped found the dynasty (in 206 B. But the strength of the novel is in the ability of its author to strike a style appropriate to the theme of rebellion: never before had the vigor and resources of the spoken language been handled with such mastery. In short. no one considers Water Margin to be a historical novel. who some have argued should be identified with a fourteenthcentury dramatist by the same name.C.e. the wise counselor of Liu Bei ~Jf. It is generally accepted that Water Margin was compiled in the fourteenth century and directed against the Mongols who then controlled China. rebellion. in the pinghua on The Three Kingdotmperiod. The novel is structured around a chain of events and permits almost any interpretation: versions of Water Margin range from 71 to 124 chapters. Paradoxically. Literature of Entertainment 135 :::1111 Kingdoms. the most popular Chinese work in other East Asian cultures. was often eschewed in official writings.) and who were unjustly executed at the instigation of Empress Lii g (r. The large number of novels attributed to this obscure figure. do not read any of Water Margin." The action of Water Margin is set in the thirteenth century: not one of the great novels takes place in a contemporary setting.i

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1 shortly after 1660. Innumerable works of opera-theater and other genres of entertainment have drawn on material from The Three Kingdoms. the novel-titled The Three Kingdoms. Its subject matter. each for its own profit. who strove to be more faithful to earlier versions. Nevertheless. This restructured version of the novel with new commentaries superseded all previous editions and remains much more popular than the edition prepared by Li Yu (1611-1680). We do not have any evidence of an edition prior to 1494 of the longer version-i. "new narratives. Was Water Margin an expression of the presumed author's indignation . themselves often considerably "folklorized. and the debate over precedence between the fuller-text versions and the simpler-text versions remains unresolved..i: Zhuge's disappearance foretells the ruin of his master. Nothing enables us to confirm the hypothesis that the cihua J'iEJ~IS (narratives interspersed with poems to be sung) is an intermediate stage between the pinghua and the long novel. since the end of the fourteenth century. Cunning occupies a place as important as warfare in this colorful novel.). The fact remains that pinghua reveal a scholarly concern for the greatest conformity with the "official" historical sources. stay away from The Three Kingdoms. It is impossible to summarize here the struggles and intrigues of this novel as the three powers search to reunify China. in 120 chapters. the amplification-yanyi ~~ (development of the sense)-of the novel The Three Kingdoms. The character who exemplifies cunning is Zhuge Liang ~g~. This text. for example.134 Chinese Literature. The "first" of the four great long novels-there is a known edition of 1522-The Three Kingdoms was the last to receive its definitive form in the hands of Mao Zonggang =B*F. A proverb puts the reader on guard: "In youth. This novel. 195-188 B. Various extrapolations lead us to conclude that the nucleus of the novel took its form from what were called xinhua f)T~. is not thought to derive directly from the pinghua account of the same period. We have been unable to confirm this. eccentric scholars have read it as a denunciation of the Chinese imperial government's abuse of power. moreover. in old age.

as Li Zhi $Jil (1527-1602). should be interpreted as the reincarnation of the revolutionary spirit of the Chinese people. a feeling no excerpt can convey. Monkey. Here also the point of departure is historical: the pilgrimage of the monk Xuanzang X:~ (602-664) in quest of the Buddhist scriptures. a conscious mastery in structuring the whole underlies an apparently reckless story. In fact. At the turning point of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in 1972.136 Chinese Literature. the most famous of a number of such trips. Song Jiang 71':1I. The band of outlaws that swelled through the course of the narrative was not made up of choir boys. or was it an exercise in literary style. eliminated a good third of the final part in such a way that the epilogue became a dream predicting the imminent massacre of the outlaws. works that readers immersed themselves in without ever being sure that they had grasped the key to the story. even though he rallied his comrades to the ideals of "fidelity and justice. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. asjin Shengtan s]z~~ (1610-1661) attempted to demonstrate in his admirable commentaries? The fascination exerted by the novel fit precisely with its resistance to any too-coherent interpretation. Literature of Entertainment 137 against the incompetence of the constituted powers. critics have condemned the commander-in-chief of the rebels. although in the strictest sense peasants are distinguished by their absence among the outlaws of Shuihu <}tuan. opposed to the impulsive Li Kui $~. It does not matter if only about 40 of its 108 heroes are memorable: what is important is the long-range view of the swirling world of the novel. The first great novel to have been re-edited in this last phase of the Cultural Revolution was the Xiyou j~ an apparent paradox. in 1642 Water Margin was the first of the great novels to be officially banned The band of outlaws ends the novel by joining with the imperial regime to combat other rebels. this work is like the other three great classical novels: it is possible to assume a coherent allegory only in a novel written by a single author ex nihilo. Inspired Marxist critics read this story of an ape endowed with supernatural powers who led a troupe of pilgrims west out of China in search of Buddhist scriptures and concluded that the "Promethean side" of the main character. It would be somewhat tedious to continue the joke over one hundred chapters. Song Jiang. but these sagas were the creations of a "composite authorship" and evolved over a long period of time. but the laugh brings salvation. is only the protege of the four monsters or animal spirits who have become Buddhist converts. converts arrayed against the covetousness of the demons along the way who seek to devour a piece of flesh from this completely . besides. Considered an incitement to banditry. This resistance to systemization by critics is undoubtedly the secret of the long-term popularity enjoyed by these vast novelistic creations. Nevertheless. the extravaganzas are related with unmatched gusto. Xuanzang was able to get an important team appointed to translate the Sanskrit texts that he had brought back-nearly a third of the entire Chinese Buddhist canon an ' undertaking without parallel from the point of view of both quality and quantity. Monkey." The Shuihu <}tuan in 70 chapters (or 71 and a prologue) has eliminated rival editions for nearly three centuries. arguing that the novel should be appreciated primarily as a literary monument. Various episodes or "mini-cycles" have inspired dramas and works in many other popular genres. the Black Whirlwind and the "true revolutionary" in the work. the accursed philosopher. would assure us. Inspired Marxist critics in the People's Republic attempted to make the work an epic of peasant revolt.Jin Shengtan. In the past a number of scholarly commentaries have sought to systematize the allegory in this novel. The pleasure of reading the novel is precisely its length. the hero of this enterprise. In]ourney to the West. he was received with the highest imperial honors upon his return in 645. since the theme of the extravagant journey to the West was the quest for salvation through the Buddhist faith. Departing the Tang capital of Chang'an in 629 without authorization. the novel emerged from the global negation of classical literature to be denounced for its "revisionist" theme and to have its "traitorous" main character. especially within a Taoist framework.

