www.smdailyjournal.

com
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 201
GOOD OPPORTUNITY
LOCAL PAGE 5
OPENING DAY
LOSS FOR S.F.
SPORTS PAGE 11
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WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19
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By Melanie Lindow
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Jane Zumot’s goal since graduating
from high school was transferring to San
Francisco State University.
The sophomore at Skyline College in
San Bruno plans to transfer in one year
when an enrollment cap will be active in
the California State University system,
and she realizes that this may change her
plans.
“If I can’t get into SFSU because of
these limits on enrollment, I don’t have
many backup colleges to apply to,” said
Zumot.
Charlene De Luna, a sophomore at
Skyline College, is in a similar situation
— but has come up with a backup plan.
She had plans to transfer to Sacramento
State University but is now headed to
Notre Dame de Namur University, a pri-
vate university in Belmont.
“I’d rather invest my time and money in
a private university,” De Luna said. “The
CSU/UC system is just chaotic.”
Zumot and De Luna, along with many
aspiring CSU students, are being forced
into making new educational choices in
the coming school year as the struggling
CSU system plans to completely close
spring 2013 admissions on many campus-
es, dissolving the chances of many future
applicants.
The newest plan by university adminis-
trators will affect 15 of 23 campuses and
limit enrollment to several hundred stu-
Students hoping for CSU transfer now seek plan B
By Sally Schilling
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
As George Chrisman of Burlingame
was driving along Crystal Springs
Reservoir one Saturday morning, he
decided to stop and admire the lake.
He did not expect to discover a bald
eagle perched atop a tree on the other
side of the reservoir.
“For the last several years, there has
been a pair of bald eagles flying through
Crystal Springs over the winter,” said
Chrisman, a member of the Sequoia
Audubon Society. “But never this late in
the year.”
By the time he set up a spotting scope,
there were two bald eagles on the tree.
And the birds were curiously active.
“I knew I had something because one
was carrying a huge branch around,”
said Chrisman.
What he had discovered on the morn-
ing of March 10 was something that has
not been seen in San Mateo County for
nearly a century; a pair of bald eagles
building a nest.
The last known nest in San Mateo
County was near La Honda in 1915, said
Joseph Morlan, one of the premier bird-
ers in California and Ornithology
Eagle-spotting
Volunteers enamored by bald eagles at Crystal Springs Reservoir
Enrollment cuts at state university system causing upheaval
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Cries while at the park sent San Carlos
moms Stacy Cooper Dent and Tarah
Smith Evans, who each have a set of
twins, diving into diaper bags full of ran-
dom items making it impossible to find
the one thing each needed at that exact
moment.
The exchange at Burton Park in 2009
was inspirational for the ladies. Both are
professionals accustomed to things
being organized. Now they each had a
set of twins. While they were willing to
accept parenting wasn’t something you
could completely plan, they both wanted
to be better prepared for the things that
were likely to happen. A baby would, no
doubt, need a diaper change, snack or
toys during any outing.
Everyone says it’s OK to be disorgan-
ized, just to accept it, but Evans
explained she couldn’t. It added to anxi-
ety.
SugarSNAP was born in hopes of
offering parents organizational solutions
with adult design aesthetics that work on
the go. The company’s first product, the
Files, include a series of five light-
weight, smaller bags with identification
Making organization a snap, sugar
San Carlos moms launching new products —with style
Fire hires
to relieve
overtime
New firefighter plan aims
to save San Carlos money
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Carlos may hire three new firefighter/paramedics to
round out its still-new department rather than continue paying
existing workers overtime under a proposal coming to the City
Council Monday night.
Expanding the roster would save $130,477 in overtime com-
pared to the cost of a single full-time firefighter/paramedic at
$127,600, according to the request by Fire Chief Jim Skinner
and City Manager Jeff Maltbie.
The three new positions will cover a piece of both planned
and unplanned absences and vacancies, reducing the need of
overtime which is paid out at $47.55 per hour for relief fire-
fighters.
KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
Charlene De Luna works on a anthropology paper at her home
in San Bruno.
Stacy Cooper Dent, left, and Tarah Smith Evans.
KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL (RIGHT)
Christine Weibel looks at bald eagles along Crystal Springs Reservoir before
continuing her sketch of the scene. See FIRE, Page 18
See SNAP, Page 18
See EAGLES, Page 18
See CSU, Page 18
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Movie director
Francis Ford
Coppola is 73.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1922
The Teapot Dome scandal had its
beginnings as Interior Secretary Albert
B. Fall signed a secret deal to lease U.S.
Navy petroleum reserves to his friends,
oilmen Harry F. Sinclair and Edward L.
Doheny.
“Money is in some respects life’s fire: it is a
very excellent servant, but a terrible master.”
— P.T. Barnum, showman (born 1810, died this date in 1891)
California Gov.
Jerry Brown is 74.
Actor Russell
Crowe is 48.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man depicting Jesus holds a cross as he walks towards the Church of the Holy Sepulchre on Good Friday in Jerusalem’s
Old City , Jerusalem.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
North winds around 5 mph...Becoming
northwest in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
mid 40s. West winds around 5
mph...Becoming south after midnight.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. A chance of rain.
Highs around 60. South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Chance of rain 40 percent.
Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows in the
upper 40s. South winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 40 per-
cent.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Highs in the lower
60s.
Monday night: Partly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows in the
upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 01 Gold
Rush in first place; No.07 Eureka in second place;
and No. 04 Big Ben in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:43.51.
(Answers Monday)
ALIAS RURAL REBUKE UPROOT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: A bad way for a lawyer to learn the criminal
justice system — TRIAL AND ERROR
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
BAULM
SUTEQ
YWYAAN
NRUIJO
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
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o
n

F
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k

h
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t
p
:
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f
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Answer:
3 9 5
2 19 20 24 33 39
Mega number
April 6 Mega Millions
3 5 8 23 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 7 5 6
Daily Four
5 0 9
Daily three evening
In 1788, an expedition led by Gen. Rufus Putnam established
a settlement at present-day Marietta, Ohio.
In 1798, the Mississippi Territory was created by an act of
Congress, with Natchez as the capital.
In 1862, Union forces led by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated
the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee.
In 1927, the image and voice of Commerce Secretary Herbert
Hoover were transmitted live from Washington to New York in
the first successful long-distance demonstration of television.
In 1939, Italy invaded Albania, which was annexed less than a
week later.
In 1948, the World Health Organization was founded in
Geneva.
In 1953, the U.N. General Assembly elected Dag
Hammarskjold of Sweden to be secretary-general.
In 1962, nearly 1,200 Cuban exiles tried by Cuba for their
roles in the failed Bay of Pigs invasion were convicted of trea-
son.
In 1969, the Supreme Court, in Stanley v. Georgia, unani-
mously struck down laws prohibiting private possession of
obscene material.
In 1972, mobster Joe Gallo was shot to death by rival gangsters
during his 43rd birthday celebration at a New York City restau-
rant.
In 1978, President Jimmy Carter announced he was deferring
development of the neutron bomb, a high-radiation weapon.
In 1983, space shuttle astronauts Story Musgrave and Don
Peterson took the first U.S. space walk in almost a decade as
they worked in the open cargo bay of Challenger for nearly
four hours.
Actor R.G. Armstrong is 95. Sitar player Ravi Shankar is 92.
Actor James Garner is 84. Country singer Cal Smith is 80. Actor
Wayne Rogers is 79. Media commentator Hodding Carter III is 77.
Country singer Bobby Bare is 77. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Charlie Thomas (The Drifters) is 75. TV personality David Frost is
73. Singer Patricia Bennett (The Chiffons) is 65. Singer John Oates
is 63. Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels is 63. Singer Janis Ian is 61.
Country musician John Dittrich is 61. Actor Jackie Chan is 58.
College and Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Tony Dorsett is 58.
Christian/jazz singer Mark Kibble (Take 6) is 48. Actor Bill
Bellamy is 47. Rock musician Dave “Yorkie” Palmer (Space) is 47.
Former football player-turned-analyst Tiki Barber is 37.
Douglas Engelbart (born 1925) holds the
patent for an “X-Y position indicator for a
display system,” commonly known as the
computer mouse. Engelbart’s 1964 inven-
tion was nicknamed the mouse because
the tail came out the end.
***
It is a myth that elephants are afraid of
mice.
***
Mice, squirrels and porcupines are the
three major types of rodents.
***
Rodents have incisor teeth that are contin-
ually growing. Gnawing is necessary to
prevent the teeth from overgrowing. The
word rodent is derived from the latin word
‘rodere’ which means to gnaw.
***
A squirrel’s brain is the size of a walnut.
***
The arctic ground squirrel has the lowest
body temperature ever recorded in a mam-
mal. In winter hibernation its temperature
drops to 26.4 degrees Fahrenheit, below
freezing.
***
Prairie dogs are members of the squirrel
family. They are called dogs because of
their characteristic barking noise.
***
The word hamster comes from the
German word ‘hamstern’ which means to
hoard.
***
Pet hamsters should live alone in their
cage. Hamsters do not like to live together.
They live in separate burrows in the wild.
***
The average life span of a pet rat is
between two to five years. A rat named
Rodney holds the record for the longest
living rat. He lived for seven years and
four months.
***
A rat’s tail is very important, to the rat that
is. Using their tails for balance, rats can
jump long distances and land on narrow
ledges. Rats can balance on ropes and
small branches, wrapping their tails under-
neath to help them hold on.
***
Can you name the members of the Rat
Pack? Do you know the movie they all
starred in together? The year? See answer
at end.
***
DC Comics published “The Adventures of
Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis” comic
books from July 1952 through October
1957.
***
Jerry Lewis (born 1926) hosted the 1956
Academy Awards.
***
In 1966, Jerry Lewis hosted his first Labor
Day telethon to raise funds in support of
the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The
celebrity-studded telethon has continued
annually. The 2003 telethon raised a
record $60.5 million.
***
Frank Sinatra began working with nation-
ally known bandleader Tommy Dorsey
(1905-1956) in 1939. Sinatra was 24 years
old and getting paid a large sum: $125 per
week.
***
The lights were dimmed on the Strip in
Las Vegas when Frank Sinatra died in
1998 at age 82.
***
The Las Vegas Strip is three miles long.
***
Five resorts in Las Vegas were imploded
during the 1990s: The Dunes, in 1993;
Landmark, in 1995; Sands, in 1996;
Hacienda, in 1996; and Aladdin, in 1998.
A total of 4,645 rooms were demolished.
***
In addition to singing, Wayne Newton
(born 1942) plays 13 instruments, many of
which are worked into his Las Vegas show.
***
In 1994, Wayne Newton performed his
25,000th Las Vegas show. Newton per-
forms 40 weeks per year, six shows per
week at the Stardust Resort and Casino in
Las Vegas.
***
A roulette wheel has a total of 38 stops.
There are stops numbered 1 to 36 repre-
senting the numbers on the roulette table
and stops 0 and 00.
***
Answer: Frank Sinatra (1915-1998),
Dean Martin (1917-1995), Sammy Davis
Jr. (1925-1990), Peter Lawford (1923-
1984) and Joey Bishop (1918-2007) made
up the Rat Pack. They all starred together
in the 1960 movie “Ocean’s 11” about a
Las Vegas casino heist. At the time, Frank
Sinatra owned 9 percent of the Sands
Hotel Casino. He was happy with the pub-
licity the casino got because of the movie.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
7 21 26 28 30 10
Mega number
April 4 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
FOSTER CITY
Theft. Parts were stolen off of someone’s
bicycle on Foster City Boulevard before 10:03
p.m. Monday, April 2.
Theft. Two rear wheels were taken from a car
parked in a carport area on Marlin Avenue
before 6:17 a.m. Friday, March 30.
Assault. A student was arrested for threaten-
ing his teacher at Bowditch Middle School
before 1:40 p.m. Friday, March 30.
Theft. A seat and pump valued at about $160
were taken from a bicycle on Beach Park
Boulevard 6:47 p.m. Friday, March 30.
Burglary. A backpack containing a laptop,
iPad and iPod Touch was stolen on Vintage
Park Drive before 8:44 p.m. Wednesday,
March 28.
SAN CARLOS
Theft. A briefcase was stolen from a vehicle
on Heritage Court before 7:20 a.m. Monday,
April 2.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen at Club
Drive and San Carlos Avenue before 3:11 p.m.
Tuesday, March 20.
Theft. A theft was reported at the 900 block of
Alameda de las Pulgas before 3:26 p.m.
Friday, March 16.
Identity theft. Identity theft was reported on
the 1300 block of Geneva Avenue before 3:21
p.m. Friday, March 16.
Burglary. A burglary occurred on the 300
block of El Camino Real before 10:15 p.m.
Tuesday, March 13.
Police reports
Crazy British drivers
A vehicle driving on the wrong side of the
road collided with another vehicle on
Redwood Shores Parkway in Redwood
City before 9:30 a.m. Friday, March 30.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The former Mills-Peninsula Health Services
mailroom employee accused of bringing
home 1,500 patient records and separately
stealing from her elderly father delayed by a
month her upcoming jury trial on charges of
embezzlement, elder abuse and forgery.
Katherine Asimos, 49, was supposed to
stand trial in May but, at a pretrial conference
Friday, successfully asked that it be moved to
June 11. She also returns to court May 29 for
a pretrial conference.
Asimos is charged with five counts of for-
gery and one count of embezzlement. She is
also charged with elder fiscal abuse for
allegedly writing checks on her father’s
account in a different case.
Asimos reportedly took the pieces of mail
between November 2009 and September 2010
while working for the Burlingame-based hospi-
tal. The majority were medical reports or X-rays
and registration information destined for deliv-
ery to physician offices. Most had patient names
and diagnostic test results but 15 also included
addresses and Social Security numbers.
Hospital officials said they learned of the
breach June 17, 2011 when Asimos’ brother
discovered the documents while helping her
move and returned them to the hospital.
Asimos was terminated and the District
Attorney’s Office contacted.
Asimos reportedly told authorities she was
overwhelmed with sorting the documents at
work and brought them home with plans to
shred them later.
All of the patients whose information was
taken were notified and the hospital offered
free credit monitoring and identity protection.
Asimos is free from custody on her own
recognizance.
Former hospital worker delays mail theft trials
By Candice Choi,
Terry Collins and Garance Burke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The founder of the
California Christian university where a gun-
man shot and killed seven people this week
said Friday that the former nursing student
returned to campus because of a tuition dis-
pute, but previously had not shown any signs
of violence.
