Thursday, April 5, 2012

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Toledo casino site soon ready for
regulators, p3

LCC breaks Jays’ winning streak,
p6
Upfront
Sports
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Farm 8-9
Classifieds 10
TV 11
World News 12
Index
www.delphosherald.com
1
419-692-2202
944 E. Fifth St.
OPEN
EASTER
SUNDAY
SUEVER’S TOWN HOUSE
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10
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5 ITEMS
UP
TO
YOUR WEEKEND WEATHER OUTLOOK
FRIDAY
EXTENDED
FORECAST
SATURDAY SUNDAY
Sunny
with
highs
in the
mid 50s.
Areas
of frost
overnight. Lows in
the lower 30s.
Sunny with
highs in
the lower
60s. Partly
cloudy
at night
with a 20 percent
chance of showers.
Lows in the mid 40s.
Partly cloudy Monday with a 30 percent chance of show-
ers. Highs in the lower 50s. Lows in the mid 30s.
Mostly
sunny
with a 20
percent
chance
of show-
ers. Highs
in the lower 60s.
Lows in the lower 40s.
Drerup
Former Delphos
business owner
passes away
The owner of the for-
mer LN Drerup Upholstery
in Delphos has died.
Leo Drerup, 82, died
Wednesday at St. Rita’s
Medical Center.
Drerup also worked on
the railroad from 1944-91
and a U.S. Army veteran
of the Korean War.
Drerup was born July 7,
1929, in Putnam County,
to Frederick and Francis
(Kreinbrink) Drerup.
On April 19, 1952, he
married Bernice Maag,
who survives in Delphos.
He was a member of St.
John’s Catholic Church,
enjoyed polka dancing,
garage sales and going
to local coffee shops.
See full obitu-
ary on page 2.
Library celebrates 100 years
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosher-
ald.com
DELPHOS — The
Delphos Public Library will
celebrate 100 years this
month in conjunction with
National Library Week set
April 8-14.
Several activities are
planned. Kicking off the
week will be Monday Movie
Madness at 3:30 p.m. with
the Muppets. A children’s
make-it-and-take-it craft
from 3:30-5 p.m. on Tuesday
in the First Edition Building.
Children will make an edible
craft and one to take home. A
shoebox will be needed. On
Wednesday, humorist Beth
Weisenburger will speak to
adults at 6:30 p.m. in the First
Edition Building. The Lima
Symphony Orchestra will
present “American Idols &
Heroes” for music lovers of
all ages at 6:30 p.m. April 12.
The week of celebration will
culminate with an open house
from 1-4 p.m. April 15 at
the library and First Edition
Building. Musician Paula
Schumm will perform at the
library and a children’s scav-
enger hunt will be offered.
With its humble beginning
as a Carnegie Foundation
Library, what patrons now
see is five times larger than
the original structure built
and furnished for $11,785 in
1912.
The first organized library
came to Delphos through the
Brumback Library in Van
Wert. The branch library
was established in 1901 in
the law offices of Judge B.J.
Brotherton at 219 N. Canal
St. where the Readmore
Hallmark store now stands.
Brotherton’s daughter, Jane,
and other family members
were in charge of the collec-
tion offered to patrons two
afternoons per week.
On April 14, 1911, a state
library organizer came to
Delphos and spoke to the
Citizens Commercial Club
about organizing an indepen-
dent library for the town. In
the meantime, the Delphos
School Board authorized
clerk George Weger to
address Andrew Carnegie
with a proposition the school
provide $1,650 yearly to
maintain a library if Carnegie
would provide the $16,500
construction costs for the
building.
The Carnegie Foundation
rejected the offer, stating It
would rather the city provide
funding and a building site.
Council pledged $1,250 for
annual support of the library
and the use of the village
park at the corner of Second
and Jefferson streets for con-
struction of the building.
A building committee was
appointed to develop plans
for the library and includ-
ed: Sylvester Shenk, H.L.
Leilich, John H. Wahmoff,
E.L. Mendenhall, William J.
Steinle, John Ricker, Burriett
J. Brotherton, Benjamin
Jauman, Charles Weger, Ed
Cordell and Fred Kollsmith.
The architectural firm of
McLaughlin & Hulsken was
hired to do the blueprints,
which had to be submitted
to Carnegie for his approval.
The project was put out to bid
on Aug. 14, 1911.
Steinle Construction of
Fremont was selected to
build and furnish the library
for $11,785. The building
was designed to be made of
buff brick and stone trim but
the Building Committee was
unable to raise local funds
to supplement the Carnegie
Grant, so cuts were neces-
sary. The stone cornice was
changed to galvanized iron,
the marble wainscoting was
changed to burlap and steel
posts replaced the scagliola
columns. The walls of the
building were also reduced
to 13 inches thick and left-
over building materials from
the construction of Jefferson
High School, now Jefferson
Middle School, were used,
producing a substantial but
plain building.
While the building was
under construction, a board
of trustees was appointed by
Mayor J.K. Williams. By state
law, the six members could
be composed of no more than
three women or three of the
same political party. The first
board of trustees consisted of
W.J. Steinle, John Wahmoff,
Olivia Jettinghoff, Mrs. A.S.
Perkins, John Fisher and
E.L. Mendenhall. Fisher and
Mendenhall quit the first year
and were replaced with I.F.
Matteson and Louis Laudick.
At the same time, the
Delphos Library Association
was formed to raise funds
to provide additional books
and magazines for the news
library and the organization
continued to do so for many
years.
By October 1912, the
new building was ready to
begin its service. A week
of celebrations and ceremony
opened the facility, highlight-
ed by speeches at Jefferson
High School and a proces-
sion of school children to the
library.
Yet to be resolved was
what to do with the Brumback
Branch Library still in Judge
Brotherton’s law offices.
The two libraries operated
for about a year. During the
summer of 1913, following
a newspaper editorial, the
branch collection was moved
to the new Delphos Public
Library. Books were sent
to Delphos from Brumback
Library until the 1950s.
The first decade of the
Delphos Public Library was
rough at times. World War
I reduced the availability of
new books and magazines
Texas residents sift through rubble from tornadoes
FORNEY, Texas (AP)
— As a twister bore down
on her neighborhood, Sherry
Enochs grabbed the three
young children in her home
and hid in her bathtub. The
winds swirled and snatched
away two of the children.
Her home collapsed around
her.
Miraculously, no one was
seriously hurt.
Enochs, 53, stood
Wednesday amid the wreck-
age of what was once her
home in the North Texas
city of Forney, among the
hardest hit by a series of tor-
nadoes that barreled through
one of the nation’s largest
metropolitan areas a day ear-
lier. No one was reported
dead, and of the more than
20 injured, only a handful
were seriously hurt.
“If you really think about
it, the fact that everybody who
woke up in Forney yester-
day is alive today in Forney,
that’s a real blessing,” Mayor
Darren Rozell said.
The National Weather
Service is investigating the
damage caused by the torna-
does, which appeared to flat-
ten some homes and graze
others next door. The twist-
ers jumped from place to
place, passing many heav-
ily populated areas overhead
and perhaps limiting what
could have been a more dam-
aging, deadly storm. Most of
Dallas was spared the full
wrath of the storms.
While tornadoes can strike
major cities, having two
major systems strike a single
metropolitan area is highly
unusual, meteorologist Jesse
Moore said. The Texas twist-
ers would have done more
damage had they stayed on
the ground for more of the
storms’ path. But weather
experts and officials credited
the quick response to torna-
do warnings for preventing
deaths or more injuries.
In the Diamond Creek
subdivision where Enochs’
home was destroyed, resi-
dents put on work gloves
Wednesday and began clean-
ing up. Many noticed things
in their yards that didn’t
belong to them.
Enochs doesn’t have a
clear memory of exactly how
things happened Tuesday,
but she was found holding
her grandson in the bathtub,
which had blown into the
area where her garage once
was. A 3-year-old she was
watching was found wander-
ing around the backyard. A
neighbor pulled another child
Enochs had been taking care
of, 19-month-old Abigail
Jones, from the rubble.
“I heard the rumbling
from the tornado and I didn’t
even hear the house fall,”
Enochs said.
Abigail was taken to the
hospital but released. The
blonde, smiling child with
bows in her hair was bruised
all over her body, but not
seriously hurt. Her mother,
Misty Jones, brought her
back Wednesday to see what
had happened.
Seven people were injured
in Forney, none seriously.
An additional 10 people were
hurt in Lancaster, south of
Dallas, and three people in
Arlington, west of Dallas.
National Weather Service
crews in Forney, east of
Dallas, spotted storm dam-
age that suggested the twister
there was an EF3, with wind
speeds as high as 165 mph.
Other tornadoes in Arlington
and Lancaster appear to have
been EF2 tornadoes, with
wind speeds up to 135 mph.
Tornadoes can range from
EF0, the weakest, to EF5, the
strongest. An EF2 or higher
is considered a significant
tornado.
Fort Jennings tak-
ing applications
Fort Jennings Athletic
Director Todd Hoehn (419-
286-2238, ext. 2200) is tak-
ing applications until Friday
for the following coaching
positions: boys varsity/
assistant/JV/Jr. Hi./elemen-
tary basketball; girls varsity
assistant/Jr. Hi/elementary
basketball; boys varsity/JV
soccer; girls varsity/assistant
soccer; baseball assistant;
and assistant track; as well
as cheerleading advisors and
musical assistant director.
SATURDAY (partial)
Baseball (noon):
Spencerville at Waynesfield
(DH), 11 a.m.; Elida and
Napoleon at Van Wert,
11:30 a.m.; Jefferson at
Bath; Fort Jennings at
Perry (DH); Wayne Trace
at Lincolnview (DH).
Softball: Waynesfield
at Lincolnview (DH),
noon; Ottoville at
Leipsic (PCL), 2 p.m.
Track and Field:
Fort Jennings at Anna
Invitational, 9 a.m.
In February 2005, an expansion of the 1961 building allowed for more computers and
in 2007, Mike Bendele was commissioned to create the art piece above the computers in
memory of Alba Landwehr and her brother, Reno Bianchi.
The Carnegie Library in Delphos was constructed in 1912 and dedicated in October
that year.
Photo courtesy of the Delphos Canal Commission
Nancy Spencer photo
See LIBRARY, page 12
2
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SPRING SAVING
SPECTACULAR
APRIL 2012
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Erica
Saine.
Congratulations
Erica!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Christian
Stemen.
Congratulations
Christian!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Thursday, April 5, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CORRECTIONS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 222
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Joel Ross Thatcher Leo N. Drerup
Delphos weather
Aug. 22, 1990-April 4, 2012
Joel Ross Thatcher, 21,
of Ohio City, died at 3 a.m.
Wednesday from injuries
received in an automobile
accident.
He was born Aug. 22,
1990, in Lima to Audie and
Sue (Waterman) Thatcher,
who survive in Ohio City.
Funeral services will begin
at 2 p.m. Saturday at Calvary
Evangelical Church, Van Wert,
with Pastor Steven Waterman
officiating. Burial will be in
Woodlawn Cemetery, Ohio
City.
Friends may call from 1-8
p.m. Friday and from noon
to 2 p.m. Saturday at the
church.
Preferred memorials are to
Van Wert high School tack
and field.
Sympathy may be expressed
at cowanfuneralhome.com
July 7, 1929-
April 4, 2012
Leo N. Drerup, 82, of
Delphos, died at 1:35 p.m.
Wednesday at St. Rita’s
Medical Center.
He was born July 7, 1929, in
Putnam County, to Frederick
and Francis (Kreinbrink)
Drerup.
On April 19, 1952, he mar-
ried Bernice Maag, who sur-
vives in Delphos.
Survivors also include sons
Dave (Martha) Drerup, Nick
Drerup, Tony (Mary) Drerup
of Delphos, Jeff (Susie)
Drerup of Powell and Fred
(Janice) Drerup of Ottoville;
daughters Janet (Dan) Bonifas
of Landeck, Molly (Dave)
Buettner of Delphos and Ann
(Don) Like of New Bavaria;
sisters Esther Knott and Edna
Salisbury of Cridersville; 21
grandchildren and two great
grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by his daughter, Ellen Drerup;
brothers Carl and Richard
Drerup; a grandchild; and sis-
ters Lucille Ringlein, Florence
Weis and Ruth Drerup.
Mr. Drerup was a United
States Army veteran of the
Korean War who owned LN
Drerup Upholstery for more
than 30 years and worked on
the railroad from 1944-1991.
He was a member of St. John’s
Catholic Church, enjoyed
polka dancing, garage sales and
going to local coffee shops.
Mass of Christian Burial
begins at 11 a.m. Monday
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev.
Melvin Verhoff officiating.
Burial will follow in St. John’s
Cemetery with military rites
conducted by the Delphos
Veterans Council.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. Sunday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home where
the parish wake will be held.
Memorials are to St. Rita’s
Hospice.
High temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
62 degrees, low was 45. High
a year ago today was 45, low
was 35. Record high for today
is 83, set in 1988. Record low
is 12, set in 1982.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Clear. Patchy
frost overnight. Lows in the
lower 30s. Northeast winds 10
to 15 mph.
FRIDAY: Sunny. Highs in
the mid 50s. Northeast winds
10 to 15 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Clear.
Areas of frost overnight. Lows
in the lower 30s. East winds
around 10 mph.
SATURDAY: Sunny.
Highs in the lower 60s. East
winds around 5 mph.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy with a 20 per-
cent chance of showers. Lows
in the mid 40s.
SUNDAY: Mostly sunny
with a 20 percent chance of
showers. Highs in the lower
60s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the lower
40s.
MONDAY: Partly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
showers. Highs in the lower
50s.
MONDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy with a 20 per-
cent chance of rain showers.
Lows in the mid 30s.
T U E S D A Y ,
WEDNESDAY: Partly
cloudy. Highs around 50.
Lows in the lower 30s.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
02-23-24-29-45-48
Estimated jackpot: $6.9
million
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $20
million
Pick 3 Evening
2-6-8
Pick 4 Evening
3-9-1-1
Powerball
0 1 - 2 4 - 3 3 - 4 5 - 4 9 ,
Powerball: 6
Estimated jackpot: $70
million
Rolling Cash 5
01-12-15-19-33
Estimated jackpot:
$110,000
Ten OH Evening
02-03-07-09-11-13-15-21-
41-42-46-51-55-56-58-59-63-
64-74-77
Corn: $6.53
Wheat: $6.40
Beans: $13.95
Houston death report
details drug signs, last day
By ANTHONY
McCARTNEY
AP Entertainment Writer
LOS ANGELES — The
hotel room where Whitney
Houston died bore the hall-
marks of a traveler — suitcas-
es and room-service food and
drinks. But it also contained
something tragically familiar
for the singer: signs of cocaine
and its paraphernalia.
The drug was found
throughout Houston’s body,
according to an autopsy report
released Wednesday that gave
the most detailed account yet
of how the Grammy-winning
singer died just hours before
she was to appear at a pre-
Grammy Awards party. By the
time an assistant found her face
down in a bathtub on the after-
noon of Feb. 11, Houston had
likely been dead for at least an
hour. The water was so hot it
scalded part of her body.
Nearby, on the bathroom
counter, investigators found
a small spoon described by
investigators as having a “crys-
tal like substance” in it and
in a drawer they discovered a
white powdery substance. The
dozen prescription drug bottles
found in Houston’s suite of the
Beverly Hilton Hotel led inves-
tigators to initially suspect she
died of an overdose, but after
further examination and toxi-
cology results they concluded
she drowned accidentally.
Heart disease, which caused
a 60 percent blockage in one
of her arteries, and cocaine
use were listed as contributing
factors.
Toxicology results also
showed Houston had marijua-
na, Xanax, the muscle relaxant
Flexeril, and the allergy medi-
cation Benadryl in her system,
but none are considered factors
in her death.
The grim accounting of
the room where Houston died
and what investigators found
provide a sad footnote to the
singer’s life, showing the
impact drugs took on her. An
investigator noted a hole in the
singer’s nose, listed under “his-
tory of substance abuse.”
Houston, 48, had been pre-
paring for the annual party of
her mentor, Clive Davis, who
helped launch her career two
decades earlier. She had fin-
ished work on her return to
acting by starring in a remake
of the film “Sparkle,” which
would also feature her rendi-
tion of the gospel classic “His
Eye Is on the Sparrow.”
The singer had a sore throat
and her assistant suggested she
take a bath to get ready for
the party. The assistant left to
pick up some items at a depart-
ment store and by the time she
returned, Houston was sub-
merged in the tub, which was
overflowing and had soaked
the carpet in another room.
Efforts were made to revive
the Houston, including using a
defibrillator, according to the
report.
Coroner’s officials declined
to discuss details in the report,
including whether toxicology
results showing the level of
cocaine in Houston’s body
could be used to determine
how recently she took the drug.
The office has said there were
signs of recent and chronic use
by the singer.
Beverly Hills police have
been awaiting the report before
closing the report, although the
agency has said there are no
signs of foul play in Houston’s
death.
The singer had battled
addiction for years, but friends
and family have said she
appeared committed to mak-
ing a comeback in the months
before her death.
“The biggest devil is me.
I’m either my best friend or
my worst enemy,” Houston
told ABC’s Diane Sawyer in
an infamous 2002 television
interview with then-husband
Bobby Brown by her side.
Brown has faced his own
troubles since his ex-wife’s
death. He was arrested and
charged last month with driv-
ing under the influence of alco-
hol in Los Angeles and faces a
court date later this month.
The details of Houston’s
death have not yet impacted
plans to release “Sparkle” later
this year. A trailer released
Monday featured Houston
prominently in her role as the
matriarch of a family of girls
who form a singing group and
struggle with fame and addic-
tion.
Hair
Klinique
Now at
Beauty Unlimited
430 N. Canal St.
Delphos

