Scenario2.

Introducing a blogging assignment into the classroom
Learning objective:
The goal of this scenario is to set the stage for planning how you will introduce a blogging assignment to your students.

The Scenario:
I am creating a blog-based learning activity with some guidance notes. It’s the first time I’ve used blogs in the classroom and I’m clear how much information students will need to do the assignment. Can’t I just ask them to blog and assess them on tier writing? Is thee more to it than this? Are there implications for assessment?

Key questions
• • What information will students be given prior to the commencement of the assignment? Assessment rubrics can be used to indicate to students the desired performance characteristics and how different levels of achievement may be demonstrated. How will this be communicated to students? How will particular aspects of the social web be used to best advantage for explaining and encouraging what students are expected to do in this assignment? When, where and how will teaching staff provide students with access and support to use the social web and guidance on using it for academic purposes? What instructions about the assignment, and examples of good practice, will teaching staff provide to students, and when, where and how will students be able to review these and to clarify things they don’t understand? What formative feedback will students receive from teaching staff on their work in progress and when and how, and how else will teaching staff motivate students to do their best? If students’ classmates or other peers or other parties such as external experts are expected to play a role (non-assessable) in introducing or supporting the assignment, when and how will they be advised and assisted to do this? What support will be provided to students?

• • •

• •

This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource for University College Falmouth through the Blogging For Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth's Learning and Teaching Enhancement Programme. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge the B4EE project.

What associated benefits (or risks) are anticipated from using blogs for this assignment, for example in terms of industry relevance, class management, student engagement, staff productivity, others? What advance preparation of the learning tools, spaces and resources for the assignment will be needed so that students can focus on the intended learning and so that other benefits can be realised or risks minimised? What criteria will be used to guide and assess students’ learning processes and learning outcomes in this assignment and how will they align with intended learning outcomes? When and how will other teaching or support staff need to be involved in the planning of the assignment before it is offered to students?

• •

NOTES:

This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource for University College Falmouth through the Blogging For Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth's Learning and Teaching Enhancement Programme. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge the B4EE project.

This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource for University College Falmouth through the Blogging For Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth's Learning and Teaching Enhancement Programme. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge the B4EE project.

Guidance Information
Compiled from: Educause Gray, K., Waycott, J., Clerehan, R., Hamilton, M., Richardson, M., Sheard, J., & Thompson, C. (2010, January). Web 2.0 authoring tools in higher education learning and teaching: New directions for assessment and academic integrity: A framework for field-testing and refining good practice guidelines in pilot projects at Australian universities during Semester One 2010. Higher Education Academy JISC When implementing student blogging assignments, lecturers should prepare students to do the best they can in this assignment by: • • • • Explaining the timing, weighting and criteria Showing and discussing exemplary student work Explaining academic attribution and citation practices that are expected Providing opportunities to practice and show learning based on formative assessment, before submitting work for summative assessment

Examples of opportunities and challenges: • Providing models of exemplary student work can make a difference in a web 2.0 environment when students can see each other’s work. If “the first one they see is not very good, they tend to think that’s the standard to which they’re working.” Blogging involves a significant learning curve for students, so students should be introduced to the technologies at the beginning of the subject; especially if they are planning to include multimedia content as part of their blog. Because of the novelty of the technology used and the peer review component of the learning activity, students should have the opportunity to do a trial run of the task: “students have previously done a practice exercise on a virtual learning environment or on paper where they wrote a biography of a classmate and then peer reviewed that.”

Studies show that students should be provided with full details regarding blogging assignments, including specific assignment criteria. Details should include: Module Information File (MIF) which
This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource for University College Falmouth through the Blogging For Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth's Learning and Teaching Enhancement Programme. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge the B4EE project.

includes learning aims and outcomes, an assessment rubric, full assignment notes and guidelines (including what, exactly, they have to do and when they need to do it by) and information about transferable skills. This information places the assignment into a strong contextual framework and wrapper and better enables students to understand why the assignment has been given, what’s expected of them, how their performance will be measured and how it will benefit them.

This resource was created by University College Falmouth and released as an open educational resource for University College Falmouth through the Blogging For Educational Environments (B4EE) project. The B4EE project is funded by University College Falmouth's Learning and Teaching Enhancement Programme. © 2012 University College Falmouth

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. When repurposing this resource please acknowledge the B4EE project.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.