01925854215 01729731844 Bangladesh cyclone

On 15 November 2007 a severe cyclone struck Bangladesh, killing more than 3,500 people. Cyclone Sidr struck overnight packing winds of 250 kph (155 mph). The Category 4 cyclone triggered a 15-foot (5-metre) high tidal surge that devastated three coastal towns and forced 3.2 million people to evacuate. The cyclone affected 8.9 million people and 1.5 million people had their homes damaged or destroyed. Crops and food sources were also destroyed. Community infrastructure was destroyed with roads, trees and more than 2,000 schools damaged by the destructive winds.

Summary
Bangladesh is a low-lying country in South Asia surrounded by India, Myanmar and the Bay of Bengal. Despite making some progress in improving standards of living, its human development ranking (UNDP, Human Development Report 2007/08) is 140 out of 177 countries. Aside from city-states, Bangladesh is the most densely populated country in the world. The total population is 144 million. The population is reasonably ethnically homogeneous. Over 97% are Bengali, the remaining 3% are Biharis, tribal peoples and Rohinga refugees. Bangla is the state language and is understood by the majority of the population including tribal groups. The 2003 Human Development Report states that 36% of Bangladeshis live on less than $1 per day and 82.8% on less than $2 per day.

Poverty is exacerbated by frequent natural disasters in the form of floods and cyclones. In 1998, the worst floods ever witnessed covered almost two-thirds of the country, affecting around 15 million people. Floods occurred again in 2000 and 2002. However, with assistance from the international community, including NGOs like World Vision, early warning systems, construction of cyclone shelters and disaster and evacuation planning can help to reduce the impact of climate disasters on people’s lives

The 1991 Bangladesh cyclone (IMD designation:BOB 01, JTWC designation:02B) was among the deadliest tropical cyclones on record. On the night of 29 April 1991 a powerful tropical cyclone struck the Chittagong district of southeastern Bangladesh with winds of around 250 km/h (155 mph). The storm forced a 6 metre (20 ft) storm surge inland over a wide area, killing at least 138,000 people and leaving as many as 10 million homeless.

Meteorological history

Storm path An area of persistent cloudiness, in part due to the monsoon trough, developed into a tropical depression on April 22 in the Bay of Bengal. The wind speed and overall size increased, with the depression becoming Tropical Storm 02B on the 24th. The enormous wind field at the time encompassed nearly the entire bay. The tropical storm continued slowly northwestward, slowly strengthening to a cyclonestrength storm on the 27th. The cyclone moved between a high pressure system to its northwest and east, and as mid-level westerlies met up with the storm, the cyclone moved northeastward. The westerlies enhanced upper level outflow, and in combination with warm water temperatures the cyclone steadily strengthened to a major hurricane on the 28th. On the 28th and 29th, as the system increased its speed to the north-northeast, the cyclone rapidly intensified to a 160 mph Cyclone, the equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane. Late on the 29th, Cyclone 02B made landfall a short distance south of Chittagong as a slightly

surrounded by flooded fields. with the highest mortality among children and the elderly.5 billion (1991 US dollars) in damage. Even so it is estimated over 2 million people did evacuate from the most dangerous areas. it was washed away by the storm surge. The storm rapidly weakened over land. Although cyclone shelters had been built after the 1970 Bhola cyclone. Bangladesh Navy and Bangladesh Air Force. effectively breaking it into two partitions.weaker 155 mph Category 4 Cyclone. possibly mitigating the disaster substantially.000 people were killed by the storm. Others who knew about the storm refused to evacuate because they did not believe the storm would be as bad as forecast. Most deaths were from drowning. The cyclone uprooted a 100-ton crane from the Port of Chittagong. Although a concrete levee was in place near the mouth of the Karnaphuli River in Patenga. three weeks after the storm had struck The storm caused an estimated $1. were also heavily hit. Impact Flooding around a river in Bangladesh At least 138. many had just a few hours of warning and did not know where to go for shelter. A large number of boats and smaller ships ran aground. and smashed it on the Karnaphuli River Bridge. The high velocity wind and the storm surge devastated the coastline. Property damage A damaged village in Bangladesh. and dissipated on the 30th over southeast Asia. The Isha Khan Naval Base at Patenga .[1] with the majority of deaths in the Chittagong area. both of which had bases in Chittagong.