Walk-ins Welcome
or call for appt.
SAME HOURS
SAME DAYS
695-1811
or
692-7777
Kathy - Kasia - Tiffany
CLEVELAND (AP) —
Regulators say several minor
problems found at an Ohio
nuclear power plant in 2011
have been ongoing for about
two years.
The Nuclear Regulatory
Commission says the Perry
Nuclear Power Plant near
Cleveland must devise a plan
to correct the problems.
In a March 5 letter, a regu-
lator says plant owner First
Energy Nuclear Operating
Co. and federal inspectors
found errors in following
proper work procedures and
documentation.
The letter also cites an
incident in April 2011 when
a poorly designed plan to pull
a radiation monitor from the
reactor’s core left workers
near a radioactive cable. The
crew escaped exposure by
leaving the area quickly.
A First Energy spokes-
woman tells The Plain Dealer
in Cleveland that the company
has strengthened procedures
and improved risk assessment
and oversight.
Regulators say Ohio nuclear
plant had several problems
Ohio church readies for
Easter after lightning strike
PERRYSBURG (AP) —
Construction and cleanup
crews are racing the clock
at a church in northwest
Ohio where a lightning
strike sparked a fire at the
top of a 170-foot steeple.
St. Rose Catholic
Church officials say they’ll
be ready for services today
and the rest of Easter week-
end.
Most of the damage
from the Tuesday morn-
ing fire at the church in
Perrysburg was contained
to the steeple, with minor
damage to the sanctuary.
The manager of a clean-
up crew working to get the
church ready tells WTOL-
TV in Toledo that he’s a
member of the church.
Kevin Fisher says the
damage could have been
much worse.
St. Rose’s pastor, the
Rev. Marvin Borger, says
he thinks those attend-
ing services this weekend
shouldn’t notice any dif-
ferences.
Keep up to date on foreign affairs, local events, fash-
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Delphos Hardware
242 North Main St. • Ph. 419-692-0921 • Open evenings til 7:30; Sat. til 5
Thursday, April 5, 2012 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Photo submitted
District Science Fair participants from Fort Jennings High School include, front from
left, Jeremy Smith, Cody VonLehmden, Alex Sealts, Jordan Neidert and Kyle Maag;
center, Kyle Hellman, Quinton Neidert, Dillon Schimmoeller, Keri Eickholt, Renee
Kraner and Aaron Neidert; and back, Emily Klir, Jenna Calvelage, Sarah Hellman, Erin
Eickholt, Alyssa Wiedeman and Troy Ricker. Kristen Maag was absent.
5 from Jennings qualify
for State Science Day
On March 24, the District
Science Fair was held at Ohio
Northern University in Ada.
Students from Northwest
Ohio who had received top
scores in their local or county
science fairs were eligible
to participate in the District
Science Fair.
Fort Jennings sent 19 stu-
dents to the fair. Each student
was asked to give a short pre-
sentation to a pair of judges
that included science teach-
ers, professors, college stu-
dents, and industry experts.
Judging for special awards
was also done by another
set of judges throughout the
morning.
Five students from Fort
Jennings received a Superior
rating and will be attend-
ing the Ohio Academy of
Science State Science Day
held at Ohio State University
on May 5.
These students included
junior Kristen Maag, fresh-
man Emily Klir, eighth-grad-
ers Jeremy Smith and Kyle
Hellman and seventh-grader
Cody VonLehmden.
Other students attending
District Science Day and
receiving Excellent ratings
are: Jenna Calvelage, Keri
Eickholt, Sarah Hellman,
Alyssa Wiedeman, Isaac
Fischbach, Aaron Neidert,
Renee Kraner, Alex Sealts,
Dillon Schimmoeller, Erin
Eickholt, Kyle Maag, Jordan
Neidert, Quinton Neidert and
Troy Ricker.
Film foundation to hold film screening fundraiser
A sweeping red carpet
and searchlights in the sky
will make everyone in down-
town Lima feel like a star at
7:30 p.m. on April 28 at The
City Club, 114 S. Main St.,
3rd floor, Lima.
The Northwest Ohio Film
Foundation invites the pub-
lic to a special screening
of the award-winning fea-
ture “Paradise Recovered,”
followed by an exclusive
meet-and-greet with screen-
writer and producer, Andie
Redwine.
“Paradise Recovered”
is about a devout, young
woman whose conservative
Christian beliefs collide with
the views held by her bohe-
mian friends. The provoca-
tive story is filled with light
comedic touches, pointing
out the need for self-explo-
ration without ever attacking
the woman’s genuine, deeply
felt faith.
“Paradise Recovered”
received the 2011 Audience
Choice Award at the inau-
gural Film Festival last July.
Since its debut, the film
has screened all across the
country and has won sev-
eral awards, including Best
Picture.
“What better film to share
with the community than
last year’s audience favor-
ite?” said Board Member
Linda McClure. “We want
this event to be as classy and
exciting as a Hollywood pre-
miere and it’s only a sneak
preview of everything to
come at the 2012 Northwest
Ohio Independent Film
Festival.”
Tickets can be purchased
at the door and online at
www.nwoff.org for $10
each. Popcorn and a cash
bar will be available. For
more information, visit
ParadiseRecovered.com or
contact Executive Director
Len Archibald at 419-979-
9692.
About the Northwest
Ohio Film Foundation:
The Northwest Ohio Film
Foundation is a 501(c)(3)
not-for-profit organization
that promotes the culture of
cinema through screenings,
workshops, events, network-
ing and the promotion of
future filmmakers and media
artists from Northwest
Ohio. The Northwest Ohio
Independent Film Festival is
the main event where the
previously mentioned goals
are put into effect. It is an
avenue for artists to shine
where they may not have had
the chance. This includes
technical artists, actors,
musicians, writers, and all
movie lovers young and old
from around the world.
Toledo casino
site soon ready
for regulators
By ANN SANNER
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Slot
machines are almost fully
installed and table games have
been delivered to Ohio’s second
casino, scheduled to open in late
May in Toledo.
That was among updates heard
by Ohio regulators Wednesday in
Columbus as the state prepares
for the openings of four voter-
approved casinos in the next year
or so.
Jeffrey Goodman, the vice
president of casino operations for
Hollywood Casino Toledo, told the
Ohio Casino Control Commission
that table games should be set
up by mid-month, and that slots
would be ready for regulators to
test around then, too.
More than 510 table and
poker dealers have been trained,
Goodman said, and surveillance
equipment is now installed.
The casino is aiming to hold
its grand opening May 29, but
that date is pending approval
from commission. Cleveland’s
casino is slated to open about two
weeks earlier. Voters in 2009 also
approved casinos in Cincinnati
and Columbus.
The commission on
Wednesday reviewed the final
steps leading up to the openings.
Each casino must do a test run
several days before their grand
openings, so that state regulators
can get a simulated look at what
a typical day might be like at the
facilities.
Invited guests to the so-called
controlled demonstrations could
play the slots and table games
and eat at the restaurants at the
casinos. The winners would get to
keep their earnings. The casinos
would still have to pay the state
33 percent of gross earnings —
defined as total amount wagered,
minus winnings. And the rest of
the casino’s net revenue from the
demonstration would go to char-
ity, said Matt Schuler, the com-
mission’s executive director.
Background checks and
licensing of employees and ven-
dors is on track to meet the open-
ing dates, Schuler said.
The commission on
Wednesday approved 861
licenses for casino employees in
Toledo and Cleveland. So far,
they’ve signed off on almost
1,140 licenses. And today, a casi-
no employee in Cleveland was
expected to be presented with the
first state-issued license.
The state is also ramping up
its efforts to tackle potential gam-
bling addictions in the state.
Laura Clemens, the commis-
sion’s point person on problem
gambling, told the panel that
200 additional social workers,
counselors and others have now
received training to treat those
who are having gambling issues
or addictions.
Report: Ohioan
accused in
dismemberment
confesses
MECHANI CSBURG
(AP) — An Ohio man
accused of stabbing his on-
again, off-again girlfriend,
suffocating her and dismem-
bering her body tells a news-
paper she begged him to kill
her and forced a knife he
held into her own torso.
Twent y-fi ve-year-ol d
Matthew Puccio of Urbana
is charged with murder in
the death of 21-year-old
Jessica Sacco. He told the
Dayton Daily News from jail
on Wednesday that he plans
to plead guilty and deserves
death.
Puccio says the cou-
ple had argued in their
apartment the night before
her March 22 death and
she asked him to “slash her
throat, slash her wrists, do
something.”
Two other couples, one
from Urbana and one from
Fenton, Mich., are accused
of helping Puccio conceal
the slaying.
A message was left before
business hours today for
Puccio’s attorney.
The hot dog was given
its name by concessionaire
Harry Stevens, who was
from Niles, Ohio, after
discovering that people
weren’t interested in buying
his “snouts & sawdust
sausages”.
“All the greatest things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single
word: freedom; justice; honor; duty; mercy; hope.” — Winston Churchill
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Thursday, April 5, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Forty Delphos City Schools students participated in the
annual PTO Amateur Show recently. The top three winners
of the gold-medal recipients received U.S. Savings Bonds.
There were also silver-medal winners. Savings bonds win-
ners were Emily Dienstberger, Cameron Jones and Matthew
Waldick.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• Four juniors, two from Jefferson High School and two
from St. John’s High School, have been selected to attend
Buckeye Girls State June 20-27 at Ashland College. Named
were Angie Moore and Deana Schmersal of Jefferson and
Christina Holdgreve and Kelly Honigford of St. John’s.
• Gregory J. Thompson, son of John L. Thompson of
Delphos, will participate in a boxing match for charity
April 8 at Ohio Northern University. The residents of Park
Hall annually sponsor the boxing match, and about $1,000 is
expected to be raised this year for the town’s rescue squad.
Thompson is a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineer-
ing.
• Jeanette Hammons, a 1985 Lincolnview High School
graduate, returns for her second season with the Wright State
softball team. Hammons will take the Raiders through their
final Division II campaign. Hammons returns with seven vet-
erans and seven newcomers. She is the daughter of Ralph and
Lora Hammons of Middle Point.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• Fred Lentz has taken over the ownership and personal
management of the Capitol Theater in Delphos, the Van Del
Drive-in and the Wapa Theater in Wapakoneta. In a trans-
action completed last Friday, Fred McBee former owner-
manager sold out his interest in its entirety and will be located
in Bucyrus.
• The Delphos Rotary Club heard Gordon Peltier read
Edna St. Vincent Millay’s “The Ballad of the Harp Weaver”
at its meeting Wednesday in Numaude’s. Peltier’s reading
of the Pulitzer prize-winning poem was the only interpreta-
tion awarded a superior rating at the recent Northwestern
Ohio High School one-act play and poetry reading festival at
Bowling Green.
• Psi Chapter of Alpha Omega Sorority held a combined
inspection meeting with Rho Chapter of Van Wert Tuesday
evening at White Hall Inn in Van Wert. Dr. Walter Wolery
of Delphos was the guest speaker. The next meeting of the
local chapter will be in the form of a Pink and Blue shower
honoring Sue McGue, and will be at the home of Carolee
Schuerman in Fort Jennings.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• A group of persons from the Delphos Presbyterian
Church Christian Endeavor Society were in attendance at one
or more sessions of the annual convention of the Van Wert
County Christian Endeavor Union which was held Saturday
and Sunday in Wren. Those in attendance from Delphos were
Mary Jane Meads, Ladonna Lockhard, Helen Davis, Elizabeth
Horine, Rev. and Mrs. J. Clement Berry and daughter, Jean,
Harry Seymour and Ivan Meads.
• Charles Sterling, manager of the Delphos city baseball
team, will go to Van Wert to attend a meeting of managers
and officers of the Northwestern Ohio League. Those who
have signified their intentions of playing on the team are
Richard Hanley, Syl Thithoff, Jim Lang, Orlo Miller, Jim
Feathers, Gordon Peltier, Harold Gonyea, Norman Jones,
Hubert Powell, Stanley Sever, Norman Mericle, Norbert
Grewe, Vaughn Rinard and Raymond Holdgreve.
• A dinner meeting of the Men’s League of St. John’s
Catholic Church will be held April 14 at the Idlewild club-
house. The following committee members will have charge
of the dinner arrangements: Carl Nolte, Carl Lindemann,
Ambrose Kramer and Edmund Imber.
WASHINGTON (AP)
— President Barack Obama
signed legislation Wednesday
barring members of Congress,
the president and thousands of
federal workers from profiting
from nonpublic information
learned on the job, calling it
an embodiment of the funda-
mental American value of fair
play.
Obama said the move to
bar insider trading among law-
makers would assure everyone
“plays by the same rules.”
“It’s the notion that the
powerful shouldn’t get to cre-
ate one set of rules for them-
selves and another set of rules
for everybody else,” Obama
said.
“If we expect that to apply
to our biggest corporations and
our most successful citizens,
it certainly should apply to
our elected officials,” Obama
said.
The new law lets the public
see more of government offi-
cials’ financial dealings yet
some members of Congress
said it fell short. Lawmakers
abandoned an earlier proposal
to require public reports from
people who gather informa-
tion from Congress and sell it,
mostly to investors.
Obama was joined by sev-
eral lawmakers who pushed the
bill through Congress, includ-
ing Massachusetts Sen. Scott
Brown, a Republican who has
been targeted by Democrats
and is expected to face a stiff
challenge from Elizabeth
Warren, a Harvard professor
who helped launch the new
federal Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau.
The driving force behind the
bill was Congress’ attempt to
boost dismal approval ratings,
with polls showing between
12 percent and 19 percent of
Americans approve of the job
Congress is doing.
Called the STOCK Act,
which stands for Stop Trading
on Congressional Knowledge,
the new law requires that pub-
lic reports of new transactions
exceeding $1,000 be posted
online either 30 days after
the individual was notified
of a transaction in his or her
account, or 45 days after the
transaction.
The House currently posts
disclosure information on the
Internet, but the Senate still
requires people seeking the
data to appear personally in a
Senate office building.
By TOM RAUM
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
federal student loan program
seemed like a great idea back
in 1965: Borrow to go to col-
lege now, pay it back later
when you have a job.
But many borrowers these
days are close to flunking out,
tripped up by painful real-life
lessons in math and econom-
ics.
Surging above $1 trillion,
U.S. student loan debt has sur-
passed credit card and auto-
loan debt. This debt explosion
jeopardizes the fragile recovery,
increases the burden on taxpay-
ers and possibly sets the stage
for a new economic crisis.
With a still-wobbly jobs
market, these loans are
increasingly hard to pay off.
Unable to find work, many
students have returned to
school, further driving up
their indebtedness.
Average student loan debt
recently topped $25,000, up
25 percent in 10 years. And
the mushrooming debt has
direct implications for tax-
payers, since 8 in 10 of these
loans are government-issued
or guaranteed.
President Barack Obama
has offered a raft of proposals
aimed at fine-tuning the sys-
tem and making repayments
easier. Yet the predicament
of debt-burdened former stu-
dents has failed to generate
much notice in the GOP presi-
dential campaign. Instead, the
candidates are dismissive of
government student loan pro-
grams in general and Obama’s
proposals in particular.
Rick Santorum went so far
as to label Obama “a snob”
for urging Americans to try
to obtain some form of post-
high-school education —
even though polls show over
90 percent of parents expect
their children to go to college.
Front-runner Mitt Romney
denounces what he calls a
“government takeover” of
the program. Newt Gingrich
calls student loans a “Ponzi
scheme” under which students
spend the borrowed money
now but “have to pay off the
national debt” later as taxpay-
ers. And Ron Paul wants to
abolish the program entirely.
Lifting student debt higher
and higher is the escalating
cost of attending schools, with
tuition increasing far faster
than the rate of inflation. And
enrollment has been rising for
years, a trend that accelerated
through the recent recession,
fueling even more borrowing.
Mark Zandi, chief econo-
mist at Moody’s Analytics,
argues that government loans
and subsidies are not particu-
larly cost-effective for taxpay-
ers because “universities and
colleges just raise their tuition.
It doesn’t improve affordabil-
ity and doesn’t make it easier
to go to college.”
“Of course, it’s very hard
on the kids who have gone
through this, because they’re
on the hook,” Zandi added.
“And they’re not going to be
able to get off the hook.”
It’s not just young adults
who are saddled.
“Parents and the federal
government shoulder a sub-
stantial part of the postsecond-
ary education bill,” said a new
report by the Federal Reserve
Bank of New York. And some
of the borrowers are baby
boomers, near or at retirement
age. The Fed research found
that Americans 60 and older
still owe about $36 billion in
student loans.
Overall, nearly 3 in 10 of
all student loans have past-
due balances of 30 days or
more, the report said.
Complicating the picture
further: Like child support and
income taxes, student loans
usually can’t be discharged
or reduced in bankruptcy pro-
ceedings, as can most other
delinquent debt. This restric-
tion was extended in 2005
to also include student loans
made by banks and other pri-
vate financial institutions.
“As bankruptcy lawyers,
we’re the first to see the
cracks in the foundation,”
William Brewer, president
of the National Association
of Consumer Bankruptcy
Attorneys, said. “We were
warning of mortgage prob-
lems in 2006 and 2007. The
industry was saying we’ve
got it under control. Nobody
had it under control. Now
we’re seeing the same signs
of distress. We’re seeing huge
defaults on student loans and
people driven into financial
difficulties because of them.”
A report by his group noted
that missing just one student
loan payment puts a borrower
in delinquent status. After
nine months, the borrower
is in default. Once a default
occurs, the full amount of
the loan is due immediately.
For those with federal stu-
dent loans, the government
has vast collection powers,
including the ability to gar-
nishee a borrower’s wages
and to seize tax refunds and
Social Security and other fed-
eral benefit payments.
By DESMOND BUTLER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
managing director of the
International Monetary Fund
made an impassioned plea
Tuesday for American leader-
ship in the global economy as
she called for the international
community to give her orga-
nization “more firepower” to
bolster tottering economies.
Christine Lagarde told
the annual meeting of The
Associated Press that last
week’s move by eurozone
countries to boost their own
rescue fund has strengthened
her case to ask other large
economies to expand the
IMF’s financial war chest.
“We certainly need more
resources,” she said, without
specifying how much more
was needed. Lagarde said the
IMF would address that ques-
tion at its spring meeting in
two weeks.
The IMF has about $400
billion in resources that it can
use to provide loans to coun-
tries in trouble. Lagarde has
talked about expanding those
resources to close to $1 tril-
lion. The 17 countries that use
the euro already have prom-
ised to provide $200 billion of
that amount.
Though the United States is
the IMF’s largest shareholder,
the Treasury Department has
not asked Congress for new
IMF funding and will face
opposition from Republicans
if it does.
Lagarde argues that the
IMF’s ability to rescue econ-
omies in Europe and else-
where has a direct bearing
on the U.S. economy. She
said Europe’s faltering would
quickly spread, and the U.S.
economic recovery, slowly
gaining strength, “might well
be in jeopardy.”
“America has a large
stake” in how Europe and
the rest of the world fares,
Lagarde said.
Lagarde said the global
economy is making some
advances in digging itself
out of the worst downturn in
decades, but that the recovery
remains particularly fragile in
Europe. She suggested cut-
ting government spending too
quickly in developed coun-
tries like the United States
and larger European nations
could make things worse, not
better.
Policymakers on both sides
of the Atlantic need “breathing
space to finish the job,” she
said. As the world’s largest
economy, the United States
could not shirk its outsized
role in the global economy,
Lagarde said.
“The world needs U.S.
economic leadership,” she
said. “Now is not the time to
retire, now is not the time to
withdraw, now is not the time
to phase out. Now is the time
to engage.”
Lagarde’s remarks came
after the eurozone countries
on Friday boosted their emer-
gency bailout funds for heav-
ily indebted countries to $1.1
trillion. That was short of the
$1.3 trillion that Lagarde and
other international leaders
have said is needed to calm
financial markets.
Since the Europeans have
moved first to raise their fire-
wall, “the time has come to
increase our firepower,” she
said Tuesday. While short of
what the IMF had hoped for,
it was a good first step — and
something she said the IMF
could work with.
Lagarde also suggested that
bold steps are needed such as
those taken by the Federal
Reserve and the European
Central Bank to help keep
growth strong and steady.
And she said that most
countries are running deficits
that are too high and “need to
bring down debt over time.”
And while “some countries
under pressure have no choice
but to cut deficits today ... a
global undifferentiated rush
to austerity will prove self-
defeating. Countries like the
United States with low costs
of borrowing should not move
too quickly.”
By ANDREW MIGA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Don’t
expect Mitt Romney to spend
a lot of time trying to get vot-
ers to like him this fall.
Instead, the likely
Republican presidential nom-
inee will probably rely on a
ton of campaign cash and a
barrage of nasty attack ads
ripping into President Barack
Obama for policies that
Romney says aren’t helping
the economy recover fast
enough. Look for Romney to
take a more moderate tack,
too.
That’s essentially the
playbook Romney followed
in his last campaign against
a Democrat, when he was
elected Massachusetts gover-
nor in 2002.
Given how Romney has
already relied heavily on key
elements of that winning
strategy — the biting attack
ads, the imposing fundrais-
ing advantage — to pound
his GOP presidential rivals,
there’s little to suggest he
won’t return to that strategy
for the likely fight against
Obama.
Ben Coes, Romney’s cam-
paign manager in 2002, said
the multimillionaire business-
man won the election because
he didn’t worry much about
whether voters liked him.
Coes said that same dynamic
will apply for November’s
presidential election, too.
Then and now, “voters
were electing someone to
clean up a mess,” said Coes,
who has no role in Romney’s
current campaign. “He ran
as the toughest guy with the
most experience to go in there
and clean up a mess. ... It’s
the reason he got elected in
2002, and it’s how he could
get elected in 2012.”
Romney’s campaign
declined to comment.
Romney swept into the
governorship with an aggres-
sive campaign that played
up his image as a political
outsider, played down his
GOP affiliation and pound-
ed Democratic foe Shannon
O’Brien as a hapless watch-
dog of the state’s cash in a
wave of attack ads. O’Brien
was the state’s first female
treasurer and a tough, sea-
soned campaigner.
Buoyed by the national
media attention he received
for turning the scandal-
plagued 2002 Winter
Olympics in Salt Lake City
into a success, Romney
returned to Massachusetts
and targeted O’Brien with a
pledge to “clean up the mess
on Beacon Hill.”
He cast her as beholden to
labor unions, lobbyists and
special interests, but espe-
cially to Democrats who
controlled the Legislature.
Romney tapped into a deep
vein of voter frustration over
patronage, ethics scandals,
state budget deficits, job
losses and a $1 billion tax
increase.
“We wanted to tie a noose
around Beacon Hill and tie
it around Shannon O’Brien’s
neck,” Coes said.
Romney won by 5 percent-
age points in the Democratic-
dominated state by appealing
to independent voters. But his
efforts to shed his image as
stiff and blow-dried, which
endures to this day, mostly
fizzled.
He stumbled by airing a
pithy TV ad in which he and
his wife, Ann, spoke tenderly
about their courtship on a
high school prom date and
their enduring love for each
other. “Ann’s just good to the
core,” Romney gushed. The
ad also featured Romney in
a bathing suit frolicking with
his sons atop a raft on a lake.
“Women found it to be
pandering, people in general
just thought it was out of
touch with their lives that
are maybe not so perfect,”
O’Brien said.
Romney also tried to proj-
ect a regular-guy image by
staging “work days” at blue-
Recovery threatened by
inability to pay ed. loans
Obama bans
insider trading
by lawmakers
Don’t expect a warm and fuzzy Romney this fall
IMF chief wants ‘more firepower’ to fight crises
1
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selected varieties
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99
28-45 oz.
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Half Ham
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Milk
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5 gal.
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12 pk cans, 6 pk 24 oz NR, 8 pk
7.5 oz slim cans, 8 pk 12 oz btls
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Must Purchase 4 - Add’t 4/$13
MIX & MATCH
LOCAL FAVORITE
Happy Easter
Happy Easter
Thursday, April 5, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Clark Mansion
Van Wert
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is closed in obser-
vance of Holy Thursday.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is closed on observance
of Good Friday.
April 6
Jerry A. Hohlbein
Glen Renner
Jesse Rushing
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
APRIL 5-7
THURSDAY: CLOSED for Holy Thursday.
FRIDAY: CLOSED for Good Friday.
SATURDAY: Doris Lindeman, Cindy Bertling, Margie
Rostorfer and Courtnie Rostorfer.
REGULAR THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday;
1-4 p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440;
Alice Heidenescher, 419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-
7145; or Lorene Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
WEEK OF APRIL 9-13
MONDAY: Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, peas and
onions, bread, margarine, peaches, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Chicken patty on bun, pasta salad, baked
beans, crushed pineapple, coffee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked ham, sweet potatoes, cabbage,
bread, margarine, fruit, coffee and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Chicken tender with dipping sauce, potato
wedges, green beans, fruit cup, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Baked fish with tartar sauce, redskin potatoes,
cole slaw, bread, margarine, Mandarin oranges, coffee and 2%
milk.
After the hunt, use that
bounty of eggs for this
delicious recipe. End
the day with a piece
of strawberry pie.
Egg and Pepper
Enchiladas
2 teaspoons oil
1 bag (16 ounce) fro-
zen mixed bell pepper
strips
8 regular-size flour
tortillas
1 can (16 ounce)
refried beans
8 hard-cooked eggs,
peeled and sliced
6 ounces cheddar or
pepper jack cheese, shred-
ded (1 1/2 cups)
1 can (15 ounce) mild
green enchilada sauce
Toppings: green
salsa, sour cream, finely
chopped red onion, diced
tomato
Heat oven to 350
degrees. Lightly coat a
shallow 3-qt. baking dish
with nonstick spray. Heat
oil in a large nonstick
skillet over medium-high
heat. Add peppers; sauté
7 to 8 minutes until liquid
from peppers evaporates.
Spread each tortilla with a
scant ¼ cup refried beans.
Arrange 1 sliced egg on
half of each tortilla, top
egg with a scant ¼ cup
peppers and sprinkle with
1 ½ Tbs. cheese. Spread
1/3 cup enchilada sauce
in baking dish. Roll up
tortillas starting from egg
and pepper edge. Place
seam side down in dish.
Spoon on remaining
sauce; cover tightly with
foil.
Bake 25 minutes.
Uncover; sprinkle with
remaining cheese. Bake
5 minutes more to melt
cheese. Serve with
Toppings.