Jongjin Kim told the Associated Press that
One Goh became upset when administrators
refused to grant him a full tuition refund after
he dropped out of the nursing program last
fall.
Goh came to campus Monday morning
looking for the person in charge of handling
tuition, Kim said.
But before then, Kim said Goh hadn’t
exhibited violent tendencies, as far as he
knew, and seemed “normal.”
Police say Goh may have been seeking mul-
tiple targets before beginning his rampage,
killing six students and a
school secretary while
wounding three others.
Kim, now the school’s
dean, was on campus at
the time and believes Goh
shot his victims at random.
Numerous administra-
tors have said that Goh
grew angry during one of
three long meetings with
officials over a financial dispute.
Goh became upset because officials would
not fully refund his tuition for the nursing pro-
gram, Jaehoon Moon, chief operating officer
of Oikos University, told KGO-TV.
The amount in dispute was $4,000 to
$6,000, according to Moon, who said officials
had offered partial reimbursement.
The disclosure came as police said they had
located a .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun
they believe was used in the attack on
Monday.
The weapon was found in the shallow
waters of a tributary of San Leandro Bay,
about a half-mile from the school. Its serial
numbers match a gun purchased by Goh, city
spokeswoman Cynthia Perkins said.
During the meetings with school adminis-
trators, the 43-year-old Goh also complained
that he didn’t get along with his classmates, so
officials offered to transfer him to another
classroom, Moon said.
They believed the issue was resolved and he
would restart classes, but police say an angry
Goh returned to the school on Monday.
Nursing program director Ellen Cervellon
previously said she met several times with
Goh over the tuition issue and that he said stu-
dents had been picking on him.
Police have said Goh was targeting a female
administrator when he went to his former
school, and opened fire when he learned she
wasn’t there.
Police are investigating whether Goh was
seeking multiple targets. Cervellon told the
AP that she believed she was the intended tar-
get.
Official: Suspect returned to campus over tuition
One Goh
4
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Carmen Louise
(Williams) Lofte
Carmen Louise (Williams) Lofte,
91, of Belmont, died from pneumo-
nia complications March 16, 2012
while on an extended visit in
Silverdale, Wash. She was born in
Rockford, Ill. April 9, 1920 to
Army Colonel Frank and Margaret
Williams. Carmen graduated from
Roosevelt High School in
Honolulu, Hawaii in 1937 and the
University of Oregon in 1942, earn-
ing a bachelor’s degree in English.
She was a proud member of the
Alpha Xi Delta Sorority, Order of
the Rose.
During World War II, she worked
for the War Department in
Washington, D.C. as a “coder.”
Carmen was married 52 years to
Robert Conrad Lofte. They lived in
Johansberg Africa, Israel and
London plus traveled and cruised to
many countries worldwide. They
also vacationed to many states
while visiting family and friends.
Robert prede-
ceased her in
2002. Carmen
enjoyed read-
ing, traveling,
playing bridge
and watching
Jeopardy.
Carmen is
survived by
four children Robin Rene (Eric),
Thomas (Hien), Zoe (Gene) and
Margaret (Bill) plus two grandsons,
Stanley and Adam (Bella). She
enjoyed many special friendships
in Belmont and San Mateo
Peninsula area after 45 years as a
resident.
Private services were held by
Cook Family Funeral Home of
Bainbridge Island, Wash. and
Carmen will be laid to rest at the
Luthern Church Cemetery in Eau
Claire, Wisc. next to Robert Conrad
Lofte.
Obituary
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — The founder of a
Northern California medical mari-
juana training school said Friday he
was giving up his downtown
Oakland-based pot businesses after
a federal raid bankrupted him.
Richard Lee has been instrumen-
tal in pushing for ballot measures to
legalize the drug, giving more than
$1.5 million as the lead financial
backer of a 2010 initiative to legal-
ize the drug in the state. He said he
will now focus solely on his advoca-
cy work.
“I am now in this legal situation,
so it’s better for me to step aside,”
Lee said.
Internal Revenue Service and
Drug Enforcement Administration
agents on Monday raided
Oaksterdam University, Lee’s home
and a medical marijuana dispensary
he also founded. The purpose of the
raids hasn’t been disclosed.
Oaksterdam University offers
classes to would-be medical mari-
juana providers in fields ranging
from horticulture to business to the
legal ins-and-outs of running a dis-
pensary. It does not distribute mari-
juana.
Police: Ex-teacher arrested
for sex abuse of minor
MODESTO — A former
California teacher who made nation-
al headlines when he left his job and
family to move in with an 18-year-
old student was arrested Friday on
suspicion of sexually abusing a dif-
ferent student more than a decade
ago, police said.
Christopher Hooker, 41, was
arrested at his home and booked in
Stanislaus County Jail on one count
of oral copulation with a minor.
Police said the abuse occurred
with a 17-year-old girl in 1998 when
Hooker was a teacher at Davis High
School in Modesto.
Marines with explosives
cause mall evacuation
REDONDO BEACH — Military
officials on Friday were trying to
determine why two off-duty Marines
left their desert base with 10 explo-
sive training devices in their truck
and went to a Los Angeles-area
shopping mall, causing three large
stores to be evacuated.
The South Bay Galleria was evac-
uated Thursday night after Marine
Corps officials called police to report
that two Marines were driving a
pickup truck and had explosives,
Redondo Beach police said.
Pot school founder calling it quits
Around the state
5
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Woman injured after
being struck by train
A woman was injured after being struck by
a train in Redwood City Friday morning,
according to Caltrain officials.
Caltrain returned to service shortly after the
collision but there were delays in the after-
noon.
The woman was struck at 11:51 a.m. by
northbound train No. 143 at Main Street,
Caltrain spokeswoman Christine Dunn said.
The woman survived the accident and was
taken by ambulance to a hospital, Dunn said.
The train, which had 245 passengers
onboard, stopped at the scene, but resumed
operation once the scene was cleared shortly
after 1 p.m., according to Dunn.
Southbound train No. 142 also stopped as a
result of the accident and was about 43 min-
utes late to its destination, she said.
Local brief
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo County Board of Supervisors will consider
increasing by 11 percent the current salary of the new controller.
After former controller Tom Huening submitted his letter of resig-
nation, the county conducted a salary survey and found that the con-
troller’s salary is behind its counterparts. The survey also found a 5
percent difference between that position and that of the assistant con-
troller. Assistant Controller Bob Adler was named to replace
Huening. If approved, the change will cost an estimated $1,503 per month or $18,036 annu-
ally in salary and benefits.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 10 in Board Chambers, 400 County
Government Center, Redwood City.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Carlos City Council will consider options for an upcoming planning retreat
with the city manager to discuss longer-range visions and priorities than the annual six-
month strategic plan meeting. Potential topics for such a retreat include relocating city hall,
adding a high school and connecting Burton Park and Central Middle School. The four
meeting options proposed include a luncheon discussion, an extended council luncheon,
having nothing further or holding one or two separate retreats per year.
The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, April 9 at City Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
• The Burlingame Planning Commission will study a use permit to allow a preschool
to be operated in 1505 Sherman Ave., Trinity Lutheran Church. In 1983, a special permit
to allow a preschool program was operated by Trinity Lutheran Church on the property. It
was in operation for two to three years. However, since then, the church has intermittently
operated programs similar to preschool such as summer camps and Sunday school. If
approved, the preschool would have 18 full-time student spots and up to six half-day spots.
It would operate from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The commission meets 7 p.m. Monday, March 9 at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Federal regulators
will allow plenty of opportunity for fishermen
to troll for Pacific Coast salmon as biologists
forecast a dramatic rebound in populations of
the prized fish.
The Pacific Fishery Management Council
on Thursday approved salmon seasons that
provide ample fishing time for commercial
and recreational anglers in California, Oregon
and Washington over the next six months.
The council, which regulates Pacific Coast
fisheries, chose the final set of regulations
from three options approved last month.
The panel’s decision comes as biologists
project big increases in salmon populations
from the Sacramento, Klamath and Rogue
rivers. Their forecast for chinook salmon
returning to the Klamath this fall is about four
times greater than average and the highest on
record since 1985.
That marks a sharp turnaround from just a
few years ago when steep declines in salmon
stocks led to the largest fishery closures on
record in 2008 and 2009.
“It’s about as big of a rebound as we could
have hoped for, when you’re talking about
record or near-record forecasts coming from
unprecedented closures,” Chuck Tracy, the
council’s salmon staff officer, said. “It’s all the
way from the bottom to the top in three years.”
Biologists attribute the comeback to wet
winters and favorable ocean conditions over
the past few years that have allowed salmon to
thrive and spawn in large numbers.
Many fishermen also link the rebound in
Sacramento River salmon to restrictions on
water pumping in the Sacramento-San
Joaquin River Delta, which the migratory fish
must traverse to get to and from the ocean.
“We’re getting more salmon back, in part,
because restrictions on siphoning water out of
the delta are working,” said Golden Gate
Salmon Association President Victor Gonella.
“It’s crucial that enough water is held back to
make sure this year’s salmon run thrives.”
Under the approved regulations, most of the
Pacific Coast will be open to commercial and
sport fishing from May to September, with
some areas open to recreational anglers in
April.
Pacific fishermen prepare
for a great salmon season
6
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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I
n an effort to help today’s
over-scheduled students
develop the resiliency and
coping strategies need to deal with
increasing levels of stress,
TheatreWorks for Schools, an
extension of the nationally
acclaimed theatre of Silicon
Valley, in collaboration with
Project Cornerstone, presents its
new play “Oskar and the Last
Straw!” a touring assembly for Bay
Area elementary schools. Using
acrobatics, pop culture references,
infectious humor and relatable
characters, this production offers
solutions for dealing with stress in a
kid-friendly format. Currently on
tour, the program will be held in
San Carlos next week.
To contact TheatreWorks about
scheduling an assembly, schools
may email learn@theatreworks.org
or call 463-7154.
***
Friends for Youth, Inc. has been
chosen to participate in the Morgan
Stanley Strategy Challenge, a vol-
unteer program that provides select
nonprofits with pro bono strategic
consulting.
Friends for Youth leadership
headed to New York on Wednesday
to kick-off the eight-week strategy
challenge. Friends for Youth will
work with a team of Morgan
Stanley employees to improve its
growth strategies. In June the team
will present its recommendations
for Friends for Youth to a panel of
experts from both the public and
private sectors. Morgan Stanley
CEO James Gorman will present
awards to the top three teams.
Friends for Youth Executive
Director Becky Cooper said,
“being selected for the Morgan
Stanley Strategy Challenge is an
honor and also a tremendous oppor-
tunity. Friends for Youth is excited
to work with Morgan Stanley, and
we look forward to a very fruitful
eight weeks.”
The Morgan Stanley Strategy
Challenge is now in its fourth year,
and serves nonprofits in San
Francisco, Chicago and New York.
***
What do a love struck old maid, a
1930s woman, a contemporary
composer and two childhood
friends have in common? You can
find all of them at the Out of the
Box Festival at Notre Dame de
Namur University, April 13
through April 22.
The Out of the Box Festival, pre-
sented by the department of Music
and Vocal Arts, gives graduate and
senior undergraduate students and
faculty the opportunity to think
“out of the box” and develop
unique performance projects. This
year’s offerings are:
• “The Old Maid and the
Thief,” a reimagining of a radio
broadcast premiere of the opera by
Pulitzer Prize-winning composer
Gian Carlo Menotti. Directed by
Christine Jarc, MFA 2014 with
music direction by Louise
Costigan-Kerns. Performances are
7:30 p.m. April 13 and 2 p.m. April
14.
•“The Women (… and The
Men),” an exploration of the atti-
tudes toward the role of women in
1930s America, with scenes from
G. Bernard Shaw and Clare
Boothe Luce and music by Jerome
Kern, Cole Porter and Richard
Rodgers. Directed by Laura
Woodruff, BFA 2012 with music
direction by Dr. Kayla Chon.
Performances are 7:30 p.m. April
13 and 2 p.m. April 14.
•“By Bohmler,” a retrospective
of the works of the renowned com-
poser Craig Bohmler. Bohmler is
in residence and will be present for
the performances. Directed by
Jenny Matteucci, BFA 2012 with
music direction by Daniel Lockert.
Performances are 7:30 p.m. April
20 and April 21.
•“Fallings,” excerpts from an
original music theater piece resid-
ing in the realm between opera and
musical theater, about the complex
bonds of friendship between child-
hood friends. Composed by faculty
Joel Phillip Friedman with libret-
to by Seth Friedman.
Performances are 7:30 p.m.April 21
and 2 p.m. April 22.
All performances are at Taube
Center, Notre Dame de Namur
University, 1500 Ralston Ave. in
Belmont. Performances are free but
seating is limited; advance tickets
can be reserved at brownpapertick-
ets.com.
***
The Burlingame School District
is seeking nominations for the H.
Jay Burns Award, which is given
annually to recognize volunteer
service in the pursuit of educational
excellence in the Burlingame
schools.
The award commemorates H. Jay
Burns, a trustee who served the dis-
trict for 24 years, and is presented
to a non-employee volunteer, past
or present, based on: service to the
district at large for a substantial
period of time; positive impact on
the education of the Burlingame
school children; and demonstration
of leadership skills on behalf of
Burlingame students.
The individual chosen to receive
this award will be recognized at a
school board meeting in June.
Nominations should include: the
nominee’s name, address, tele-
phone number, a brief description
of the reason for the nomination,
and the name, address, email
address and telephone number of
the individual submitting the nomi-
nation. Please do not advise the
nominee of the nomination.
The deadline for nominations is
May 11. Please submit nomina-
tions to Kathy Symanski, at the
Burlingame District Office, locat-
ed at 1825 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame, CA 94010.
If you have any questions contact
Dr. Maggie MacIsaac, superin-
tendent, at 259-3805.
***
Oceana High School in Pacifica
will host Because Art Matters
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, May
4.
BAM is an annual, student-run
art festival that shares with the
community the importance of art.
It’s aim is to help aspiring artists to
exhibit their talent, showing any
form of art. It brings the communi-
ty together through both fine arts
and performing arts.
This year, one of the featured per-
formances will be a display of a
sand art performance throughout
the evening. Sand art is a manipula-
tion of sand on a back-lit display
that can be viewed by a general
audience. There will be live bands
and an art gallery from the Sanchez
Art Center. Belly dancing and
Slam performances (spoken word)
will also be shown.
