Georgia DOE 2011 Library Media Program Self-Evaluation Rubric Creekview High School, Canton GA Completed by: Steve

Sapere, M. Ed. Student Overview This self-evaluation was conducted in conjunction with the lead media specialist at the school. The Creekview High School media center earned an exemplary rating from the state in 2010. Since that time, a variety of forces have conspired to negatively impact that rating. Chief among these forces is the continued economic crisis, which has resulted in some key staffing cuts. The result of these cuts is that the media center’s rating in the staffing category is now at the basic level. Another area where the media center falls into the basic category is in the category of administrative support. This stems in part from diminished funding, but also from a perceived lack of support from administration, including a lack of receptiveness to input from the media specialist. The following table summarizes the results of the self-evaluation. For areas in which the media center was rated as exemplary, a brief explanation is provided. In areas rated as basic, a list of recommended action steps is included in addition to an explanation for the rating (these areas are indicated in yellow).Finally, for one of the areas rated as proficient, a list of action steps required to move that area to exemplary is included, along with an explanation for the current rating (his area is indicated in green).
Category 1 - Student Achievement and Instruction Rating Explanation/Action Steps to Improve Currently, the Creekview High School Media Center does an excellent job of fostering critical thinking skills and independent inquiry through the collaborative instructional efforts of the media specialists and classroom teachers in creating and delivering lessons which incorporate both the Georgia Performance Standards and the AASL standards. Currently, the media specialists actively encourage collaboration with all teachers in the school. The media specialist works with all teachers who are willing to plan collaboratively in designing learning experiences for all students, inclusive of a variety of learning styles, abilities, and needs.

1. Information Literacy Standards are integrated into content instruction; AASL Standards for the 21st-Century Learner Exemplary are integrated into content instruction.

2. Collaborative planning includes Library Media Specialists and teachers to ensure use of library media center resources that support on-going Exemplary classroom instruction and implementation of state curriculum and the Georgia Performance Standards. 3. Professional library media staff are engaged in active teaching role/s. Exemplary

Media specialists employ a variety of strategies to meet student needs, work collaboratively with teachers to plan lessons that incorporate state standards, and are actively involved in the assessment of student learning products. The media center continues to be an important element in the school’s curricular and recreational reading programs.

4. The library media center resources encourage and support reading, viewing, and listening.

Exemplary

Georgia DOE 2011 Library Media Program Self-Evaluation Rubric Creekview High School, Canton GA Completed by: Steve Sapere, M. Ed. Student
5. Services are provided to students who have diverse learning abilities, styles, and needs. Currently, the media specialist feels that the media center does a good job of providing for the needs of students with diverse learning needs. However, she did not feel that these services were worthy of an exemplary rating. Further discussion reveled some ways in which this area could be improved from the proficient level to exemplary status. Action steps the media specialist can take include:  Involving the special education and ESOL department chairpersons (or designated representative) in the library media program advisory committee (see item 16), and in the selection of materials and resources that will best support students with diverse learning abilities.  Involving special education co-teachers and ESOL teachers in the collaborative planning process with the media specialist and regular education teacher in order to better design instructional experiences to meet the needs of students with diverse learning abilities and styles.  Relying on the expertise of special education and ESOL professionals in modifying lessons, materials and grading procedures in accordance with students’ Individualized Educational Plans (IEPs) and language needs.  Actively seeking to increase own professional and personal knowledge of techniques for modifying instruction to meet the needs of a diverse population of learners, and for accommodating students with varying special needs. The most important resource for this continuing education will be the special education and ESOL professionals within the building. The media specialists routinely collaborate with teachers to assess student achievement using a variety of collaboratively designed evaluative tools.

Proficient

6. Student achievement is routinely assessed. Category 2 - Staffing 7a. If less than base size: A school system shall provide no less than halftime services of a Library Media Specialist for each school less than base size and shall provide adult supervision in the library media center for the entire instructional day.

Exemplary

Exemplary

Currently, two full-time Library Media Specialists are employed and are not shared at any other time with other areas in the school. Adult supervision by certified personnel is available for the entire day.

Georgia DOE 2011 Library Media Program Self-Evaluation Rubric Creekview High School, Canton GA Completed by: Steve Sapere, M. Ed. Student

7b. If base size or larger: A school system shall employ a full-time Library Media Specialist for each base size school or larger.