Strawberry Pie
1 1/2 quart strawber-
ries
3 level tablespoons
cornstarch
1 cup sugar
1 baked pastry shell
Whipped topping
Select half of choic-
est berries and place in
pie shell. Mash remaining
berries. Bring to a boil
and add sugar mixed with
cornstarch. Cook slow-
ly 10 minutes. Let cool
and pour over uncooked
berries in pastry shell.
Refrigerate.
Serve with whipped
topping.
CAMPUS NOTE
UNOH February
dean’s list
The University of
Northwestern Ohio is proud
to acknowledge its dean’s List
for February Session 2012
for students in the College of
Technologies.
The following full-time
students received a grade point
average of 3.5 or better:
Delphos
James Asberry
Seth Knebel
Ray McClelland
Nathan Miller
Michael O’Brien
Cory Osting
Patrick Redmon
Lance Weppler
Bryan Wright
Elida
Jonathan Freed
Andrew Neidhardt
Michael O’Bradovich
Fort Jennings
Craig Elwer
Joshua Kuhlman
Nicholas Neidert
Middle Point
Chad Williams
Spencerville
Cory Counts
Russell Jones
Venedocia
James Rigdon
Jeffrey Van Der Groef
www.delphosherald.com
6 – The Herald Thursday, April 5, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC 7
ab-r-h-rbi
Colin Stolly p 3-3-2-0, Travis Clark
lf 3-0-1-1, Bill Taflinger 3b 4-1-1-0,
Connor Dee c 4-1-1-1, Kien Duffy 2b
4-0-1-1, Corey O’Dowd cf 4-1-0-0, Ben
Stolly 1b 2-0-0-0. Nick Watkins ss
3-0-1-2, Ryan Cousy dh 2-1-0-0, Sam
Heider rf 0-0-0-0. Totals 29-7-7-5.
ST. JOHN’S (3)
ab-r-h-rbi
Curtis Geise p/ss 4-0-1-0, Jordan
Bergfeld dh 3-0-1-1, Andrew Metzger rf
0-0-0-0, Josh Rode ph 1-0-0-0, Tanner
Calvelage cf 3-1-2-1, Troy Warnecke ss/p
3-0-0-0, Austin Reindel c 1-0-0-1, Cody
Kundert 3b 3-0-0-0, Alex Wehri 1b 2-1-0-
0, Ryan Buescher lf 3-1-2-0, Ryan Densel
2b 3-0-0-0. Totals 26-3-6-3.
Score by Innings:
Lima CC 2 2 0 0 2 1 0 - 7
St. John’s 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 - 3
E: Kundert 2, B. Stolly, Warnecke,
Reindel, Densel; DP: St. John’s 2, Lima
Central Catholic 1; LOB: Lima Central
Catholic 6, St. John’s 5; 2B: Clark,
Duffy, Geise; SB: O’Dowd, Calvelage,
Buescher; SF: Reindel.
IP H R ER BB SO
LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC
C. Stolly (W, 1-0) 7.0 6 3 3 2 5
ST. JOHN’S
Geise (L, 1-2) 5.0 7 7 2 2 9
Warnecke 2.0 0 0 0 0 2
Geise pitched to 2 batters in the
sixth
WP: Geise 2, Warnecke; HBP: B.
Stolly 2 (by Geise 2)
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — During St.
John’s 5-game winning streak
this baseball season, they had
been getting good pitching,
solid and timely — and at
times, explosive — hitting
and sound defense.
The defense let down on
a gorgeous spring
Wednesday night at
Stadium Park versus
Lima Central Catholic,
committing five errors
and not getting the
consistent offense, as
the Blue Jays fell 7-3
to the Thunderbirds.
“We didn’t make
the plays we had been making
all season; even on the plays
that weren’t errors, we need-
ed to come up with them. You
can’t give a good-hitting team
like this extra outs,” St. John’s
coach Dan Metzger acknowl-
edged. “At the same time,
LCC was finding the gaps
offensively. Their pitcher also
did a nice job of changing
speeds and locations on all
three pitches he threw; when
we hit the ball, we weren’t
making solid contact. You’re
going to have games like this;
the hitting won’t always be
there because you’re facing
good pitching.”
Those miscues led to five
unearned runs against junior
starter Curtis Geise (1-2;
5-plus innings, 7 hits, 7 runs,
2 bases-on-balls, 9 strikeouts;
99 pitches, 64 strikes).
It started in the top of the
first as a hit, a walk and a pair
of errors allowed Colin Stolly
(2-for-3) and Bill Taflinger
to come across, the first on
a run-scoring grounder by
Connor Dee and the second
on a line-double to left center
by Kien Duffy.
Stolly threw a 98-pitch
complete game — 65 for
strikes (6 hits, 3 earned runs,
2 BBs, 5 Ks), setting down
the first six Blue Jays.
“He did a great job in his
first varsity start as a sopho-
more. He started out well,
went through a rough
patch in the third and
fourth but then settled
back down, so we let
him finish the game,”
LCC coach John
Schneiders said. “He
was mixing his three
pitches — fastball,
curve/breaking ball
and changeup — well, chang-
ing speeds and spots. He was
pitching from in front, which
is a lot easier when you can
make the batter hit your pitch.
Connor called a great game
behind the plate; we made
the batters uncomfortable and
that is key against a team like
St. John’s that hits well.”
Two more runs came
across in the LCC (3-3) sec-
ond, with two hits and two
more errors allowing both
runs. A throwing error on a
bunt single by Stolly allowed
Ryan Cousy to score and a
misplayed grounder hit by
Travis Clark brought Stolly
home for a 4-0 lead.
“Curtis was struggling the
first two innings; he was fall-
ing behind because he wasn’t
locating well and then he
had to come into the batter’s
strength,” Metzger added.
“The defense didn’t help him,
either. He settled down some
after that but he has to learn
to be mentally and physically
focused from the first pitch.
We can’t spot teams four runs
in two innings and expect
to come back. We need our
pitching and defense for seven
innings.”
Geise allowed only one
base-runner the next two
frames.
The Jays (5-2) cut their def-
icit in half in the home half of
the third. Senior Alex Wehri
walked to lead it off and took
third on a bloop down the
right-field line by junior Ryan
Buescher (2-for-3). He stole
second and two outs later,
an infield hit wide of first by
senior Jordan Bergfeld put
runners on the corners and
plated Wehri. Senior Tanner
Calvelage lined a hit to right
that plated Buescher. An error
on junior Troy Warnecke’s
pop-up loaded the bases but
the Jays left the bases that
way.
The T-Birds got two more
unearned tallies in the fifth
on two singles and one more
miscue. A 2-run knock to
left by Nick Watkins brought
home Dee and O’Dowd to
make it 6-2.
LCC chased Geise in
the sixth after he gave up
an infield chopper up the
middle by Stolly, two wild
pitches and an RBI double
deep to left center by Clark.
However, Warnecke got out
of the inning with no more
damage, getting an inning-
ending twin-killing.
The Jays got one back in
the home half on Calvelage’s
leadoff infield single up
the middle, a stole base, a
groundout by Warnecke and
a sacrifice fly to left by senior
Austin Reindel.
The Jays mounted another
chance in the seventh. With
one down, Buescher chopped
one to center but was elimi-
nated on a comebacker by
senior Ryan Densel. A dou-
ble to deep center by Geise
brought up senior pinch-hitter
Josh Rode, who was retired to
end the threat and the game.
“We came out aggressive
at the plate; we wanted to put
the ball in play,” Schneiders
added. “We also have strug-
gled in the field, especially
the infield, this season and
we made a concerted effort to
focus on that this week. We
played an outstanding defen-
sive game, especially Nick
(Watkins) at short and Bill
(Taflinger) at third.”
St. John’s heads to Kalida
5 p.m. Monday.
LCC hosts Jefferson
tonight in NWC action, start-
ing at 5 p.m.
Jays’ winning streak stopped at 5 by LCC
Jefferson junior Corrine Metzger connects for a shot to
the right-centerfield fence Wednesday afternoon at Lady
Wildcat Field and ended up with a standup triple. She
scored on a passed ball but the Wildcats fell to Miller City
10-4.
Tom Morris photo
By BOB WEBER
btzweber@bright.net
DELPHOS — Wednesday
night, it was a battle of the
Wildcats with Delphos
Jefferson hosting Miller City
in softball activity.
Jefferson scored
early but the third
inning (Miller City
scoring 7 runs) sealed
the win for the visiting
Wildcats as they came
away with a 10-4 win.
The game started out
very well for the home
team. Junior pitcher Taylor
Branham retired Miller City
1-2-3 with two strikeouts. In
the bottom of the first, the
home team plated the game’s
first run as Corinne Metzger
and Samantha Thitoff both
singled and Metzger scored
on a groundout by Fallon
Van Dyke.
The lead was short-lived
as Miller City — in the sec-
ond with two outs — got a
bunt single by Jennifer Leis.
Leis came all the way around
and scored as the home team
committed two errors in the
inning.
The third inning was the
telling story for the game
as the visitors batted around
and plated seven runs. Ali
Lammers and Ashley Niese
both led off the inning with
bunt singles. Jessica Leis
knocked in both with a
triple to deep center field.
Leis scored on an error by
the home Wildcats. Marissa
Schroeder, starting pitcher
for the visiting team, helped
her cause by knocking in
another run with a triple
and scored on a wild pitch.
Jennifer Leis came through
with a single and scored on
Elizabeth Schimmoeller’s tri-
ple; she scored the final run
of the inning after a ground-
out. Bottom line - seven
runs scored, 8-1 Miller City
lead.
Miller City’s head coach
Jim Leis was quick to point
out the importance of the
third inning and propelling
his team to a win: “We
got a big run in the
second to tie the game
and had a big third that
kind of gave us a little
comfort at that point
of the game. Tip your
hat to Jefferson; they played
real well.”
After Miller City added
one more run in the top of
the fifth to make in 9-1, the
home team rallied to score
two runs in their bottom half
of the inning. With one out,
Kayla Kill singled. Metzger
reached base on an error and
Van Dyke drilled a deep dou-
ble off the fence to drive in
two runs to cut the deficit
to 9-3.
Miller City added another
run in the sixth to go up 10-3
and the home team fought
back and scored one more
run with two outs in the bot-
tom of the seventh when
Metzger tripled and scored
on a wild pitch, making the
final score 10-4.
Schroeder pitched seven
innings (6 Hits, 4 runs). She
struck out 10 batters (strik-
ing out the side in the sixth)
and didn’t walk a batter. The
visiting Wildcats had 12 hits
with Jennifer Leis going 3-3
(3 singles) and Lammers and
Schimmoeller with two hits
on the contest.
Coach Leis said he liked
what he saw from Schroeder
on the mound: “She did real-
ly well for us tonight. They
scored four runs tonight
but probably three were
unearned. She’s a senior and
has been pitching at the var-
sity level for four years.
We have a lot of confidence
in her.”
Branham pitched a very
good game, even though the
score doesn’t indicate it. She
struck out 11 batters (strik-
ing out the side in the sixth
and fanning four of the last
six batters she faced) and
also didn’t walk a batter (6
unearned runs). Metzger led
the home team with two hits
and three runs scored. Van
Dyke knocked in three of the
four runs for the Wildcats.
Jefferson (0-6) will travel
to Lima Central Catholic for
a 5 p.m. start today against
the Lady T-Birds. Miller City
(4-1) will travel to Ottoville
today.
Miller City 10
Ali Lammers 4-2-2-0, Ashley
Niese 3-1-1-0, Jessica Leis 4-1-
1-2, Toni Steffan 4-1-2-1, Marissa
Schroeder 4-1-1-1, Jennifer Leis
3-3-3-0, Brianne Rosengarten 1-0-
0-0, Elizabeth Schimmoeller 3-1-2-
1, Chelsie Hoffman 1-0-0-0, Taylor
Niese 3-0-0-1, Kylie Ricker 1-0-0-0,
Samantha Michel 3-0-0-0. Totals
36-10-12-6.
Jefferson 4
Corinne Metzger 4-3-2-0,
Samantha Thitoff 4-0-1-0, Fallon
Van Dyke 4-0-1-3, Cassidy
Bevington 3-0-0-0, Taylor Branham
3-0-0-0, Whitney Hohlbein 2-0-0-0,
Destiny Thompson 1-0-0-0, Kimber
Kill 3-0-0-0, Shayla Rice 3-0-1-0,
Kayla Kill 3-1-1-0. Totals 30-4-6-3.
Score by Innings:
Miller City 0 1 7 0 1 1 0 - 10
Jefferson 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 - 4
WP - Marissa Schroeder; LP -
Taylor Branham. 2B: Steffan, Van
Dyke; 3B: Jessica Leis, Schroeder,
Schimmoeller, Metzger.
Third inning sinks Lady
Jeffcats vs. Miller City
The obvious thing to write about
today is the start of the continental
major-league baseball season — doffing
my cap to the 2-game series played in
Japan last week.
It’s sad that one of the game’s sto-
ried traditions — that the Cincinnati
Reds always kicked off the new season
— went by the wayside several years
ago because of whatever (money, televi-
sion).
That is because of its historical ties to
the original Cincinnati Red Stockings —
the game’s first officially professional
ball club starting in 1869 after three
years of amateur status.
I find it fascinating about the history
of franchises.
I will be relying on Wikipedia for this
information, so I hope it’s correct.
The original Red Stockings domi-
nated for two years before — more or
less — moving to Boston and becoming
the Boston Red Stockings, the precur-
sor to the team that became the Atlanta
Braves.
A new Cincinnati Red Stockings crew
began play in 1876 as a charter member
of the National League but — to show
how times have changed! — was kicked
out in 1880 after refusing to stop selling
beer to fans (against league rules of the
time!) and for stop renting out their ball
park, Bank Street Grounds, on Sundays.
The third incarnation of the Cincinnati
Red Stockings became a founding mem-
ber of the American Association in 1882
and returned to the National League in
1890.
There is some other interesting tidbits
and disputes about all of this — whether
or not that this club was the same that
soon became the Reds (name changed
in 1890 or thereabouts), for example —
but be that as it may, the rest, as THEY
say — the Reds off and on great success
throughout the 20th century to its the
amassing and dismantling of the awe-
some Big Red Machine to the trade of
the Oakland A’s ace pitcher Vida Blue
to the Reds in 1976/7 voided by then-
Commissioner Bowie Kuhn as an effort
to maintain the competitive balance in
baseball! — is history.
The history of this 143-year-old fran-
chise — in its several incarnations —
includes playing at several different sites:
Bank Street Grounds, League Park I,
League Park II, League Park III (Palace
of the Fans), Crosley Field (aka Redland
Field), Riverfront Stadium/Cinergy Field
and now Great American Ball Park.
Think there is any marker acknowl-
edging where Bank Street Grounds were,
for example?
Oh well. As always this time of
year, with the flowers and trees already
blooming, hope springs eternal.
College basketball just finished
its March Madness by crowning the
Kentucky Wildcats as the champions of
the men’s and the unbeaten and history-
setting Baylor Lady Bears as its women’s
champions.
Both teams were seemingly “fated”
to end up cutting the final nets in New
Orleans and Denver, respectively, with
players such as the 6-10 man/child
Anthony Davis and the 6-8 Brittany
Griner.
All I know is this: my men’s bracket
was smashed to smithereens early. It’s a
conspiracy, I tell you!
The NFL Draft is three weeks
away.
This has already been a rather event-
ful off-season in a positive way after last
spring’s constant bickering back and
forth between the owners and the Players
Association over a new CBA.
Now it seems that both sides are
really in agreement on the issue facing
Commissioner Roger Goodell about how
to handle the bounty situation involv-
ing the New Orleans Saints — and, by
extension, any situation regarding this
possibility.
After all, players’ careers could be
shortened or flat-out ended in this sce-
nario, which should be a major concern
of the NFLPA.
I am waiting to see what Goodell
eventually does to the players that have
been proven to be a part of this.
I am also waiting to see if Andrew
Luck will be the first pick in the draft
by Indianapolis or will they change their
minds and go with Robert Griffin III.
Of hope, the end of the Madness and the future of the NFL
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
By Jim Cox
Times Bulletin
Correspondent
CONVOY - The field-
ing was shaky for Crestview
and Fort Jennings (each
team committing 5 errors)
Wednesday afternoon but the
hitting was not as the Knights
came out of it with
an 11-8 non-league
baseball win at the
Crestview Athletic
Complex.
Both teams are
now 4-3.
Crestview seemed
to have control early,
piling up a 9-2 lead, but Fort
Jennings rallied to get with-
in one at 9-8 after 5 1/2
innings.
The Knights came up with
two big runs in the bottom
of the sixth to push the lead
to three, then blanked the
Musketeers in the seventh for
the win.
Two Jennings errors --
a misplayed fly ball and a
booted grounder -- gave the
Knights a first-inning run
but the Musketeers bounced
back with two in the sec-
ond. Shortstop Nick Verhoff
clubbed a ground-rule double
-- one bounce over the fence
in right center. Then desig-
nated hitter Zack Schuerman
crushed a 2-run homer over
the right-field fence -- 2-1,
Fort Jennings.
The bottom of the second
turned out to be an inning
the visitors would like to do
over. Crestview scored six
runs, only two of which were
earned, while sending the
entire lineup to
the plate. Two
errors, four
hits (infield
bunt single by
shortstop Kole
Rolsten, infield
bunt single by
third baseman
Venice Roberts, double to
the gap in right center by
rightfielder Jake Wortman,
ground single up the middle
by pitcher Damian Helm) and
a sacrifice fly (catcher Nate
Owens) got the lead up to
7-2.
The Knights added single
runs in the third (singles by
Roberts and leftfielder Alec
Heffner) and fourth (walk to
first baseman Jake Harmon,
singles by Rolsten and