dating to the end of the sixteenth century. such as the limited number of principal characters in both novels or the use of the cycle of the seasons as a chronological reference in the narrative. We did not know he had spared himself of completing the number. it's you. The first seven chapters are devoted entirely to him. In his turn Sandy then applauded: "It's you. is uncontested. At first examination. narrative interspersed with poems. a shihua "W'"iffi. notices that the number of terrible trials that the Chinese monk must undergo is not complete. when they turned to find a corpse floating down the stream.iji(Jgt (ca.. including some of the most prominent of the time. that the originality of the novel dazzled the few privileged persons who had access to the incomplete manuscripts at the tail end of the sixteenth century.. to his capture and confinement under a mountain. In Buddhism. Many Chinese critics of the May Fourth Era (1919-1942) vaunted the modernity they found in this novel. you!" The boatman uttered a cry and also exclaimed. Guanyin. Was it a work which did not take itself seriously but was received as a serious work.. the first being _a kind of Sancho Panza to the second. The object of the quest-seeking Buddhist texts-seemed derisory in relationship to the merits accumulated through the eighty-one tests and to the brilliant arrival at their goal. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. when just before meeting the Buddha. But there is no doubt that Monkey attracts all of the footlights. do not be afraid at all! In fact. from his birth out of a rock "impregnated" by Heaven. congratulations!" All three joined in a single voice to offer their congratulations.138 Chinese Literature. other than that they share the same number of chapters. The central role was already allotted to Monkey in an earlier printed version of the story dating to the twelfth or thirteenth century. Literature of Entertainment The patriarch gently punted the small boat away from the shore. the horse-dragon speaks in only a single episode. the monk Tripitika sees his mortal remains floating in the river. it insists on the latter interpretation without managing to sustain the allegory of "monkey = troubled human spirit" from beginning to end. Seeing that the venerable monk was terrified by this view. while glancing through the reports of the protective deities. Critics still face an insoluble textual problem concerning the priority of a' "full" version of the novel and an "abridged" one. composed in the style of Buddhist gillha poetry. 139 abstinent holy monk. The literary superiority of the first over the other versions. without parallel in world literature. nine times nine is necessary to find the truth." Pigsy joined in chorus. The emphasis is on Pigsy and Monkey. is also the earliest version of the story in the novel format. nothing could be more different from]ourney to the West than the ]in Ping Mei sl'Zfm~ (Plum Flower in a Vase of Gold). Of these four animal spirits. Monkey laughed and said. through the correspondence of a coterie of scholars. In fact. . "But that's you! Congratulations. An example of the humor so characteristic of the narrative comes from chapter 98. the reliability of the attribution of]ourney to the West to Wu Cheng'en ~. which may in tum derive from a ninth-century text. he still lacks one. that is you!" "It is you. since one mouthful would make them immortal. Could it be because the monkey is the animal associated with the west in East Asia? Or because it symbolizes the unrest of the human spirit? The most complete edition of journey to the West. 1500-1582) remains unconfirmed. the Western paradise . and Sandy remains most often a secondary partner. Monkey having pushed them into a boat without a bottom: In the penultimate chapter. or just the opposite? Should one enjoy the humor in it or bring out its irony? This ambiguity makes the novel a unique work. some other similarities could be pointed out. one-hundred. however. "Master. Since the holy monk has suffered eighty tests. We know.

which contains the names of two of his concubines and a temperamental maidservant. The "realism" of ]in Ping Mei does not lie simply in the "little details that are true. from which he has selected and skillfully employed a good thousand fixed expressions. The career of the huckster who is the protagonist of this work. who." "My dear little cookie. the concept of alternating "hot and cold" is developed remarkably by the commentator. mouthful after mouthful. But the young woman refused to let go of [the penis which she had kept in her mouth]. Quarrels and problems occupy a large place in the text." it translates the passion of the teller of "minor stories" or xiaoshuo into the tiny details that organized daily life. conveniently re-situated in the thirteenth century. These clues weaken the generally accepted thesis that this work was the first creation of a single author (albeit an unknown 111 author) in the realm of the novel.ng. "My dear. you should avoid the cold.e "schemes" of the master of the house to crush the weakest of those who oppose his designs. She actually drank it. no one loves me like you do!" Ximen Qjng exclaimed. reaches its apogee exactly at the middle of the novel. the Confucian philosopher of antiquity who felt that human nature was fundamentally bad. "piss in me. along with t:l). The wealth of erotic descriptions is elevated more by curiosity than by indulgence. although it has been recognized throughout Chinese literary history as a masterpiece. a collector of women. inaccessible to the public at large. the text has no prologue.Jin Shengtan. and weak. the qualifier "naturalist" to condemn this work. denounces the treachery of Song Jiang and condemns the principal wife of the Ximen Qj. with a number of hidden links. Ximen Qjng [ffi F5!:1. as abusive. ·Inspired Marxist critics take pleasure in using. slowly. Literature of Entertainment 141 Drawn from an episode narrated in chapters 23-27 of Water Margin. that with which to satisfy its worst tendencies? Yet a careful examination of the text reveals that the author presumed to leave a manuscript that was incomplete. depicting Ximen Qj. I will swallow it all! It's good to stay warm. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. suspends the action." she said to him. a primitive stage of the novel. At this he pissed to his heart's content into her mouth. Golden Lotus ~ri. These descriptions have caused the first great novel of Chinese morals to be forbidden. as we can see in the following excerpt from chapter 72.140 Chinese Literature. the ]in Ping Mei in effect is of the dimensions of a saga or long novel. following the example of his predecessor. The edition refined and commented upon by Zhang Zhupo 1 71H'r!&: near the end of the seventeenth century is a long-unrecognized masterpiece of literary criticism. His breathtaking erudition touches the domain of entertainment literature. an old printed edition dating to 1618 was discovered. immensely happy with such attention. in spite of various developments in subplots and digressions. but rather employs a brief "oblique" tale on a related theme to open the narrative in the age-old style of the storyteller. did human nature not find in the corrupt society of that time. resembles that of the shorter novel. the main plot. particularly that in the vernacular. which otherwise embarrasses them by honoring no taboos. "Is it good?" Ximen asked her? . it is because the true center of interest is that emphasized by the title. Labeled a cihua (narrative interspersed with verse to be sung). In the 1930s. reprehensible.ng in bed with one of his concubines just after they have made love: Ximen Qjng felt the need to get down from the bed to urinate. and brings out the feelings of things and people. if that is troubling you. without losing a drop. or abusing. One finds in the novel a marquetry of texts cleverly joined and adapted to the needs of the narration. The vigor of the editing and the structure seems to preclude the notion of one personality who might have imposed on this work a vision of the world close to that of Xun Zi. It would be better than getting down and freezing your balls off. As a result. If the last quarter of the narrative carries on without him.

All say the author is crazy. If you have some jasmine tea.. Later. which completely differed from the little sentimental or erotic novels]. from the homeland of Confucius. The wealth and variety of the commentaries have not ceased to feed critical studies of sprawling proportions. She will have no shame before the most humiliating indulgences. none of which went beyond chapter 80. Literature of Entertainment 143 "A little bitter.. The allegorical and marvelous framework brings a coloring more Buddhist than Taoist to the work. from sensuality love was born. as Mao Zedong. who boasted of having read it five times. Handfuls of harsh.142 Chinese Literature. The authenticity of the 40 final chapters remains a subject of controversy. who prides herself on her eminent position. in consequence he changed his name from Vanitas to Amor and modified the title of the Story of the Stone to A Record of the Amorous Monk. He reread carefully the Story of the Stone. a search for a lost time which was no more than a dream of the splendors of a life spent among girls in the women's quarters of an aristocratic Manchu residence. The prologue explains this: Mter having heard this sort of discussion [on the originality of this work. let me tell you that such is in general the conduct of a concubine. playing on the reality and fiction underlying the sufferings that threaten when the enjoyment of life in the enchanted world of childhood and adolescence comes to an end.. Never would a legitimate wife. the Taoist monk Vanitas was lost in thought. where sensual passion destroys. and from sensuality one awoke to [the true meaning ofj emptiness [that all nature is illusory]. From this time on the Taoist monk Vanitas realized that from emptiness sensuality emerged. titled it The Twelve Beauties of Nanjing and added an introductory quatrain: Pages filled with words insane. an "encyclopedia of Chinese feudal society in its decline?" One could hardly put it better than the major commentator. without even attempting to reproach or harming morals and inciting to debauchery . through love one entered sensuality. The novel shows the same predilection for the closed world of what seems to be a heavenly garden. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4.. Cao Xueqin. Was the novel a sort of "sentimental education" or. " Dear readers. Chief among such works is the Honglou meng ?.. rightly or wrongly. The identification of the author." reworking the text five times and establishing a table of contents and a chapter division for it. a relative of the author. It goes without saying that this seems a radically original novel to the Western reader: the development of feelings of love in a doomed and unauthentic world. who will resort to anything to bewitch her husband. would have it. a position in a sense diametrically opposed to that of the ]in Ping Me. and that it held to a faithful relationship with facts.. The work marks a turning point in novelistic technique in the coherence of its vision and the meticulousness of its descriptions. it would help to make that taste go away . Kong Meixi. Cao Xueqin W~:FF {1715-1763).IT:fi?J {Dream of the Red Chamber). It is also the outcome of an intellectual current descended from the preceding centuries.. noting that in it one spoke only in general of the sentiments of love. The work was published for the first time in 1791-1792 in 120 chapters. is in the end the 'only point on which there is unanimity. suggested calling it Precious Mirror for Lovers in the Breeze and Clarity of the Moon. But who can understand its true flavor? . an incomparable source of information on society at the end of the Ming. who claimed in a marginal note that the novel was inspired by the fin Ping Me~ but explored the sentimental rather than the erotic side of love. It explains the appearance in the following century of works that became indisputable modes of individual expression.. bitter tears. The reputation that has resulted from such passages should not cause us to forget the other facets of the novel. having worked on it for ten years in his study "Nostalgia for the Red. stoop to such practices. But it had circulated since 1754 in a half-dozen unfinished manuscripts presenting numerous variants.