Oceana High School is located at
401 Paloma Ave. in Pacifica.
***
The Mills High School String
Quartet will help decide the liveli-
est debate in rock history — which
band is better: The Beatles or The
Rolling Stones — as tribute bands
Abbey Road and Jumping Jack
Flash square off for a “musical
shoot out” 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 4
at the Redwood City Fox Theatre,
2219 Broadway, Redwood City.
Tickets are $17 to $30 and may be
purchased online at
http://tickets.foxrwc.com/, by call-
ing 369-7770 and choosing option 1
for tickets or by visiting the the-
ater’s box office.
Mills High School’s Andrew
Lin (violin 1), Valerie Fates (violin
2), Michael Tom (viola) and Iris
Yu (cello) will accompany the
Beatles and Stones tribute musi-
cians on “Imagine” and “Can’t
Always Get What You Want.”
***
Attention young actors ages 12 to
18, a summer theater program will
debut at Woodside High School
July 9 through July 27 featuring
local theater professionals.
The Woodside Teen
Performing Arts is a new camp
offering a unique acting experi-
ence. Offering classes Monday
through Friday, the program will
also feature a “game time class”
from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., allowing
parents to pick up their children
after work. A master class, taught
by a professionals will be featured
at the end of each week. Total
enrollment is $700, which includes
customized make-up kit, T-shirt
and all day classes.
For more information visit
www.woodsidehs.org/summerthe-
ater or call 367-9750 ext. 4852.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by educa-
tion reporter Heather Murtagh. You can
contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105
or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.
NATION 7
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Kids Across
1. What a bumblebee uses
to stick it to those who
come too close
3. The spiny part on top of
a trout’s back
4. It’s the sharp end of a pin
5. What you need to get a
kernel of popcorn
unstuck from your mouth
7. A brand-new ______ is no
good until it’s sharpened
8. Small arrows that people
throw at a bulls-eye
11. What a man uses to get
rid of his beard
12. A lion’s big front teeth
13. A quill, like the one the
Founding Fathers used to
sign the Constitution
15. You’d be smart to handle
this flower with care
17. What a mom uses a knife
to do to a birthday cake
19. Underwater pirate: When
it’s time to 2D, this ocean
animal thrashes around,
using its long nose to
slash its prey
Parents Down
1. Sharp sliver that gets
under your skin
2. What folks do to fondue
3. Stone Age man used
chips of ____ as cutting-
edge tools
6. Manual knife sharpener
(it requires a little elbow
grease)
7. Burst one’s bubble
9. Hits an A-sharp in a choir
10. Vision sharpeners that
rest on a bridge
14. Woodpecker’s sharp
snack-seeker
16. Handyman’s companion
with super-sharp teeth
18. Sharp journalist: Mr.
Bradley, who co-anchored
“60 Minutes” for 26 years
Enjoy fun time with Mom, Dad or your favorite grown-up. The across clues are for kids and the down clues are for adults.
This Week’s Solution
© 2012 Jan Buckner Walker. Distributed by
Tribune Media Services, Inc.
4/8/12 kris@kapd.com Visit www.kapd.com to join the KAPD family!
You’re So Sharp
U.S. executives at
bailed-out firms have pay cut
WASHINGTON — Top execu-
tives at three companies bailed out
by U.S. taxpayers during the 2008
financial crisis were ordered to take
pay cuts by the federal government.
The Treasury Department says
nearly 70 executives at American
International Group Inc., Ally
Financial Inc. and General Motors
Co. had their annual compensation
reduced by 10 percent. The CEOs of
each company had their pay frozen
at 2011 levels.
All three companies have yet to
repay what they received from the
$700 billion bailout and therefore
are subject to pay cuts.
Maryland high court poised
to hear lesbian divorce case
WASHINGTON — Maryland’s
highest court is poised to hear argu-
ments in a precedent-setting case
involving two women who married
in California but were denied a
divorce in Maryland, which does not
currently allow same-sex weddings.
Around the nation
By Zinie Chen Sampson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. — A
fighter jet that malfunctioned just
after takeoff hurtled into a Virginia
Beach apartment complex on Friday
in a spectacular crash that sent
flames and black smoke billowing
from the rubble.
The two pilots managed to eject
just before impact, suffering minor
injuries along with five others on the
ground. Several residents described
hearing a loud explosion and look-
ing out their windows to see the red
and orange blaze. In the confusion
that followed, two men helped one
of the bloodied pilots from the two-
seat F18 Hornet move to safety.
“Oh, my God, I heard three really
loud explosions, then the black
smoke went up high in the sky,” said
71-year-old Felissa Ezell, who lives
in a townhouse near the crash site.
By evening, emergency crews
were searching through the charred
remains of the complex, where
some 40 apartment units were dam-
aged or destroyed. No fatalities had
been reported.
Seven people, including the pilots
from nearby Naval Air Station
Oceana, were taken to a hospital.
All except one of the pilots were
released by late afternoon.
Virginia Beach Fire Department
Capt. Tim Riley said three residents
remained unaccounted for late
Friday.
Navy jet crashes into Virginia apartments
REUTERS
Virginia Beach Fire Department firefighters continue cleanup efforts after
extinguishing a blaze that destroyed buildings when a U.S. Navy F/A-18D
fighter jet crashed into an apartment complex in Virginia Beach.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Otha Thornton, president-
elect of the National PTA, signed up
to help lead the PTA at Maryland’s
Meade Senior High School in 2005,
the chapter had about 25 members.
Within two years, membership
soared to 400 as the school commu-
nity mobilized to boost morale and
academic performance. Now he’s
trying to rekindle that spirit on a
larger scale as the PTA strives to
reverse a steady decrease in its
national membership.
“I tell parents: ‘Other people are
making choices for you and your
children. We need you at the table,”’
said Thornton, who will become the
National PTA’s first male African-
American leader next year.
National PTA seeks to reverse drop in membership
WORLD 8
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Does your aging loved one have diffi culty:
• Accurately reporting symptoms to their doctor
• Remembering and following doctor’s orders
As a certified geriatric care manager,
I CAN HELP:
• Provide medical symptoms at the
doctor’s appointments
• Increase compliance with doctor’s orders
at home
PHONE: 650-245-5285
FAX: 650-654-9303
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www.stjamesassociates.net
Charlotte St James
MACP, CMC
12 Years Experience
April 21, 2012
rs,
By Frances D’Emilio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ROME — Pope Benedict XVI encour-
aged those threatened by unemployment
and other economic woes to draw courage
and strength from the suffering of the cru-
cified Jesus Christ as the pontiff presided
over a Good Friday candlelit Way of the
Cross procession at the ancient
Colosseum.
Benedict, who turns 85 on April 16, did-
n’t carry the cross during the hour-long
procession itself. Instead, he listened
intently to meditations on suffering that he
asked an elderly Italian couple to compose
for the traditional ceremony. Then, as the
final reflection was read aloud, the pontiff
was handed the slender, lightweight
wooden cross, which he held steadily for
a few minutes.
Thousands of tourists, pilgrims and
Romans jammed the boulevard outside
the Colosseum and the ancient Roman
Forum to pray with him on a mild, cloudy
night and listen to hymns.
Faithful clutched candles and prayer
books. A few held palms or olive branch-
es they had saved from Palm Sunday,
which opened solemn Holy Week cere-
monies in the Catholic church.
“The experience of suffering and of the
cross touches all mankind. It touches the
family, too,” the pope said in a brief hom-
ily at the end of the procession, which he
observed from an elevated landing.
Dressed in red robes to symbolize the
blood shed by Jesus, the pope added that
“these days, too, the situation of many
families is made worse by the threat of
unemployment and other negative effects
of the economic crisis,” such as worry
about the future of young people.
But Benedict advised families to “look
to Christ’s cross. There we can find the
courage and strength to press on.”
Strength from God, Benedict sought to
assure the faithful, will help families “to
make sacrifices and to overcome every
obstacle.”
After the Colosseum appearance,
Benedict’s next public ceremony is an
Easter vigil Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica on
Saturday evening. Late Sunday morning,
he will preside over an Easter Mass in St.
Peter’s Square, expected to be jammed by
tens of thousands of people.
Pope takes cross at end of procession
REUTERS
Pope Benedict XVI holds the cross as he leads the Via Crucis (Way of the Cross)
procession at the Colosseum in downtown Rome, Italy.
Egyptian ex-regime
strongman to run for president
CAIRO — A former strongman of ousted President Hosni
Mubarak’s regime announced his presidential candidacy
Friday, shaking up an already heated race
that is emerging as a contest between two
longtime rivals — former regime officials
and Islamists who have surged in influence.
Omar Suleiman, one of the most power-
ful figures of Mubarak’s regime, had said
earlier this week that he would not run. But
he said he changed his mind after hundreds
of people rallied in Cairo to support a bid.
The announcement drew outrage from
youth activists who spearheaded the popu-
lar uprising that toppled Mubarak last year
and have since been disappointed by the continued influence of
members of his ex-regime. Liberals and revolutionaries have
been largely squeezed out of the presidential race. Some have
vowed to boycott the May 23-24 balloting altogether.
Mali’s coup leader to return power
BAMAKO, Mali — Under intense pressure from the nations
bordering Mali, the junior officer who seized control of the
country in a coup last month signed an accord late Friday,
agreeing to return the nation to constitutional rule.
The announcement came only hours after separatist rebels in
Mali’s distant north declared their independence, a move that
further complicates a crisis that began 16 days ago when a
group of disgruntled soldiers stormed the presidential palace,
reversing two decades of democratic rule in the space of a day.
On Friday, Capt. Amadou Haya Sanogo emerged from his
office inside the same military base where the mutiny began
and which has acted as the de facto seat of government ever
since the March 21 coup.
Around the world
Hosni Mubarak
OPINION 9
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Support Starbucks,
don’t dump it
Editor,
In calling for a boycott of Starbucks
for its supposed campaign to promote
recognition of same-sex marriage,
Carlos Valencia, in this letter pub-
lished in the April 5 edition of the
Daily Journal, cites those in our com-
munity “who believe in marriage”
who should be “deeply offended” by
such efforts. Well, Mr. Valencia, speak
for yourself. I am married. I believe
strongly in marriage, family and its
roles in our society. I believe that
denying this positive and stabilizing
force to other responsible and loving
adults on the basis of sexual orienta-
tion does nothing to advance or pro-
tect marriage in our society.
People like Mr. Valencia should be
morally honest enough in their beliefs
to stop using supposed threats to het-
erosexual marriage and family as
excuses for their positions. Their posi-
tions are based on nothing more than
dislike and disrespect for homosexu-
als, period. They simply don’t have
the courage to admit this in the public
arena.
However, I would like to thank Mr.
Valencia for making us aware of
Starbucks’ efforts. Before reading his
letter, I could care less about
Starbucks. However, I now planning
on steering my business in their direc-
tion, if only just to thumb my nose at
Mr. Valencia’s boycott.
Alex Perez
Hillsborough
In support of advocacy
Editor,
In his letter published in the April 5
edition of the Daily Journal, Carlos
Valencia did Starbucks a great serv-
ice. By pointing out that the company
actively supports same-sex marriage,
he educated our community about the
fact that the company supports equal
rights for all, thus making those of us
that do enjoy their product feel that
much better about where we spend
our money. I too support locally-
owned businesses who support my
values and need my business. I guess
the difference is that one of my
deeply held values is that everyone
has a right to be treated equally.
Thank you for publishing his public
service announcement regarding
Starbucks’ support of equality for all.
Cherlene Wright
Redwood City
‘Intent is all it takes’
Editor,
This letter is regarding Siobhan
Canterbury’s letter to the editor, “Who
is the evil aggressor?” in the April 6
edition of the Daily Journal. When I
began my career as a nuclear engi-
neer, almost 50 years ago, my compa-
ny was just completing a nuclear
research reactor in Pakistan under
President Eisenhower’s Atoms for
Peace program.
As one of Asia’s poorest countries,
Pakistan’s government chose not to
pursue nuclear weapons for a long
time but their scientists and engineers
were training on our reactor. When
Pakistan decided they needed a
weapon, they had no trouble building
one, in fact many. They had the peo-
ple and the plans. Iran’s theocratic
government no longer has any exter-
nal enemies but has conjured up two,
the United States and Israel. They
have promised to wipe Israel from the
world’s map. They surely are ready to
build a bomb. Intent is all it takes.
They have the people and the plans,
despite Canterbury’s naive statements
to the contrary. By the way, my com-
pany provided Iran’s first research
reactor also many years ago.
Shelton Ehrlich
Palo Alto
Iranian threat
Editor,
Siobhan Canterbury’s letter to the
editor, “Who is the evil aggressor?” in
the April 6 edition of the Daily
Journal, claims to know more about
Iran’s nuclear capability than the gov-
ernments of the United States, Israel
and the U.N.
Canterbury’s final questions reveal a
hatred for Israel, so probably not con-
cerned about the Iranian risk to Israel,
and has an evaluation of Iran that is
therefore suspect. The Iranian leaders
have said they want Israel destroyed,
so who doesn’t believe their threats
other than Canterbury?
Norman Licht
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
— The Eagle,
Bryan-College Station, Texas
T
he crisis aboard JetBlue
Flight 191 from New York to
Las Vegas recently was fright-
ening, to be sure. We are glad we
weren’t passengers on that flight when
captain Clayton Osbon suffered what
has been described as a mental break-
down.
Jason Dowd, Osbon’s copilot, said
the veteran pilot began pushing but-
tons and flipping switches, muttering
about religion and telling air traffic
controllers to be quiet. The co-pilot
had the presence of mind to suggest
the captain go to the bathroom and
when Osbon did, the co-pilot and
another JetBlue pilot on board locked
themselves in the cockpit. Osbon tried
to get back into the cockpit and
reportedly tried to open the plane’s
outer door. He urged the co-pilot to
get the plane on the ground quickly
and told passengers to say their
prayers.
Now, Osbon has been charged by
the U.S. Department of Justice with
interfering with the flight crew, an
unusual charge for a commercial pilot
that carries a penalty of up to 20 years
in prison.
But the incident should raise con-
cerns about the mental health of those
who serve us as pilots, ship’s crew,
bus drivers, engineers and the like.
How many other Clayton Osbons are
out there? JetBlue says Osbon passed
a mandatory health check some four
months ago, but did it include any
kind of mental evaluation? We don’t
know, but perhaps it should have.
The sad fact is we do a terrible job
of identifying and dealing with mental
issues in the country. We still attach a
stigma to those who seek help. Many
health plans cover only limited care
for mental issues and for those with-
out insurance, care is a nightmare of
neglect and denial. When budgets
have to be cut, they too often are
trimmed in areas of mental health
care.