Basic

Due to budget cuts in the past two fiscal cycles, there has been a significant reduction in the media center staffing formula. For the 2010-2011 SY, the media center paraprofessional position was cut, requiring the media specialist for perform a myriad of additional duties on a daily basis which reduced the amount of time the media specialist was available to assist teachers and students. The 2012-2013 SY will see additional changes, with a reduction in the number of certified media specialists on staff from 2 to 1.5, further impacting availability to students and teachers. Action Steps to Improve: As these budgetary/staffing decisions are largely beyond the scope of control of the media specialist, action steps to improve this area are limited. Possible options include:  Actively seeking and securing additional, costneutral help with daily clerical tasks by increasing the media center’s pool of parent/community volunteers and student aides.  Assigning other teachers and staff on an “as available” basis to assist with daily media center tasks commensurate with their level of ability.  Limiting or restricting access to the media center before/after school and during the school day (with the exception of scheduled classes) in order to allow the media specialist time to perform other duties. The first of these two options is obviously preferable. The reduction of media center services would be viewed as an option of last resort. Unfortunately, the realities of the situation require that all options be explored.

Category 3 - Facilities, Access, and Resources

8. There shall be a plan for flexibly scheduled library media center access for students and teachers in groups or as individuals simultaneously throughout each instructional day. Accessibility shall refer to the facility, the staff, and the resources and shall be based on instructional need.

Proficient

While flexible scheduling is maintained allowing full participation of teachers and the Library Media Specialist in collaborative planning, the lack of sufficient staff (library paraprofessional) interferes with students coming to the library media center at any time. In addition, although the library media center is available both before and after school, no evening hours are currently scheduled.

Georgia DOE 2011 Library Media Program Self-Evaluation Rubric Creekview High School, Canton GA Completed by: Steve Sapere, M. Ed. Student
9. School library media center square footage requirements based on FTE. Based on the school’s FTE, the media center exceeds minimum square footage requirements and can accommodate as many as three large classes at one time. Available physical spaces include a computer lab, presentation area, main floor area and reading/study lounge. There are over 90 computers available for student use. The media center also houses a production/work room, storage and office space. The media center exceeds ADA guidelines for accommodating students with special needs. Streaming video and other technologies are regularly used to support the curriculum. The media center has an electronic whiteboard (in the computer lab space) and it is used regularly. Electronic white boards are located in every classroom in the building and are used by all teachers as a part of daily instruction. Access to all media center resources (subscription databases, Internet, research pathfinder pages, online tutorials) is available on the school’s LAN. In addition, many library media center resources are accessible via Internet access outside the school, enabling students to use media center technology remotely to work independently. Students have access to over 90 computers in the media center. The media center’s OPAC is available on a LAN throughout the school, as well as via remote internet access from outside the facility. All resources are recorded in MARC format within an automated data management system so that inventory, weeding, etc. can be executed in a time-efficient manner. The OPAC is upto-date and reflects the library media center holdings.

Exemplary

10. Streaming video is used throughout the school to support the curriculum. Interactive whiteboards and computers are used for teaching and learning throughout the school. A central electronic media distribution system is also available. 11. Print and non-print resources and access to online information are basic to a library media program. A school network is effective for delivering media resources to the classroom and beyond. Multiple computers are available for student access to online resources that enhance instruction. 12. All library media resources are managed for maximum efficient use. The library media center has an electronic online public access catalog (OPAC). Funds for acquisition of computers are utilized to implement the goals/objectives set forth in the System Three-Year Technology Plan 1999 – 2002 or in the System Comprehensive School Improvement Plan. 13. One of the national educational technology goals states: “Effective and engaging software and on-line resources will be an integral part of every school’s curriculum.” The GALILEO on-line service provides Georgia students and teachers access to exceptional on-line resources at no cost to the local school district. . Searches performed in GALILEO databases will exceed one million annually and the number of fullcontent items viewed will exceed one million annually.

Exemplary

Exemplary

Exemplary

Exemplary

Collaborative instruction is planned and delivered incorporating instruction and promotion of GALILEO resources. As part of information literacy instruction, searches will be conducted to maximize efficiency and result in high quality student learning products. Best practices and lesson/unit plans that encourage and endorse GALILEO will be produced, taught, and shared with other media specialists throughout the state via the media center’s website as well as through other means. The media specialist provides training and inservice to interested faculty and staff.