and thousands of people living in the coastal areas are . The funnel-shaped northern portion of the Bay of Bengal causes tidal bores when cyclones make landfall. which included 3. Approximately 1 million homes were destroyed. troops. India. are credited with having saved as many as 200. Most of the fighter planes belonging to the air force were damaged. and therefore.[2] International response Bangladeshis unloading international aid from a US helicopter The United States amphibious task-force. consisting of over 7.S. was subsequently sent to Bangladesh to provide food. The efforts of U.was flooded. mass land erosion resulted in more and more farmers losing their land. This was part of Operation Sea Angel. A Contingency Joint Task Force under the command of Lieutenant General Henry C. water. returning to the US after the Gulf War was diverted to the Bay of Bengal. one of the largest military disaster relief efforts ever carried out. with heavy damages to the ships. with the United Kingdom.000 tons of supplies. Stackpole. 1991 when President Bush directed the US military to provide humanitarian assistance. Environmental impact The storm surge subsequently caused the embankment. China. and medical care to nearly two million people. due to its unique geographic location.[3] List of Bangladesh tropical cyclones Bangladesh. to be swept away.[1] Operation Sea Angel began on May 10.000 US soldiers. Pakistan and Japan also participating.500 men. the number of unemployed rose. as well as whole villages.000 lives. suffers from devastating tropical cyclones frequently. consisting of 15 ships and 2. leaving about 10 million people (a substantial portion of Bangladesh's population) homeless. For an additional three to four weeks after the storm had dissipated.

the coast has been heavily protected with concrete levees.The impact of tropical cyclones on the coastal regions of SAARC countries and their influence in the region. Date/Year No. A detailed program for storm prevention was outlined by the Government following the cyclone of 1991. The three satellite ground stations. Low pressure is the main weather associated with cyclones. Storms Historical records • Source: SMRC-No. Some of the most devastating natural disasters in recorded history with high casualties were tropical cyclones that hit the region now forming Bangladesh. which can last up to 24 hours. It is recommended people have a supply kit ready in case a cyclone hits their area. are used to receive feeds from other satellites. A Comprehensive Cyclone Preparedness Programme (CPP) is jointly planned. operated.000 are trained to help in warning and evacuation in the coastal areas. a Government agency under the ministry of defence[1] provides storm predictions and early warnings using feeds from NASA and NOAA's satellites.[2] Around 2. 1. and serve the dual role of schools or community centers during normal weather. Among them. Loss and damage: People killed = 200. Reference/Source of Information • Ain-i-Akbari • Riyaz-UsSalatin • SL.000. located in Betbunia. In Patenga. and managed by the Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief and the Bangladesh Red Crescent Society. Also. and Mohakhali. Talibabad. the 1970 Bhola cyclone alone claimed more than 500. Bangladesh Space Research and Remote Sensing Organisation (SPARRSO).1 . • Storm preparedness Bangladesh lacks any satellites of its own. 1582 AD (Date and month N/A) Bengal District .500 cyclone shelters have been constructed in the coastal regions. SAARC Meteorological Research Center (SMRC).affected. Cyclones are a product of heat and moisture. and are known to knock out electric and water supplies. The warnings are usually given in a scale of 10.000 lives. Chittagong.1998 Type of Disturbance Severe Cyclonic Storm with a core of hurricane Relevant Information Coast: The cyclone crossed the coast of Backerganj (Sarkar Bala). and a volunteer force of more than 32. with the number10 being given for the deadliest storms. Cyclones can cause devastating damage. The shelters are built on elevated platforms. an afforestation has been initiated in the coastal regions to create a green belt.

