Parking Requirements

What is the Purpose of Parking Requirements?
Parking requirements are used to ensure adequate and appropriate levels of vehicle and bicycle parking. Changes to parking requirements are based on a Parking Policy Study commissioned by the Montgomery County Department of Transportation.

Agricultural, Rural, Residential, Industrial Zones
Parking requirements in these zones reflect a nonshared parking environment. In a non-shared parking environment, spaces are typically used only by the people who work or live at the property. The code sets a baseline minimum parking requirement for each use or use group in the Allowed Use Table. Minimum parking requirements in these zones can be reduced with adjustments such as on-street space, carshare space and the provision of moderately priced dwelling units.

Parking Benefit Districts
Parking Lot Districts have been rebranded as Parking Benefit Districts (PBDs). The PLDs, located in Bethesda, Montgomery Hills, Silver Spring, and Wheaton, have market incentives for the creation of shared parking supplies in a high-density, mixed-use environment. Chapter 60 creates two types of PBDs: Primary Parking Benefit District Includes established Parking Lot Districts and areas the County owns or can obtain property for the operation of shared public parking. In Primary PBDs, minimum parking requirements do not need to be met on site. Instead, a property owner may choose to provide fewer than the required number of spaces and pay a County-assessed property value tax. This revenue is directed towards the PBD program for the purpose of providing shared, public parking. Secondary Parking Benefit District For emerging mixed-use areas, such as White Flint, where the County’s capacity to provide publicly owned or operated shared parking resources is substantially limited. There is no means for a property owner to buy out of the minimum parking requirement in a Secondary PBD.

Commercial/Residential & Employment Zones
Parking requirements in these zones reflect and encourage a shared parking environment. In a shared parking environment, spaces are collectively used by people who work or live at properties within close proximity to one another. The code has different requirements for Parking Benefits Districts (PBDs) compared to all other areas. In PBDs, the code sets a baseline minimum parking requirement, as well as a maximum cap, for each use or use group in the Allowed Use Table. In areas outside PBDs, the code sets a baseline minimum parking requirement lower than they are today in order to discourage underused surface parking lots. Minimum parking requirements in these zones can be reduced with adjustments such as the Non-Auto Driver Mode Share factor; carpool/vanpool spaces; and unbundled residential space – where spaces are offered at market rates as an option distinct from the purchase or lease of a residential unit.

Bicycle Parking
Bicycle parking requirements are established for certain uses or use groups in the Allowed Use Table. The requirements also specify a percentage of spaces for long-term parking. Short-term spaces are focused on patrons. Long-term spaces are focused on resident and employee parking.

The proposed code also includes bicycle parking design Maximum parking requirements in PBDs can be standards that address location, access, and security; exceeded with shared parking, unbundled residential space dimensions; signage; rack specifications; and spaces, and payment of an annual tax per space. changing facilities for large commercial uses. Proposal based on January 25, 2012  ZAP Review Draft

www.zoningmontgomery.org