Roberts) to lead 9-2.
However, the Knight
defensive lapses and the
Jennings bats then came into
play to make things interest-
ing. Fort Jennings got two
unearned runs in the fifth via
a Knight error and three sin-
gles (pitcher Kurt Warnecke,
leftfielder Cody Warnecke
and Verhoff) that made it
9-4.
Kurt Warnecke then
moved back to his normal
spot at short and Ryan Rau
moved from second base
to the mound. The
Knights went score-
less in the fifth for the
first and only time.
Roberts replaced
Helm on the mound
to start the sixth and
the guests prompt-
ly scored four times
(1 earned) on three Knight
errors, a hit batsman and two
singles (Kurt Warnecke and
Verhoff) -- 9-8, Crestview.
However, the home team
bounced right back in the
bottom half. Owens lined
one over the fence in left to
make it 10-8. Harmon sin-
gled, advanced to second on
a wild pitch and scored when
Roberts bounced a ground-
rule double over the left-field
fence.
Roberts blanked the
Musketeers in the seventh to
end it.
“On the bright side, in our
last inning after we let them
back in, I was pretty pleased
with how our kids responded
with the sticks,” said Knight
coach Jim Wharton. “That’s
probably the brightest spot of
the day. It’s just high school
kids. They have a hard time
staying focused (defensively)
for an extended period of
time, so we need to work on
that.“
Musketeer coach Jeff
Swick, like Wharton, was
happy with his team’s hit-
ting but not pleased with the
defense.
“Our hitting has been
very solid,” said Swick. “We
don’t strike out much. We
put the ball in play. That’s
been our strength. As bad as
our defense was, our offense
came around and we clawed
back into the game.”
Kurt Warnecke (2-for-5, 2
runs, 1 RBI), Verhoff (3-for-
4, a double, 1 run, 1 RBI) and
Schuerman led Fort Jennings’
hitters.
Roberts had a huge day
for Crestview, going 4-for-4
(a double, 2 runs, 2 RBIs).
Owens (1-for-3, a homer, 2
RBIs), Rolsten (2-for-4, 1
run) and Wortman (1-for-
2, a double, 1 run, 2 RBIs)
also had big games at the
plate.
Helm got the win, giving
up four runs (two earned) and
six hits in five innings, while
striking out five and walking
only one. Roberts went two
innings, yielding four runs
(one earned) on three hits,
striking out one, hitting one
and walking nobody.
For Fort Jennings, Kurt
Warnecke took the loss, going
three innings, giving up eight
runs (three earned) on seven
hits, fanning two and walking
one. Rau went three innings,
yielding three earned runs on
five hits, striking out two and
walking one.
Jennings hosts Leipsic
tonight, while Crestview vis-
its Lincolnview.
Fort Jennings (ab-r-h-rbi)
Kurt Warnecke p-ss 5-2-2-1,
Neidert 1b 4-2-1-1, Hellman cf 4-0-
0-0, Cody Warnecke 4-0-1-1, Verhoff
ss-3b 4-1-3-1, Schuerman dh 4-1-1-2,
Rau 2b-p 0-0-0-0, Vetter 3b 1-0-0-0,
Hoersten 2b 1-1-1-0, Van Loo rf 3-0-
0-0, Wallenhorst ph 1-1-0-0, Metzger
c 3-0-0-0. Totals 34-8-9-6.
Crestview (ab-r-h-rbi)
Holden cf 3-1-0-0, Helm p-rf 4-1-1-
1, Adam 2b 3-0-1-0, Brown 2b 1-0-0-0,
Owens c 3-1-1-2, Harmon 1b 3-3-1-0,
Rolsten ss 4-1-2-0, Roberts 3b-p 4-2-
4-2, Heffner lf 3-1-1-0, Leary lf 1-0-0-
0, Wortman rf 2-1-1-2, Simerman 3b
1-0-0-0. Totals 32-11-12-7.
Score by Innings:
Ft. Jennings 0 2 0 0 2 4 0 - 8 9 5
Crestview 1 6 1 1 0 2 x - 11 12 5
WP - Helm. LP - Kurt Warnecke.
LOB - Fort Jennings 8, Crestview 6.
2B: Verhoff, Roberts, Wortman. HR:
Schuerman, Owens.
Knights hold off Musketeer rally for 11-8 win
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Thursday, April 5, 2012 The Herald — 7
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STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 4, 2012
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 30 23 .566 —
Philadelphia 29 25 .537 1 1/2
New York 27 27 .500 3 1/2
Toronto 20 35 .364 11
New Jersey 19 37 .339 12 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami 39 14 .736 —
Orlando 32 22 .593 7 1/2
Atlanta 32 23 .582 8
Washington 12 42 .222 27 1/2
Charlotte 7 45 .135 31 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Chicago 42 13 .764 —
Indiana 33 21 .611 8 1/2
Milwaukee 26 28 .481 15 1/2
Detroit 20 33 .377 21
Cleveland 17 35 .327 23 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 38 14 .731 —
Memphis 30 23 .566 8 1/2
Dallas 31 24 .564 8 1/2
Houston 29 25 .537 10
New Orleans 14 40 .259 25
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 40 14 .741 —
Denver 29 25 .537 11
Utah 28 27 .509 12 1/2
Portland 26 29 .473 14 1/2
Minnesota 25 31 .446 16
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 35 20 .636 —
L.A. Clippers 32 22 .593 2 1/2
Phoenix 28 26 .519 6 1/2
Golden State 21 32 .396 13
Sacramento 19 35 .352 15 1/2
x-clinched playoff spot
———
Wednesday’s Results
Indiana 109, Washington 96
Toronto 99, Philadelphia 78
Atlanta 120, Charlotte 93
San Antonio 87, Boston 86
New Orleans 94, Denver 92
Golden State 97, Minnesota 94
Milwaukee 107, Cleveland 98
Miami 98, Oklahoma City 93
Dallas 95, Memphis 85
Phoenix 107, Utah 105
Portland 101, New Jersey 88
L.A. Lakers 113, L.A. Clippers 108
Today’s Games
New York at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Chicago, 9:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Oklahoma City at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30
p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Denver, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
z-N.Y. Rangers 80 51 22 7 109 223 178
x-Pittsburgh 80 49 25 6 104 273 217
x-Philadelphia 80 46 25 9 101 260 227
x-New Jersey 80 46 28 6 98 222 206
N.Y. Islanders 80 33 36 11 77 195 244
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Boston 80 47 29 4 98 262 198
x-Ottawa 80 41 29 10 92 246 233
Buffalo 80 39 31 10 88 214 224
Toronto 80 34 36 10 78 227 258
Montreal 80 30 35 15 75 207 223
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 80 37 25 18 92 197 222
Washington 80 40 32 8 88 214 227
Winnipeg 80 37 34 9 83 218 237
Tampa Bay 80 37 36 7 81 229 275
Carolina 80 32 32 16 80 210 238
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-St. Louis 80 48 21 11 107 206 159
x-Detroit 80 48 27 5 101 245 198
x-Nashville 80 46 26 8 100 229 209
x-Chicago 80 44 26 10 98 244 234
Columbus 80 27 46 7 61 190 257
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver 80 50 21 9 109 244 195
Colorado 80 41 33 6 88 205 209
Calgary 80 35 29 16 86 194 222
Minnesota 80 34 35 11 79 174 221
Edmonton 80 32 39 9 73 210 233
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Los Angeles 80 40 27 13 93 187 170
Phoenix 80 40 27 13 93 208 202
San Jose 80 41 29 10 92 219 203
Dallas 80 42 33 5 89 209 217
Anaheim 80 33 35 12 78 199 224
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Wednesday’s Results
Detroit 3, St. Louis 2, SO
Montreal 5, Tampa Bay 2
Today’s Games
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Game
Phoenix at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 0 0 .000 —
New York 0 0 .000 —
Philadelphia 0 0 .000 —
Washington 0 0 .000 —
Miami 0 1 .000 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 1 0 1.000 —
Chicago 0 0 .000 1/2
Cincinnati 0 0 .000 1/2
Houston 0 0 .000 1/2
Milwaukee 0 0 .000 1/2
Pittsburgh 0 0 .000 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 0 0 .000 —
Colorado 0 0 .000 —
Los Angeles 0 0 .000 —
San Diego 0 0 .000 —
San Francisco 0 0 .000 —
———
Wednesday’s Result
St. Louis 4, Miami 1
Today’s Games
Atlanta (Hanson 0-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Santana 0-0), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 0-0) at
Pittsburgh (Bedard 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 0-0) at Chicago
Cubs (Dempster 0-0), 2:20 p.m.
Miami (Buehrle 0-0) at Cincinnati
(Cueto 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 0-0) at San
Diego (Volquez 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
St. Louis (Garcia 0-0) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
Colorado (Guthrie 0-0) at Houston
(Rodriguez 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 0-0) at
Arizona (Kennedy 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 0-0) at San
Diego (Luebke 0-0), 10:05 p.m.
----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 0 0 .000 —
Boston 0 0 .000 —
New York 0 0 .000 —
Tampa Bay 0 0 .000 —
Toronto 0 0 .000 —
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 0 0 .000 —
Cleveland 0 0 .000 —
Detroit 0 0 .000 —
Kansas City 0 0 .000 —
Minnesota 0 0 .000 —
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 1 1 .500 —
Seattle 1 1 .500 —
Los Angeles 0 0 .000 —
Texas 0 0 .000 —
———
Today’s Games
Boston (Lester 0-0) at Detroit
(Verlander 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Romero 0-0) at Cleveland
(Masterson 0-0), 3:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-0) at
Texas (Lewis 0-0), 2:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 0-0) at Baltimore
(Arrieta 0-0), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 0-0) at Tampa
Bay (Shields 0-0), 3:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 0-0) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 0-0), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 0-0) at Oakland
(McCarthy 0-0), 10:05 p.m.
MLB GLANCE
LOCAL ROUNDUP
By EDDIE PELLS
The Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. — It’s
wrong to call Charl Schwartzel
an accidental champion. Can’t
do that to a player who makes
four straight bird-
ies to close out a
Masters victory.
But anyone who
remembers that
magical Sunday at
Augusta last year
remembers so much
more than the win-
ner.
There was Rory McIlroy’s
meltdown, Tiger Woods’ late
charge, a leaderboard with
eight different players on top
during the back nine and a
barrage of birdies that sent
roar after roar echoing through
those famous Georgia pines.
“When that putt disap-
peared on 18, honestly the last
thing that went through my
mind is that I made my fourth
straight birdie,” Schwartzel
said. “It was, ‘I just won the
green jacket’.”
The year’s first major got
underway under calm skies
this morning, with Jack
Nicklaus, Gary Player and
Arnold Palmer all hitting their
ceremonial first tee shots in
the fairway. Three-time cham-
pion Phil Mickelson, who had
the day’s final tee time, was
on hand in his green jacket
to watch the legends hit their
perfect shots.
Woods had a 10:35 a.m.
tee time and McIlroy was set
to start at 1:42 p.m.
Schwartzel, meanwhile,
was scheduled to begin his
defense at 10:24 a.m.
But forgive fans if they
aren’t swarming the South
African when he tees it up, try-
ing to become the first back-
to-back winner at Augusta
National since Woods in
2001-02. As was the case dur-
ing last year’s carnival-like
final round, the golf world has
an awful lot going on.
The free-for-all begins
with Woods, who notched his
first PGA Tour win in
30 months two weeks
ago in Orlando, and
is suddenly re-estab-
lished as the favorite
to win his fifth green
jacket.
It includes McIlroy,
who won the Honda
Classic in March but
is better remembered for the
resilience he showed last year
by winning the U.S. Open by
eight shots, two months after
blowing the 4-stroke lead he
took into the last day of the
Masters.
Mickelson, world No. 1
Luke Donald, Steve Stricker
and Hunter Mahan all had
wins early in 2012 season.
Schwartzel, meanwhile,
has moved into the top 10
based largely on his Masters
victory. He started the year
with a pair of top-5 finishes
but has missed the cut in his
last two events.
“There’s a lot of talk now,”
he said. “Tiger has obviously
won again and he’s really play-
ing very good. Rory is playing
well. Phil is playing well. Luke.
All of the guys. But to me,
I go about my business as I
normally do and I feel — and I
know — if I play my best, I can
compete with anyone.”
While Schwartzel tries to
bring the third Masters title
back to South Africa in five
years, his countryman Ernie
Els won’t get that chance.
Els’ 18-year string of Masters
appearances ended this year
when he failed to qualify by
the tournament’s normal cri-
teria and officials decided
against extending him a spe-
cial invitation.
South Africa’s most
renowned golfer, 76-year-
old Player, was reunited with
the 72-year-old Nicklaus and
Palmer, who is 82, on the first
tee box this morning, as the
Big Three hit the ceremonial
first shots, then sit back and
watch the fireworks.
There’s been plenty of that
already at Augusta, thanks to
Mother Nature.
A powerful storm hit early
Wednesday, dropping 1.4
inches of rain and sending a
tree crashing through a rest-
room near the 16th hole.
Everyone at Augusta needs
as much practice as they can
get. Even before they made
subtle changes by rebuilding
the greens on Nos. 8 and 16,
the Masters was best known for
producing the toughest putting
test in golf. Though the greens
figure to be soft because of
the rain, competition committee
chairman Fred Ridley promised
pin positions would be adjusted
accordingly.
Still, given the way the
world’s best are playing this
year, along with the condi-
tions, Mickelson is expecting
low scores.
“The greens are soft,” the
three-time champion said. “I
don’t want to say they are
slow but it’s just not the same
Augusta. It’s wet around the
greens and there’s no fear
of the course. You’ve got to
attack it this week.”
Schwartzel certainly knows
that drill.
In one of the most excit-
ing finishes at a tournament
renowned for them, he started
his streak by getting up and
down on the par-5 15th for
birdie to briefly tie for the
lead. Moments later, Adam
Scott made birdie to go ahead
again and Schwartzel respond-
ed with a 15-footer on 16.
He took the lead for him-
self for the first time with a
10-foot birdie putt on No. 17,
then closed it out with another
birdie to pad his margin to
two shots. His 6-under 66 was
the best closing round by a
winner in 22 years.
Payne: No comment on member-
ship issues at Augusta: Jabbed, prod-
ded and poked repeatedly about a topic
that never really goes away, Payne
wouldn’t budge.
Faced with questions at his annual
news conference about when a woman
would be a member at the home of the
Masters, the Augusta National chairman
gave different variations of the same
answer: that’s our business, not yours.
The topic was on the front-burner
again Wednesday, the eve of the year’s
first major, because one of the club’s
longtime sponsors, IBM, has a new
CEO — Virginia Rometty. The last four
CEOs at IBM, all male, have been
invited to be members.
Payne’s polite-but-firm responses
were in direct contrast to those of his
predecessor, Hootie Johnson. Faced
with the issue 10 years ago, Johnson
famously declared female membership
would come on the club’s timetable and
“not at the point of a bayonet.”
The issue first came up in 2002
when Martha Burk, then the chair
of the National Council of Women’s
Organizations, campaigned for Augusta
National to end its all-male membership
and threatened to boycott companies
whose executives belonged to the club.
Johnson responded by cutting loose
corporate backers and the Masters was
televised without commercials for the
next two years. A planned protest before
the 2003 Masters was a dud and the
issue slowly receded.
When Payne replaced Johnson as
chairman of the club and of the Masters
tournament in 2006, he said there was “no
specific timetable” for admitting women.
The question was raised at the 2007 and
2010 Masters. Both times, Payne said
membership issues were private.
Today, in addition to IBM, Exxon
Mobile and AT&T are also sponsors of
the Masters.
Contacted after Payne’s news con-
ference, Burk responded she didn’t pay
attention to it and had no plans to
protest this year because “we saw that
didn’t work.”
It’s not her job to pressure the club,
she added, but rather IBM’s.
Rometty, who took over as CEO Jan.
1, is said to play golf sparingly, being more
passionate about scuba diving.
Because the secrecy level at Augusta
National is so high, there could already
be a female member that nobody knows
about. Though members are visible dur-
ing the Masters because of their iconic
green jackets, not every member is in
attendance this week.
Nicklaus, Player, Palmer
get Masters underway
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting
Kansas City 4 0 0 12 7 1
New York 2 2 0 6 10 7
Columbus 2 1 0 6 3 2
Houston 2 1 0 6 2 2
New England 2 2 0 6 4 5
D.C. 1 2 1 4 5 5
Chicago 1 1 1 4 2 3
Philadelphia 0 3 1 1 2 6
Montreal 0 4 1 1 3 11
Toronto FC 0 3 0 0 1 7
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 4 1 0 12 9 4
San Jose 3 1 0 9 5 1
Colorado 3 1 0 9 7 5
Vancouver 2 0 2 8 3 0
Seattle 2 1 0 6 5 2
Portland 1 2 1 4 6 6
FC Dallas 1 2 1 4 5 8
Los Angeles 1 2 0 3 5 7
Chivas USA 1 3 0 3 1 3
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
———
Wednesday’s Result
Real Salt Lake 1, Montreal 0
Today’s Game
New England at FC Dallas, 8:30
p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Toronto FC at Montreal, 12 p.m.
New York at Columbus, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at Sporting Kansas City,
4 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 7 p.m.
Seattle FC at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m.
Chivas USA at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