Loss and damage: N/A. Other information are not available. May 5.03 m (43 ft) Loss and damage: People killed: 30. The whole area was almost damaged.S. 1991. Surge height: 13. May 5. 7. published. 1914. 1585 (Date and month N/A) N/A • Banglapedia[2] Daily Ittefaq. ICS. Severe • Bangladesh . 1991.S. Other information are not available. May 5.000. May 5. Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast • Daily Ittefaq. May–June. 2. Coast: The cyclone crossed the Sundarbans coast • • Gazetteer. Coast: The cyclone crossed • Daily Ittefaq. 1767 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm Daily Ittefaq. Casualty: unknown. 24 Parganas-by L.[2] Only Hindu temples with a strong foundation were spared.by the Bengal SOC Dept. The whole area was destroyed. 1699 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm Loss and damage: People killed = 50. 1991. Other information are not available. A tropical storm hit the eastern side of Bakerganj (now Barisal) near the mouth of the Meghna River estuary. Other information are not available. 1991.000.The destruction was reported to have been caused by a storm wave. Coast: The cyclone crossed Backerganj (Barisal) coast. 6. a fivehour hurricane and thunderstorm destroyed houses and boats in the coast near Bakerganj (presently in Barisal and Patuakhali). causing devastation of crops. 1765 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm Loss and damage: N/A. 4. winds According to Banglapedia. 1760 (Date and month N/A) Severe Cyclonic Storm 5. Coast: The cyclone crossed the Sundarbans coast 3. O'Malley.

(Actual date core of N/A) hurricane Cattle killed = 100. Other information are not available. Soc. by Henry Piddington. Sailors Horn Book for the law of storms. of Bengal. Blandford Buist's 1st catalogue Trans. Appendix A.C. Bombay Geo. Part II. • • 9. winds Storm wave swept away the collectorate records. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. Appendix A. Other winds information are not available. pp 332. 20523 by F. XII. Vol.S. Severe Loss and damage: People killed = Cyclonic June.000. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979.F. Disastrous Coast: The cyclone crossed the coast of Backerganj (Barisal). June 2. Two ships hurricane were sunk in Chittagong Port.by H. Prepared for the Office of U. Washington D. Meteorological Department • • Banglapedia[2] Journal of Asiatic SOC. Henderson.000. Sarkar Bala. 1822 Storm with a 50. • 8. 10. 46. June 8. Vol.Chittagong coast Cyclonic Storm with a 1797 (Actual Loss and damage: Every house in core of date N/A) the area was destroyed. 1823 Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast Other information are not available. 1824 Heavy Storm Coast: The cyclone crossed • . Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal.

12-4. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979.S. Coast: Crossed Head Bay (Bengal coast) Other information are not available. Cyclonic 1831 Storm Loss and damage: People killed = 22.S. Severe October 31. storms in the Bay of Bengal. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for Coast: The cyclone crossed Barisal coast (Grazed the Balasore-Orissa coast) Surge height: 2. ICS Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Prepared for the Office of U. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development.C. June 3–5.(Severe Cyclonic Storm) Chittagong coast Other information are not available.by L. 20523 by F. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. Bengal District Gazetteer (Balasore).S.000 (along the coast of India and Bengal) Cattle killed > 50.55 m (7–15 ft) 11. 1839 Cyclonic Storm Other information are not available.000 12. • • • . O'Malley.S. Henderson. Bangladesh Meteorological Department. Washington D. Prepared for the Office of U.

A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. Henderson. . Washington D.• 13. Washington D. Washington D. 20523 by F. Prepared for the Office of U. 1844 Coast: Crossed Noakhali and Chittagong coast.S.S. • May 11. Henderson. 20523 by F. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. September Cyclonic 19–21. 20523 by F. 1839 Storm Coast: The storm passed north across Sundarbans coast between Calcutta and Barisal.C. Other information are not available. Prepared for the Office of U.C. Henderson. International Development. 14.C. Cyclonic Storm (Gale) Other information are not available.

16. 17. 20523 by F. Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Prepared for the Office of U. Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. 20523 by F. Prepared for the Office of U. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by . A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. Henderson.C. Cyclonic 1850 Storm Coast: It moved north to Bengal from West Nicobars. Cyclonic 1852 Storm Formation: Formed near 15°N. Washington D.S. April 23–28. Other information are not available. May 12–15.S. Washington D. the center passed 39 miles (63 km) east of Calcutta • Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Henderson. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. Cyclonic 1849 Storm (Gale) Coast: The cyclone crossed Chittagong coast Other information are not available.C.• 15. • Formation: Formed over West Nicobars. May 12–13. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. Coast: It moved northward and crossed the Sundarbans coast.

May 13–17. Cyclonic 1869 Storm The storm moved northwestward from Cape Negrais to Bengal and crossed the Bengal coast Other information are not available. 1869 Cyclonic Storm Coast: From the North Bay the cyclone passed over Bengal. • Month Through 1979.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. 20523 by F. 19. Henderson. Washington D.S. Washington D. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal.C. Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Other information are not available. June 5–10. Prepared for the Office of U. Foreign Disaster . Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development.S.Other information are not available.C. Prepared for the Office of U. Henderson. • 18. Prepared for the Office of U. 20523 by F.

