Gender, Race, Class in Media Course Syllabus WGST 095 Gender/Race/Class In Media N.B.

THIS SYLLABUS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE Instructor: Janice Perry Email: jlperry@uvm.edu Office Hours: By appointment This “hybrid” course will be comprised of meetings in a classroom, and online Blackboard work. Blackboard work can be done at any time before the week’s deadline. Course Description This course is an introduction to analysis of representations of identities such as gender, race, class, sexual orientation, and body in the mass media. We’ll view, read about, analyze and discuss mass media like television, film, print, radio, music, sports, news, advertising and the web, and look at what these forms represent. An underlying understanding within the course is recognition of the inextricable interconnections between/insectionality of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation etc. Students will use online discussion in Blackboard, write response papers, present analyses individually in class, and work in groups to produce an original media presentation as a final project. The course will be comprised largely of discussions based on readings, class presentations, and viewing and interpreting a large range of mediated texts. The course readings are both practical and theoretical, and can be applied to all media. Students will also get an opportunity to produce their own media presentation and a work on a group media project. By the end of the course, students will be more media literate, which means that students will: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how people use media personally and publicly 2. Understand the complex relationships among audiences and media content 3. Understand that media content is produced within particular social, political, and cultural contexts 4. Understand the commercial nature of media, and 5. Possess the ability to use media to communicate to specific audiences. About this Course 1. Be sure to read and use the 5-minute workshop on critical reading guidelines, PDF available on BB under Course Materials. You should frame your discussion by using these guidelines. 2. You will develop new understanding about the way media constructs Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 1

identity. You are expected to actively participate and take responsibility for your education. rather than passively receive information. Every students’ opinions on race, class, and gender issues will be heard in class. 3. In this discussion-based course on the social construction of race, class and gender, students learn from each other, and learn to understand and appreciate different perspectives. Learning is a collaborative and social experience. You are expected to arrive on time having done all of the reading, and having posted to the Discussion Board and to make contributions to our learning in each class. A higher level of discussion results when students ground their observations in the readings. 4. Since many of the race, class, and gender issues we discuss in class may affect you personally, be prepared to be challenged and to challenge the readings. Required Course Reading: These 2 books will be available at the bookstore: Lind, Rebecca Ann. Race/Gender/Media: Considering Diversity Across Audiences, Content, and Producers. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc., 2004. Gail Dines and Jean M. Humez. Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical

Reader, Edition 3. Los Angeles: Sage Publications, 2011.
Other required or recommended readings/video clips: Otnes , Cele and Elizabeth Pleck. Cinderella Dreams (University of California Press, 2003). Chaz Bono on the Oprah Winfrey Show “Becoming a Man” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmaNBkFazQ8 Cook and Kaiser, “Betwixt and Be Tween”, Journal of Consumer Culture, July 2004. “Romancing the Clone: The White Wedding,” in Ingraham, White Weddings, pp. 77-122 and “The Rise of the Lavish Wedding” in Otnes and Pleck, Cinderella Dreams. “Pornonormativity and the Visual Culture of Online Swinging” by Alison Rooke and Monica Moreno Figueroa. Robert Heasley, “Crossing the borders of Gendered Sexuality Queer Masculinities of Straight Men” in Ingraham, Thinking Straight These are e-reserve readings: 5 minute workshop in Critical Reading Davis, Eisa. “Sexism and the Art of Hip Hop Maintenance.” To Be Real: Telling the Truth and Changing the Face of Feminism, ed. Rebecca Walker. New York: Anchor Books, 1995. Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 2

Mulvey, Laura. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” Screen 163_1975:Autumn_ Jane Ussher, “Sexual Science and the Law” and read http://rawstory.com/rs/2010/0630/doctor-testing-drug-prevent-lesbianism-interestmotherhood/ and http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2009/sep/11/caster-semenyarunner-intersex

All of the above readings are on reserve at the library. There will be additional web-links and/or handouts.