In 1977, Seattle Slew won
the Kentucky Derby.
Tribe punishes Lady Green
OTTOVILLE — Shawnee
was firmly in control in the first
three innings and then explod-
ed for 14 runs in the fourth and
fifth to pound Ottoville 21 in
non-league fast-pitch softball
action Wednesday in Ottoville.
Not only did the Lady
Indians amass 13 hits but the
Lady Green (0-4) committed
four miscues.
Courtney Von Sossan took
the loss for the hosts. Morgan
Beibning was a bright spot in
the Green and Gold lineup by
going 3-for-4 with a double.
J. Mitchell was the winning
pitcher for the Tribe. Klefner
went 3-for-3 with a 2-bagger.
Ottoville visits Leipsic 2
p.m. Saturday.
Shawnee 3 1 3 8 6 - 21 11 1
Ottoville 0 0 0 3 1 - 4 4 4
WP: K. Mitchell; LP: Courtney Von
Sossan. 2B: Klefner (S), Evans (S),
Morgan Beining (O), Kelsey Hoersten
(O).
---
Miller City bests
Ottoville in baseball
MILLER CITY — Miller
City rode the solid pitching of
Ross Kaufman and a 10-hit
attack (and 5 Ottoville errors)
Wednesday night to best the
Big Green 9-2 in Putnam
County League baseball action
in Miller City.
The hosts Wildcats (2-6)
scored five runs in the first to
send them on their way.
The Big Green (0-5) visits
Continental 5 p.m. Monday.
Ottoville 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 - 2 6 5
Miller City 5 0 3 0 1 0 x - 9 10 0
WP: Ross Kaufman; LP: Luke
Schimmoeller. 2B: Brent Niese (M).
-----
Scott outduels Roney as
Continental edges Columbus
Grove
COLUMBUS GROVE —
Continental’s B. Scott outdu-
eled Columbus Grove’s Trey
Roney as the visiting Pirates
grabbed a 3-2 Putnam County
League baseball triumph over
the host Bulldogs Wednesday
in Columbus Grove.
Both pitchers went the dis-
tance.
Scott gave up nine hits and
two earned runs, walking four
and fanning eight.
Roney (0-2) was even bet-
ter, giving up five hits and two
walks, fanning five, but gave
up three earned runs.
Blake Hoffman, Brandon
Benroth and Brady Shafer went
2-for-3 for the hosts (4-3, 1-2
PCL), while the Pirates (4-2,
1-1) had five different players
get a hit.
Grove visits Paulding
tonight.
Continental 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 - 3 5 0
Col. Grove 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 - 2 9 0
WP: B. Scott; LP: Trey Roney (0-2).
2B: Brady Shafer (CG).
----
Cougars outhit
Lady Knights
VAN WERT - The Van
Wert Lady Cougar softball
team struck for 10 runs in the
first inning of a game against
Crestview Wednesday night
at Jubilee Park, only to watch
their lead turn into a 13-10 defi-
cit by the sixth inning.
Still trailing by three, 14-11,
heading into the bottom of the
seventh, the Lady Cougar bats
awakened and they came up
with four runs in the frame to
shock the Lady Knights and
pick up a 15-14 non-conference
victory.
Van Wert visits O-G
tonight, while Crestview has
to regroup quickly as they visit
Lincolnview for a cross-county,
Northwest Conference rivalry
game today.
The loss drops Crestview to
6-3 on the season, Van Wert
improves to 5-4.
Crestview 0 24 404 1 - 14 16 3
Van Wert 10 00 001 4 - 15 18 4
WP - Klausing. LP - Crowle. 2B -
(CV) K. Hicks, D. Hicks. (VW) Klinker,
Bigham (2). HR - (CV) D. Hicks,
Richard.
2
8 — The Herald Thursday, April 5, 2012
AGRIBUSINESS
www.delphosherald.com
Freshmen members of the Delphos FFA
spent a day on the farm or at a local agribusi-
ness to enhance their education and apprecia-
tion of the various sectors of the agricultural
industry. The experience teaches students
about real world agriculture and allows them
to apply skills and techniques learned in the
classroom.
“Freshmen Experience is an excellent way
for students to experience what we are teach-
ing them in the classroom and also for them
to start to develop a Supervised Agriculture
Experience Program. They gain hands on
experience needed to be well-informed and
establish a good work ethic,” said Agricultural
Education Instructor, Scott Elwer. “FFA mem-
bers worked hand-in-hand with 15 local farms
and businesses from the Delphos area for the
day. Whether it was a seed dealer, vet, swine,
beef, or dairy farm, students gained knowledge
of what it is like working on a daily basis in
the agricultural industry.” The various pictures
below depict the many scenes and lessons
learned during this busy day.
The Ag Ed Department would like to thank
all the Freshmen Experience hosts for their
cooperation and assistance in putting this
program together.
Freshmen Experience: a truly educational day
Jordan McCann, Trevor Dudgeon and Cary Parsons
worked at Best One Tire organizing and cleaning the
warehouse, moving and inventorying tires and helped in
the change with tire changes.
Molly Geise, Kelsie Gerdeman and Ericca Jacomet spent their freshman experience
day at Ivy Hutch assisting in designing flower arrangements.
Y & K Hay and Straw had Adam Crabtree and Ian
Levalley load a semi of straw to be transported down south
in Kentucky to a horse farm.
Austin Schulte, Jake Horstman, Justin Siefker worked at Renner Dairy Farm with
Carl Renner. They performed a variety of tasks, including cleaning the milking liners and
feeding baby calves.
Howard Violet of H.G. Violet Equipment worked with Ben Dickrede, David Leathers
and Devin Rabe during the Freshman Experience activity. They serviced lawn equipment
for the spring season ahead and also put new lawn mowers together.
Gage Seffernick, left, and Gunnas Lucius spent the day with Jim Friedrich on his swine farm. During the day they
worked in a grain bin and on farm equipment to prepare for planting season.
Harry Heidlebaugh, Lahnna Lehman, Karen Cline, Elizabeth Miller, Shayla Rice,
Jordan Blackburn and Mackenzie Urton spent the day with Dr. John Jones of Delphos
Animal Hospital, Harry Heidlebaugh at his sheep farm, and Dick Thompson at Thompson
Seed farm. They helped treat the newborn baby lambs and bottle fed them. They also
learned about the veterinarian industry as well as Thompson Seed Farm and how that
business operates.
Derek Foust, left and Cameron Jones worked at C & J Agriservice preparing equipment for
the planting season ahead of us.
Shelby Koenig and Libby Spring assisted Dr. Jason
Kessen at Kessen Vet Clinic. They learned about com-
mon vet practices on a day-to-day basis and watched
some surgeries and helped take care of the recovering
small animals.
Warren Poling and Brady Kleman spent their day at
Delphos Ace Hardware under the direction of Eric Fritz.
They spent their day cleaning the shop and assembling spring
tools for rent for the new season including lawnmowers.
Photos submitted
1
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Thursday, April 5, 2012 The Herald — 9
www.delphosherald.com
Alex Haehn and Decoda Bellmann worked at Crop Production Services under the
direction of Gary Mack. They pulled soil samples and delivered seed to farmers in the
area for the upcoming planting season and also helped service equipment.
Alyssa Hall, Devin Coronado and Jorden Boone worked on Hempfling Dairy farm with
Chuck Hempfling. They assisted with the daily feeding and also helped get equipment
ready.
Tony and Joe Wrasman of Pitsenbarger Auto Supply allowed Tyler Fisher, left, Tyler Roby, and Jackson Donley to take inventory and stock shelves for an order of products
that came into the store.
Elida FFA holds annual banquet
Elida FFA recently held its 58th annu-
al parent-member banquet at the Old
Barn Out Back, at which President Casey
Troyer, left, presented an honorary chap-
ter degree to Howard Violet, owner of H.G.
Violet Equipment. Violet has worked with
the agricultural science program through
various chapter activities including the
member auction, National FFA Week
advertisement and has helped train mem-
bers for career development events. Guest
speaker was former State FFA Sentinel
Colin Barclay. The Cooperative Education
Team was recognized for placing fourth
in the state contest. Team members were
Jessica Foust, Trenton Long, Jessica
Dunham and Audry Fox. The Agricultural
Engineering Team was also recognized
for placing 5th in the state contest. Team
members were Zac Siefker, Austin Etzler,
Keaton Brenneman and Colin Blymyer.
2012 State FFA Degree recipients were recognized at the banquet. Keaton Brenneman,
left, Alex Shaw-Roberts, Josh Dawson, Ron Lloyd and Jessica Troyer. They will receive their
degree in May at the State FFA Convention in Columbus. Derrik Long, Caleb Saunders and
Clayton Miller were recognized for receiving their American FFA Degrees last October at
the National FFA Convention. Miller was also recognized for winning the National Turf
Grass Proficiency Award. Members recognized for placing in the Top 4 in State FFA 2012
Proficiency Awards include, Reggie McAdams for Ag Mechanics & Fabrication; Austin
Etzler for Home & Community Service; and Zac Siefker for Landscape Management and
Home & Community Service. Siefker also placed 1st in District in Beef Proficiency.
Other awards given at the banquet included, left, Star Agri-business Person Zac
Siefker, co-Star Chapter Farmers Alex Shaw-Roberts and Casey Troyer and Star
Greenhand Jake Hunter. Top fruit salesmen were given cash awards. They included Riley
Overholt, first place; Andrew Troyer, second; and Casey Troyer, third. Receiving soil
judging awards include: Isaac Troyer, Ashley Bartlett, James Waggamon, Emily Siefker,
Halle Strayer, Cody Hunter, Trenton Long and Dustin Bolenbaugh. Other 2012 District
Proficiency Award winners include: Josh Dawson, first place, Ag Sales and Service; Casey
Troyer, first place, Ag Mechanics and Repair; Adam Troyer, fifth place, Beef Production;
Keaton Brenneman, second place, Oil Crop Production; Theran Carroll, first place, Turf
Grass; and Alex Shaw-Roberts, second place, Turf Grass proficiency.
Retiring Officer plaques were given to the 2011-2012 officer team. Seated, left, Casey
Troyer, Reighn Waters, Austin Etzler and Keaton Brenneman. Standing, left, Ron Lloyd,
Zac Siefker, Alex Shaw-Roberts and Theran Carroll. The Outdoor Power team was rec-
ognized for placing 6th in the state contest. Team members were Garret Kamine, Alex
Shaw-Roberts and Zac Siefker. The Greenhand Quiz Team was recognized for placing
5th at the 2012 Career Development Event. Team members were Trey Archer, Travis
Watkins, Jared Blymyer and Makenzie Poling. William Legge received an award for
placing 3rd at the District FFA Creed contest and A.J. Siefker was presented a plaque for
being the top place individual in the 2011 State FFA Greenhand Quiz contest.
Photos submitted
X – The Herald Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Miscellaneous
Forresters
Hall
LANDECK
is available
to rent
for all occasions
Accommodates up
to 80
Full kitchen,
bathrooms,
heating & air.
BIG BACK YARD
Rent $90/day
Contact
Jim Miller
419-692-9867
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
A S HOME
IMPROVEMENT LLC
•WINDOWS-DOORS
•DECKS-CUSTOM TRIM
•FLOORING-SIDING
•TEXTURED CEILINGS
FREE ESTIMATES
Be sure to get my quote-
Quality Service-Best Price!
Andy Schwinnen
419-303-0844
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
950 Cakes
www.elegantcakesbynikki.com
419-203-4784
“Nikki’s Cakes”
Order your speci al
occasion cakes by
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Computers
GERDEMAN’S TV
& COMPUTERS
* New Location *
203 N. Main
(old Westrich building)
LG LED/Plasma TVs
New & Used Laptops & Towers
Computer Repair
Delphos 419-692-5831
dangerd@wcoil.com
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
To advertise call
419-695-0015
ext. 131
To be connected to
your ad rep.
KLIMA’S
CARPET
CLEANING
•Residential, auto,
commercial
•Free Estimates
•Certified Warranty Work
•Locally Owned, Operated
Call Bob Klima
1-888-872-1445
Automotive CARS
WANTED! PayMax Car
Buyers pays the MAX!
One call gets you TOP
DOLLAR offer on any
year, make or model
car. 1-888-PAYMAX-7
(1-888-729-6297).
Business Services
REACH 2 MILLION
NEWSPAPER READERS
with one ad placement.
ONLY $295.00. Ohio's
best community news-
papers. Call Kathy
at AdOhio Statewide
Classified Network, 614-
486-6677, or E-MAIL at:
kmccutcheon@adohio.net
or check out our website
at: www.adohio.net.
Business Services
REACH OVER 1
MILLION OHIO
ADULTS with one ad
placement. Only $975.00.
Ask your local newspa-
per about our 2X2 Display
Network or Call Kathy
at 614-486-6677/E-mail
kmccutcheon@adohio.net.
or check out our website:
www.adohio.net.
Help Wanted A
CLEAR DIRECTION
FOR YOUR CAREER -
AMERICA'S NAVY *
On-the-job training,
* Superior Benefits, *
Full Tuition for College,
* Medical and Dental
Benefits provided, * 30
days paid vacation yearly,
* Must be H.S. Grad or
GED 15 College Credits,
* Ages 17-34 Navy
Reserve, * Travel and
Adventure Opportunities.
AMERICA*S NAVY. A
GLOBAL FORCE FOR
GOOD. CALL 1-800-
282-1384 OR EMAIL us
at Jobs Ohio@navy.mil
Help Wanted A Few
Pro Drivers Needed Top
pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp. 877-
258-8782. www.melt-
ontruck.com/drive
Help Wanted Attention
Owner Operators!! Cargo
Van, Straight Truck &
Tractor positions available
immediately. Great mileage
rates + FSC Lease Purchase
Program. 877-878-9911.
www.TST911.com
Help Wanted Company
Drivers/Recent Trucking
School Graduates. Your
new career starts now!
*Up to $4,800 tuition
reimbursement (for a lim-
ited time only) *Great
Pay & Benefits *Excellent
Training Program
*Industry-leading safety
program New to trucking?
Call us for opportunities.
Call: 866-275-1748 www.
joinCRST.COM
Help Wanted Driver
- CDL-A. Drive With
Pride. Up to $3,000 Sign-
on Bonus for Qualified
Drivers! CDL & 6 mo.
OTR exp. Req'd USA
Truck 1-877-521-5775
www.usatruck.jobs
Help Wanted Drivers
- CDL-A. SOLO TEAMS
Need more miles? We've
got them! Top Pay for
experience! More Pay w/
Hazmat! 800-942-2104
Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.
totalms.com.
Hel p Want ed
Immediate Openings.
Private Security agents
needed for escorting cli-
ents to special events,
providing in home secu-
rity services. Specialized
Training provided. Call
1-615-228-1701 www.
psubodyguards.com
Hel p Want ed
International Cultural
Exchange Representative:
Earn supplemental income
placing and supervising
high school exchange stu-
dents. Volunteer host fam-
ilies also needed. Promote
world peace! www.afice.
org/reps
Help Wanted New
To Trucking? Your new
career starts now! *0
Tuition Cost *No Credit
Check *Great Pay &
Benefits. Short employ-
ment commitment required
Call: (866)854-6062 www.
joinCRST.com
Help Wanted Over
18? A can't miss limited
opportunity to travel with
a successful young busi-
ness group. Paid train-
ing. Transportation/lodg-
ing provided. Unlimited
income potential. Call
1-877-646-5050.
Help Wanted Owner
Operators: Up to a $2,000
Sign-On Bonus. Great
Pay & paid FSC. Paid OH
& IN Tolls. Fuel & Tire
Discounts. Hometime
throughout the week. 3rd
Party Lease Purchase
program available. Call
Comtrak at 800-846-0024,
or apply online at www.
comtrakinc
Hel p Want ed
Rewarding CDL-A Career
with Averitt! 37-42.5cpm
w/1+ Years' Experience
(Depends on Location).
4-12 Month Experience?
Paid Refresher Course
Available. 888-362-
8608 or AVERITTcareers.
com Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Help Wanted We are
looking for a few good
drivers that are interested
in a family oriented envi-
ronment. We are a refrig-
erated fleet traveling east
of the Mississippi. We
offer competitive pay and
a complete benefit pack-
age with attention to fam-
ily needs. Please call Jeff
Hall at HTI Hall Trucking
Express 419-423-9555
or stop in at 110 Bentley
Court, Findlay, Ohio.
Help Wanted Werner
Needs Driver Trainees
Now! Tired of living pay-
check to paycheck? Stop
the cycle! No CDL? No
Problem! 16-Day CDL
training w/Roadmaster!
1-866-467-0061.
Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT.
Job Guaranteed after
FREE 3 week CDL-A
Training. Live within 100
mile radius of Wauseon,
Ohio 1-800-621-4878.
Also, Hiring Drivers!
Help Wanted “You
got the drive, We Have the
Direction” OTR Drivers
APU Equipped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass. Pets/Passenger
Policy. Newer equipment.
100% No touch. 1-800-
528-7825.
Instruction Attend
College Online from
Home. Medical, Business,
Criminal Justice,
Hospitality. Job Placement
Assistance. Computer
Available. Financial Aid
if Qualified. SCHEV cer-
tified. Call 877-295-1667.
www.CenturaOnline.com.
Manufactured Homes
for Sale SINGLE WIDE
MOBILE HOMES - NEW
3 BEDROOM - $24,995.
NEW 2 BEDROOM -
$21,995. Vinyl siding and
Shingle roof. Includes
Delivery and Set-up in
Ohio. 1-800-686-1763
www.williamsburgsquare.
com.
Misc. Airlines Are
Hiring - Train for hands
on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Job Placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance. 877-676-
3836.
Misc. CABINS FOR
RENT IN CANADA.
Walleyes, perch, north-
erns, birds, wildlife, pris-
tine nature. Boats, motors,
gas included. Call Hugh
800-426-2550 for free
brochure. website www.
bestfishing.com
Misc. Sawmills - from
only $3997.00- Make &
Save Money with your own
bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.
com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.
300N
OHIO SCAN
NETWORK
CLASSIFIEDS