the two works share the characteristic of being a mode of individualized expression for literati to leave reality in a way that previously had been seen only in literary criticism. Butcher Hu. with an unaffected style of incomparable poetic power.Jia Baoyu JBl. The principal theme of the novel is a devastating criticism of the "system of examinations. was born with a piece of jade in his mouth." as he puts it. retorts sharply:] "Don't waste your time! You think of yourself already as a 'gentleman. but on your advanced age-the chief examiner accorded you the title out of pity. you imagine yourself 'His Lordship!' All those who achieve such status are stars in the literary constellation in heaven. however.3S. who dies in despair when Baoyu is compelled to marry another cousin. after much prompting.5t: (An Indiscreet Chronicle of the Mandarins [better known under the title The Scholars})." and-literally-deliriously happy: the shock of the announcement of his success rendered him unconscious. like other young men." 145 The alternate title Story of the Stone (Shitou ji :fij. and known especially for an episode in which the hero lands in a country where the positions and duties of men and women are reversed. reputed to be close to Pekingese. decided to give him a "congratulatory slap.ey: (The Destiny of the Flowers in the Mirror). This maturity in the art of the novel. is "fashioned of mud. The most lively popular successes were reserved for novels of the so-called "Wuxia" ~{~ (chivalric or martial-arts) school and for those of the judiciary-case school (a kind of detective novel featuring well-known judges from history). in a language closer to that of the vernacular of N anjing. His father-in-law at first dared not lay a hand on this eminent person. Although The Scholars has a sarcastic tone completely different from that of the Dream of the Red Chamber. The earliest extant edition of this satiric masterpiece dates to 1803. he must pay The nineteenth century witnessed the birth of other subgenres of the novel." [In chapter three the wretched scholar Fan Jin has finally received the "baccalaureate. Baoyu means "precious jade.." the key to the vault of the imperial regime and to the bureaucratic Chinese society we commonly refer to as "feudal. whom he has asked for financial help. whereas he. A number of other subplots are linked to this general line of the narrative. poor fool. set..3S. girls whose purity is that of "clear water. the wise and saintly Xue Baochai iWW~." . you would do better to piss on the ground and view your reflection in that pool!. but." which qualifies him to participate in the highest examinations to qualify for an official position.!~c) is explained by the fact that the hero of the novel." He is insanely in love with his sensible and sickly cousin Lin Daiyu 1*1i. Haven't you remarked that the 'lords' of the Zhang family in the village possess a fortune worth millions. however. But Fan Jin became. Now. His father-in-law. which was his life itself." Baoyu spends his last years among the young women of the residence. The proliferation of the novel testifies to its increasing numbers. but it must be added that none of these products could aspire to the standards reached by the ." and his family name "unauthentic. both containing fantastic adventures.' although you are only a leprous toad dreaming of eating the flesh of a wild swan. peopling the novel with memorable characters who are depicted in pure spoken language. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. I have heard it said that your success was based not on your compositions.144 Chinese Literature. and that each is endowed with a square face and large ears [suitable for high rank]? With your beak-like mouth and ape's chin. "His Lordship. Literature of Entertainment the costs of the trip to the provincial capital. Among the most curious of these is that labeled "the scholarly. can be found in an unfinished work left byWujingzi ~1if:l[t$ (1701-1754).. 1763-1830). Rulin waishi 1$1*:7f. ]inghua yuan ~Jf1Et. contrary to all expectations. subtly structured." It is represented by the masterpiece by Li Ruzhen $&~ (ca. Its fifty-five chapters constitute an episodic structure that exercised a decisive influence on this subgenre at the end of the nineteenth and the start of the twentieth centuries. a novel of a fantastic journey.

ed. story writers. 1990. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz. Glen. and Stephen West. The literary influence of the West was necessary before the vernacular novel could be rehabilitated among the literati.lf (1852-1924) brought nearly two hundred works of fiction to the notice of the public. Chinese Theater in the Days of Kublai Khan. the abolition of the traditional examination system in 1905 sounded the death knell for this language of the scholars. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. ed. The recent renewal of interest in traditional literature. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 1995." and "Popular Literature" in the Indiana Companion(!: 13-30. University of Michigan. that the bonds which unite the two are even more solid and more numerous than those which connect the literatures of the West to their Greek. modeled on its Western counterpart. London: Paul Elek. Chinese Theater from 1100-1450: A Source Book. 1973. respectively) provide ready access to more information on the subjects of this chapter. New York: Columbia University Press. 1989. and their works can also be found in the Indiana Companion. Meanwhile. Thus it was in classical Chinese that Lin Shu #f. and other ancestors. David. their genres. Operatic Ritual: "Mulien Rescues His Mother" in Chinese Popular Culture. one could claim that the quality of modern or contemporary production has not eclipsed that of the past. Narrative Literature Written in Classical Chinese Dudbridge. Johnson. long remained confined to educated circles. James I. and young men. although written in the language of the people. The reading of novels. But the modern novel. referred to as "modern Chinese. Karl. Scenes for Mandarins: The Elite Theater of the Ming. London: Ithaca Press for Oxford University.146 Chinese Literature. Crump. Individual entries on the numerous other novelists. Cyril. The Theater Birch." in literature beginning about 1920. an activity primarily of women. The Tale of Li Wa. Bloomington: Indiana University Press." shows that the rupture between the modern and traditional literatures is much less complete than it appeared. A History of Chinese Drama. and dramatists. Wilt. the "search for roots. Literature of Entertainment 147 masterpieces of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 1986. Dolby. At the very least. Idema. 1983. Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies. Ritual Opera. 1982. Chinese Literature: Popular Fiction and Drama." "Fiction. having first published his version of La Dame aux camilias in 1899. Does this mean that classical literature will henceforth be a thing of the past? No one would dare affirm that the crisis of cultural identity in China would be reduced by shelving classical literature. Latin. Hsin-chang. . Suggested Further Reading The essays on "Drama. Kao. was more than ever considered unworthy of a mature scholar during the nineteenth century. 1976. William.31-48. Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies. The diffusion of the old-fashioned entertainment genres facilitated the triumph of the spoken language. children. Chang. and 75-92. Classical Chinese Tales of the Supernatural and the Fantastic: Selections from the Third to the Tenth Century.

