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Al-Bayqooniyyah
by Taa Haa ibn Muhammad ibn Futooh al-Bayqoonee
Translated by Aboo Shaybah

A poem outlining various terms used in the study and classification of hadeeth and narrations.

In the name of Allaah, the Most Merciful, the Bestower of Mercy

[1] I begin with praise, sending salaah upon


Muhammad, the best Prophet ever sent.
[2] These are several categories of hadeeth,
each of them listed along with its definition.
[3] The first of them is saheeh, and it has a connected
chain, and contains no shuthooth or illah.
[4] Someone with adl and dabt narrates it from another like him
dependable in his dabt and ability to narrate.
[5] The hasan has routes which are known, but
its narrators do not have the same repute as those of the saheeh.
[6] Everything that does not reach the level of hasan
is daeef, and it has many subcategories.
[7] Whatever is ascribed to the Prophet is marfoo,
and whatever is ascribed to a Taabiee is maqtoo.
[8] The musnad has a connected chain from
its narrator until the Chosen One, unbroken.
[9] Whatever is connected by each narrator hearing from the next
in its chain until the Chosen One is muttasil.
[10] Musalsal is anything that has come having a specific circumstance
like saying, Indeed, by Allaah, this boy narrated to me;
[11] similarly, He narrated it to me standing,
or after narrating to me, he smiled.
[12] Azeez is narrated by two or three.
Mash-hoor is narrated by more than three.
[13] Muanan is like: an Saeed, an Karam.
Mubham has narrator in it left unnamed.
[14] Whatever has fewer narrators is aalee,
and its opposite is that which is naazil.
[15] Anything you ascribe to a Companion, whether
statement or action, is known as mawqoof.
[16] Mursal has the Companion omitted from it.
And call ghareeb anything narrated by only a single narrator.
[17] Whatever, at any point, has a disconnected
chain is munqati with respect to its continuity.
[18] The mudal has two narrators omitted.
And whatever comes as mudallas is of two types:
[19] The first is omitting a shaykh and
narrating from whoever is prior to him using the term an or an.
[20] The second does not omit him, but rather describes
him in a manner which he is not usually identified.
[21] Whenever a thiqah contradicts a larger group
it is shathth. And maqloob is of the following two types:
[22] Substituting one narrator for another is a type,
and substituting an isnaad for another matn is a type.

[23] The fard is when you tie a thiqah


or a certain group or place to a narration.
[24] Whatever has an obscure illah or inconspicuous flaw
is known to them as muallal.
[25] When there is discrepancy in the isnaad or matn
it is mudtarib according to the scholars of this field.
[26] The mudraj portions of a hadeeth are what have come
from the words of narrators, but left attached.
[27] Each contemporary narrating from his brother
is mudabbaj, so be certain and take pride in knowing this.
[28] Agreement in pronunciation and writing is muttafiq,
and its opposite in what we mentioned is muftariq.
[29] Mutalif is agreement in writing only,
and its opposite is mukhtalif, so be cautious of error.
[30] Munkar is the fard which has a narrator, though
his validation cannot support the single route of narration.
[31] Matrook is narrated by only one,
and they agreed about his weakness, so it is like a rejection.
[32] The formulated, fabricated lie
upon the Prophet that is mawdoo.
[33] Thus, it has come like a hidden gem;
I have named it Manthoomah al-Bayqoonee.
[34] In four more than thirty it was composed;
its categories completed, and well concluded.

  
        
 

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