Clayton Osbon needs such help, and
we doubt he will get it behind bars.
The JetBlue pilot flap
Contempt of Court
F
or a number of years, I’ve been wanting to write about
the conservative majority of five on the Supreme Court
but couldn’t remember enough civilized words that
would past muster with my editor. I’m still not sure, but I feel
compelled to try.
One of things I worried
about with the 2000 election of
George W. Bush, even before
he and Dick Cheney released
their economic and war-mon-
gering devastation upon our
country, is that he was likely
going to be able to finish off
the packing of the Supreme
Court with fossil-brained,
antique minds that his father
began with the nomination of
Clarence Thomas, in my view,
the nadir of any justice serving
during my lifetime.
What’s my beef? All five are
not only handmaidens of the conservatives and justices Scalia
and Thomas devotees of the conservative billionaire Koch
brothers, but follow the same agenda in the political and legisla-
tive worlds.
Lib-ber-tee, they cry endlessly! Freedoms are granted us by
the Constitution and Declaration of Independence. Freedom
from governmental intrusion; freedom from oversight; freedom
from regulations; freedom from fair taxation. But only for the 1
percent and the major corporations, that is.
For the others, less freedom. Much less freedom. More legis-
lation and court decisions to regulate their lives. Much more
intrusion into their private, marital and sexual lives, reductions
in the range of their personal choices and, now, intrusions upon
the bodies of women and reducing the availability of contracep-
tion products.
In other words, “Liberty for me but not for thee!”
I won’t belabor the point. Only two example decisions of
these legal reprobates will serve the purpose.
Everyone by this time knows of the “Citizens United” deci-
sion in which they threw some kind of judicial holy water upon
what exists on paper as fictional legal entities called corpora-
tions and converted them into living, breathing, humans granted
freedom of speech and assembly by the first amendment of our
beloved Constitution. That means freedom to participate in our
electoral system without the right to actually vote, but to anony-
mously dump unlimited amounts of their wealth into our elec-
toral process. And there is nothing we can do about it.
On the other hand, last week, they took up the matter of one
of the “others,” a citizen detained by the police when his wife
was stopped for speeding. When the police radioed for informa-
tion, they found a warrant relating to him for an unpaid traffic
fine. There had been a computer glitch and he carried an
acknowledgement from the city that it had indeed been paid.
Even if the warrant had still been valid, failure to pay a fine is
not a crime in New Jersey.
But, nevertheless, he was arrested and dumped in a cell for
six days among other prisoners of all kinds of offenses. But that
was not the crux of his case. He was stripped down and every
crevice in his body was invaded and probed. Then he was trans-
ferred to another jail for two days and, again, every crevice in
his body was invaded and probed. I saw the man on television
and he was a very dignified middle-aged man who told how
humiliated he had been.
But, the five constitutional “musketeers” have a different view
of constitutionally guaranteed liberties when applied to one of
“The Others,” shaving away more of our constitutional rights
every day.
According to them, jailers may perform invasive strip search-
es on people arrested even for the most minor of offenses.
Justice Kennedy’s justification? Detecting lice and contagious
infections, looking for tattoos and other evidence of gang mem-
bership and preventing the smuggling of drugs and weapons.
Breathes there man or woman or teenager who is reading this
who would not be terminally outraged at this, having one’s
body violated in such a way for a traffic stop arrest?
Lib-ber-tee? Yah! But not for any of “The Others.”
And these “five” are still young and healthy, liable to contin-
ue enhancing the liberties of their conservative brethren while
demeaning and reducing the rights of “The Others” for many
years. And with their protection of life tenure, we can’t do a
damn thing about it.
***
I would like to correct a prediction I made in my column
“Hell hath no fury like women voters scorned,” where I predict-
ed it would lead to a Republican loss in the presidential elec-
tion.
I cannot believe how clueless the Republicans are to be in
denial they are conducting a “war on women,” when
Republican dominated states have already produced 91 bills
restricting women’s rights.
In this week’s polling, well over 60 percent of the women
among the all-important voting independents are overwhelm-
ingly negative on any winner of the Republican nomination for
president.
Therefore, correction: The Republican nominee, whomever it
may be, will lose by a landslide.
Keith Kreitman has been a resident of Foster City for 26 years.
After degrees in political science and journalism and advanced
studies in law, he retired after a 50-year business career in
insurance, as a commodities options broker and with four
major private corporations. His column appears in the weekend
edition.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,060.14 -0.11% 10-Yr Bond 2.175 -3.03%
Nasdaq3,080.50 +0.40% Oil (per barrel) 103.309998
S&P 500 1,398.08 -0.06% Gold 1,628.50
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the stock market, it was a tri-
umphant first quarter. But for earnings
growth, the past three months were just
ho-hum.
Analysts are expecting earnings for
companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500
index to decline 0.1 percent compared to
a year ago, according to FactSet. It’s a
tiny number but a significant turning
point. Earnings growth was on a winning
streak for the previous nine quarters.
Year-over-year earnings growth has been
at least 10 percent for all but the most
recent period, when it was 6 percent.
The reasons for the expected slow-
down range from global (a weak Europe
hurts everybody) to mathematical (it’s
hard to top double-digit quarters).
Whatever the cause, the stagnation in
earnings growth is a stark reminder that
the economy’s problems are far from
solved. Just three months ago, analysts
were predicting 3 percent earnings
growth for the first quarter.
We’ll soon see if the expectations are
on target. Earnings season gets under
way Tuesday when the aluminum pro-
ducer Alcoa becomes the first major U.S.
company to release its first-quarter
results.
Should this batch of earnings contain a
lot of bad surprises, it could upend a
stock market rally that pushed the S&P
500 index up 12 percent in the first three
months of the year.
Here’s what you need to know:
• Are earnings really that bad?
It depends on how you look at it.
People are blaming the slowdown on
several factors including higher oil
prices and Europe’s debt crisis. Those
are legitimate concerns. High prices for
oil and gas make it more expensive for
companies to ship their products and
leave people with less money to spend
on other things. Europe’s debt crisis
means that the U.S. can’t sell as many
products there. It also hurts fast-growing
economies like China and India that
export to Europe. That, in turn, affects
U.S. companies that count on growth in
emerging markets to boost their own
sales.
Keep in mind that this deceleration
follows an extended period of big gains.
Earnings surged 19 percent in the first
quarter of 2011, and that was on top of
53 percent growth the year before as
companies bounced back from a dismal
first quarter of 2009. Aggregate earnings
of companies in the S&P 500 were $96
per share last year, a record, according to
FactSet senior earnings analyst John
Butters. Investors realize that companies
can’t sustain warp speed indefinitely.
“It’s supposed to be a very weak quar-
ter,” says Sam Stovall, chief equity
strategist at S&P Capital IQ, “but Wall
Street is not freaking out because they
understand why.”
—Does the market care about earn-
ings?
Sure, to an extent. More often than
not, a company’s stock moves in the
same direction as its earnings.
Investors tend to trade on what they
expect to happen in the coming months.
By the time a company actually
announces its quarterly results, chances
are they’ve already been baked into the
stock price and won’t have much of an
immediate effect unless there’s a big sur-
prise. A company’s predictions about the
future are what investors really listen to.
“A lot of what we’re going to get now,”
Butters says, “is already in the rear-view
mirror.”
Butters also notes the outsized impact
of Apple’s earnings on the overall figure
for the S&P 500. Strip out Apple,
Butters says, and the prediction for the
first quarter falls from minus 0.1 percent
to minus 1.6 percent.
Besides, one quarter of earnings
growth hardly means a company is solid.
Earnings can be a deceptive measure-
ment, and will rise even when revenue
falls if a company slashes jobs and other
expenses. Share buybacks and account-
ing charges can also inflate profits and
mask a company’s struggles.
“You can always juggle earnings,”
says Stovall. “It’s a lot harder to fudge
sales.”
• What’s the big picture?
Despite all the hubbub about The End
of Earnings Growth, analysts are expect-
ing only a short-term decline. Earnings
growth is expected to return to 7 percent
in the second quarter and 5 percent in the
third quarter, according to FactSet.
Bigger jumps of 16 percent, 14 percent
and 13 percent are predicted for the three
quarters after that, through the middle of
2013. Analysts also expect per-share
earnings in the S&P to rise to more than
$105 in 2012, another record, according
to Butters.
That reflects investors’ belief that
Europe will stabilize by the end of the
year. Even if it doesn’t, the thinking
goes, companies will have adjusted to
turmoil in Europe as a new normal that
they can function under, rather than
something that sets off constant fears of
another cataclysm.
Machinery company Caterpillar said
in its last earnings call that the company
expects its sales in Europe to continue to
rise despite the problems there.
“It’s been going on a long time and
hasn’t tanked the place yet,” said chief
financial officer Edward Rapp. “We
don’t think it will.”
Will 1Q earnings derail market?
Wall Street
Palo Alto Networks files
documents for $175 million IPO
Computer security provider Palo Alto Networks Inc. is
eyeing taking the company public in an offering that aims
to raise as much as $175 million.
In preliminary documents filed by the company on
Friday with the Securities and Exchange Commission,
Palo Alto said it intends to use proceeds from an initial
public offering to fund working capital, sales, marketing
and other operating costs.
The Santa Clara-based company did not specify how
many shares will be put up for sale in the IPO, nor at what
price. It also didn’t say what ticker symbol it will trade
under.
Palo Alto Networks’ services help control traffic on cus-
tomers’ networked computer systems and prevent threats.
It said it had over 6,600 customers in more than 80 coun-
tries at Jan. 31.
In its most-recently completed fiscal year, which ended
July 31, Palo Alto posted a loss of $12.5 million, or 88
cents a share, compared to a loss of $21.1 million, or
$1.78 a share, a year earlier.
Revenue in fiscal 2011 more than doubled to $118.6
million from $48.8 million.
Bravo plans ‘Silicon Valley’ reality show
NEW YORK — Randi Zuckerberg, the sister of
Facebook’s founder, is working with Bravo on a TV show
about Silicon Valley.
Bravo says “Silicon Valley” is a working title for the
show, which follows young professionals in real life
working to create the next big thing in tech. Going by a
short preview on Bravo’s website, this involves drinking,
driving fast cars and bragging about money.
Bravo hasn’t said when it would start running the show.
But it has already gotten criticism. Sarah Lacy, a former
editor with the technology blog TechCrunch, calls the
show unconscionable and compares it to “Jersey Shore.”
Business briefs
By Paul Wiseman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The U.S. job mar-
ket took a breather in March after its best
hiring stretch since the Great Recession.
Employers added 120,000 jobs last
month — half the December-February
pace and well short of the 210,000 econ-
omists were expecting. The unemploy-
ment rate fell from 8.3 percent in
February to 8.2 percent, the lowest since
January 2009, but that was largely
because many Americans stopped look-
ing for work.
Still, few economists expect hiring to
fizzle in spring and summer, as it did the
past two years. And they blamed season-
al factors for much of Friday’s disap-
pointing report from the Labor
Department.
“We don’t think this is the start of
another spring dip in labor market con-
ditions,” said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S.
economist with Capital Economics.
The report was also closely watched in
political circles. If employers retreat on
hiring, consumers could lose confidence
in the economy and potentially dim
President Barack Obama’s re-election
hopes.
Ashworth and other economists cited
the weather for the latest jobs report. A
warm January and February allowed
construction companies and other busi-
nesses that work outdoors to hire workers
a few weeks earlier than usual, effective-
ly stealing jobs from March. It helps
explain a 7,000 drop in construction jobs.
Alan Amdahl, who has run his own
construction company in Sioux Falls,
S.D., for three decades, said a mild win-
ter helped contribute to a flurry of new
remodeling jobs. He started hiring in
January.
“Our winter didn’t really exist,” he
said. “It’s just incredible. People didn’t
hibernate.”
Economists also say the numbers can
bounce around from month to month.
Consistently creating 200,000 jobs a
month is tough. The economy hasn’t put
together four straight months of 200,000
or more new jobs since early 2000.
Job market takes a break after hiring
By Charles Babington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The nation’s
steady-but-modest job growth presents
political challenges for both of
November’s all-but-certain presiden-
tial rivals.
Republican Mitt Romney needs an
ailing economy to fully exploit his
image as a “Mr. Fix-It” who can
restore the nation’s financial health, as
he turned around the troubled 2002
Winter Olympics. President Barack
Obama needs job-creation momentum
to persuade voters that things are mov-
ing in the right direction, even if mil-
lions of people remain unemployed.
Friday’s neither-hot-nor-cold jobs
report leaves both campaigns unsure of
whether they can sell their narratives.
Employers added 120,000 jobs last
month, about half the December-
February pace and well short of the
210,000 economists were expecting.
Still, the unemployment rate declined
from 8.3 percent in February to 8.2
percent, the lowest since about the
time Obama took office.
GOP leaders were quick to note that
the rate dropped largely because many
Americans stopped looking for work
and were not counted in the govern-
ment survey.
The U.S. jobs picture was bleaker
when Romney began his second presi-
dential bid a year ago, emphasizing his
experience in running the Olympic
games and reorganizing companies
while at Bain Capital.
Jobs report leaves
Obama, Romney
campaigns wary
By Carolyn Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BUFFALO, N.Y. — Eastman Kodak
Co. is seeking permission to pay about
300 executives and other employees a
total of $13.5 million in bonuses to per-
suade them to stay with the company as
it reorganizes under bankruptcy protec-
tion.
The Rochester-based photography
company said the targeted employees
have knowledge and skills critical to
help the business emerge from
Chapter 11 and would be difficult to
replace if they left to pursue other
offers. They include 119 middle man-
agers who would share $8.5 million of
the sum.
Also this week, Kodak told retirees it
has withdrawn for now its motion to end
supplemental health care benefits for
about 16,000 Medicare-eligible retirees.
The company will instead create a
retirees committee to examine the issues
of medical and survivor benefits.
Kodak proposes bonuses,
withdraws benefits cut
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CSM, Ohlone will finally play
A boxer’s Everest
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Step one: Check the weather forecast.
According to weather.com, noon in the
Fremont area calls for partly cloudy skies with
a temperature of around 59 degrees
Fahrenheit.
So with that out of the way, it looks like
finally Mother Nature is going to cooperate as
the College of San Mateo and Ohlone College
square off for Coast Conference North
Division supremacy.
And thus, a game that was supposed to hap-
pen more than a month ago will get played.
The CSM softball team comes into the contest
riding a 15-game winning streak. They also
hold a 1.5 game lead on the Renegades with
six games remaining on the 2012 schedule —
with two of those six against Ohlone, the nine-
time defending conference champions.