1987. Berkeley: University of California Press. Attributed to Luo _. Mair. Andrew H. New York: Columbia University Press. Hawkes. Chung-wen. Tempe: Center for Asian Studies. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 1976. ed. 1973. Y. 1996. 1990. The Chinese Short Story: Studies in Dating. The Four Masterworks of the Ming Novel: Ssu ta ch 'i-shu. Traditional Chinese Stories: Themes and Variations. _. David. 1973-1986. Tun-huang Popular Narratives. Colin. Brill. Sung. and joseph S. Hsien-yi. Hsia. Leiden: E. 4 vols. Roberts. Peking: Foreign Languages Press. Patrick. Marina. 1981. 1978. Wilt L. The Novel in Seventeenth-Century China. Three Kingdoms: A Historical Novel. Chinese Vernacular Fiction: The Formative Period. Outlaws of the Marsh. J. trans. Hegel... New York: Columbia University Press. Robert E. 1973. The Narrative Art ofTsai-sheng yuan. Rolston. Idema. Traditional Chinese Fiction and Fiction Commentary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Glen. eds. "Wu-hsia hsiao-shuo. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 1981. II: 188-192. and Gladys Yang. The Chinese Vernacular Story. 1997. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.. The Novel Dudbridge. 1992. Yang. 1989. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. Hanan. 1994. C. The Story of Hua Guan Suo. Princeton: Princeton University Press." In Indiana Companion. trans. 1974. M. Victor H. Authorship and Composition.journey to the West. 1983. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Yu.148 Chinese Literature. Rereading the Stone: Desire and the Making ofFiction in a Dream of the Red Chamber. Lau. Literature of Entertainment 149 Mackerras. Harmondsworth: Penguin. 1997. The Classic Chinese Novel: A Critical Introduction. trans. Sidney. 1976-1983. 2 vols. . 1968. King. The Legend ofMiao-shan. 1978. Arizona State University. Chinese Drama: A Historical Survey. David. Plaks. _. trans. Gail Oman. Ancient and Classical Chapter 4. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Shih. W. San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center. Guandwng. trans. Shapiro. The Golden Age of Chinese Drama. London: Ithaca Press for Oxford University. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Moss. Ma. The Scholars. 5 vols. Peking: New World Press. 1981. New York: Columbia University Press. The Carnal Prayer Mat. The Story of the Stone. Anthony C. Stanford: Stanford University Press. T. trans.

.................... 124 Boccaccio ... 118 bi......................... 107 Buddhism ................................................................................... 91................... 123................................................................................................................................ 143 Analects ofConfucius(see also Lunyu ~lfB~ ........... 137...........................................®£ (772-846) ..................... 72 Cai Yong~~ (133-192) ............................INDEX A allegory .......................................... 19 Bowu z/zifJI~~ (Record of All Things) ................. 178) ............................................................................................... 110 "Ballad of Beautiful Women" (Liren xing HA 11') ............................................................................................... 26................ ........... pro-Legalist campaign .................. 20....... 41................................................................. 45 ancient-style prose (see also guwen) ............................ 39.................... 25 bianwen ~:Z(texts on scenes of the life of Buddha in pictures) . ca..l:t ............................................................. 26 Book ofRites................................. 130 Book ofHistorical Documents (see also Shu jing) ....................... 132 Canglang shihua ~~!B~I!i ................ 111 Bai Xingjian 81'JM (775-826) ........47 anti-Confucian....... 55 ..................................... 40........................................................ 84............. 41 B Baijuyi 8..... 78................................................................................................. 80 "Ballad of the Pipa" (Pipa xing !6~11') ...................... 38... 81 "Ballad of the Army Carts" (Bingju xing ~$ff) ............................................... 83 Ban Gu l'JfiE!I (32-92) ... ............................ 82....................... 65 BaojianjiYi'~U~c (The Story of the Precious Sword) ........................ 131............. 138 c Cai Yan ~~ (b................................. 72 cakijiaren7rr{~A "men of talent and beautiful women" ............... 75................... 57 Cao Pi \!f::::f (187-226) ............................... 137................... 111 "Baiyuan zhuan" Er 3Rft (The Story of the White Ape) ...................................

...............k {Spring and Autumn) .~15 {Idle Talk under the Bean Arbor) ........... 68 Confucian "Four Books" ......................................... 90 Er ya'm........................................................•.................................................... 93............................................ 62................. 17....... 13 "Dazai Letian xing" Ji~~~fT {On Getting the Point ....3! .........•............................................... 133 Confucian Classics ................ 87 "Du Shiniang nu chen baibao xiang" :t±+~~ms•~ .... 97 Edouard Biot . 123 dynastic histories ...... 117-118............... 24.................................................................................................. 69 Ershisi ski pin= +12:9~ 6'6 {Evaluations of Poetry in 24 Poems) .................................................................................................................. 13............................. 57 Diao QJl Yuan ~ }ffi }Jjt {Grieving for Qu Yuan) ....................................................... l8 eight great prose writers {of the Tang and Song dynasties) ....................................................... 1200) .....................................................•................ 26 erotic poetry ........................................................ 16..................................................................................................................... 7-8................... 134................. 1796) ................................... ! 09......... 91............ 80 Du Guangting if:J\::&g {850-933) ........ 26..................................................................................... 125 Chenjiru !*f..................... 34 E "Each Word in Slow Tempo" (Shengsheng man !l:!l:'lt) ........................... 142 Chan Buddhism ...........•.... 62.............................. 33 ci~l'IT {lyric) ........... 51 Chinese Buddhist canon ............................ 117 Dong Zuobin if{'fj{ {1895-1963) ..................... 62....................... 23 Confucianism ............................. {The Palace of Eternal Youth) ...Rtlml13....................... 25.. 144 "Dreaming of Li Bai" (Meng Li Bai ~$ 8) ............................ 41....................................... ) ................................152 Index Index 153 Cao Xueqin lJ~Jr {1715-1763) ..................................... 800-863) ..... 17. 112 Chun qiu ~f................................................................................................ 130 Dream of the Red Chamber (see also Honglou meniJ ................:}l< {Grand Study) ..... 50...lfm {1558-1639) ............45 Chen Duansheng !*)lffii~ {1751-ca...................... {Classic of the Way and ofPower) .•... 26.. 25 "Dances and Songs" (Gewu ilfX~) ............ ................................................ 26.................................•...................................................................................... 65 Doctrine ofthe Mean (see also Zhongyonm ................................................................................. 130 "description" lfu) ..... 82-83 Dunhuang...... 79 Du Fu i±ffi {712-770) . 6 Dostoevsky ....................................... 112 Du Mu i±~ {803-852) ............@...................................... 98 cihua ~l'IT~!!i {narratives interspersed with poems to be sung) .... 83 Changsheng dian !k~Wi.................................................................................. 79.................{tales) ................................ 12 7 "court style" (gongti '§B) ............................................. 121-122 chuanqi 1$ iD............ 72 "Elegy on a Cicada" (Chan !l!fi!) .... l28 Dou E yuan ili'MX~ {The Resentment of Dou E) ..................{drama) .......... 121 "Chaoran Taiji" ~~-~c {Notes on the Terrace of Transcendence) ...........................................~ {ca................................. 139 m De dao jing~'m_~I! {Classic of Power and the Way) ................................... 20 Dongjieyuan ifJWjG {fl...............$:) ..................................................................•............................................................ see also Songs of the Soutlf} ........................... 86 ................ 75 Changhen ge fiH...............IHfX {The Song of Eternal Regret) ......................................................................................•.......................................................................... 43 "Eighteen Stanzas on the Reed-Whistle" (Hu jia skiba pai M9Fti+ /\tB) ................................... 57 D Da xuej................................................................ 128 Du Yu i±ffl {222-284) .•.......................... 72 chuanqi'f. 85 Dao dejing'm_~t... 20-22.. 31..........................................3t ............. 77..................................................... 76............................. 45............................................. 96........WiD............................. 140 Classic ofPoetry (see also Ski jinm . 41 Confucius ............ l37 Chu ci ~IM {Words of the State of Chu...... 62 Contes de la Montagne sereine ( Qjngping Shantang huaben 3¥ Ur:lit~J5:....................... 19 da ya :*............................ 116 Doupeng xianhua .................... 44 eight prose masters ......................... 69 critics of the May Fourth Era {1919-1942) ......... 32 Duan Chengshi f&gX... 14 Decameron ........................................... 24...............................