Attendance Policy This is an intensive class. This means that students are expected to attend each class meeting. Each student is allowed one unexcused absence. Unexcused absences that exceed this amount will be penalized by points off the final letter grade for each additional absence. If you are absent without an excuse on the day of your media presentation, you will receive a grade of 0 for the presentation. No make-ups. To obtain excused absence contact the Student Services at the Dean of Arts and Sciences office. Course Requirements ONLINE DISCUSSION 20% Media Report 15% Reading Responses 15% Group Project 15% Final Paper 15% General participation in class 20% Total 100% Media Report: In each class meeting, whether face-to-face or online, one or more students will bring in an example from current media to share with the class. The media can be in any form (for example, a news article, television commercial, movie clip, internet site, powerpoint etc.), but it should be related to course topics. The student should introduce the media text, explain their own interpretation of that text, and provide questions to stir discussion about that media text in relation to course topics. Students should address these major questions about production of media: Who has produced the media? What else does this producer own/produce? Who is the intended audience? How is the media distributed? Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 3

How is the audience using the media? The entire presentation, including discussion, should take approximately 15-20 minutes. Please do NOT simply read to us from your powerpoint. Thanks. Response Papers: We will have 2 brief 2-4 page double spaced papers that respond to the readings. This paper should include a summary of what you think are the most crucial and interesting arguments being made, backed up by SPECIFIC REFERENCES TO THE READINGS AND DISCUSSION. Use the critical reading guidelines provided in the PDF. Final Paper: At the end of the semester, we’ll have a final paper, approximately 5 pages in length, double spaced, on a topic agreed upon with the instructor. The final paper will ask students to use course materials to delve further into an area of interest to them. Group Project SEE DETAILS in Course Materials on Blackboard. Students will divide into groups of 3-4 people. Each group will consider what they think to be one of the most pressing problems posed by dominant representations of gender, race, class, sexuality in the media. In response to this problem, the group will create and produce their own form of mediation to counter and/or re-present these representations. Students are encouraged to be creative in this process. For example, you may choose to make a commercial, a newspaper advertisement campaign, put up an internet site, create a short play or skit, or take another approach to producing your own media. The group will present their project to the class. The presentation should include an explanation of the process of production, an interpretation of the project in terms of the group’s goals and purposes, and the facilitation of a 10 minute class discussion about the project. Discussion Participation: This course is a discussion-based seminar. Students will be expected to be familiar with vocabulary from the readings and course content and to engage in critical course discussions. If you choose to relate your experiences and opinions, these should be grounded in an engagement with and specific references to the concepts presented in the readings. Course Schedule: this schedule is subject to change. 1 Introduction to course and syllabus. View in Class: An Anthropological Introduction to YouTube: Michael Wesch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPAO-lZ4_hU&feature=channel Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 4

2 Topic: Introduction to Media Theory • Reading: • E-reserve/ in Course Materials on Blackboard- 5 minute workshop in Critical Reading. Although not all of these techniques apply specifically to this course, use this as a basic tool in composing your discussion posts. • Lind, Chapter 1 • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG Film on YouTube: bell hooks: Cultural Criticism and Transformation 3 • Dines & Humez— Kellner, Douglas. “Cultural Studies, Multiculturalism, and Media Culture.” Croteau, David and Hoynes, William. “The New Media Giants.” • Additional reading to be assigned • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG Film: Pornography in Everyday Life 4 Topic: Audiences Reading: • Lind, Chapter 2, 3 • Gramsci: Cultural Hegemony – in Course Materials on Blackboard • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG Film: Bamboozled 5 Topic: Audiences: Reading: Dines & Humez— • Hall, Stuart. “The Whites in Their Eyes: Racist Ideologies and the Media.” • Gerbner, George. “Television Violence: At a Time of Turmoil and Terror.” • Jenkins, Henry. “Lessons From Littleton: What Congress Doesn’t Want to Hear About Youth and Media” • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG 6 ***First Reading Response Due Topic: Introduction to Content & the Role of Marketing & Consumer Culture Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 5

Reading: • Lind, Chapter 4 (4.2-4.4) • Dines & Humez— Davis, Susan G. “ Space Jam: Media Conglomerates.” • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG Film: Mickey Mouse Monopoly: Disney, Childhood, and Corporate Power 7 Topic: Advertising and Magazines • Lind, Chapter 4 (4.1) • Dines & Humez— Oulette, Laurie. “Inventing the Cosmo Girl: Class Identity and Girl-Style American Dreams” Jhally, Sut. “Image Based Culture: Advertising and Popular Culture.” Wilson II, Clint C. and Gutierrez, Felix. “Advertising and People of Color.” Fejes, Fred. “Advertising and the Political Economy” Steinem, Gloria “Sex, Lies & Advertising” • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG Film: Beyond Killing Us Softly 8 Topic: Film Reading: • Lind, Chapter 6 (6.1, 6.2, 6.4 only) • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG 9 REVIEW CATCH UP ON READING/DISCUSSION POSTING/BLOG Film: Baad Asssss Cinema: Blaxploitation films of the 70’s 10 Topic: News, Public Affairs, Sports Content Reading: • Lind, Chapter 5 • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG Film: Wrestling with Manhood Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 6