“I think every game is the game of the year
at this point,” CSM coach Nicole Borg told
the Daily Journal last week. “It’s our rival, it’s
Ohlone, so it always get your blood flowing a
little more when you’re playing them, just
because we’re always the first- and second-
place teams.
“But in all honesty, we always stayed
focused, just taking it one game at a time.
We’re not so much focusing on the name on
the other shirts, but more what we have to do
to beat their strengths and really capitalize on
their weaknesses. I think we’ve done a pretty
job of that so far.”
San Mateo has made quick work of their
opponents leading up to Saturday’s tango with
Ohlone. Five of their last wins have come in
See CSM, Page 17
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
On Saturday, April 14, Theo Atienza will
reach the top of his personal Mount Everest by
climbing into a Burlingame boxing ring.
Three years ago, the now 34-year-old AC
Transit mechanic hailing from Daly City,
found himself at 225 pounds. Overweight, and
facing a “Biggest Loser” type challenge with
his family along with high blood pressure and
cholesterol, Atienza knew it was time for a
change.
“Originally, I tried boxing when I was 21,”
Atienza said, “but I didn’t have the dedication
and the drive for it.”
Ten years later, Atienza said he rediscovered
a passion for it.
And now, under the tutelage of Eddie Croft
of B Street Gym in San Mateo, Atienza finds
himself a week away from his first fight as part
of “The 650 Show,” a boxing card hosted by
Croft’s gym. The 12-fight card takes place at
Machinists Hall in Burlingame.
The first bell will sound at 6 p.m. Tickets are
$25.
“I’ve been prepping for this fight for two
years now,” Atienza said, who admittedly said
his story is “kind of special.”
Atienza drew up on the Peninsula, attending
five high schools in four years.
“I wasn’t the good Samaritan type of kid. I
went through my stage of some gangs and
stuff. But I grew out of that,” he said. “I guess
I’ve always had a chip on my shoulder
because I’ve always wanted to try boxing and
see what I can do with it.”
Atienza will get that opportunity against
Pablo Romo of Pacific Ring Gym in Oakland.
See BOXER, Page 15
<< 49ers sign RB Jacobs to one-year deal, page 14
• Race around the world makes a local stop, page 15
Weekend, April 7-8, 2012
By Bob Baum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Chris Young and Paul
Goldschmidt hit first-inning home runs
off Tim Lincecum and the Arizona
Diamondbacks opened defense of their
NL West title with a 5-4 victory over the
San Francisco Giants on Friday.
Ryan Roberts’ two-run double broke a
sixth-inning tie as Arizona defeated
Lincecum (0-1) for the fourth time in a
row.
Ian Kennedy (1-0) allowed three runs
on nine hits in 6 2-3 innings to beat the
Giants for the fourth straight decision.
See GIANTS, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Westwood gets his nose in front at the Masters
REUTERS
Lee Westwood of England lines up a putt on the first green during second
round play in the 2012 Masters Golf Tournament in Augusta.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUGUSTA, Ga. — With his words and then his play,
Lee Westwood shot down the notion Thursday that this
Masters was a two-horse race.
On a busy opening day at Augusta National that fea-
tured mud, a little rain and a snowman on the final hole
for Henrik Stenson, Westwood provided a steady hand
Thursday with seven birdies for a 5-under 67 that gave
him a one-shot lead.
It was the first time Westwood has led after the open-
ing round of a major, though that was little comfort.
Louis Oosthuizen made four birdies over the last five
holes for a 68, while Peter Hanson of Sweden made six
birdies for his 68. Bubba Watson, blasting tee shots with
his pink driver, was among six players at 69.
Westwood had said it would be naive for anyone to
think this major was only about Tiger Woods and Rory
McIlroy.
Those two horses were happy to still be in the run-
ning.
Woods took two penalty shots, hit three tee shots that
rattled the pines and was thrilled to make bogey on his
last hole for a 72, the first time since 2008 that he failed
to break par in the opening round of the Masters.
“I had some of the worst golf swings I’ve ever hit
today,” Woods said.
McIlroy opened with a double bogey, though his big
moment was on the 10th hole. A year ago, that’s where
his Sunday collapse began with a hooked tee shot into
the cabins for a triple bogey. This time, he pushed a 3-
wood into the trees on the other side and managed a par.
“That was a bit of an improvement from the last time
I played it,” McIlroy said.
Better yet was a birdie-birdie finish, including a 15-
foot putt from the fringe on the 18th that gave him a 71,
making him one of 28 players who broke par and were
within four shots of the lead.
“It was huge,” McIlroy said. “I didn’t feel like I had
my best out there. To finish under par for the day, I’m
very pleased.”
Along with Woods smiling after a 72, three-time
Masters champion Phil Mickelson was delighted with a
74. He sprayed tee shots all over the course, including
one so far left on the 10th into bushes he didn’t know
existed that he never found his ball. Mickelson made a
triple bogey there, then spent the rest of the back nine
scrambling for his life.
He recounted all the bad shots, the missed opportuni-
ties, the triple bogey, and decided the glass was half full,
almost spilling over.
“This is good news,” Mickelson said. “Because if I
can get hot tomorrow, I’m playing good enough to shoot
6 or 7 under, and I’ll be right in it for the weekend.
Fortunately, I didn’t shoot myself out of it.”
Luke Donald, the No. 1 player in the world, had a few
nervous moments, and that was after he signed for a 75.
When his card was sent to the scoring room to be
entered into the computer, an official accidentally
punched in a birdie 3 for the fifth hole, even though
Donald three-putted for a 5. The leaderboard showed
him with a 73.
It took about two hours to clear up the confusion.
“This place, if you are a little bit off, it can eat you
up,” Donald said.
Donald and Westwood are the only two players to be
No. 1 without ever having won a major. Westwood is
atop the list of the best who have never won a Grand
Slam event — 36 wins around the world, formerly No.
1 in the world and a half-dozen close calls in the majors,
including a runner-up finish at the Masters two years
ago.
“I’ve come close,” Westwood said. “I’ve won all there
is to win other than a major championship. That’s my
primary focus and it’s been a long time coming around
since the PGA last year.”
Westwood made his move on the front nine when he
ran off four straight birdies, all of them inside 10 feet,
including a difficult pitch from short of the par-5 eighth
green that settled within tap-in range.
SPORTS 13
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Endof
Regular
Season
vs.Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/7
@Denver
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/9
@Portland
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/11
vs.Dallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
@Jazz
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/6
vs. Denver
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/7
@RedBulls
4p.m.
CSN+
4/14
vs.Real Salt
Lake
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@Philly
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/28
vs.United
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/2
@White
Caps
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/5
vs.Chivas
USA
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/13
vs. White
Caps
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/7
at Dbacks
1p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/8
at Rockies
1p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/9
at Rockies
1p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/11
at Rockies
1p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs.Pirates
1:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/13
vs.Pirates
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/14
at Dbacks
1p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/7
vs.Royals
7p.m.
MLB-TV
4/9
vs.Royals
7p.m.
MLB-TV
4/10
vs.Royals
12:30p.m.
MLB-TV
4/11
at Seattle
7p.m.
MLB-TV
4/13
at Seattle
6p.m.
MLB-TV
4/14
at Seattle
1p.m.
MLB-TV
4/15
vs. Seattle
6p.m.
MLB-TV
4/7
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
z-N.Y. Rangers 51 23 7 109 225 183
x-Pittsburgh 50 25 6 106 278 219
x-Philadelphia 47 25 9 103 262 228
x-New Jersey 47 28 6 100 224 207
N.Y. Islanders 34 36 11 79 200 248
Northeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Boston 48 29 4 100 265 199
x-Ottawa 41 30 10 92 247 236
Buffalo 39 32 10 88 215 226
Toronto 35 36 10 80 230 260
Montreal 30 35 16 76 208 225
Southeast Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Florida 37 26 18 92 199 226
x-Washington 41 32 8 90 218 229
Winnipeg 37 35 9 83 222 242
Carolina 33 32 16 82 212 239
Tampa Bay 37 36 8 82 231 278
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
y-St. Louis 48 22 11 107 207 163
x-Nashville 47 26 8 102 231 209
x-Detroit 48 28 5 101 246 200
x-Chicago 44 26 11 99 245 236
Columbus 28 46 7 63 195 259
Northwest Division
W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver 50 22 9 109 246 198
Calgary 36 29 16 88 197 224
Colorado 41 34 6 88 207 214
Minnesota 35 35 11 81 176 222
Edmonton 32 39 10 74 212 236
PacificDivision
W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Phoenix 41 27 13 95 212 203
x-Los Angeles 40 27 14 94 192 176
x-San Jose 42 29 10 94 225 208
Dallas 42 34 5 89 209 219
Anaheim 34 35 12 80 202 226
Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss
or shootout loss.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 30 24 .556 —
Philadelphia 29 25 .537 1
New York 28 27 .509 2 1/2
Toronto 20 36 .357 11
New Jersey 20 37 .351 11 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami 39 15 .722 —
Atlanta 33 23 .589 7
Orlando 32 23 .582 7 1/2
Washington 12 44 .214 28
Charlotte 7 46 .132 31 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Chicago 43 13 .768 —
Indiana 34 21 .618 8 1/2
Milwaukee 27 28 .491 15 1/2
Detroit 21 34 .382 21 1/2
Cleveland 18 35 .340 23 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 39 14 .736 —
Memphis 31 23 .574 8 1/2
Dallas 31 25 .554 9 1/2
Houston 29 25 .537 10 1/2
New Orleans 14 41 .255 26
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 40 15 .727 —
Denver 29 25 .537 10 1/2
Utah 29 27 .518 11 1/2
Portland 27 29 .482 13 1/2
Minnesota 25 31 .446 15 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 35 20 .636 —
L.A. Clippers 33 22 .600 2
Phoenix 28 26 .519 6 1/2
Golden State 21 33 .389 13 1/2
Sacramento 19 36 .345 16
NBA STANDINGS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 1 0 1.000 —
Philadelphia 1 0 1.000 —
Washington 1 0 1.000 —
Atlanta 0 1 .000 1
Miami 0 2 .000 1 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 2 0 1.000 —
Cincinnati 1 0 1.000 1/2
Chicago 0 1 .000 1 1/2
Houston 0 1 .000 1 1/2
Milwaukee 0 1 .000 1 1/2
Pittsburgh 0 1 .000 1 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 1 0 1.000 —
Colorado 1 0 1.000 —
Los Angeles 1 0 1.000 —
San Diego 0 1 .000 1
San Francisco 0 1 .000 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 1 0 1.000 —
Tampa Bay 1 0 1.000 —
Toronto 1 0 1.000 —
Boston 0 1 .000 1
New York 0 1 .000 1
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 1 0 1.000 —
Kansas City 0 0 .000 1/2
Chicago 0 1 .000 1
Cleveland 0 1 .000 1
Minnesota 0 1 .000 1
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
Texas 1 0 1.000 —
Oakland 1 1 .500 1/2
Seattle 1 1 .500 1/2
Los Angeles 0 0 .000 1/2
MLB STANDINGS NHL STANDINGS
AmericanLeague
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Announced RHP Rick
VanDenHurkdeclinedhisoutright assignment and
elected free agency.
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed INF Jed Lowrie on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 29. Selected
thecontract of INFBrianBixler fromOklahomaCity
(PCL).
NEWYORK METS—Placed OF Andres Torres on
the 15-day DL.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Placed RHP Scott Line-
brink on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 30.
Selected the contract of RHP Victor Marte from
Memphis (PCL).
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA—Signed Sacramento C DeMarcus Cousins
$25,000 for public criticism of NBA officiating after
an April 5 game against the Los Angeles Clippers.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
SEATTLESEAHAWKS—Agreed to terms with CB
Roy Lewis, G Deuce Lutui and LB Barrett Ruud.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
NHL—Suspended Minnesota D Nate Prosser one
game for head-butting Chicago F Jamal Maye.
TRANSACTIONS
SPORTS 14
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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49ers announce signing
of Jacobs to one-year deal
SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco
49ers have officially announced the signing of
running back Brandon Jacobs to a one-year
contract.
The 49ers made the announcement Friday,
more than a week after the two sides agreed to
terms. Jacobs was released March 9 by the
Super Bowl champion Giants after both failed
to work out a restructured contract. He is
expected to play behind Frank Gore and com-
pete with second-year pro Kendall Hunter for
carries with the NFC West champion 49ers.
Jacobs spent seven seasons with New York,
winning two Super Bowls and helping the
Giants beat the 49ers 20-17 in overtime of the
NFC championship game at Candlestick Park.
Sports brief
Williams recording prompts anger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW ORLEANS — A recording of then-
New Orleans defensive coordinator Gregg
Williams urging players to deliver punishing
hits on specific San Francisco players was
released without approval from retired special
teams standout Steve Gleason, who had
helped a documentary filmmaker gain behind-
the-scenes access to the Saints.
“I feel deflated and disappointed. I feel frus-
trated and distracted,” Gleason said in a state-
ment on his website.
Gleason has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,
or ALS, and has allowed filmmaker Sean
Pamphilon to capture his struggle with the
incurable disease. He played for the Saints
from 2000 to 2007 and maintains a strong
relationship with the club, which has backed
his efforts to improve the lives of those living
with the debilitating symptoms of ALS.
Gleason’s connections to the team and to
Pamphilon allowed the documentarian to be in
the room with the Saints defense ahead of
New Orleans’ 36-32 playoff loss to San
Francisco in January.
“The Saints have been incredibly open and
supportive of me and my family during my
disease progression,” Gleason wrote. “From
my perspective, the Saints have helped begin
to shift the paradigm of how an NFL team
should treat its players after retirement.”
“I included Sean Pamphilon in some of
these activities, because I felt my relationship
with the Saints was an integral part of my
overall journey,” Gleason said in the statement
posted Friday. “The Saints trusted me and
gave us unlimited access in filming, and I, in
turn, trusted Sean Pamphilon.”
Gleason said there was an agreement that he
and his family would own the rights to any
recordings made of his interaction with the
Saints and that “nothing can be released with-
out my explicit approval.”
“I did not authorize the public release of any
recordings,” Gleason continued.
Williams is suspended indefinitely for his
admitted role overseeing a bounty system that
rewarded Saints defenders with cash for
painful hits during his tenure with the team
from 2009 to 2011.
SPORTS 15
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
It is the second fight for the 30-year-old
Romo.