We are Growing! Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a start of the art
facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record, Desire to
enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing a plus.

Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including Medical, Rx,
Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards premiums. Company paid
Basic Life Ins, STD,& LTD. 401k Plan w/company match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we are unable
to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.

Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a state
of the art facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Laboratory Technician
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record,
Desire to enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing required.
Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including
Medical, Rx, Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards
premiums. Company paid Basic Life & Disability Ins. 401k Plan w/company
match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we
are unable to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.
MANUFACTURING OPPORTUNITIES
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 24 years of steady
employment. Now, our business is growing again, creating the following new
employment opportunities:
MACHINE REPAIR TECHNICIANS:
•Performs installation, troubleshooting, and repair of various machinery and
equipment.
Qualifications: At least 3 years of multi-trade experience/training with indus-
trial electrical, mechanical, hydraulics/pneumatics, robotics, and PLC’s; Work-
ing knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges, test equipment, and
blueprints/schematics
MACHINING TECHNICIAN
•Develops, implements & modifies CNC programs for high-volume production
and new product launches
•Monitors equipment/tooling, processes, and procedures and assists in imple-
menting actions to support safety, quality and productivity
•Trains others in set-up, operation, and maintenance of equipment
Qualifications: At least 3 years of related experience and formal training in pro-
gramming of CNC lathe and mills; exposure to SPC and blueprint reading also
required
FIRST-LINE PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
•Plans and directs work of up to 15 production associates
•Analyzes production processes and results and takes actions in support of safety,
quality, productivity, and cost containment
•Provides regular communication and coaching of associates through daily con-
tact, departmental meetings, and performance evaluations
Qualifications: Associate degree, or equivalent, and at least 3 years of pro-
duction supervision required. Prior experience with painting/coating processes
preferred.
In return for your expertise, AAP offers a competitive salary plus profit-sharing
and excellent fringe benefits--including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career opportunity with
a growing company, then we want to hear from you. Please send your qualifica-
tions with salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
INTERESTED
IN SPORTS?
Interested in sports, fall,
winter or spring
and doing some writing?
Would you like to make some extra
money covering the local sports
teams, no matter your age?
If so, contact Sports Editor Jim
Metcalfe at
(419) 695-0015, extension 133;
or by e-mail at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
005

Lost & Found
FOUND: BEAGLE
2-3 year old, neutered
male beagle found March
29th in the area of Zion
Church Rd. & Defiance
Trail. Call (419)234-2037.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
010

Announcements
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
Are you looking for a child
care provider in your
area? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
COME JOIN our great
team! Van Crest Health
Care & Rehabilitation
Center is now accepting
application for part time
positions for Nurses -All
Shifts available. Work will
include every 3rd week-
end. Benefits include
earned vacation time &
competitive wages. Expe-
rience recognized.
*Also - STNA CLASSES
will be offered here at
Vancrest*
Apply in person at VAN-
CREST of DELPHOS,
1425 E. Fifth St., Delphos,
OH -8am to 4pm, Monday
through Friday, E.O.E.
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Sales Reps.
Responsibilities: Greeting
customers, paperwork, ex-
plaining company benefits,
and procedures. Flexible
hours, days, nights, week-
end shifts available. Full/
p a r t - t i me . C a l l
(877)623-9160
FULL TIME Graphic Artist
is needed by local com-
pany. Website knowledge
and able to do page lay-
outs a plus. Benefits pack-
age includes: Health, Den-
tal, 401K & Vacation.
Send replies to Box 165
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
080