000. 20523 by F. • 21.• October 1872 (Date 20. Henderson. October 29. Washington D. and vast • .[2] Casualty: about 200.S. Banglapedia[2] Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Disastrous storms in the Bay of Bengal. Assistance Agency for International Development. Barisal. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979. Washington D. A Listing of Cyclonic Storms by Month Through 1979.C. Prepared for the Office of U.6 m (10–45 ft) According to Banglapedia. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. Foreign Disaster Assistance Agency for International Development. a cyclone with a storm-surge of 12.C.Severe November 1. 20523 by F. Maximum wind: 220 km/h (119 knots) Surge height: 3-13. Prepared for the Office of U. Cyclonic 1876 Storm with a core of (The Great hurricane Backerganj winds. The storm also caused epidemic and famine. and Noakhali. Cyclone of 1876) Coast: The cyclone crossed the coast of Backerganj (present Barisal) near Meghna estuary. Henderson.2 metres (40 ft) hit Meghna River estuary near Chittagong. was not available) Cyclonic Storm Coast: The cyclone hit the coast of Cox's Bazar Other information are not available.S.

accompanied by storm surge and tidal bores hit Barisal.V. pp.000 people.C. Hatiya Island and Noakhali. Only Hindu temples with a strong foundation were spared. October 1831 Barisal: Casualty: unknown. 1585: A tropical storm hit the eastern side of Bakerganj (now Barisal) near the mouth of the Meghna River estuary. Vol.F. XL VIby H. causing devastation of crops. Tracks of Storms and Depressions in the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea. • • • • . Journal of Asiatic Soc. Banglapedia[2] • This is a partial list of the tropical cyclones in Bangladesh or the historical region of Bengal in general. Nalivkin. Henderson.000. 1982. November 1797: A severe cyclone destroyed most of the houses in the Chittagong) region. 1979. 1877–1970. BMD Hurricane Storms and tornadoes. May 1822: A cyclone.[2] • 1584: A five-hour hurricane and thunderstorm destroyed houses and boats in the coast near Bakerganj (presently in Barisal) and Patuakhali). 20523 by F. Total casualty: about 200.• • • property damage. 68. Casualty: unknown. Most of the figures have been taken from Banglapedia.by D. Blanford pp. Some of the years and dates may be slightly incorrect. IMD. • Washington D. 338. Two ships sank in Chittagong Port. Casualty: 40.

Casualty: unknown. The storm had wind speeds of up to 201 km/hour. November 1904 Sonadia: cyclonic storm.000 acres (380 km²) of land were destroyed. and Noakhali. Char Amina.• • October 1872: A cyclone hit Cox's Bazar.500. The resulting epidemic of Cholera killed another 18. October 1913 Muktagachha upazila (Mymensingh District): A tropical cyclone.654 cattle. Casualty: 870 people and 14. 24 September 1917 Khulna. Casualty: 432 people and 28. Other effects: 62. Also standing crops were destroyed. Casualty: 500 people.000 people. Hatiya and Noakhali. Casualty: approximately 1.029 cattle. 17–19 May 1948: A cyclonic storm hit the deltan between Chittagong and Noakhali. It caused devastating damage in Char Jabbar. Bakerganj. 9–10 October 1960: A severe cyclonic storm hit Eastern Meghna River estuary near Noakhali. May 1941: A cyclonic storm accompanied by storm-surge hit Eastern Meghna River estuary. 21–24 October 1958: A cyclonic storm struck Chittagong coast. Casualty: about 200.000. Effect: Approx.2 metres (40 ft) hit Meghna River estuary near Chittagong. 16 October 1909 Khulna: A tropical cyclone accompanied by storm surge. Barisal.05 metres. 16–19 May 1958: A cyclonic storm accompanied by storm surge hit east and west Meghna River estuary. 1942: A severe cyclonic storm hit The Sundarbans. Casualty: 698 people and 70. The storm also caused epidemic and famine.200 people and 20.000 cattle. A tropical cyclone. 143 killed and fishing fleet wrecked. • • • • • • • • • • • • . May 1898 Teknaf: Tropical cyclone with storm surge.725 houses destroyed. having moved inland destroyed villages. Crops on 94. Casualty: unknown.000 families were rendered homeless. Casualty: unknown. Char Bhatia. The maximum storm surge was 3. October. and vast property damage. Ramgati. especially near the Kutubdia island. Casualty: 14. Faridpur and Patuakhali. 24 October 1897 Chittagong: A tropical cyclone accompanied by storm surge hit the area hard. Casualty: 3.000.000. 100. Casualty: unknown. 31 October 1876: A cyclone with a storm-surge of 12. east of Barisal and Noakhali.