“I’m excited,” Atienza said. “I’m always
going to be nervous, even before I spar. I
always get butterflies. But as soon as that first
punch is thrown, that’s when it becomes sec-
ond nature.”
It’s an amazing turnaround for Atienza, who
will fight at 160 pounds; 65 below where he
was three years ago. The weight might have
been the easy part. There aren’t many 34-
year-old married men beginning a boxing
career.
“I think Eddie wanted to see how tough I
was,” Atienza said about his first experiences
back in the ring. “He threw me into the fire
with some of the amateurs at B Street and, I
got my butt kicked plenty of times. But I think
what Eddie saw, and I can’t quote him on this,
but he probably said, ‘hey, this guy can at least
take an ass whoopin’. I didn’t quit. And
maybe that’s what he liked the most.
“This is what I enjoy doing,” Atienza said,
“It’s just a part of me, this is my Mount
Everest. If I win, it’ll be the icing on the cake.
This was my goal. Anything from here is a
bonus for me.”
Along with Atienza’s debut, Croft has put
together a 11-fight card, with bouts in a slew
of different weight classes.
Benjamin Baetiong, representing B Street
Gym, will also make his debut at the age of
13, fighting at 92 pounds against Victor Rios
of Ring of Fire gym in San Francisco.
Jose Landin from San Jose’s PAL will face
Antonio Cardenas of Dreamland at 165
pounds.
Carmelo Diaz from Park Gym is giving up
seven pounds on Gaston Bolanos of Combat
Sports Academy in the fourth bout.
Ulises Serrano will take four fights worth of
experience and represent B Street against
ROF’s Danny Portillo at 145 pounds.
Branndon Adams of 3rd Street Gym will
face Salah Selem of King’s Gym.
Marek Urbanski, a B Street boxer at 230
pounds, makes his debut against Will Prescott
of King’s Gym who is four fights his elder.
Evelio River of Peninsula Boxing Club and
Ali Ahmed will face off in the day’s most
experienced fight. Together, they’ve been in
19 bouts.
Females tango at 123 pounds when Casey
Morton takes on Rebecca Villagran of Pacific
Ring.
Jessi Lopez, another B Street fighter, will
face Andrew Moy in the afternoon’s 10th
fight.
Billy Burke of Woodside fights John
Broussard out of San Jose PAL at 165 pounds.
Mike Marshall, also of Woodside and
Ramon Hernandez of King’s Gym finish off
The 650 Show with their bout at 201 pounds.
chased by B Street Gym in San Mateo. For more
information visit http://bstreetboxing.com/.
Continued from page 11
BOXER
By Brian Grabianowski
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
To most people sailing around the world on
a 40,000 mile journey sounds crazy, but
what’s crazier than that? Turning the journey
into a race.
On Saturday, March 31, the city of Oakland
welcomed more than 250 participants of the
Clipper 11-12 Round the World Yacht Race at
Jack London Square. However, Oakland is
just a stop, until a few weeks later when the
crews will depart once again for the UK, thus
ending the race on the seventh and last leg
where it started.
Every two years, almost 500 participants of
a wide range of ages man boats to begin a race
that touches almost every continent, starting
with the UK and then moving on to Africa,
South America, Australia, Asia, the United
States, Central America and then back to the
starting point in Southampton. During this
most recent competition, two participants
from San Francisco represent the age-diversi-
ty and versatility of which the crews are com-
prised.
“I was looking for a challenge ... it was
everything I’d hoped for,” Lisa Perkin said.
Perkin is 42, and had just completed a
month-long stretch from Rio, eventually com-
ing to Singapore, and finally ending in
Oakland on Saturday.
“It’s not done professionally, it makes sail-
ing available to [anyone],” she said.
Although only two of the 29 days of travel
were sunny, Perkin was able to observe dol-
phins, birds and even whales during the jour-
ney.
On the opposite side of the spectrum, Jim
Cole who is 72, will be departing for the last
leg of the race from New York to the UK.
“It doesn’t matter whether you’ve sailed for
35 days or 35 years, everyone has to go
through preparation and training,” Cole said.
Cole has, as a matter of fact, been sailing for
35 years.
“Some people participating have never set
foot on a boat before their training,” Cole said.
During training, the participants are
observed by a committee to make sure they
work well with other members of the crew.
“When you’re out on the ocean you gotta
make sure you have the right kind of attitude,”
Cole said.
The boats in action are Clipper 68s (68 feet
long), and Clipper 70s (70 feet long), both are
sailing yachts, the Clipper 11-12 being the last
time the 68s will be used. The boats that
arrived in Oakland on Saturday will depart for
Panama on their way to New York and then to
the UK on April 14, on the seventh and last
leg.
Clipper Race yachts will be on display for the pub-
lic to see at the Strictly Sail Pacific Boat Show
Thursday, April 12 to Sunday, April 15, in Jack
London Square, in Oakland.
Round the World
PHOTO COURTESY OF CLIPPER STAFF
Yacht racers of the Clipper 11-12 dock in Bay amid 40,000-mile journey around the world.
Petrino didn’t want 911
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Moments after
their motorcycle accident, Bobby Petrino and
a female employee told a passer-by not to call
911, then got a ride back
to Fayetteville where the
Arkansas football coach
was met by a state trooper
who provides his personal
security during the sea-
son.
New details of the
immediate aftermath of
Petrino’s crash were in a
911 call released Friday
by the state police. The
passer-by, Larry Hendren, describes coming
upon the accident scene Sunday evening just
after Petrino and Jessica Dorrell “were get-
ting up out of the ditch.” He said Petrino was
“walking, but it looked like his face was
bleeding quite a lot.”
“The rider and the passenger of the motor-
cycle declined us to call 911,” Hendren told a
dispatcher. “They got into a vehicle and head-
ed toward the hospital.”
Petrino was taken to a Fayetteville intersec-
tion by another passer-by. There, Dorrell left
in her own car while Petrino was met by Capt.
Lance King, his personal security guard dur-
ing the season. King took Petrino to a hospi-
tal, where he was treated for broken ribs and
a cracked neck vertebra.
State police said Friday they planned to
question the trooper, looking for “any infor-
mation Captain King may have learned about
the crash” during conversations with Petrino.
“While the inquiries have no direct correla-
tion to the investigation of the motor vehicle
crash, the questions are legitimate and worthy
of answers,” state police spokesman Bill
Sadler said. King has been asked to detail “his
involvement with coach Petrino and other
individuals who’ve been identified within the
crash investigation.”
The developments came as Arkansas athlet-
ic director Jeff Long considered the future of
the football coach, whose salary averages
more than $3.5 million.
Bobby Petrino
16
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Pablo Sandoval’s RBI double with
two outs in the ninth pulled the Giants
within a run. But J.J. Putz got Buster
Posey on a grounder to earn the save.
Melky Cabrera hit a two-run homer in
his first game for San Francisco after
coming over in a trade with Kansas City.
Posey, the 2010
NL Rookie of the
Year, singled twice.
The young star
catcher also walked
in his first game
back after the brutal
left leg injury sus-
tained in a home
plate collision last
May 25 with
Florida’s Scott
Cousins.
After having to watch the
Diamondbacks celebrate their division
crown when they clinched it with a vic-
tory over San Francisco last Sept. 23 at
Chase Field, the Giants waited through a
pregame ceremony while Arizona
unveiled a big letter “A” sign designat-
ing the title.
Then the Diamondbacks got to
Lincecum in a hurry.
Willie Bloomquist led off with a sin-
gle and Young, who hit .400 this spring
with five home runs, hit a 2-2 pitch into
the left-field seats.
Lincecum struck out Justin Upton and
Miguel Montero, but Goldschmidt’s
towering home run to left on a 3-1 pitch
made it 3-0. It was Goldschmidt’s third
home run in 10 at bats against the two-
time NL Cy Young Award winner.
San Francisco got close in the fifth
when Angel Pagan led off with a double,
and Cabrera’s line drive to right
bounced off the top of the fence in right
and over for a home run.
The Giants tied it at 3 in the sixth after
singles by Aubrey Huff and Brandon
Belt. Ryan Theriot advanced the runners
with a sacrifice bunt, and Huff scored on
Brandon Crawford’s groundout.
But Arizona regained the lead its next
time up. Upton doubled and advanced to
third on a deep fly out by Montero.
Goldschmidt walked and Jason Kubel
reached when Posey couldn’t handle his
spinning hit in front of the plate. With
the bases loaded, Roberts lined a double
into the left-field corner for a 5-3 lead,
ending Lincecum’s evening.
Lincecum struck out five in a row in
one stretch. He was 0-3 in four starts
against Arizona last season.
NOTES: Young hit his second career
opening day HR. The first was in 2008.
... Giants RHP Ryan Vogelsong threw
three innings in a rehab start in the
opener for Triple-A Fresno Thursday
night, allowing no runs on three hits in
four innings, striking out six and walk-
ing three. ... The Giants and
Diamondbacks met in a season opener
for the first time. ... San Francisco 1B
prospect Angel Villalona’s option to
Class A San Jose was canceled because
of his continuing visa problems in the
Dominican Republic. The Giants say
Villalona was placed on the Major
League Baseball restricted list pending
further developments. ... The attendance
of 49,130 was the third-largest opening
day crowd at Chase Field and fourth
largest for any game there.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
Buster Posey
SPORTS 17
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
mercy-rule style — in fact, 17 of
CSM’s 31 victories have come in
that fashion.
Their latest win was a revenge
victory against De Anza, 9-1. The
Dons are the only team to hand the
Bulldogs a conference loss this sea-
son.
San Mateo freshman pitcher
Michele Pilster (Capuchino)
allowed just three hits, struck out
three and gave up one earned run to
earn her 23rd victory. The mark is
the best in the state.
Jamie Navarro hit a home run,
scored twice and had four RBI for
the day.
Annabel Hertz, Jacey McDaid,
Kaylin Stewart, Selina Rodriguez
and Navarro each had two hits.
“As long as we play our best, I
think we’re going to come out on
top,” Borg said of their matchup
against Ohlone. “We were the co-
conference champs with them in
2005 and 2007 but since then
they’ve won it outright. So, for four
years we’ve been second place,
that’s kind of how we look at it. It’s
always been a real tight run, it’s not
like they’ve blown us out of the
water. It’s been one game, one run.
So, I think we have all the tools nec-
essary to overcome that this year, I
really, really do. And I have a great
group. They just don’t like to lose.”
Ohlone comes into the game win-
ners of three straight. After a loss to
Hartnell, the Renegades have
outscored their opponents 19-5. In
an 11-2 win over Foothill, Mariah
Nisbet had four RBI and Renelle
Taylor went yard.
First pitch in this conference
showdown is scheduled for 11 a.m.
on the Ohlone campus.
MENLO COLLEGE
PLAYER GOING PRO
Menlo College men’s soccer
standout Sam Zipperstein will take
his talents to the next level, agreeing
to go to the Kitsap Pumas of the
Professional Development League.
The Kitsap Pumas hail from
Bremerton, Wash. and will enter the
2012 season as the league’s defend-
ing champions.
“I am very excited,” Zipperstein
said via Menlo press release.
“Kitsap has a good team, so I am
excited to have a shot yet I know
that it is going to be a huge chal-
lenge. But I am ready for it.”
Zipperstein’s two years in Menlo
blue were as good as any, compiling
four goals and 18 assists throughout
his Oaks tenure.
Zipperstein’s 11 assists in the
2011 season ranked in the top 20 in
the nation, as the team captain
helped lead Menlo to an undefeated
California Pacific Conference sea-
son, culminating in the squad’s first
ever trip to the NAIA National
Tournament.
“Sam’s a really hard-working guy
and it’s nice that it paid off for him,”
said Oaks second-year head coach
Mike Keller. “The coaching staff
and the program are fired up for
him. It’s a great opportunity and it’s
nothing but excitement for Sam.”
Zipperstein is a two-time All-
Conference first teamer and, this
past season, the senior mid-fielder
was named as an NAIA All-
American Honorable Mention as
well as a Jewish Sports Review First
Team All-American.
MENLO WRESTLERS
ALL-ACADEMIC
The NAIA and National
Wrestling Coaches Association
announced their All-Academic
Team Thursday, and Menlo
College’s Angel Garcia and
Nicholas Gill both found them-
selves on the list..
Garcia is a month removed from
earning a seventh place finish in the
133-pound weight class at the
NAIA National Tournament in Des
Moines, Iowa.
Continued from page 11
CSM
18
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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The national bird has been making a recent
comeback after a long struggle for survival in
the lower 48 states. Bald eagles were first feder-
ally protected in 1940 and were only recently
removed from the endangered species list, in
2007.
“The cause of the early decline is unknown,
but DDT played a part in preventing the species
from nesting successfully,” said Morlan.
Pesticide DDT caused eggshell thinning
which was believed to cause nesting failure, he
said. Since the banning of DDT in 1973 many
fish-eating populations, including bald eagles,
ospreys and pelicans, have recovered in
California.
The reintroduction of bald eagles to central
California was the project of the Ventana
Wildlife Society, based in Monterey. The proj-
ect, which lasted from 1986 to 1994, involved
bringing dozens of bald eagle chicks from the
East Coast. They brought chicks the size of
turkeys from Vancouver Island in British
Columbia to Big Sur. To find eagle chicks, the
Ventana team flew over the island in a helicop-
ter, said Glenn Stewart, who worked on the
project and is now Director of the UC Santa
Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group at
UCSC’s Long Marine Lab.
“It was easy to find the nests,” he said. “They
can fill the back of a pickup truck.”
The recovery goal was three pairs, said
Stewart. There are now 20 pairs in central
California. More than 200 bald eagle chicks
have fledged since 1993.
“It’s a very healthy bald eagle population
today,” he said.
Bald eagles are natural to the coastal areas
from Baja California to Alaska, said Stewart.
“Now we are seeing them in places birders have
never seen them before,” he said.
He explained that the relatively recent con-
struction of reservoirs like Crystal Springs are
new habitats for the birds away from the coast-
line.
The Ventana bald eagle restoration was a eye-
opener for Ventana Wildlife’s Joe Burnett, who
worked on the project as a young biologist.
“The Bald Eagle was a big affirmation, to me,
that we could return endangered and threatened
species back to their historic range,” said
Burnett, who is now working to restore condors
to central California.
The Sequoia Audubon Society is now send-
ing weekend volunteers with spotting scopes to
the nest viewpoint off of Skyline Drive. The
viewing site is about a half mile away from the
nest.
While the Audubon Society has detailed
directions for viewing the birds on their web-
site, it is hard to spot the birds without some
guidance, said Leslie Flint, who is on board of
directors of the Audubon Society.