Georgia DOE 2011 Library Media Program Self-Evaluation Rubric Creekview High School, Canton GA Completed by: Steve Sapere, M. Ed. Student
Category 4 - Administrative Support 14. The local system superintendent shall appoint a system media contact person (SMCP) to serve as a liaison to the department. The media specialist reported that the district does have a SMCP who does, in fact, coordinate communication among all Library Media Specialists in the district, and disseminates messages from DOE, GALILEO, and other entities. However, the SMCP does little to encourage opportunities for media specialists to meet regularly. Currently, the media specialist does not feel fully supported by the school principal. Neither the principal nor district-level administrators take an active, leadership role in encouraging teachers to integrate library media center resources into their instruction. Furthermore, district-level administration has not only not encouraged the media specialist to visit other exemplary programs and improve professionally, but has actively discouraged this activity by failing to provide budgetary support (including leave time from work) Action Steps to Improve: Once again, as this area is beyond the direct scope of control of the media specialist, arriving at an effective course of action is problematic. Possible solutions include:  Increasing current efforts to educate building and district-level administrators of the benefits of a properly supported school library media program. These efforts should include enlisting the active support of teachers, students, parents, and community members. The purpose of these efforts would be to increase administrative support of the library media program. Currently, there is not a library media advisory committee, although one did previously exist. The media specialist reports that the staffing cuts that have resulted in additional duties have reduced the time available for such activities as an advisory committee. In this area, there are clearly some actions that can be taken by the media specialist. Possible solutions include:  Establishing (re-establishing) a library media advisory committee consisting of one member of the administrative team, department heads, the school’s technology specialist, a parent, and a student.  If department heads are not available, each department may designate a teacher in their department as a representative to the library media advisory committee.  The committee will meet twice yearly

Proficient

15. Administrative staff support at both the school and district levels is essential for the development of a strong library media program.

Basic

16. Each local board of education shall adopt a library media policy that provides for the establishment of a media committee at the system level and at each school. A library media committee makes recommendations and decisions relating to planning, operation, evaluation, and improvement of the library media program. This committee shall annually evaluate library media services and develop a multi-year media plan for budget services and priorities.

Basic

Georgia DOE 2011 Library Media Program Self-Evaluation Rubric Creekview High School, Canton GA Completed by: Steve Sapere, M. Ed. Student
(December and May) to make recommendations and decisions relating to planning, operation, evaluation, and improvement of the library media program

17. Local Board approved library media policy is current. This policy requires development of procedures for the school system and for selecting materials locally, handling requests for reconsideration of materials, considering gifts of instructional resources, using non-school owned materials, and complying with the copyright law.

Currently, there is a district library media policy in existence, and it is implemented consistently. However, the media specialist reports that she is not given the opportunity to provide input or suggest periodic revisions. Proficient

18. Each local school system shall spend 100 percent of the funds designated for library media center costs.

Basic

The library media program receives an allocation for expenditures every year; however this amount does not meet the minimum expenditure tests. According to the media specialist, receiving full funding is rare, particularly in the current economic climate. Even though the amount of funding provided by the by both the state and the local board is beyond the scope of control of the media specialist, there are some action steps that the media specialist can take. Possible actions include:  Continue efforts to actively educate district and state-level administrators and legislators of the benefits of a properly supported school library media program in increasing student achievement. These efforts should include enlisting the active support of teachers, students, parents, and community members. The purpose of these efforts would be to increase fiscal support of the library media program.  Actively seek additional sources of funding by applying for and securing grants and donations to supplement the media center budget.  Eliminating from the current budget items which are underused (based on statistical analysis of circulation/usage). One example would be cancelling subscriptions to online databases which are not routinely used or deemed unnecessary.

Georgia DOE 2011 Library Media Program Self-Evaluation Rubric Creekview High School, Canton GA Completed by: Steve Sapere, M. Ed. Student
Category 5 - Staff Development 19. Staff development opportunities are available both for the library media staff to enhance their own professional knowledge and for the library media staff to provide information and technology literacy skills to other teachers and administrative staff. Professional resources and services for all faculty members are provided in the library media center for the "learning community". The media specialist continually seeks to enhance his/her professional, particularly technology, skills by participating in continuing education opportunities through state or national conferences, online learning opportunities, and networking with other library media/technology professionals. The media specialist plays an integral role in the staff development program for faculty, assisting in organizing and teaching sessions. The media specialist is recognized both inside and outside of the school as a master teacher; she routinely provides staff development options beyond the usual offerings by drawing on professional resources both at the local and district levels and online to provide individual assistance to teachers using technology and designing curriculum. The media specialist also assists teachers in their graduate research and secures professional resources for them through interlibrary loan. The library media program at Creekview High School remains a leader in technology integration among school library media programs. From the incorporation of class wikis and a full range of Web 2.0 tools in instruction to the implementation of e-readers and e-books for student use, the media center consistently seeks to integrate technology into the library media program. The links below provide additional information on just a few of the ways in which technology has been integrated into the program:  http://theunquietlibrary.libguides.com/media21  http://theunquietlibrary.libguides.com/media21 -spring2012  http://theunquietlibrary.libguides.com/easybib  http://theunquietlibrary.libguides.com/nooks  http://theunquietlibrary.libguides.com/kindles

Exemplary

Category 6 – Other (Give additional indicators that describe the quality of your school library media program as it relates to technology integration)

Exemplary