The official death toll was 500. The storm surge was 2.2 m in Chittagong. 16. two large ocean-going ships ran aground in the shore.000 people. Noakhali and Comilla.000 cattle.1 m.332 houses. and also property and crops. Casualty: 11.1 m. 14–15 December 1965: A strong cyclone hit the coast near Cox's Bazar and Patuakhali. Total loss of cattle reached more than one million. Char Tazumuddin and south of Maijdi. Bakerganj. Maximum windspeed was up to 203 km/h and at Cox's Bazar 164 km/h.000 but the number is likely to be higher. Also. Total people affected: 1.5 million people. • • • • • • • • .7-9. Patuakhali. Maximum strong surge was 4. many domestic cattle.000 people.44-3. Cox's Bazar and coastal islands of Sandwip.456 in Barisal). 9 May 1961: A severe cyclonic storm hit Bagerhat and Khulna. Damages: The railway tracks between Noakhali and Harinarayanpur were damaged. Casualty: 850 people. 26–30 October 1962: A severe cyclone hit Feni.05 m.161 houses destroyed (including 70% houses in Hatiya). Losses: 568. and 5-7 vessels capsized in Karnaphuli River. Most affected were Chittagong.000 fishing boats.520 people. and standing crops.• 30–31 October 1960: A severe cyclonic storm hit Chittagong. Faridpur.7-6. Casualty" 873 people.3-5. 28–29 May 1963: A severe cyclonic storm devastated Chittagong. 13 November-13 November: The 1970 Bhola cyclone hit the entire coast of Bangladesh (then East Pakistan).468 people (mostly in Char Alexander). The storm surge reached 4. 1 October 1966: A cyclone hit Sandwip. The storm surge rose up to 4. Haringhata.793 cattle . It had wind speeds of up to 161 km/h. Maximum windspeed was 161 km/h. Casualty:19. Maximum windspeed reached about 222 km/h. Damages include destruction of approximately 20. The storm surge was 3. Noakhali.000 salt beds destroyed. with winds speed up to 210 km/h. The maximum wind speed was 146 km/h. Noakhali.617 cattle. Patuakhali and eastern Meghna estuary.5-6. 4. Casualty: 11. Casualty: about 10. Kutubdia.000 cattle. The storm surge reached a height of 4.6 m. Hatiya and Maheshkhali.000 houses and 3. Damage: 40. Damages: 376. 11–12 May 1965: A strong cyclone hit Barisal and Bakerganj. 65.500 educational institutions were destroyed. 25. 5–6 November 1971: A cyclone hit coastal areas of Chittagong.787 boats. Khulna. Khepupara. The storm surge reached 2.279 people (out of that.1 m. More than 400. Barguna. Chittagong. Maximum storm surge was about 10. north of Char Burhanuddin. Casualty: about 1.0 m.7 m. The windspeed reached a maximum of 162 km/h. The windspeed was up to 210 km/h in Cox's Bazar. Bakerganj.5-3. 27. 32.