If it would have jeopardized the birds, they
would have kept the nest site a secret, said Flint.
But this particular nest on private watershed
property provides a unique opportunity for peo-
ple to see the majestic birds without disturbing
them.
Viewers are essentially guaranteed to see the
eagles because one bird is constantly sitting on
the eggs. There is not much activity on the nest
other than the eagle getting up and turning the
eggs about once every hour, said Flint. Every so
often nest relief occurs, when the eagles will
switch off sitting on the eggs.
The pair will be more active in about two
weeks when the eggs are expected to hatch and
they start bringing food up to the nest.
The Audubon volunteers have already seen a
surprising turnout from birders and curious
locals.
“It’s exciting because it is our national sym-
bol,” said Flint. “And it’s a big bird.”
Bald eagles have a wingspan of up to eight
feet. They pair for life and are loyal to their nest-
ing site, meaning Crystal Springs pair will like-
ly return to the same nest for years to come.
Audubon volunteers will be assisting viewers
at the viewpoint off of from 9 a.m. to noon,
Saturdays and Sundays. Volunteers will cancel
in rain. For detailed directions to the bald eagle
nest viewing site visit sequoia-audubon.org/.
Continued from page 1
EAGLES
If the City Council approves the plan,
$28,200 will be added to the fire department
budget which, for fiscal year 2012, is current-
ly $3.48 million. The extra funds will replen-
ish the overtime pool which will be shifted to
personnel costs.
Firefighters in their first two years on the
job were absent an average of 4.31 percent,
according to an attendance study cited by
Skinner in his report.
Aside from the financial piece, using exist-
ing employees as back fill rather than new
workers can lead to mandating shifts and
fatigue which in turn can influence injuries or
poor decision making, according to Skinner’s
memo to the council.
Skinner was not available to comment on
whether the latter has been happening but
wrote that employee fatigue is “underappreci-
ated” when it comes to determining the cause
the accidents and behavioral issues.
Councilman Ron Collins sees no problem
with the staffing increase suggestion.
“Any time we can give people a job, make
the fire department more attractive and add
qualified people, why wouldn’t you want to
do that?” Collins asked.
Others, like fellow Councilman Bob
Grassilli, are also behind the proposal.
Grassilli said finding the perfect staffing bal-
ance is always a question when a job requires
round-the-clock workers. The choices are
either overstaff “a bit” or “try to get by with
what you have.”
As the department’s employees age,
Grassilli said having extra workers — or at
least not relying on overtime to meet minimal
levels — is a good move so the city isn’t
scrambling in months or a year when retire-
ments create vacancies.
“It’s like insurance,” Grassilli said.
It’s also a “big win” in terms of fire costs,
said Assistant City Manager Brian Moura.
The city dismantled its joint Belmont-San
Carlos Fire Department last year as a cost-
savings move and established a hybrid depart-
ment with Redwood City. Last year, Moura
said the city spent $7.1 million compared to
this year’s budgeted $5.8 million — a $1.3
million difference — while Belmont
announced it is spending $7.4 million on its
department.
The proposal for three more
firefighter/paramedics is another opportunity
to keep costs down, Moura said.
The San Carlos City Council meets 7 p.m.
Monday, April 9 at City Hall, 600 Elm St., San
Carlos.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
tabs on top and the ability to snap together or be
used individually. The system can be thrown in
a purse, backpack or diaper bag.
The two designs are a bright and bold mix of
colors and a subdued darker version. Dent
explained they wanted something that was
beautiful. Most of the options for parents were
in kid colors or covered in ducks. While it’s a
cute look, it isn’t Dent’s or Evans’ style.
Orders are starting to roll in for the first prod-
uct, which was just released for sale about six
weeks ago. The ladies aren’t slowing down.
They are already focusing on their next product
— which they are trying to raise seed funding
for online through Kickstarter. Through the
online site which allows small businesses to
find backers, the women have a cute video
explaining their product and a goal of raising
$8,000 by 6:35 a.m. Friday, May 4. Reaching
that amount would allow Dent and Evans to
purchase the first inventory of their second
product, Car-Go, which brings their filing sys-
tem into a bin that fits into your trunk while
leaving room for your stroller, grocery bags,
whatever.
The key to Kickstarter, however, is that they
only get the money if they reach the goal by the
deadline. As of Friday afternoon, the project
had drawn 19 backers for a total of $2,195.
Backers get to choose their level of support,
which could result in getting products. For a
$45 pledge, for example, a person will get the
Files. For $65, a person would receive both the
Car-Go and the Files.
Neither women has a background in design.
The process of building a business and a prod-
uct has been a learning process. But it all start-
ed on a hospital tour, where the two met.
Both quite pregnant with twins at the time,
the women quickly bonded over their very large
bellies. They learned both were having twins,
using the same doctor and had the same due
date. Despite this, Dent ended up having her
twins about three weeks before Evans. As new
moms with twins, the women bonded further.
They went through the struggles of managing
two children, finding child care and going back
to work at the same time. Working together on
sugarSNAP has been another adventure — one
both women do in addition to their day jobs.
Today their kids are 4. The women both live
in San Carlos with their husbands, who are very
supportive of the business.
To learn more about SugarSNAP visit
www.heysugarsnap.com. To support
sugarSNAP on Kickstarter visit
http://kck.st/HDS62l.
Continued from page 1
SNAP
dents at the remaining eight campus-
es. Admissions after that could also
be limited if Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax
measure increase is not passed in
November, which could reduce
enrollment by 25,000 students.
As budget cuts have plagued the
public university system for the past
three years, campuses have looked for
ways to combat these hardships
through tuition increases and decreas-
es in the number of faculty and staff.
However, these tactics do not com-
pare to the impact that this new move
will have on students. It is one thing if
a student is enrolled in the school and
must adjust to the circumstances, but
it is another if a student cannot attend
the school at all.
The students to be hardest hit will
most likely be community college
students. There are many students
who have planned to complete two
years at a community college with the
goal of transferring to a CSU to
achieve their degree. It is for many
their only option, whether it is
because of the university’s affordabil-
ity or convenience. Also, if these stu-
dents are not admitted to these uni-
versities, they may have to wait addi-
tional semesters to complete their col-
lege careers.
As a student with limited options,
Zumot chose San Francisco State
University because of the proximity
of the school to where she lives in
Millbrae. Her parents prefer for her to
stay close because they believe she is
too young to leave home. Zumot, 18,
graduated early from Mills High
School after her sophomore year by
taking the California High School
Proficiency Examination. This
allowed her to begin college when she
was 16, making her younger than
most college students.
“My parents don’t want me moving
out any time soon and they would
prefer that I go to a college I can drive
to from home. If I don’t get into any
colleges around here, I’d basically be
stuck at home waiting until I can,”
Zumot said.
The liberal studies major plans to
study to become an elementary
school teacher at the San Francisco
campus, one of the eight CSUs that
will still be accepting students in the
spring, but its admissions will be
reduced significantly to only students
who have achieved associate degrees
and junior standing.
De Luna said she has already had
her share of problems enrolling in
classes at the community college
level and is skeptical of continuing
her education at a public university.
Another reason she stated for avoid-
ing public schools was that her major,
biochemistry, was impacted in the
CSU system, meaning there are not
enough spots and resources for those
interested due to budget constraints.
Skyline student, David Martinez,
has already been accepted into San
Francisco State University for the fall
2012 semester, but acknowledged
that if he waited any longer, he may
not have had the same outcome.
“I was able to get in this year, but if
I had to apply for the spring semester,
it would have been a lot harder,” said
Martinez.
Continued from page 1
CSU
By Chloee Weiner
I
guess you could call me a sports fan. I
like March Madness, I eat nachos and
chicken wings on Super Bowl Sunday
and I watch FIFA World Cup games well after
the U.S. team is eliminated. But there is no
sport in the world that
comes nearly as close to
my heart as baseball.
To be admittedly senti-
mental and cliché, my fan-
dom began before I can
even remember. My first
few games were probably
spent sleeping in a blanket
in the arms of my parents
at Candlestick Park, but
later memories at the very same park are crys-
tal clear. I remember being a toddler, shivering
and shuddering as the ice-cold Candlestick
winds threatened to tear through my layers of
clothing. My dad, who has always been
responsible for taking me to most of the games
I attend, spotted my discomfort immediately
and offered to take me home early. “No! We
have to stay until the end,” I’d insist, never
wanting to miss the end of the game. But my
obsession did not truly begin until I was 10
years old.
When I was in fifth grade, the San Francisco
Giants were already spending their sixth year
in their current home at AT&T Park and for
reasons still unknown, I was hooked from the
beginning of the 2005-06 season. My interest
soon became nothing short of fanaticism. The
hours between 5 p.m. (when I returned from
any given after-school program) and 7 p.m.
were grueling before night games as I’d count
down the minutes until first pitch. I’d beg to
stay up late if the Giants played extra innings
and, on the occasional off day, I’d mope relent-
lessly. I watched, eyes glued to the screen, as
Matt Cain made his Major League debut
At 24 Willie
Mays Plaza
Great
night of music
Rodrigo y Gabriela
shine at the Fox
SEE PAGE 22
Titanic ball
It’s been 100 years and The Titanic
Anniversary Ball marks the remembrance
Saturday night.
After a dance lesson, Bangers & Mash
plays a variety of Edwardian waltzes,
sizzling Ragtime and other vintage
ballroom dances from the Titanic’s own
1912 set list. Vintage or modern evening
dress is admired but not required. Event
includes dance performances, a light
snack buffet and a no-host bar. The ball
takes place 7 p.m. at the San Mateo
Masonic Lodge Ballroom, 100 N. Ellsworth
Ave., in San Mateo. $15 in advance, $20 at
the door. For more information call 510-
522-1731.
Easter egg hunt
Free Malibu Castle Annual Easter Egg
Hunt includes photos with Easter Bunny
and mascot Maliroo. Facepainting and
balloon animals provided by entertainers
from ‘Magic Princess.’ Registration from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Raffles every hour
starting from 1:30 p.m. 320 Blomquist St.,
Redwood City. For more information call
367-1906.
Best bets
By David Germain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Has it really been 13
years since a teenager got it on with an apple
pie to launch one of Hollywood’s most-suc-
cessful gross-out franchises?
“American Pie” came out of nowhere in the
summer of 1999 to become a $100 million
smash and continued with 2001’s “American
Pie 2” and 2003’s “American Wedding.”
Hollywood figures it’s time for another slice.
“American Reunion” brings back all the prin-
cipal cast for the first time since “American
Pie 2” for an outrageous reunion weekend.
Here’s a look at what the actors and their
characters have been up to in the last 13 years.
Ready for one more slice?
‘American Reunion’ rounds up ’Pie’ cast again
See PIE, Page 21
See STUDENT, Page 21
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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$405,000: Judgment for
Domestic Violence Survivor
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
You probably haven’t been
lying awake in bed at night
wondering whatever
became of Stifler and
Oz and the rest of the
horny kids from the
o r i g i n a l
“American Pie”
movie.
Yet here they
are, after 13 years
and a couple of
sequels, in
“ A m e r i c a n
Reunion.” And
they’re more bland
than bawdy these
days.
That’s part of the joke:
that they (and we) aren’t in
high school anymore, that we all
have to grow up and function as adults with
responsibilities and whatnot. We can’t spend
all our time thinking lascivious thoughts about
pastry. That’s just adolescent.
But that doesn’t make for a
very fun or funny movie;
instead, “American
Reunion” relies on
clichis about nostal-
gia, forced tension
over strained
friendships and
m e l o d r a m a
about the rekin-
dling of first
loves.
Jim and
Michelle (Jason
Biggs and Alyson
Hannigan) are now
married with a 2-year-old
son and zero sex life. But
they return to their Michigan
hometown for a 10-year high school
reunion that’s being staged three years
late because supposedly no one could get
their act together on time. It’s a plot con-
trivance, leave it at that.
There they run into the old gang, including
Chris Klein as Oz, who’s now a slick sports
anchor, Eddie Kaye Thomas as the sophisti-
cated Finch and Seann William Scott as
Stifler, who’s still ... Stifler. Tara Reid and
Mena Suvari show up as personality-free
blonde robots Vicky and Heather, respective-
ly. And really, the women get short shrift
here. They’re either boring good girls or sex-
ually aggressive nymphets, with no shadings
of substance or complexity in between.
“Harold & Kumar” creators Jon Hurwitz
and Hayden Schlossberg take over as writers
and directors but the sense of unpredictability
that infused their own franchise never surfaces
here. Plus, this kind of raunchy, hard-R come-
dy has been done — and done better — count-
less times since “American Pie” debuted and
seemed fresh in 1999. Movies like “The 40-
Year-Old Virgin,” “Forgetting Sarah Marshall”
and even the recent hockey flick “Goon”
(which also stars Scott) have found a way to
push boundaries more daringly while simulta-
neously finding an unexpected, resonant
sweetness.
“American Reunion” achieves neither of
these extremes, and playing intrusive, cloying
music to signal that certain moments are sup-
posed to be special isn’t terribly persuasive.
The few moments the film gets right — which
is true of the whole series — involve Eugene
Levy as Jim’s awkward but well-intentioned
dad. A grieving widower, he misses his son
and longs for the companionship of a woman
once more.
He has a couple of moments with Stifler and
even with the notorious Stifler’s mom
(Jennifer Coolidge, brash as ever) which bring
a temporary loveliness to the proceedings.
Then again he also has to go through the oblig-
atory trying-on-clothes montage as he pre-
pares to take a photo for his online dating pro-
file — yet another cliche.
“American Reunion,” a Universal Pictures
release, is R for crude and sexual content
throughout, nudity, language brief drug use
and teen drinking. Running time: 105 minutes.
One and a half stars out of four.
‘American Reunion’ isn’t even half baked
John Christgau
Local educator John Christgau dis-
cusses his book ‘Birch Coulie: The
Epic Battle of the Dakota War,’ an
account of the war between white
settlers and the Dakota Indians in
Minnesota. 7 p.m. Thursday, April 12,
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.For
more information visit smcl.org.
All events are free unless otherwise noted. Please check before the
event in case of schedule changes.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
LOTUS
BUDDHIST
CIRCLE
(Rissho Kosei-kai of SF)
851 N. San Mateo Dr., Suite D
San Mateo
650.200.3755
English Service: 4th Sunday at 10 AM
Study: Tuesday at 7 PM
www.lotusbuddhistcircle.com
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
Jason Biggs as Jim:
Since “American Pie,” Biggs starred in
Woody Allen’s “Anything Else” and had roles
in Kevin Smith’s “Jersey Girl” and such films as
“Saving Silverman,” “Prozac Nation” and
“Eight Below,” while giving the small-screen a
try with the TV comedy “Mad Love.”