Help Wanted
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
PART-TIME ACCOUNT-
ANT 16-20hrs/week. Ac-
counts receivable/payable,
reconciliations, payroll,
b u d g e t i n g a n d
record-keeping. Needs to
be proficient in Quick -
books. Flexible hours, ex-
perience required. Send
resume to CCC 238 N.
Main, Delphos, OH, Attn:
Bruce.
RURAL CARRIER
Sub Position needed
at Delphos Post Office.
Salary $13.05/hr.
Call 419-695-2811
For more information.
Seeking a
Self-Motivated
Individual
• Full-time position
• Agricultural
background a plus
• GPS grid sampling
helpful
• Computer skills
helpful
• Shop skills needed
• Communication
skills
• CDL is a plus
Please send resume
to:
C&J
Agri-Service
13395 Converse
Roselm Rd.
Venedocia, OH 45894
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
330

M u s i c a l
Merchandise
TRUMPET LIKE-NEW.
Used only a few months.
Includes case and clean-
i ng suppl i es. Cal l
419-695-7099
501

Misc. for Sale
FOR SALE: Pair of Khaki
Campbell ducks. Asking
$30.00. PH. 419 453-2934
560

Lawn & Garden
WILL DO Lawn Mowing
and odd jobs. Specializing
in the elderly. Over 30
years experience. Call
419-303-0865
590

House For Rent
COUNTRY HOUSE. 1
Bedroom. Attached Ga-
rage. Stove/Refrigerator
included. $400/month +
$400 Deposi t . Cal l
419-905-5620
COUNTRY RENTAL
2 BR 1 1/2 BA. $450/mo.
Lawn mowing & snow re-
moval included. NO PETS
419-863-0088.
600

Apts. for Rent
2 BEDROOM ranch du-
plex, range/refrigerator.
539 Toomey St .
$400/Month plus utilities.
Nice clean Apartment.
419-286-2816
800

House For Sale
604 W. Seventh St., Del-
phos. Rent To Own and
Land Contract available
on this remodeled 3 bed-
room home. chbsinc.com
or 419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
32” SANYO Color TV,
works great, $50. Call
419-233-0450
Place Your
Ad Today
419 695-0015
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
To advertise call
419-695-0015
ext. 128
To be connected to
your ad rep.
X – The Herald Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Miscellaneous
Forresters
Hall
LANDECK
is available
to rent
for all occasions
Accommodates up
to 80
Full kitchen,
bathrooms,
heating & air.
BIG BACK YARD
Rent $90/day
Contact
Jim Miller
419-692-9867
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
A S HOME
IMPROVEMENT LLC
•WINDOWS-DOORS
•DECKS-CUSTOM TRIM
•FLOORING-SIDING
•TEXTURED CEILINGS
FREE ESTIMATES
Be sure to get my quote-
Quality Service-Best Price!
Andy Schwinnen
419-303-0844
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
950 Cakes
www.elegantcakesbynikki.com
419-203-4784
“Nikki’s Cakes”
Order your speci al
occasion cakes by
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Computers
GERDEMAN’S TV
& COMPUTERS
* New Location *
203 N. Main
(old Westrich building)
LG LED/Plasma TVs
New & Used Laptops & Towers
Computer Repair
Delphos 419-692-5831
dangerd@wcoil.com
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
To advertise call
419-695-0015
ext. 131
To be connected to
your ad rep.
KLIMA’S
CARPET
CLEANING
•Residential, auto,
commercial
•Free Estimates
•Certified Warranty Work
•Locally Owned, Operated
Call Bob Klima
1-888-872-1445
Automotive CARS
WANTED! PayMax Car
Buyers pays the MAX!
One call gets you TOP
DOLLAR offer on any
year, make or model
car. 1-888-PAYMAX-7
(1-888-729-6297).
Business Services
REACH 2 MILLION
NEWSPAPER READERS
with one ad placement.
ONLY $295.00. Ohio's
best community news-
papers. Call Kathy
at AdOhio Statewide
Classified Network, 614-
486-6677, or E-MAIL at:
kmccutcheon@adohio.net
or check out our website
at: www.adohio.net.
Business Services
REACH OVER 1
MILLION OHIO
ADULTS with one ad
placement. Only $975.00.
Ask your local newspa-
per about our 2X2 Display
Network or Call Kathy
at 614-486-6677/E-mail
kmccutcheon@adohio.net.
or check out our website:
www.adohio.net.
Help Wanted A
CLEAR DIRECTION
FOR YOUR CAREER -
AMERICA'S NAVY *
On-the-job training,
* Superior Benefits, *
Full Tuition for College,
* Medical and Dental
Benefits provided, * 30
days paid vacation yearly,
* Must be H.S. Grad or
GED 15 College Credits,
* Ages 17-34 Navy
Reserve, * Travel and
Adventure Opportunities.
AMERICA*S NAVY. A
GLOBAL FORCE FOR
GOOD. CALL 1-800-
282-1384 OR EMAIL us
at Jobs Ohio@navy.mil
Help Wanted A Few
Pro Drivers Needed Top
pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp. 877-
258-8782. www.melt-
ontruck.com/drive
Help Wanted Attention
Owner Operators!! Cargo
Van, Straight Truck &
Tractor positions available
immediately. Great mileage
rates + FSC Lease Purchase
Program. 877-878-9911.
www.TST911.com
Help Wanted Company
Drivers/Recent Trucking
School Graduates. Your
new career starts now!
*Up to $4,800 tuition
reimbursement (for a lim-
ited time only) *Great
Pay & Benefits *Excellent
Training Program
*Industry-leading safety
program New to trucking?
Call us for opportunities.
Call: 866-275-1748 www.
joinCRST.COM
Help Wanted Driver
- CDL-A. Drive With
Pride. Up to $3,000 Sign-
on Bonus for Qualified
Drivers! CDL & 6 mo.
OTR exp. Req'd USA
Truck 1-877-521-5775
www.usatruck.jobs
Help Wanted Drivers
- CDL-A. SOLO TEAMS
Need more miles? We've
got them! Top Pay for
experience! More Pay w/
Hazmat! 800-942-2104
Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.
totalms.com.
Hel p Want ed
Immediate Openings.
Private Security agents
needed for escorting cli-
ents to special events,
providing in home secu-
rity services. Specialized
Training provided. Call
1-615-228-1701 www.
psubodyguards.com
Hel p Want ed
International Cultural
Exchange Representative:
Earn supplemental income
placing and supervising
high school exchange stu-
dents. Volunteer host fam-
ilies also needed. Promote
world peace! www.afice.
org/reps
Help Wanted New
To Trucking? Your new
career starts now! *0
Tuition Cost *No Credit
Check *Great Pay &
Benefits. Short employ-
ment commitment required
Call: (866)854-6062 www.
joinCRST.com
Help Wanted Over
18? A can't miss limited
opportunity to travel with
a successful young busi-
ness group. Paid train-
ing. Transportation/lodg-
ing provided. Unlimited
income potential. Call
1-877-646-5050.
Help Wanted Owner
Operators: Up to a $2,000
Sign-On Bonus. Great
Pay & paid FSC. Paid OH
& IN Tolls. Fuel & Tire
Discounts. Hometime
throughout the week. 3rd
Party Lease Purchase
program available. Call
Comtrak at 800-846-0024,
or apply online at www.
comtrakinc
Hel p Want ed
Rewarding CDL-A Career
with Averitt! 37-42.5cpm
w/1+ Years' Experience
(Depends on Location).
4-12 Month Experience?
Paid Refresher Course
Available. 888-362-
8608 or AVERITTcareers.
com Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Help Wanted We are
looking for a few good
drivers that are interested
in a family oriented envi-
ronment. We are a refrig-
erated fleet traveling east
of the Mississippi. We
offer competitive pay and
a complete benefit pack-
age with attention to fam-
ily needs. Please call Jeff
Hall at HTI Hall Trucking
Express 419-423-9555
or stop in at 110 Bentley
Court, Findlay, Ohio.
Help Wanted Werner
Needs Driver Trainees
Now! Tired of living pay-
check to paycheck? Stop
the cycle! No CDL? No
Problem! 16-Day CDL
training w/Roadmaster!
1-866-467-0061.
Help Wanted WOOD
TRUCKING, Inc./MCT.
Job Guaranteed after
FREE 3 week CDL-A
Training. Live within 100
mile radius of Wauseon,
Ohio 1-800-621-4878.
Also, Hiring Drivers!
Help Wanted “You
got the drive, We Have the
Direction” OTR Drivers
APU Equipped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass. Pets/Passenger
Policy. Newer equipment.
100% No touch. 1-800-
528-7825.
Instruction Attend
College Online from
Home. Medical, Business,
Criminal Justice,
Hospitality. Job Placement
Assistance. Computer
Available. Financial Aid
if Qualified. SCHEV cer-
tified. Call 877-295-1667.
www.CenturaOnline.com.
Manufactured Homes
for Sale SINGLE WIDE
MOBILE HOMES - NEW
3 BEDROOM - $24,995.
NEW 2 BEDROOM -
$21,995. Vinyl siding and
Shingle roof. Includes
Delivery and Set-up in
Ohio. 1-800-686-1763
www.williamsburgsquare.
com.
Misc. Airlines Are
Hiring - Train for hands
on Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Job Placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance. 877-676-
3836.
Misc. CABINS FOR
RENT IN CANADA.
Walleyes, perch, north-
erns, birds, wildlife, pris-
tine nature. Boats, motors,
gas included. Call Hugh
800-426-2550 for free
brochure. website www.
bestfishing.com
Misc. Sawmills - from
only $3997.00- Make &
Save Money with your own
bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready
to ship. Free Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.
com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.
300N
OHIO SCAN
NETWORK
CLASSIFIEDS

We are Growing! Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a start of the art
facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record, Desire to
enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing a plus.

Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including Medical, Rx,
Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards premiums. Company paid
Basic Life Ins, STD,& LTD. 401k Plan w/company match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we are unable
to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.

Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a state
of the art facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Laboratory Technician
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record,
Desire to enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing required.
Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including
Medical, Rx, Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards
premiums. Company paid Basic Life & Disability Ins. 401k Plan w/company
match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we
are unable to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.
MANUFACTURING OPPORTUNITIES
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 24 years of steady
employment. Now, our business is growing again, creating the following new
employment opportunities:
MACHINE REPAIR TECHNICIANS:
•Performs installation, troubleshooting, and repair of various machinery and
equipment.
Qualifications: At least 3 years of multi-trade experience/training with indus-
trial electrical, mechanical, hydraulics/pneumatics, robotics, and PLC’s; Work-
ing knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges, test equipment, and
blueprints/schematics
MACHINING TECHNICIAN
•Develops, implements & modifies CNC programs for high-volume production
and new product launches
•Monitors equipment/tooling, processes, and procedures and assists in imple-
menting actions to support safety, quality and productivity
•Trains others in set-up, operation, and maintenance of equipment
Qualifications: At least 3 years of related experience and formal training in pro-
gramming of CNC lathe and mills; exposure to SPC and blueprint reading also
required
FIRST-LINE PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
•Plans and directs work of up to 15 production associates
•Analyzes production processes and results and takes actions in support of safety,
quality, productivity, and cost containment
•Provides regular communication and coaching of associates through daily con-
tact, departmental meetings, and performance evaluations
Qualifications: Associate degree, or equivalent, and at least 3 years of pro-
duction supervision required. Prior experience with painting/coating processes
preferred.
In return for your expertise, AAP offers a competitive salary plus profit-sharing
and excellent fringe benefits--including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career opportunity with
a growing company, then we want to hear from you. Please send your qualifica-
tions with salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
INTERESTED
IN SPORTS?
Interested in sports, fall,
winter or spring
and doing some writing?
Would you like to make some extra
money covering the local sports
teams, no matter your age?
If so, contact Sports Editor Jim
Metcalfe at
(419) 695-0015, extension 133;
or by e-mail at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
005

Lost & Found
FOUND: BEAGLE
2-3 year old, neutered
male beagle found March
29th in the area of Zion
Church Rd. & Defiance
Trail. Call (419)234-2037.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
010

Announcements
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
Are you looking for a child
care provider in your
area? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
COME JOIN our great
team! Van Crest Health
Care & Rehabilitation
Center is now accepting
application for part time
positions for Nurses -All
Shifts available. Work will
include every 3rd week-
end. Benefits include
earned vacation time &
competitive wages. Expe-
rience recognized.
*Also - STNA CLASSES
will be offered here at
Vancrest*
Apply in person at VAN-
CREST of DELPHOS,
1425 E. Fifth St., Delphos,
OH -8am to 4pm, Monday
through Friday, E.O.E.
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Sales Reps.
Responsibilities: Greeting
customers, paperwork, ex-
plaining company benefits,
and procedures. Flexible
hours, days, nights, week-
end shifts available. Full/
p a r t - t i me . C a l l
(877)623-9160
FULL TIME Graphic Artist
is needed by local com-
pany. Website knowledge
and able to do page lay-
outs a plus. Benefits pack-
age includes: Health, Den-
tal, 401K & Vacation.
Send replies to Box 165
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
080

Help Wanted
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
PART-TIME ACCOUNT-
ANT 16-20hrs/week. Ac-
counts receivable/payable,
reconciliations, payroll,
b u d g e t i n g a n d
record-keeping. Needs to
be proficient in Quick -
books. Flexible hours, ex-
perience required. Send
resume to CCC 238 N.
Main, Delphos, OH, Attn:
Bruce.
RURAL CARRIER
Sub Position needed
at Delphos Post Office.
Salary $13.05/hr.
Call 419-695-2811
For more information.
Seeking a
Self-Motivated
Individual
• Full-time position
• Agricultural
background a plus
• GPS grid sampling
helpful
• Computer skills
helpful
• Shop skills needed
• Communication
skills
• CDL is a plus
Please send resume
to:
C&J
Agri-Service
13395 Converse
Roselm Rd.
Venedocia, OH 45894
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
330

M u s i c a l
Merchandise
TRUMPET LIKE-NEW.
Used only a few months.
Includes case and clean-
i ng suppl i es. Cal l
419-695-7099
501

Misc. for Sale
FOR SALE: Pair of Khaki
Campbell ducks. Asking
$30.00. PH. 419 453-2934
560

Lawn & Garden
WILL DO Lawn Mowing
and odd jobs. Specializing
in the elderly. Over 30
years experience. Call
419-303-0865
590

House For Rent
COUNTRY HOUSE. 1
Bedroom. Attached Ga-
rage. Stove/Refrigerator
included. $400/month +
$400 Deposi t . Cal l
419-905-5620
COUNTRY RENTAL
2 BR 1 1/2 BA. $450/mo.
Lawn mowing & snow re-
moval included. NO PETS
419-863-0088.
600

Apts. for Rent
2 BEDROOM ranch du-
plex, range/refrigerator.
539 Toomey St .
$400/Month plus utilities.
Nice clean Apartment.
419-286-2816
800