accompanied by storm surge. 1000 cattle. 9–12 May 1977: Khulna. Cox's Bazar coast near Kutubdia.6 km/h. Maximum wind speed was up to 112. The storm surge reached 1 m. Patuakhali. 13–15 August 1974: A cyclonic storm hit Khulna. The storm surge was 1. Damages: 972 km² of paddy fields were inundated. The maximum wind speed reached 136 km/h. Schools.2 m. Maximum wind speed was 97–113 km/h. hospitals. Low lying areas of Khulna town inundated.5 to 112. more than 150 fishermen and 100 fishing boats went missing Damages: 20% of the aman rice crops in the affected regions were destroyed. Casualty:11.033 cattle.6 m. Damages:2. Maximum wind speed at Chittagong was 154 km/h. Barisal. • • • • • • • • • .• 28–30 November 1971: A cyclonic storm hit the coast near the Sundarbans. The storm surge reached a height of 3.0-4. Maximum wind speed was 96. Cox's Bazar. Maximum windspeed was 110 km/h at Chittagong and 90 km/h at Khulna. Moipong. Maximum wind speed reached 80. Maximum wind speed reached 161 km/h. 135. Damages: 94. Maximum wind speed reached 122 km/h: Casualty: 43 people. Barisal. Patuakhali and Noakhali. and Urirchar). Casualty: 14 people. warehouses. houses and buildings were destroyed at Amtali upazila in Barguna District. Sonadia. mosques. Patuakhali and Noakhali.63 km/h. Damages: 2. at Cox's Bazar was 100 km/h.300 houses destroyed.000 houses destroyed. Barisal. 8–9 November 1986: A severe cyclonic storm hit the coastal island and chars near Chittagong.379 houses and 74 km of road. The storm surge was up to 2. 5–9 November 1983: A cyclone hit Chittagong.8-5. Casualty: 200 people.52 m. Noakhali and coastal islands (Sandwip. Teknaf. Casualty:300 fishermen with 50 boats missing. 14–15 October 1983: A strong cyclone hit the coastal islands and chars near Chittagong and Noakhali. Noakhali. at Sandwip was 140 km/h. Casualty:600 people. Coastal areas near Patuakhali and nearby islands were submerged under the tidal bore. including the offshore islands. 9–12 May 1975: A strong cyclone pummeled Bhola. Chittagong and offshore islands were hit by a cyclone. 6–9 December 1973: The coastal areas near the Sundarbans were hit by a cyclone. Hatiya. 24–28 November 1974: A cyclone struck the coastal areas near Cox's Bazar and Chittagong. St Martin's Island.069 people. Ukhia. 6 fishing boats and a trawler lost. 24–25 May 1985: A severe cyclone hit Chittagong.5 km/h. Cox's Bazar and Khulna. and embankments destroyed. Casualty: 5 people.

16–19 May 1997: A severe cyclonic storm hit the coastal islands and chars near Chittagong. Noakhali and Bhola.44 metres. and Bhola 178 km/h. The maximum wind speed was 225 km/hour. 19–22 November 1998: A cyclonic storm. 21–25 November 1995: A severe cyclonic storm hit the coastal islands near Cox's Bazar. The storm made landfall near the coast north of Chittagong port during the night of the 29th April. Noakhali and Chittagong.41 billion. 17. Cox's Bazar.22 to 2. The maximum storm surge height reached about 5 to 8 m.000.5 m at Mongla Port. Maximum windspeed reached 210 km/h. 70. • • • • • • • • .000 cattle. Barisal. Cox's Bazar 185 km/h. Royal Bengal Tiger 9). 29–30 April 1991: The 1991 Bangladesh cyclone hit Bangladesh late 29 April night. Casualty: 400 people. 31 May-2 June 1991: A cyclone hit the coastal islands and chars near Patuakhali. It had wind speeds of up to 150 km/hour. and Patuakhali. Casualty: 126 people.05 metres. and Noakhali. Cox's Bazar.44 metres.38 pm on 29 April). 29 April-3 May 1994: A severe cyclonic storm hit the coastal islands near Cox's Bazar. and a storm surge of 1. Kushtia. Maximum wind speed reachd 110 km/h. Casualty: 650 people.83 to 3. Cox's Bazar. (The NOAA-11 satellite estimated the maximum wind speed to be about 240 km/h at 1. Total damage to crops reached Taka 9.000 cattle. hit coastal islands and sand shoals near Khulna. 8.• 24–30 November 1988: A severe cyclonig storm struck Jessore. the maximum wind speed was reported as follows: Chittagong 160 km/h. 25–27 September 1997: A severe cyclonic storm hit coastal islands near Chittagong. The maximum windspeed was 162 km/h.000 people. Noakhali and Bhola districts. The storm surge was 1. Khepupara (Kalapara) 180 km/h. The storm surge was from 1. cattle 65. and a storm surge of 1. Faridpur and coastal islands of Barisal and Khulna. 16–20 May 1998 A severe cyclonic storm with windspeed of 150 km/hour struck coastal islands near Chittagong. Kutubdia 180 km/h. The maximum wind speed was up to 210 km/h.05 metres. and the storm surge reached 3.9 m. Barisal. The maximum wind speed (observed at Sandwip) reached 225 km/h.000 cattle. The diameter of the storm was close to 600 km. The storm was accompanied by a storm surge of 4.83 to 2. The storm originated in the Indian Ocean and reached the Bay of Bengal coast after 20 days. and numerous wild animals at The Sundarbans (deer 15. At other places.708 people. Damages: loss of property was estimated at about Tk 60 billion. Casualty: 5. with wind speeds up to 90 km/hour.000. Casualty: 150.