11 Topic: Entertainment Television Reading: • Lind, Chapter 7 • Dines & Humez-Raymond, Diane. “Popular Culture and Queer Representation: A Critical Perspective” Fiske, John. “Gendered Television: Femininity” • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG

EACH GROUP WILL GIVE A BRIEF REPORT ON PROGRESS OF GROUP PROJECT. EACH MEMBER WILL CONTRIBUTE TO THIS. 12 Topic: Music Readings: • Lind, Chapter 8 Davis, Eisa, “Sexism and the Art of Feminist Hip-Hop Maintenance” YouTube: Erykah Badu: “Window Seat” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hVp47f5YZg YouTube: Leslie Hall http://www.youtube.com/user/lesliehall#p/u/4/oWWtQvX-6N4 Film: Dreamworlds 3 • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG 13 Topic: New Media Reading: • Lind, Chapter 9 • Dines & Humez— McChesney, “The Titanic Sails On: Why the Internet Won’t Sink the Media Giants” Arnold, Ellen L. and Plymire, Darcy C. “The Cherokee Indians and the Internet” • POST Reading responses to Discussion Board, follow the guidelines • UPLOAD (at least one) show and tell on the Blackboard BLOG 14 Topic: Production Issues & Working in and for the media Reading: Lind, Chapter 11, 12, 13 ***Second Reading Response Due Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 7

15 1st half project presentations Catch up on reading and Discussion Postings Week 16 2nd half project presentations

Media Report Assignment You will sign up for a specific date on which to present your media report. In each class meeting, whether face-to-face or online, one or more students will bring in an example from current media to share with the class. The media can be in any form (for example, a news article, television commercial, movie clip, internet site, powerpoint etc.), but it should be related to course topics. The student should introduce the media text, explain their own interpretation of that text, and provide questions to stir discussion about that media text in relation to course topics. Students should address these major questions about production of media: Who has produced the media? What else does this producer own/produce? Who is the intended audience? How is the media distributed? How is the audience using the media? The entire presentation, including discussion, should take approximately 15-20 minutes. Please do NOT simply read to us from your powerpoint. Thanks. Your presentation should include the following components: 1. Introduction of the text—Explain to the class what the text is and where it came from. 2. Interpretation of the text—Explain to the class what you think the media text is trying to communicate. Who is the targeted audience? What messages is the audience being sent? What messages about gender, race, class, body, and other identities are being communicated? How is the targeted audience likely to interpret this message? In your view, is the message positive or negative or both? Why? 3. Critical analysis—Explain what you think is the implication in your answers to the questions above. What do these messages mean in social/cultural terms? How do these messages impact persons of diverse races, ethnicities, sexualities, classes, etc. differently? 4. Class discussion—Facilitate a group discussion about your media text. Bring a list of a few questions that you think will spur discussion. *You will be graded according to the following criteria: 1) your choice of media texts Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 8

2) knowledgeable presentation of the text. interpretive and critical reflection that incorporates concepts introduced in the course 3) overall preparedness, organization and clarity of the presentation 4) ability to choose questions that incite discussion in the class

Media Report Sign Up

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Supplemental Readings/videos: Kathy Davis, “’My Body is My Art’: Costmetic Surgery as Feminist Utopia?” and Simone Weil Davis, “Loose Lips Sink Ships.” Rosi Braidotti, “Signs of Wonder and Traces of Doubt,” pp. 290-300 and Shildrick and Price, “Breaking the Bondaries of the Broken Body,” pp. 432-444 in Shildrick and Price, eds., French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu (1930- 2002) introduced the concepts of social and cultural capital (and more-- feel free to research him). This short paper by cultural critic William Bowles synthesizes work and concepts in this field very well. Please read: http://www.williambowles.info/mimo/refs/tece1ef.htm in addition, this entry from the Stamford Encylopedia of Philosophy provides a thorough background on the development and legal applications of affirmative action. It is much easier to grasp if you keep the idea of cultural capital in mind. Please read point 9 (and 7 & 8, and the rest).http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/affirmative-action/#3 Rosemarie Thomson, Freakery: Cultural Spectacles of the Extraordinary Body (New York University Press) Rosemary Thomas Garland, Introduction, and Robert Bogdan, “The Social Construction of Freaks,” in Freakery, pp. 1-17, 23-36. and * Armand Marie Leroi, Mutants, pp. xiii-xv; 3-22. Lori Merish, “Cuteness and Commodity Aesthetics,” Freakery, pp. 185-206. Shirley Temple films in class. David D. Yuan, “The Celebrity Freak: Michael Jackson’s Grotesque Glory,” Freakery, pp. 368-384. Do some research on news coverage of the trials and/or death of Michael Jackson as a racial and sexual freak.