.... ....................... 105 " express th e tntentwn"(y an<~•t s .....::J (Story 0 f an An ctent M"uror) ........... Going Back) ................................................................... 116 Guan Zi 11f-T (Master Guan) ........ 108 Four Books (see also Confucian "Four Books" and Sishu) ........ 62 ........................................ 133 Feng Menglong {................................. 17...........................................41 Festivals and Songs ofAncient China ..................................................................................... 118 "four great extraordinary books" (sida qishu ll9::kii'tilf) .................................................................... 121 Honglou mengfo...................................... 17...................................................................................... 31............................. ...................................... 24 First Emperor of Qjn.................................... 64 hexagrams ................................... 33 Guwenci lei... 1220-1320) ..........................................................................k (Autumn in the Palace of Han) ............................................................ 62 Guwen guanz}ti ~::Zil'lll (The Major Works of Ancient Prose) ................................................................................................................ 312) ............................ 116 Han Yu~Jt.......................... 135 Hong Mai #!................................. 122 Hu Yinglin MI!!M (1551-1602) ...........2js: (base of the narration or story ............................................... 106-107 Gao Ming 1'3JEY=I (ca.. 15 .............................................................................]u song:fill1il'i ............ 12 Han gong qiu rJ............. 9 hundred schools of thought.......................................... 39-42.................. 110 huaben ~J5...................... Tian wen :-Rro~ ..................................................... 69 Gongsun Yang01*~ (also known as Shang Yang fl?i5~) ............................................................................................. 26 Guo Xiang f!l~ (d.............. 11 Guanyin .......................! ................... 17 historical novel.............................. 320) ................................. 1305-1370) ................... 133 fuM (rhapsody or prose-poem) .. 62 Funiaofulli..................... 74 "GuiingJ"i" +{>ai..................... ............................................. .. ) ........................................................ ..................... 118 "four great chuanqi' (sida chuanqi ll9::k'ftii'f) ......... 7...........88 Hanshan ~UJ (Cold Mountain) ................... 142 Hou Fangyu {~)J~ (1618-1655) ..................... 99................................................................................. 65 G Gan Bao ::P~ (fl............................ (768-824) ...........................................~ (1645-1704) .. 79 The Elegy on the Orange...........................................154 Index Index 155 essay .......................... ................. 23 Four Cries of the Gibbon (Sisheng yuan [9~~) .............................. 116 Huang Zongxi Ji*~ (161 0-1695) ...............................................~ (1123-1282) .......~M ...." ren t ................. 19. .........................48...... 94 Haoqiu z:huan tif~'ft (The Fortunate Union) ......................................................... 25 guti shi ~R~ (ancient-style verse) ............................................................................ (heroic ~d unrestricted) ........................................ 126................... 138 George Soulie de Morant (18 78-1955) ............................................. 127 Hong Pian #f..zuan ~)<:jM!)@[~ (Collection by Category ........... .......................... 110 · ~ o ii'Ji'.................................ffll............... 139 "Guiqu lai xi ci" !ffl'i$:3l~~jM (Rhapsody on Returning..............~=tu Guliang z}tuan ~mit ................................................................... 127 Huang liang mengJim~ (Yellow-Millet Dream) .............................................. 132 "Hard Road to Shu" (Shu dao nan !Vllift) .......................................... 126. 12 Gongyang z}tuan 0$-ft ............. 75 haofangjf(1/J............................................................................. 32 H Han Fei Zi ~~Fr (ca....................................... ....................... 64 Heavenly Qyestions.................................................................................... 136 Guan Hanqing ~yJJ)l!P (ca. 280-233) ............ 14 guofeng ~)!ill....................................................·~"±) F fantastic novel ... ............ 117 giithii poetry ...... 26 "Goodness............................ 38.........................................[:fl~ (Dream of the Red Chamber) ........... 127 Hong Sheng's #!.................... 22 Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-76) ............................................................................................ -l.........................................c...........................................~~~ (1574-1646) ...41..................'§f'............................................................................................................ 32 Hui Shi~tif!i . 127 Fengjian lun}j}!~ifB (On Feudalism) .....................

......................... 67 laments....................... 136..................... 122 Li Yu *................................. 770-848) ..........•• 66.....................................................I ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••....................................... 144 Jia Yi Will! (200-168 B...................................... 118 I 'I'he Idiot ..................••••......................................... 16 jingben tongsu xiaoshuoEJ:................ 62 K Kong Shangren :rlf............................................. 76................. 121 "Kunlun nu" ]l!Wtl)( (The Slave from Mount Kunlun) ....... 78 jinti ski mfttf...................... 112 jiandeng yuhua ~m:~nli (Supplementary Tales Told ........................J................................................................ 119 Li Yu *~ (937-978) .................................lrrff: (1648-1718)................... 69 Li Bai *8 (701-762) ......... 64 Li Shangyin *flli~ (ca............ 136 Liang Chenyu~~Jl (ca............................. 139....................... 134 Li Zhen *~ (1376-1452) ....... 26 LiKaixian*009G (1502-1568) ................................ 111 Li Xiangjun *:W~ ......... (1591-1671) ...................................................................... 138-139 jueju f.......................................................................................) ........................ 120........ 145 Li sao MH (Lament for the Separation [from the King of Chu]) ....................................... 130................................................ 112 LiHe*Jf (791-817) ........ 18.. 106 Li Gongzuo*0~ (ca.......................... 131 La Dame aux camilias .......................................... (Thoughts on a Quiet Evening) .......................................... 129 "Jingye si" fli1?t...46... 88 journey to the West(see also Xiyujz) ...................................................................... 77.......................................... 63........%f.......................................20 Ji Yun *Eil:'a (1724-1805) ........................................... ~ ..... 112 Li Zhi *:JI (1527-1602) ......... 119.......C........................ 63 Lao Zi ~T (Master Lao or "The Old Master") ................. 34 Li Qj................................................................................. 146 Lady Ban F............................................................................................................ 132 L J Jacques Dars.................................... 88-89 Lijiiltr3 (see also Book ofRite~ ...f (modern-style verse) ............................%1.................••••••........................................................................................ 128.............. 128 inspiration (yi~) ..........................91 Li Fang *IVJ (925-996) ... 132 John Keats ....................(Nine Thoughts) ........156 Index Index 157 kunqu ]i! e±! ...... .................................................................................... 89..). .... 813-858) .......................................................2js:jjlffitj\m (Short Stories which Could ....................... 127 James Legge (1815-1897) ........................................................................................ 62 John Francis Davis .................................... 17.............................................................ngzhao *~W!t (1085-after 1151) ...................... 51-52. sao Ill.............. 11.......................... 13 Legalism ............................ 118 Kyokaku den ~~1$ (Stories of Heroism) ............................................54................................................................ 19............... 92 Li Yu *rH............................. 41 LeiJin .............. 110......................................................3S.......... 114 Jia Baoyu W!lf.......................................................................) .................. 118 Li Kui *~• the Black Whirlwind ..............................................................................) ...•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••........................t (1611-1680 ......................................................... ................................ 145 ]ingu qiguan ~ti1itB (Wonders of the Present and Past) ................................ 65 jiandeng xinhua ~mirm5 (New Tales Told ................................. 62 ]iu si 11.............................................................................................. 136 Li Ling*~ ..................................................................................................... 1763-1830) ................................... 112 ]inPingMeifti'/fN............... 1510-1582) ................................... 142 Jin Shengtan {JZ~~ (1610-1661) ................................................ l32-133................................................. 140 jingfJJ! (the warp of a fabric) ...................................................................... ................................3S... 126 ]inghua yuan -:ffi~ (The Destiny of the Flowers in the Mirror) ....... 47 Kunshan ]i! Ill ................. 91 "Li Wa zhuan" *t€E1$ (The Story of Baby Li) ................. 98-99 LiRuzhen*~~ (ca...................... 96........ 118 .....................l§iiT (quatrains) ..............W (Plum Flower in a Vase ofGold) .....