Over the past decade especially. Early warnings and preparations had a "significant mitigating effect in this emergency. the Bangladeshi government quickly began distributing 4. in human history. As devastating as it was. More than 2.2 million people who lived along the coastline in the days before Sidr hit. How Bangladesh Survived a Cyclone A man sits and grieves for his family. this is because Bangladesh has gotten a lot better at dealing with cyclones. which killed at least 138.000 deaths and severe damage. 15. along with thousands of tents and blankets.000 people were killed. according to official numbers. executive director of the Bangladesh . Soon after the storm passed. flattening houses. many are thankful that it wasn't much worse. Sidr has taken far fewer lives than 1991's Cyclone Gorky. which build in the Bay of Bengal and surge north to hit the country with dreadful regularity. the country's early warning and preparedness systems have improved considerably. some 27 million people were affected by Cyclone Sidr. causing over 2. and destroying thousands of acres of crops. and one of the worst natural disasters. the category 4 storm that swept through Bangladesh last week.000. damaging buildings and roads. But even as Bangladesh begins a massive cleanup operation. which left as many as 500. "[The system] has worked much. Officials evacuated some 3. and the toll could eventually reach 10." according to the United Nations Office for the coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). 2007: Cyclone Sidr makes landfall on southern Bangladesh. and deployed more than 700 medical teams to the worst-affected areas. Atiq Rahman." says A. and stockpiled relief supplies and rescue equipment. who were lost in the cyclone that rocked Bangladesh on Nov. 2007. and 1970's Bhola. In all.000 people dead and is considered the deadliest cyclone.000 metric tons of rice. Mainly.• November 15.000 people. much better than before.

but the $10 billion proposal has run into opposition from farmers whose land it would take. combined with more frequent and stronger cyclones. backed by France. who is a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and chair of the Climate Action Network South Asia. has helped people living along the coast rediscover forgotten farming techniques such as baira cultivation. keeping future death tolls low is likely to get a lot harder. And as the rivers swell with water from melting Himalayan glaciers. if the Bangladeshi government speeds up its implementation of plans created after earlier ruinous floods. "You have these huge. because Bangladesh is already one of the most densely populated countries on the globe — just under half the population of the U. of the country's disaster preparations. better sanitation management and fixing up the worst slums. whose courses are constantly shifting. Non-governmental organizations such as U. CARE. would construct 8. an age-old agricultural system well suited to areas that are flooded for long periods of time. A World Bank project. "The death toll is going to be an order of magnitude less. vast swaths of coastal land will disappear in coming decades — as much as 18% of Bangladesh's current landmass. or floating gardens.S. crammed into an area the size of the state of Iowa. Scientists believe that global warming will make cyclones in the region bigger and more frequent. Those effects. sees a silver lining: Bangladesh's fleeing multitudes can help feed the West's need for cheap labor as its own population ages." he says." Still. the U.K. too. Neighboring India is already so worried about the growing number of Bangladeshi migrants that it is building a huge fence on the two nations' shared border. Most of Bangladesh sits on the giant alluvial delta created by the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers.-based Practical Action have also developed simple house designs — two-foot-high concrete plinths topped with inexpensive and easily replaced jute panel walls — that help prevent some homes from being washed away. much of Bangladesh will be transformed if current global warming trends continue. It will help. including improving drainage in cities. could spark an exodus of climate refugees fleeing for the cities and for other countries. And if the rich world is not ready to let in millions of Bangladeshis looking for somewhere dry to . there are some slivers of hope. Japan and the U. As the sea level rises.-based NGO.. Already people in some areas of Bangladesh have begun building houses on tall stilts to evade annual floodwaters. rapidly changing geological dynamics here that make it a very hard place to protect. land in the center of the country will also disappear.S.S. "The globalization of the climate process will force the globalization of the demographic process. That's a problem. Massive Dutch-style dikes to hold back the sea — and future cyclone-induced waves — are probably even more unworkable. whose location and geography makes it not only particularly susceptible to the effects of climate change but also extremely hard to protect. Rahman." says Rahman. Farmers might also benefit from salt-tolerant varieties of rice or fast-growing crops that can be harvested before the devastating monsoons arrive.Centre for Advanced Studies. Regardless of these preparations. however." On a more human scale. making it difficult to build up river banks to protect farmland. however. That's bad news for Bangladesh.000 km of dikes to control the rivers. according to the World Bank. "The soil isn't steady as such — it's mud.