Books on RACE, ETHNICITY & WHITENESS: NOTES OF A NATIVE SON and GO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAIN, James Baldwin BLACK LIKE ME, John Howard Griffin BLACK SKIN, WHITE MASKS Frantz Fanon THE HISTORY OF WHITE PEOPLE, Nell Irvin Painter Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 10

TEACHING TO TRANSGRESS: Education as the Practice of Freedom,and AIN'T I A WOMAN: Black Women and Feminism, bell hooks I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS, Maya Angelou MORE THAN BLACK? Multiracial Identity and the New Racial Order, G.Reginald Daniel WHITE, Richard Dyer WHITE LIKE ME: Reflections on Race by a Privileged Son, Tim Wise TERRORIST ASSEMLAGES: homonationationalism in queer times, jaspir k. puar AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN OF THE OLD WEST, Tricia Martineau Wagner QUEER LATINIDAD: Identity Practices, Discursive Spaces, Juana Maria Rodriquez INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL WRITTEN BY HERSELF, Harriet A. Jacobs RUNNING 1000 MILES TO FREEDOM, William (and Ellen) Craft BAREED MISTA3JIL-True Stories (Voices from people of non-conforming sexualities and genders in Lebanon) OUT OF PLACE: Interrogating Silences in Queerness/Raciality Edited by Adi Kuntsman, Esperanza Miyake BLACK QUEER STUDIES: A Critcal Anthology Edited by E. Patrick Johnson and Mae G. Henderson QUEERING THE COLOR LINE: Race and the Invention of Homosexuality in American Culture, Siobhan B. Somerville RUAHINE: Mythic Women, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku THE BLUEST EYE, Toni Morrison Lesbians Talk MAKING BLACK WAVES, Valerie Mason-John and Ann Khambatta WHITE LIES: Race and the Myths of Whiteness, Maurice Berger THE RACIAL CONTRACT, Charles W. Mills WHITE IDENTITIES: A Critical Sociological Approach, Simon Clarke and Steve Garner BETWEEN BARACK AND A HARD PLACE: Racism and White Denial in the Age of Obama, Tim Wise omonationationalism in queer times, jaspir k. puar AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN OF THE OLD WEST, Tricia Martineau Wagner QUEER LATINIDAD: Identity Practices, Discursive Spaces, Juana Maria Rodriquez INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL WRITTEN BY HERSELF, Harriet A. Jacobs RUNNING 1000 MILES TO FREEDOM, William (and Ellen) Craft BAREED MISTA3JIL-True Stories (Voices from people of non-conforming sexualities and genders in Lebanon) OUT OF PLACE: Interrogating Silences in Queerness/Raciality Edited by Adi Kuntsman, Esperanza Miyake BLACK QUEER STUDIES: A Critcal Anthology Edited by E. Patrick Johnson and Mae G. Henderson Janice Perry Gender/Race/Class/Body/Media Syllabus 11

QUEERING THE COLOR LINE: Race and the Invention of Homosexuality in American Culture, Siobhan B. Somerville RUAHINE: Mythic Women, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku THE BLUEST EYE, Toni Morrison Lesbians Talk MAKING BLACK WAVES, Valerie Mason-John and Ann Khambatta WHITE LIES: Race and the Myths of Whiteness, Maurice Berger THE RACIAL CONTRACT, Charles W. Mills WHITE IDENTITIES: A Critical Sociological Approach, Simon Clarke and Steve Garner BETWEEN BARACK AND A HARD PLACE: Racism and White Denial in the Age of Obama, Tim Wise

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