House For Sale
604 W. Seventh St., Del-
phos. Rent To Own and
Land Contract available
on this remodeled 3 bed-
room home. chbsinc.com
or 419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
32” SANYO Color TV,
works great, $50. Call
419-233-0450
Place Your
Ad Today
419 695-0015
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
To advertise call
419-695-0015
ext. 128
To be connected to
your ad rep.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday Evening April 5, 2012
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Thursday, April, 5, 2012 The Herald – 11
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Hubby needs
help, not
judgment
Dear Annie: I’ve been
with my husband for 15 years.
He has many good qualities,
but he has always struggled
with shyness, low self-esteem
and awkwardness. When we
got together, he promised to
be the financial provider. He
started many careers, all of
which fizzled. Twice he’s had
year-long gaps where he was
unemployed. Right now, he
works a minimum-
wage job.
We are both in
our mid-30s and
recently had our
first baby. I am
resentful and angry
that I had to return
to work and put the
baby in day care. I
missed my baby’s
first steps and first
word. I feel robbed
of time with my
child.
My husband says the dif-
ficulty of being the provider
has been too hard to over-
come. He wants me to let it go
and move on. But, Annie, he
is perfectly capable of mak-
ing it happen. I never wanted
to be “Mrs. Career,” and now
I feel trapped. He always has
excuses for not choosing a
career. He has abandoned me
to carry this financial burden
on my own.
I have seen a few counsel-
ors, who say to keep encour-
aging and believing in him,
but my baby is nearly 2, and
my husband is not making
any effort. My father worked
two jobs, and he says there’s
something wrong with a man
who can’t provide for his
family. I tend to believe him.
Do I let the dream die and
accept reality or keep encour-
aging him? -- Sad Wife
Dear Sad: There are worse
things than being the main
breadwinner and putting your
child in day care. But the
resentment and anger are
problematic, and encourage-
ment only goes so far. Please
insist that your husband be
evaluated for adult ADD, and
also that he get some career
counseling as well as therapy
to work on his negative, self-
defeating attitude.
Dear Annie: My father is
dying of cancer. According
to the doctors, he doesn’t
have much longer to live.
Dad and his second wife
have been married for near-
ly 60 years. She has some
dementia. My two younger
half-brothers have told me
she will get very upset if my
daughter and I go see Dad.
My stepmother and I have
never been close, but she was
always very sweet to us in
the past. I don’t want to upset
her, but at the same time, I
want to see my dad, and my
daughter wants to visit her
granddad before he passes.
We were able to see him for a
short visit in the hospital, and
once we came over when his
wife was out of the house.
I know this is a stressful
time for the whole family.
I don’t think Dad has much
more time, and I will be upset
if he dies and I haven’t had a
chance to say goodbye. What
should I do? -- First Born
Dear First Born: Go
anyway. If you fear
it will derail your
stepmother, ask one
of her sons to please
take her out for din-
ner or shopping so
you can stop by
with your daughter
and say goodbye.
Give them two or
three possible time
options, and insist
that they select one
within the week.
Our thoughts are with you.
Dear Annie: Here’s one
more about naming a pet the
same as a person. Years ago,
I had a cat named Charlie.
He was not allowed on our
sofa. One day, a business
associate stopped by and was
sitting on the sofa talking to
my husband. I walked into
the living room and saw our
cat jumping onto the couch.
I yelled, “Charlie, get off of
that sofa,” and the visitor
suddenly jumped to his feet
in confusion. I had forgot-
ten that his name was also
Charlie. I quickly apolo-
gized. -- Still Chuckling in
Pennsylvania
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 737
3rd Street, Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254.
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, APRIL 6, 2012
Most of your greatest successes in
the year ahead are likely to come from
independent endeavors. Conversely,
in many of the arrangements that
you share with partners, there will
be ample potential for mishaps. Go it
alone.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- If you find yourself attempting to
negotiate with someone who won’t
budge an inch, it might be better to
forget about trying to work with him
or her. Look for another source.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- During this phase of the heavenly
cycle, it will be important to keep
pace with all of your responsibilities
and duties. If you fall too far behind,
you may never get back on track.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
This is one of those days when people
tend to put the social graces under a
microscope. Any form of misconduct
or overindulgence on your part will be
frowned upon and talked about for a
long time.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- If you find yourself being forced
to accept another person’s desires in
spite of your own needs, chances are
you’ll rebelliously do the opposite.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Usually
you would simply shrug off anyone
who is not in accord with your views
or desires, but if the way the offending
party goes about it ticks you off, you
won’t hesitate to bury him or her.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- When you’re put in charge of the
financial affairs or resources of others,
be as prudent as possible. Even then,
unless you first consult the sponsor,
you could get in trouble.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be
on guard and ready to deal with some
opposition from an unexpected source.
Regardless of how out of line it might
be, it’ll give you a big, fat headache.
Forewarned is forearmed.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Excuses won’t be any help
whatsoever where neglected promises
are concerned. When you are not
in total control of matters, they will
simply control you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Don’t allow yourself to get
caught in the middle of two warring
friends. You wouldn’t be able to help
at all, plus you’d get hammered from
both sides.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Take nothing for granted
in negotiating a competitive
development. If your opposition has
more going for him or her than you
surmise, you could get in way over
your head.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- There is a good chance that you’ll
be far more vulnerable than usual to
high-pressure sales pitches. If this is
the case, you could impulsively do
something that would prove costly.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- When it comes to issues about
which you feel strongly, be extra
careful about expressing them when
confronted by someone who holds
equally strong opposing viewpoints.
Keep mum.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Annie’s Mailbox
(Continued from page 1)
and the library had to close
during the winter months
since the Fuel Administration
would not allow the library
any coal during the war.
Things got worse the next
winter when the coal-fired
boiler exploded and broke
into four chunks. A pot-bel-
lied stove replaced it and
remained for several years.
Grace Boardman was
the librarian from 1912-
18 when she resigned and
Marie Rosselit took charge.
In 1919, she started the first
Story Hour for children.
Rosselit resigned in 1923
to marry Charile Meyer and
Hortense Metcalfe was hired
as librarian and continued
guiding the library for the
next 20 years through its
most difficult period.
By the mid-1920s, the
library’s financial situa-
tion became dire. The city
found it increasingly diffi-
cult, due to millage reduc-
tions and state cutback, to
contribute $1,200 annually
to support the library. The
Library Association contin-
ued with fundraising efforts
in order to buy books but
completely broke, the library
closed in the winter of 1926.
The school board came to
the rescue and re-opened the
library, converting it from
a municipal district library
to a school district public
library on March 4, 1927.
The Great Depression
made things tight again but
the library saw many repairs
during this time. In 1933,
Ohio established the 5-per-
cent Situs Intangibles Tax
on stocks, bonds and invest-
ments for the sole support
of public libraries, remov-
ing them from the control
of school boards and cities,
making them responsible to
their own boards of trustees.
In September 1935,
with the library now near-
ly 25 years old, the board
applied to the Public Works
Administration for manpow-
er to construct an annex to
the building. In addition, a
bond issue was placed on
the November ballot to raise
funds for the materials. The
issues did not receive the
needed 65-percent approval
so the matter of enlarging
the library was dropped and
the staff began discarding
older, less-used books as an
alternative.
Finances again trou-
bled the library in 1936
when Allen County offi-
cials refused to release the
library’s share of the taxes
since Van Wert County had
refused for three years to fun
the Delphos library opera-
tions. The board of trust-
ees filed suit against Van
Wert County for funds and
an agreement was made both
counties would fund the
Delphos Public Library.
Metcalfe resigned in 1943
to become Hortense Fettig.
For the next three years, staff
took over duties until Mary
Ireton of Cincinnati arrived
in 1946. During tenure, the
Summer Reading Club was
started and many civic club
began under the sponsorship
of the library including The
Green Thumb Garden Club
still in existence today.
Ruth Pierce of
McConnelsville took over
the position of librarian in
1950. The building was once
again in need of renovations
and Board President Elmer
Werner enlisted the aid of his
workmen from New Delphos
Manufacturing to install new
florescent lights and other
businesses helped with
painting, repairs and yard
upgrades. The Children’s
Room was opened in the
basement, taking over the
former Lyceum Lecture
Room and a person in charge
of children’s services was
hired for the first time.
The 1950s brought
growth to library usage and
the little building with four
tables and chairs had long
outgrown its size and useful-
ness. Books were shelves in
every available space with
many stored in the basement
and attic crawl space. By the
end of the decade, things had
reached crisis stage.
In 1958, with Margaret
Elen Cauble as librarian,
the board studies possibili-
ties including demolition of
the Carnegie Building and
construction of a whole new
building or adding on to the
existing building. The deci-
sion was made to add on and
firms submitted their plans
in late 1959 with Horace
W. Wachter & Assoc. of
Toledo selected for the
work. The plans called for
an 8,500-square-foot addi-
tion, tripling the space. The
proposals was submitted to
voters in November 1960
with the bond issue pass-
ing for a $150,000 addition,
funded by a 3-percent bond
sale. Construction began in
Spring 1961 and the new
building opened in October
1961 with all new furni-
ture and shelving. The new
building provided room for
70 people to study and read.
During the 1960s, the
book collection grew to
50,000 and a wide cross-
section of the public became
regular library patrons.
In 1975, Ann Newport
became the library director.
During her 2 1/2-year tenure,
she revitalized the collection
with new and updated books,
weeding out the lesser-used
and older material. With
civic donations, she added
records and cassettes to the
collection and the library
joined WORLDS, a coopera-
tive which contracted with
the Toledo-Lucas County
Public Library for reference
and InterLibrary Loan (ILL)
services.
The first man to be hired
as library director was Alan
Hall in 1977. In November
1978, voters passed a sup-
plemental tax for library sup-
port, replacing the Intagibles
Tax needs at the library had
outgrown. The new tax pro-
vided not only operational
funding but monies for
repairs.
In 1982, Hall undertook
the PUP project, federally
funded and involving a slide/
picture program of historical
points of interest in Delphos.
Large-print books, a collec-
tion of learning disabilities
materials and video cassettes
were added to the list of
materials available at the
library.
Hall left in May 1983, and
in June, a renewal levy for
the library passed and Jim
Dennis was hired as direc-
tor in August 1983. During
his two-year stay, the col-
lections continued to grow
with video cassettes being a
top-priority item. The library
ended 1985 with a circula-
tion of 101,000, an increase
of 20,000 items from 1984.
In March 1986, the
board of trustees promoted
Nancy Mericle to director.
Additional resource now
included books, assorted
phone directories, cassettes,
magazines, records, micro-
film, daily newspapers,
computers, CDs (music and
books), video cassettes and
DVDs. Books, however,
are still the backbone of the
library.
In 1997, the library dis-
carded its card catalog and
the system became comput-
erized.
In the fall of 1999, work
began on the remodeling of
the basement. All the mag-
azines stored there had to
moved to the lower base-
ment under the original
building so the old wooden
floors could be removed and
replaced with concrete and
linoleum. An outside exit
was added as well as a wheel
chair lift in the stairwell.
The room was painted and
decorated to appeal to chil-
dren. Its main use was for
Storytime, first used in the
summer of 2001.
Library cards changed to
a credit-card style.
The library’s web site
went online in September
2000, allowing patrons to
access the card catalog,
request InterLibrary Loan
books, check their personal
record information, review
items they have out and
renew them if necessary.
In 2005, new tile flooring
was installed in the 1961
building.
Work began on the expan-
sion to the 1961 building in
February 2005, increasing the
children’s area, bringing the
Genealogy area down from
the mezzanine to the first
floor, expanding the existing
work area for employees and
adding two more public rest-
rooms, another reading area
and more Internet-access
computers for patrons.
G a r m a n n - M i l l e r
Ar chi t ect s, M&W
Construction, Smith-Baughn
Plumbing and Hesseling
Electric worked on the new
addition. The open house
was held in April 2006 dur-
ing National Library Week.
In 2007, the library joined
the OHIONET in order to
acquire inter-library loan
materials that cannot be
obtained from other sources
and in 2008, Cotterman &
Co. was hired to replace the
roof on the main part of
the library. New steps were
also installed on the Second
Street entrance.
New digital microfilm
viewer-scanners were pur-
chased with a donation from
the Alba Landwehr estate
and Mike Bendele was hired
to make an art piece as a
memorial to Alba and her
bother, Reno Bianchi.
In 2008, the Metzner-
Minzing Building at First
and Jefferson streets came
on the market. The library
purchased the building for
$60,000 and it is now used
for library activities and by
civic organizations.
In 2009, Garmann-Miller
was hired to draw up renova-
tion plans for the building.
Later that year, budget cuts
caused the project to be put
on hold. In 2010, the board
approved proceeding with
the plans and hired locals
for the renovations. By June
2011, the building was ready
for use. Several Summer
Reading Programs were held
there that year and the board
of trustees meet there.
In 2012, the library joined
the SEO Consortium for
inter-library loans and access
to e-books. Full access to
SEO materials is expected at
the end of the year.
In 2011, the library
received an Arnold C.
Dienstberger Foundation
Grant and is the board
accepted a quote from ADC
Co. of Fort Wayne for auto-
matic handicapped acces-
sible door fixtures for the
Jefferson Street doors of the
library.
12 – The Herald Thursday, April 5, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
A heavy-duty coil spring from a John Deere cultivator
was used to create the first breakaway rim for basketball
backboards, ensuring backboards and players would sur-
vive slam dunks reasonably intact.
The P in the NATO Phonetic Alphabet stands for
papa.
Today’s questions:
What do entomophagists do?
What is the name of the company that gave us Frisbee,
the Hula Hoop, the Superball and the Boogie Board?
Answers in Friday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Gharnao: a raft made with inverted ceramics pots
Paillasse: a straw mattress
Pain Pill Nation: Sales soar, fuel addiction
By CHRIS HAWLEY
Associated Press
NEW YORK — Sales of the nation’s two
most popular prescription painkillers have
exploded in new parts of the country, an
Associated Press analysis shows, worrying
experts who say the push to relieve patients’
suffering is spawning an addiction epidemic.
From New York’s Staten Island to Santa
Fe, N.M., Drug Enforcement Administration
figures show dramatic rises between 2000
and 2010 in the distribution of oxycodone,
the key ingredient in OxyContin, Percocet
and Percodan. Some places saw sales increase
sixteenfold.
Meanwhile, the distribution of hydro-
codone, the key ingredient in Vicodin, Norco
and Lortab, is rising in Appalachia, the original
epicenter of the painkiller epidemic, as well as
in the Midwest.
The increases have coincided with a wave
of overdose deaths, pharmacy robberies and
other problems in New Mexico, Nevada, Utah,
Florida and other states. Opioid pain relievers,
the category that includes oxycodone and hydro-
codone, caused 14,800 overdose deaths in 2008
alone, and the death toll is rising, the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention says.
Nationwide, pharmacies received and ulti-
mately dispensed the equivalent of 69 tons of
pure oxycodone and 42 tons of pure hydro-
codone in 2010, the last year for which sta-
tistics are available. That’s enough to give 40
5-mg Percocets and 24 5-mg Vicodins to every
person in the United States. The DEA data
records shipments from distributors to pharma-
cies, hospitals, practitioners and teaching insti-
tutions. The drugs are eventually dispensed
and sold to patients, but the DEA does not keep
track of how much individual patients receive.
The increase is partly due to the aging U.S.
population with pain issues and a greater will-
ingness by doctors to treat pain, said Gregory
Bunt, medical director at New York’s Daytop
Village chain of drug treatment clinics.
Sales are also being driven by addiction, as
users become physically dependent on pain-
killers and begin “doctor shopping” to keep the
prescriptions coming, he said.
“Prescription medications can provide enor-
mous health and quality-of-life benefits to
patients,” Gil Kerlikowske, the U.S. drug czar,
told Congress in March. “However, we all now
recognize that these drugs can be just as dan-
gerous and deadly as illicit substances when
misused or abused.”
Opioids like hydrocodone and oxycodone
can release intense feelings of well-being.
Some abusers swallow the pills; others crush
them, then smoke, snort or inject the powder.
Unlike most street drugs, the problem has
its roots in two disparate parts of the coun-
try — Appalachia and affluent suburbs, said
Pete Jackson, president of Advocates for the
Reform of Prescription Opioids.
“Now it’s spreading from those two poles,”
Jackson said.
The AP analysis used drug data collected
quarterly by the DEA’s Automation of Reports
and Consolidated Orders System. The DEA
tracks shipments sent from distributors to phar-
macies, hospitals, practitioners and teaching
institutions and then compiles the data using
three-digit ZIP codes. Every ZIP code starting
with 100-, for example, is lumped together into
one figure.
The AP combined this data with census fig-
ures to determine effective sales per capita.
A few ZIP codes that include military
bases or Veterans Affairs hospitals have seen
large increases in painkiller use because of
soldier patients injured in the Middle East,
law enforcement officials say. In addition,
small areas around St. Louis, Indianapolis, Las
Vegas and Newark, N.J., have seen their totals
affected because mail-order pharmacies have
shipping centers there, said Carmen Catizone,
executive director of the National Association
of Boards of Pharmacy.
Many of the sales trends stretch across big-
ger areas.
In 2000, oxycodone sales were centered in
coal-mining areas of West Virginia and east-
ern Kentucky — places with high concentra-
tions of people with back problems and other
chronic pain.
But by 2010, the strongest oxycodone
sales had overtaken most of Tennessee and
Kentucky, stretching as far north as Columbus,
Ohio and as far south as Macon, Ga.
Per-capita oxycodone sales increased five-
or six-fold in most of Tennessee during the
decade.
“We’ve got a problem. We’ve got to get
a handle on it,” said Tommy Farmer, a coun-
terdrug official with the Tennessee Bureau of
Investigation.
Many buyers began crossing into Tennessee
to fill prescriptions after border states began
strengthening computer systems meant to
monitor drug sales, Farmer said.
In 2006, only 20 states had prescription
drug monitoring programs aimed at tracking
patients. Now 40 do, but many aren’t linked
together, so abusers can simply go to another
state when they’re flagged in one state’s sys-
tem. There is no federal monitoring of pre-
scription drugs at the patient level.
In Florida, the AP analysis underscores
the difficulty of the state’s decade-long battle
against “pill mills,” unscrupulous doctors who
churn out dozens of prescriptions a day.
In 2000, Florida’s oxycodone sales were
centered around West Palm Beach. By 2010,
oxycodone was flowing to nearly every part
of the state.
While still not as high as in Appalachia or
Florida, oxycodone sales also increased dra-
matically in New York City and its suburbs.
The borough of Staten Island saw sales leap
1,200 percent.
Library
Nancy Spencer photos
The Delphos Public Library today.
The First Edition was purchased in 2008 and is used for children’s programs, civic
group meetings and board of trustee meetings.
The gazebo and landmark noting Leslie Peltier’s life
work.
Visit the library and note its historical display in the
hallway at the Jefferson Street entrance.

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