.•............ 65 Mencius (see also Meng Zi) ...................... 133 Manchus ...................................................... 66 Liu Xiangi!JrnJ (77-6 B......................................... 8 LuJi Wim {261-301) .....................................................................................................................................................................................3S................................................) .................41....................................:vf!f (Biography of the Governor.......... 124.............• 16 Lie Zi 37Ur (Master Lie) ..........................C............ 110 ................... 142 Mao Zonggang Wfl ..........................................158 Index Index 159 M Liangdufo~$M .............................................:~ ........................... 69 Ma Zhiyuan ~3&m (ca.C...................................................................... 1260-1325) ..................... 23 Meng Haoran ~$~ {689-740) ................................................................•••••••............................................. 55 Lunyu ~j1fg (see also The Analects of ConfUcius) ...........C.......B( ............................................................. 65 Liaomai Q..) ............................................ 119 "Mulberry Tree along the Path" (Mo shang sangiml::~) ....... ) ................................................................. 76 Meng Zi (Master Meng........................................................................................ 34................................................ l05 "Little talks" (xiaoshuo .................................................................................................................... 118.......y (The Peony Pavilion) .................................................... 8 Mo Zi ~r (Master Mo) ............ ... 26 Miao Quansun f..................................................................................."IDl) ............ 32 "minor books........................................................ 48 Liushi jia xiaoshuo ....................... 55 lu shif$~ (regulated........J................................. 33 Mudan ting!j±ft.............m~Z:........ 127 Liweng yijia yan 1i~-i!~r§ (Words from the Unique School of .......................{!!~~ {1844-1919) . 465-520) ................ 134 Marcel Granet ......................................................... ca. 141 B....D....................................." dashu :7..~ ..... 10 "May Fourth Movement" (4 May 1919 until about 1942) .......... l6 Lin Daiyu *f\................. 10 Liu Xie ~!Jim (c.............l{!Jtg.................... 144 Lin Shu *f\f.................... 124 Mei Sheng~~ (d..................... 62 LiiZuqian §:til~ (1137-1181) ......................................................................................... 129 literary yuefo ...............................•••••••••••••••.................. ) ..C.................................lf (1852-1924) .............................. eight-line verse) ................................Jms (Tales Written while Searching for a Lamp) ............................................................... 124 Mawang Dui ~ ::E:tl .......... 390-305 B... 66 literature of entertainment ....................................... 51 Logicians....................... 89.................................................................-23 A......... 69 =B* :tlh:r l j N Naito Kanan I"J§mlm (1866-1934) ................. ....................................... 8 Monkey .......................... 112 Mingwen hai l!§::)(w (The Ocean of Ming Prose) ......................... 32 Lun wen~::)( (Discourse on Literature) ............................................................. 126 Mideng yinhua :W..............................................................................................................................................................................................) .................... 87 Liu Zongyuan Wll*5C (773-819) .... +~Vl'IDl (Stories of Sixty Tellers) ...................................................................... 116 "major books....................... l33 MoDi~~ ..... 146 Ling Mengchu ~~M (1580-1644) ...... 23. 92 Liu Yuxi I!J~~ (772-842) .......... 134 Luofu ......................................................................iyiJII)~'ilf~:l: (Records of Unusual Stories ........ 126 Liu Bangi!Jn (256-195 B.................................................................................................................................................................. 40 Mao Zedong............... 137-138 Mu Tianzi 2}tuan fJ~rfif (Chronicle of the Son of Heaven Mu) ........." xiao shulj.....................i< {987-1053) ..................... ................................ 113 Lie Yukou 37U '!t.. 16................. 127..............!I J.......... •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••....................... 118 Maudgalyayana (Mulian Ell~ in Chinese) .................. 24 Mao Ying =§~ . 5 "Nanke Taishou zhuan" l¥WlJ7................................................................... 55 Liu Xin IJJW\: (50 B................................................... 48 Mao Heng =§1jr .........) ............... ) .......... 42........................... and Mo Zi................ 108 Liu Yang W117............... 24 Matteo Ricci (1551-1610) ................................................................................................................C..... 26 Luo Guanzhong ~j{tp ............................ 24 Liu Yiqingi!J•m (403-444) ...................................••..........................................

.............................................................................................................................. 65 "records of the strange" (dtiguaz) ......................... 105 Prince Dan ................................................. 125 ping [hua] }jl~3 (plain narratives) ......................................]iu ge fLllfA: ...................................................................... 110 p Pai'an jingqi:JB~~ilf (Striking the Table in Amazement at ...... :........................................................................................................U:WJ~) .. 6~+fL §) .. of Y an ~ .................................................................................................... 117 poetry ................................................................ 62.............. 69 "Qj. 112 Qu Yuan Jffi)Jj( (ca.......................... 113 "Qj1 at................................................... 43........ 68 novel ............an Daxin ~*B!f (1728-1804 ..................................... 43 "new yuefii' (xin yuefu ~~iff ................... 44................................................................................................................. 134 Pipa ji :EB~~c (Story of the Lute)' ............................ 125 Ouyang Xiu W\ll~H~ (1007-1072) ................................................. 138 Ping Shan Leng Yan }jL !l1 ~~ .......................... 63 professional storyteller ....... 122 novel..................................... 38 New History of the Five Dynasties .E!.. 144 ................... 71 ... 113 "The Red Parrot" (Hong yingwu f.................A) ......................... 129 parallel prose-pian wen~#)( ...................................u Hu f)(M ............... 123...................................................................................... 98 qu /®( {amusement) ................................................. 62.. 112 Qu You IHtl {1341-1427) .....]iu dtang fL~ . 131 Peking/Beijing Opera" (jing xi.................. 1 _]_.......................... 122 Pu Songling Mit£~ (1640-1715) ......... 111 Rites des Tcheou (Rites ofZhou) .........................................................................uran ke zhuan" !kLJ~~ft (The Story of Curly-bearded Stranger) ... 133...................................................................................................................... sh"" -w-Rn>J (Seven Lamentahons) ............................... 52 R Q 0 "On Stopping Wine" (Zhi jiu ll:j§) ...... 130........................................" .................160 Index Index 161 nanxiffi~ (drama of the South) ......................................................................................................................................ffJi........ 64 qu E!E (aria) ........................... "parallel" or "harnessed prose..... 61............. 110......... 105 "popular" literature .. 91 Nine Arguments.................................................... 133.?:~............. 121 pianwen'fj.............................. 132 Qj....................... 140 novella ................................................~~ Qj.. 64 Nine Declarations.............. 114 oral genre ...................................]iu bian fL?ii¥ ..................................................................................................................................... ) ............... 32 Pigsy .................. of behavior and morals ............................................................................................................................... 93 Ouyang Xun W\~j'jaj (557-641) ........................................ 49..U:!l±ft) ........ 62 Opera-Theater of the North ............ 340-278) ............B:............................................................. 77 "Renshi zhuan" 1:E........................................ 108 Princess of the River Xiang (Xiangfuren #§te........... 74 opera-theater ............................................................................................ 72 Rulin waishi {fm............................. 133 oralliterature ..................................................................~ (The Scholars) ............................. 31.......................................................................................................... 19 Rou putuan ~Ml~ (Prayer Mat of Flesh) .................................. 117 N eo-Confucianism ..................................... 68... 84 "Red Peony" (Hong Mutan f.............)(........................................................................................................... 64 Nine Songs.................... 79 Record ofPeach Blossom Fount {Taohua yuan jif:}~:ffiillHc) ............. literally "drama of the capital") .............................................. 73 Records of the Grand Historian (see also Shi jz) ................................................................................... 31 Pei Xing ~fi {825-880) ................................... 128...............................ft (The Story of Lady Ren) ........................................................ 63 "Nineteen Ancient Poems" (Gu shi shijiu shou................................................................................... 131 Ruanji 1!7C~(210-263) .................................................. 132 Rebellion of An Lushan ..........