US and Europe. While the official death toll remains low.000 In the worst affected districts. aid agencies have said as the full extent of the disaster became clear. • • • Children tied to trees to escape cyclone In pictures: Cyclone Sidr Peter Foster: Notes from a chaotic city The Bangladeshi Red Crescent Society.000 people in 1970 and 143.however local officials said the impact would now fall on the many survivors." They may have to get used to it Bangladesh cyclone death toll hits 15. They don't like hearing that.000 tons of carbon you have to take a Bangladeshi family.live? "The rich world caused this problem so they're going to have to pay for it. said that more than 3. Previous cyclones killed 500.000. Britain. .000 bodies had already been recovered from villages shattered by Cyclone Sidr's 150mph winds. supported by donations from the UN.000 in 1991 .000 people could have died while the Red Crescent estimated around 10." says Rahman.000 families had been affected. was slowly grinding into gear yesterday as the International Red Cross estimated 900. An international relief effort. South Asia correspondent 8:01PM GMT 18 Nov 2007 Up to 15. "I've started telling my colleagues from Europe and Canada that we might have to introduce a system that says if you produce 10. Save the Children last night said that it feared that 15.000 people were killed and seven million lives left devastated by the cyclone in Bangladesh last week. the country's main humanitarian group. 90 pc of homes and 95 pc of rice crops and valuable prawn farms were obliterated by the winds By Peter Foster.

90 per cent of homes and 95 per cent of rice crops and valuable prawn farms were obliterated by the winds. "For the corpses we don't have clothes to wrap them in for burial. an official from Barguna District. air-lifting supplies to areas cut off by flooding." When reached. Millions of people are living out in the open and relief is reaching less than one percent of the people. Lord Malloch Brown. said: "We have offered our immediate support to relief efforts through the UN and stand ready to provide more assistance when required. Officials described the humanitarian situation in coastal districts like Barguna. We are wrapping the bodies in leaves. while the United States ordered two warships from the Bay of Bengal to assist with rescue and relief efforts. with elephants being used in some areas to clear the heaviest debris. as the "worst in decades". the Foreign Office minister. Tapan Chowdhury. I am afraid that the rest of us will die of hunger.400 Peter Foster: The anti-capitalist capitalist 15m facing health crisis after Asia's floods "I have never seen such a catastrophe in my 20 years as a government administrator. which generated a 20ft tidal surge that swept everything from its path. "Village after village has been shattered. a grave assertion in a country that is used to dealing with annual floods and storms. Relief operators on the ground said supplies were still inadequate and that the government should make an immediate plea for more international aid to avert a "human disaster". a 55-year-old farmer in the village of Nishanbari." • One million displaced by 140mph cyclone . victims are being found dehydrated and in a state of shock. 130 miles south of the capital Dhaka.In the worst affected districts. "I lost six of my family members in the cyclone. described the cyclone as a "national calamity" and urged all to come forward to help the victims." said Sattar Gazi. a government adviser for food and disaster management.5 million. Fallen trees and flooded roads are also seriously impeding the relief crews' efforts to reach stricken coastal villages." said Harisprasad Pal. • • • Death toll in monsoon disaster rises to 1." Britain announced immediate aid of £2.

I appeal to international solidarity.The Pope appealed for immediate international aid for those stricken by the disaster in Bangladesh." . "I encourage all possible efforts to help these brothers who are suffering so much. "In renewing my deep condolences to the families and the entire nation. which is very dear to me." he said.