.........................an ~............................................tllJ£m (ca........................ 138 Sandy .. 89 Songwen jian *:Z£ {Mirror of Song Prose) ......................... ... 9~ Su Xun ~rm {1009-1055)......................... 19 SikongTu ~~~~~ {837-908) ................. :.. 7 6 "Spring Dawn" (Chun xiao :§'~) ..................................... 117 storytellers .................... 33 Shi jingfj!j#!fi (Classic of Poetry) .....................'................................................................................................................................................46 "Sequel to Liao2)zai Qztjiwith Illustrations and Explanations" . 125 Si shu [9:]1 {The Four Books) .................... .................................................................... 138 Sh~anjin~ 2)zush_........................................................................................... 65 ShaoJingzhan's B~:e:)jt .................................................. 65 "The Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove" (Zhulin qi zi tJ:fft...........) ..... 99 StanislasJulien ...............%Iiff:Wlt (The Thirteen Classics Commented.........................................................C............. ........ 138 Sanguo Qzi yanyi =~~ijl:f~ (The Three Kingdoms) . 108 short story................................................................................................................... 130 Shu jingi!Ji#!fi (Classic of Documents) ..................... 95 SongJiang *1I .......... 127 Sancho Panza .......... Shuihu 2)zuan Jj<..................................................... .............................t*i'M (Rhapsody of a Hunt in the Party ..... 31 61 Shidan ~JJ(! (Menus) ........ 125 Su Che ~........) ......... 134 santao ~...... 116............................................................ 140 ~:~~~~·~·=::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~: Songs of the South (see also Chu ci) ................. 57 S'k u quanshu m1 F............................................................ 136............................................................................................................................. 145-ca............................ 125.........................................." ................... 7 "Springtime" (Chun :§') ........................... 32 sao~ (laments) ............................................................................... 144 "Story of Yingying" ............................. 47...... 44.....riff~ {Water M argm) ................................... 98 sanwen ~X.................................................. 107 Soushen ji~:t$~ {Records of Searching for Spirits) .......................................... 24 Shzshuo xmyut!t~¥JT~ (A New Account of Tales of the World) ............................................. 132 Story of the Stone (Shitou ji E~~Cl) .......... 110 B........................................................................................... )..................................................................................................... 177-119) .....Y) ......................................... 118 Shen Yue tt~ (441-553) ............................................................................... 62 65 Sei Shonagon ?11i':'P*f'I§ ............. 740-800) .... 110....................... 116 ShenJing ttf!f (1533-1610) ........................ 130 shihua fi!i~§' (narrative interspersed with poems) ............................................................. 21 Shi ji 9:: ~B (Records of the Grand Historian) .............. 114 Seven Exhortations (Qjfa t~) ............................................................................. 34 SimaXiangru ~. 85 ...................... 10~ "Spending the Night on the Cliff over Stone Gate" ................... 12 Shanglin fo --....................... 52 Shi'er lou+ -=1'1 (Twelve Towers) ........... 72 Shangjun shu jfij:!g~ (The Book of Lord Shang) .............................. 75 shengren ~A ................................................................................... 20.......... 133........................................ 32 Soushen houji~:t$~~[\ {Sequel to Records of Searching for Spirits) .................... 33............................g ................. "free" or "dispersed prose...............................~~ {d.........................................................................................................................C...................................................................................................~}¥{ca................. 56 shifj!j ................................................. 126........................ 7......... 24 26 Shi pin fi!in~ (Evaluation of Poetry) ................... 4 "Suffering from the Cold While Living in My Home Village" ...E2>............ 26 .....{1039-1112) ...............................) .................................................. :.... 112 Shenjiji ¥..............._u +53... 111..................................................... 44 SuShi~$\ {1037-1101) ...........162 Index Index 163 s saga ... 1 5 shuoshude ~Wii¥1 {tellers of books) ............................................................................................... 17......... 85 B. 93.. 132 Sanyan53_§ (Three Words) ........................... 113 t ~'-"=~I-'¥± er · Sima Qj......... 65 Sima Tan~................ 65 "The Snail" (Gua niu !lli%4) ..................................... .............. 118 ' 133 ' 135 ' 136 ' 140 2 shuohuaren ~~3'A (tellers of stories) ...................................................~f§~IJ {ca.................................................................................................................................................................

..... 107 Tao Zhenhuai llWJ~tl ...............................................•.................................:EJ...-~1:1 (1021-1086) ...... 38................. 26 ................... 6 Wang Zhaojun ..............................••..................... 82 "Written on the Sprig of Flowers .................................................................................................................................fffi (thirteenth century) .....................j~ (1767-1848) ... 106 Takizawa Bakin (ri)ll...... 92 "The Tomb of Little Su" (Su Xiaoxiao mu if*.... 31 Wang Can...J vJ 'm) ..............) .[..........•..... ...3:........585 (226-249) ................•........................................................... 71 Wang Du ....................... 132 tanci5!flj'ji'IJ (strummed ballads) ..164 Index Index 165 T Taiping guangji *:if.... 55 "Wenyi Tang ji" ::ZM'¥:'ilB (Record of the Hall of Literary Ripples) ..........................•....lis%::Wil~ ................rp_=li (Jade within Iron) ..... 122 Wen fu )(Jllf:t (Fu on Literature) ............... 118 Wei Zhongxian ~J~.......... (1550-1617) .... 32 wen)( .....................................§~ .. 125 Tie Zhongyu ......... 132 Tianyu huaxffi:ft (Flowers Falling in the Rain) ... 13.............•............................................... 130 Wuxia ~{?!( (Chivalric or Martial-arts) School of Fiction) ............ 84 Wei Liangfu ~..........................•........... 48 "West Gate" (Hsi men xing®1Flfi) ...... 118 Tao Qj.......................................................................... 72 Xiang Yu :IJ'-[3j)j •.............. 76 WangYirong............................ 145 X w Wang Anshi ..................:E*l (701-761) .....ijl(J~t (ca...........................••................................................•.......................•........................................................... 125 Taohua shan........ilim ...............................................Bl-..............................................•.........................j'g~:ft~ (Peach-blossom Fan) ..................................•.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 110 Wang 1..... 95 Wu Cheng' en ~.....•................................•..................................................... 1500-1582) .......................................:E~~ (1845-1900) ............................ 119 Xiao jing#~ (Classic of Filial Piety) .......... 45 u utilitarian conception of literature ...~ (1828-1897) .... 4 7 Theodor Benfey (1809-1881) ·················~··················································124 thirteen classics ..........................................~ ................................................... 93 "To the Tune 'Night after Night"' (Yeyequ :nz{§zli!l) .... 31 Wenxin diaolong)(............ 94 Wang Bi .................................................. 114 Wang Wei ..................:E...........................................................•......................................... 92 "To the Tune 'Declaration of My Intimate Feelings"' ............................. 74......................................................... 116 "Weeping for Little Golden Bell While I Was Ill" ......................•....................... 67 "Writing Down My Feelings While Traveling at Night" .........•.. 41 technique lfa $) ....................................:£~ (177-217) ............................... 132 "To the Tune 'A Casket of Pearls"' (Yihu dtu -ff-J..3:................. 72..................................... 26 Thomas Percy ..an llWJM or Tao Yuanming llWJl1l\l~ (365-427) .................. 52 Wang Shifu .................. 35 Xianqing ouji ~....................... 97 "To the Tune 'Fresh Are the Flowers of the Chrysanthemum"' .........................D..........W (1568-1627) ......:EBR::ef ......................... 93 "To the Tune 'The Broken Formation"' (Pochen zi ~ll$-T) .......................•..••.......................................44................................................•............................w..•.....................•.........•.............. " ..................................3:............~) ....................................... 158 A..................•....... 144 Wubaijia xiangyan shi.....................•...........• 34... 91 Wen xuan )(~ (A Selection of Literature) ...........................~~'liB (Notes Thrown Down to Pass the Time) .•..... 125 Tang Xianzu ~Mti!............................ 55 Wen Tingyun ~~t& (812-870) ..................................................................................................... 24.... 121 Taoism .......... 116 Wang Tao ............................ 14 Xi Kang f&~ (223-262) ......3:.. 88 trivial literature . 138 Wujingzi~WJ[...........j$ (1701-1754) ............................••.............................................................~ (d...............fi!HH~~ (The Heart of Literature Carves Dragons) .............................................................................................................. 69 Wusheng xi~~~ (Silent Dramas) ..............................................•......

.................. ~6 ?J'i.................. 137 Xue Baochai M!lflil\Z ........... yzan -1..................166 Index Xiao Tongllif~ (501-531) ..........................!$ Zhang Qjtan :JJJ<::$ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••.............R..gtll.................................. 46 xiaoshuo tN!)l (the Chinese equivalent of "fiction") .......•••••••... ................................. "'"....... 52................4 yuefo~J& (music-bureau poetry) .......r eiV __......................................... ca...................................... 62....... 12.................................................. 52 xinhua ~ffiS (new narratives) ........................ 115....................:~$~ (variety plays) ....................................... 78 • ::r:..........................................::T!I!JI"l:J "YueX1a du zh uo " n ~{l!!!ilfih (Drinking Alone under the Moon) .........................................._ •••••••••.................................... 64 Yuan Zhen jGJ{ (779-831) ............!....................................................................................... 88 Yuewez· Caotang b···l'!A1!!llr.... 66... l9............................................... 114................................... 11 Yang Guifei ~ittzc .......!::!r~~................................. 106........................... 141 y Index 167 Yao Nai ~® (1732-1815) ............. 126.........1.. 300-230 ...............:J (Notes from the Cottage......:<n::~ Yutaz• xznyong ................................. 144 Xun Qjng liJUI!P............. 55 xiao ya tj'ft .........................................................~>........ 116 XiyoujiffiJbltitl aourney to the West) ...................... 1586-1641) .................................................... a dramatic interlude) .................................................................. 87 Zhangjiuling ill:fL~ (678-740) ....•••••••........................... 32 Yao ~-············································································································ 4: Yi jing ~~ (Classic of Changes) ·························:·························· ........... 8 Yuan Zongdao ~7Rit! (1560-1600) ........~ (Ties for the Next Life) .........d? Zhang Zhupo :JJJ<::TJ >tx.... Yuan you~jlj (Distant journey) .. 141 xing$ .................................................................. 38 Yan Zi chunqiu ~-TtFf:k (Springs and Autumns of Master Yen) ....... 69 z ·h ng yuan :PEE......................................................... 107 Zhangji ill~ (ca.. 590) .........· .................................................... 87............ l12 xiezi ~T (inserted wedge........................... 25 xingling'l'i.........................) ········ 49-50 Yu Ai )J[!f& (262-311) ..-....Mlt ........ 75 "Xie Xiao'e" li[tJ................ ........ 125 z ...m+ ...........................................li (the efficacy of [one's own] nature) ................... =t.......................................... 116.............................................................................. 115 Zazuan • • (Miscellanies) ···········································:······························· 46 Zeng Gong~~ (1019-1063) ......e.....................:......... 57 YanZhituiM~...... 25 xiaolingtj'~ .......... 98 xiaopin wen th\it)( (essays on minor subjects) ....... 49...>1'JIW................... Ill ................................. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 0 ... 7'l!"E'Ci' "Y" · mgymg zh uan" &&lffi (The Story of Yingying) .. 12 Xun Zi tfi-T (Master Xun) ....................f.. 68.......................l' (New Songs from thejade Terrace) ..~ I'<'J' • "You Wutai Shan riji" Jbf1i§ W8 iftl (A Diary of Roammg · · ...... 136 Xu Ling f*~ (507-583) ..................................... 44 Zhang Hua ill¥ (232-300) .......................... 32. 111....................................................................................... 115 Ximen Qjng ffiF~!Jl .................................:JS.......... 127.............45............. Xu Hongzu f*......................................... 67............ 50 Xuanzang S~ (602-664) .. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 132 6 Yuan Hongdao~............ 69 Xu Weif*m (1521-1593) ...............................Jwl¥~-'*"i'iu · 1=1 .... 114 'JZJ............ ···· 17• ~ Yi li'(lif (The Book of Etiquette and Ceremoma) ..............................................................Jt (531-ca...............B:5J3] ..................... 118 Xu Xiakef*if~ (i........ 110..................................................... .....................:¥:............... 133.......................... 81 yanyi~ft (development of the sense) ..................................... 122 Yan Yu.............. 1~~ Yuan Zhongdao iJtr:j:lit! (1570-1624) ...................... ....... l34 Zang Mouxun!)I!:!G~::fl~ (d....................................................................................................................................... :..'l'l'lf.................... 132 Xie Lingyun litlfil (385-443) ......•••••••••••••••••••••• • • • • •• • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 2 .gm (1568-1610) ··························································~~: Yuan Mei i\ttlc (1716-1798) ................. l40................. 135 Xixiangjiffitffitftl (The Story of the Western Pavilion) .............. 85.....@..................... 776-829} ... ............................... 81 Yang Guozhong~~}iSt ............................ 109 · · ::r:ftl!i:21i: Yu]zao L z.. 82......................................•••••• 49 • ?J"-M..... 1 7 v........................ ) ............................................ 1621) .............................................

........................................................... 19..................... 24 Zhuang Zhou !ttfi!il (see also Zhuang Zi) .... 69 Zuo Qj...........................t{_•'(£ (records of the strange) ......(§__A {records of [strange] persons) .................................... 26.......... (Zuo Commentary) ........ 386) .................... 96 "Zhenzhong ji" tt q:r~c (The Story of the Inside of a Pillow) .......................................... 10 Zhao Mingcheng 1m !Yj~ (1081-1129) ........................ 56 Zhong yong $ Ji' ............ 115........................................................................... 26 Zhu Xi*:!: (1130-1200) ........................ 18................ 11 0...........uming tr:........................................... 116 :dliguai....... 18 Zuo ......." d.....................................................................................................................O:G!Yj ............ 20 Zhou li fi!il:fl ................ 109 :dlugongdiao ~ '§~ (chantefable) ............... ("Midnight................................................. 56 Zhong Rong ~~ ....dliren .............................. 106......................................................... 14.....168 Index Zhanguo ce ~~~ (Intrigues of the Warring States) .............dluantl':Vf!..................... 113 Zixuforl!mM {Rhapsody of the Hunting Parks) ....................................................................18.. 14 Zhuang Zi !ttr (Master Zhuang) ............ 65 Ziye r1Y<...................................................... 106 Zhiyin ~tf (Understanding Sound) ....................... 9.......... 15-17...... 106 ...... 33 .................................. 11 7 Zi bu yu r/flm {What the Master [Confucius] Did Not Speak 0~ ....................

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