But he’s still best known for his role as a
horny teen who pleasures himself with a pie.
In “American Reunion,” Jim’s settled in with
Michelle (Alyson Hannigan), whom he married
in “American Wedding.” Despite having a
young son, Jim’s still finding himself in com-
promising sexual situations, this time with the
hot 18-year-old who had a crush on him when
he babysat her as a child.
“In terms of headspace, I think he’s surprised
to find himself in really a similar sort of sce-
nario as the first film, and frankly, all the films,
which is to say, he is sexually frustrated,” Biggs
said. “He’s like, ‘You know, haven’t I grown
up? I’ve got a wife and a kid. How is this possi-
ble?”’
Alyson Hannigan as Michelle:
Already a fan favorite as bookish Willow on
“Buffy the Vampire Slayer” when “American
Pie” came out, Hannigan has continued her TV
success with the comedy “How I Met Your
Mother.”
In “American Reunion,” the adorable band-
camp geek of the first “American Pie” has
grown into a tender mom, who happens to be
married to a guy who keeps stumbling into
embarrassing sex-capades.
Hannigan has a pretty good idea of where
Michelle might be at if there were another
“American Pie” movie 13 years from now.
“She’ll probably be worried about her son
being a teenager, because he’s got half of Jim’s
genes,” Hannigan said. “So maybe she’ll be
like, looking at boarding schools, military
schools, like on a remote island. Where all the
girls will be safe.”
Seann William Scott as Steve Stifler:
After party-boy Stifler, Scott has kept a busy
big-screen career going with “Dude, Where’s
My Car?”, “Road Trip,” “The Dukes of
Hazzard,” “The Rundown” and “Role Models.”
His latest, the hockey tale “Goon,” has just
opened.
As “American Reunion” begins, Stifler’s the
only one of the gang who hasn’t gotten on with
his life. He’s just thrilled for a chance to relive
the glory days of keggers and mayhem with his
old pals.
“I think Stifler’s been waiting for the high
school reunion since the day he graduated high
school,” Scott said. “He doesn’t grow up a
whole lot. It’s just enough where he, in this
movie, he becomes a little bit more human. ...
For him, high school was awesome, and he
doesn’t really know how he fits in. I don’t know
how much he’s going to change after we see
him in this movie. I think that’s probably
enough for him for the next five years.”
Mena Suvari as Heather:
Suvari was an all-American breakout star in
1999, following “American Pie” just months
later with her role as Kevin Spacey’s teen
temptress in “American Beauty.” She had a
recurring role on TV’s “Six Feet Under” and
appeared in such movies as “Loser,” “Sugar &
Spice” and “Beauty Shop.”
“American Pie” cast Heather and Oz (Chris
Klein) as the perfect high school couple, whose
relationship is tested as graduation nears.
Thirteen years later, they’ve gone their separate
ways, only to find old feelings resurface.
Suvari reflects on old feelings of her own as
she considers the success of “American Pie.”
“It was the first studio film I’d ever done,”
Suvari said. “I was so green I had honestly no
idea what it all meant, what I was really doing.
I was just excited and thrilled to have a job. I
honestly thought that every movie made a hun-
dred-million dollars when it came out. People
were like congratulating me. I was just thinking,
like, OK, thanks.”
Chris Klein as Oz:
Klein has had ups and downs since
“American Pie” with such duds as “Rollerball”
and “Say It Isn’t So.” He also co-starred in “We
Were Soldiers” and “The United States of
Leland.”
“American Reunion” has ex-jock Oz living
the high life. He’s a national sports broadcaster
with a gorgeous home in Los Angeles and a
babe of a girlfriend — who starts to pale in Oz’s
eyes as he gets reacquainted with Heather.
“On paper, he’s seemingly having it all and
kind of living the American dream, or his ver-
sion of it. But then he sees Heather for the first
time in a long time, and the spark is still there
and that vibe of first love is still alive in him,”
Klein said. “Then he gets confused, and as only
‘American Pie’ can do, all hell breaks loose.”
Eddie Kaye Thomas as Finch:
Along with roles in “Harold & Kumar Go to
White Castle” and its two sequels, Thomas has
had steady success on TV with “How to Make
it In America,” “’Til Death” and a recurring
voice role on “American Dad.”
Finch returns home for “American Reunion”
as the envy of his friends, sharing tales of his
globe-trotting, adventurous life — but conceal-
ing a big secret.
Unlike most of his “American Pie” co-stars,
Thomas attended his own high school reunion,
but he found it had few revelations in the era of
online social networking.
“I kind of hang out with all the people I was
friends with then, and I had seen all the people
I was interested in on Facebook. I know who
got fat, and I know who got hot, and I know
who was successful, and I know who we
thought was going to be successful and wasn’t.
You lose a lot of the element of surprise,”
Thomas said.
Tara Reid as Vicky:
Her small but memorable role in Joel and
Ethan Coen’s “The Big Lebowski” put Reid on
the map, and after “American Pie,” her credits
included “Josie and the Pussycats,” “National
Lampoon’s Van Wilder” and Robert Altman’s
“Dr. T and the Women.”
Like Heather and Oz, Vicky encounters her
old flame, Kevin (Thomas Ian Nicholas), in
“American Reunion,” resurrecting thoughts
about her choices.
Reid has not been to a school reunion herself,
but the latest sequel gave her a taste of what it’s
like.
“It did feel like a high school reunion. That
many years have gone by, actually a little bit
longer, and we all started off together, and we
all haven’t been together in such a long time,”
Reid said. “The title of the movie says how it
was for us in real life, too.”
Thomas Ian Nicholas as Kevin:
The child star of “Rookie of the Year,
Nicholas has had his biggest success as an adult
with the “American Pie” franchise. Also a musi-
cian, he has released two albums, and one of his
songs is included on the “American Reunion”
soundtrack.
Now married in “American Reunion,” Kevin
has some troubling moments after he’s reunited
with Vicky, learning that when the gang gets
back together, old habits can reassert them-
selves.
“It’s one of those things where I think it’s
very true to life,” said Nicholas, who showed up
on set figuring everyone had changed and
grown up. “Then as soon as I got back in the
room and everyone was there, without even
thinking about it, I fell back into the niche that I
had in the group. And everyone else seemed the
same. ... That magic and chemistry and intangi-
ble thing kind of just returned, and we were
right back there.”
Shannon Elizabeth as Nadia:
Elizabeth went on to co-star in “Tomcats,”
“Scary Movie,” “13 Ghosts” and “Jay and
Silent Bob Strike Back.” She also competed on
“Dancing With the Stars.”
The Czech bombshell of a foreign-exchange
student who inexplicably had the hots for Jim in
“American Pie,” Nadia turns up in “American
Reunion” with a substitute guy who’s a bit of a
Jim clone.
“All I can tell you is, she went back home, she
missed Jim and she found another boy that
could kind of be in his place. She never quite
got over him,” Elizabeth said. “She’ll probably
pick Jim up when he gets divorced.”
Continued from page 19
PIE
against the Colorado Rockies, feeling an inex-
plicable loyalty to him from the beginning. My
fandom continued through middle school,
when I was one of the few girls to find com-
mon ground with the boys, proudly sporting
my Omar Vizquel jersey at school. I groaned
with frustration alongside my father as we
watched players like Ryan Klesko and Ray
Durham hit groundball after groundball in the
later years of their careers. I was heartbroken
in 2009 when I believed, for the first time, that
the Giants really had a chance at the then-elu-
sive playoffs and was rewarded with the magic
of 2010, even skipping school to attend the
championship parade.
As a sophomore in high school, my love
affair was hindered by increased workload and
the distraction of friends, but my loyalty per-
sisted. As a junior, I couldn’t be more excited
for the season. I’ve longed to come home after
a day of school and practice to the voices of
Kruk and Kuip, or Miller and Flemming. The
Midnight Replay will undoubtedly accompany
my late-night essay marathons and the KNBR
morning show will provide the soundtrack to
my drive to school. I’ll feel guilty on the nights
when I leave the Giants to see a movie or to
spend time with friends, only to later remem-
ber that neither Brian Wilson nor Sergio Romo
is aware of my individual existence. So I guess
you could say I’m a baseball fan and even for
a young one, I’m as sentimental as they come.
As college looms in the near future, I just
spent most of my Spring Break looking at
schools and can’t help but notice my tendency
to only visit colleges located in towns with
renowned baseball franchises (Boston,
Chicago and even Los Angeles, to name a
few). No matter the staggering differences
between my life when I attended my first game
and my life as I’ll attend my first game of the
season, the comfort of baseball never fails to
remain constant.
Chloee Weiner is a junior at Crystal Springs
Uplands School. Student News appears in the
weekend edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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AUTOBODY & PAINT
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
OAKLAND — If you’re a Bay
Area purist of Rodrigo y Gabriela,
the guitar maestros from Mexico,
you woke up Friday morning with a
bit of an internal conflict.
OK, a rather big one.
On the one hand, you have the
purist side of your persona. You’re
in love with RYG’s carefully craft-
ed, yet masterfully erratic guitar
artistry that has catapulted them into
international stardom. RYG’s span-
ish influenced style is not unique by
any stretch of the imagination. Yet,
there is something about watching
them play with one another that has
captured the heart of countless fans.
Thursday night’s ticket for their
show at the Fox Theater in Oakland
was without a doubt the hottest,
most difficult to come upon of the
Latin music concert year so far. And
with good reason — there is some-
thing darn near magical about
watching the duo treat their guitars
like art canvases.
But on the other hand, there is
part of you that went to their show
on Thursday and got something you
weren’t expecting and, as a RYG
purist, perhaps it fell a little short of
your initial expectation. So you
don’t quite know if you liked the
concert or not. What a moral dilem-
ma to have. Those who came to the
Fox Theater in Oakland expecting
two hours of the duo sitting, pick-
ing, plucking and strumming their
way to musical nirvana instead got
the pair plus the Caribbean rhythm
machine C.U.B.A. equipped with
piano, brass and percussion to
accompany the RYG guitars. If you
didn’t do your homework and had
no previous experience with “Area
52,” their fifth studio album, you
were caught a bit off-guard and it
probably didn’t take too long into
their rendition of “Santo Domingo,”
and “I Like It Like That,” (the for-
mer being off of the 52 album) for
some in the audience to go, “hey,
what gives? Is this even Rodrigo y
Gabriela?”
Well, yes. Yes it was. But the truth
is, what occurred on Thursday night
at the Fox was much bigger than
just the tandem. Yes, as a RYG
purist, you’re allowed a bit of scorn,
but not too much. That’s because
with “Area 52” and their show at the
Fox, RYG treated their fans to a
deeper side of their music — a
whole new level of musicianship.
While Rodrigo y Gabriela are still a
mind-blowing act that shine
extremely bright, what stood out
was the fusion between RYG and
C.U.B.A. For musical purists and
those with adventurous minds,
Thursday’s show answered the
question of what would happen if
the tandem collaborated with an
equally gifted set of musicians —
just what kind of magic could they
produce.
The answer is nearly two hours of
Spanish guitar turned Cuban jazzed
mixed with Caribbean salsa that
transformed what at times may feel
repetitive into a wonderful potpour-
ri of Latin sound.
And thus, your conflict: Do you
stay upset that at times the addition
of C.U.B.A. may have drowned out
RYG guitars and as such deprived
you from a pure Rodrigo y Gabriela
experience? Or are you one of us,
those who believes that the fusion
between the Spanish and Caribbean
sound opens up a whole different
door to the Rodrigo y Gabriela
experience?
There was very little you hadn’t
heard before coming from the Fox
Theater stage on Thursday. “Area
52” is mostly Rodrigo y Gabriela
reworked by the ears and hands of
Peter Asher and Alex Wilson.
Wilson was present on piano for the
show and his reputation as a
Caribbean-meets-African sound
arranger precedes him.
The show begins and ends with
the duo accompanied on stage by
C.U.B.A. performing “Diablo
Rojo,” Ixtapa” and “Juan Loco”
among others. They’re songs well
known by RYG fans.
The trick, and the fun, revolved
around understanding and appreci-
ating the composition and comple-
mentation of C.U.B.A. to Rodrigo y
Gabriela. RYG were at the forefront
the entire time, leading the show
and at times, rather valiantly, letting
members of C.U.B.A. take the spot-
light. Rest assured, it isn’t some-
thing they would do for just some
amateur band. C.U.B.A and its
members have the ability to put on
one hell of a show by themselves.
But it’s RYG’s willingness to share
and as such, explore their own
music that made the evening and in
large parts “Area 52” stand out.
“Santo Domingo,” “11:11”
“Tamacun” take on additional lay-
ers with that brass, soulful Latin
funk of C.U.B.A. Sure, RYG could
have played that show alone and
been just as fantastic. But the ques-
tion is, why? Or perhaps more fit-
ting, why not?
The “how?” of Thursday’s show
is just as interesting. Most artists
need that lyrical element to engage
their audience. The sing-along of it
all keeps fans engaged and partici-
pating.
But RYG don’t utter a single lyric
and still fill venues like the Fox with
energy. Fans jumped, stomped and
danced their way through the near
two hours of concert. And thus, it
became crystal clear that Rodrigo y
Gabriela’s music, their passion and
love-making with the guitar, speak a
completely different language. One
that we all speak.
And that is nothing to fight over.
Rodrigo y Gabriela shine at the Fox
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Rodrigo y Gabriela,the guitar maestros from Mexico,rocked the Fox Theater
in Oakland Thursday night. See more photos at http://bit.ly/HkSkBg.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
SOPHISTICATED FOUR SEASONS
HOTEL DENVER SHOWCASES CON-
TEMPORARY COLORADO ARTISTS.
The 2010 opening of the sleekly elegant Four
Seasons Hotel Denver marked a celebratory
moment in the local art community, putting on
display a spectacular assembly of nearly 1,200
pieces of original art, 90 percent by Colorado
artists. The majority of the works are in the
hotel’s public spaces, including within its sig-
nature restaurant, EDGE, and are sited so that
guests have the pleasure of experiencing the
collection casually and naturally.
Thierry Kennel, general manager of Four
Seasons Hotel Denver, said, “We are thrilled
to support the local arts community and show-
case amazing works created by artists from
across the state of Colorado. It’s rare that a
hotel has such as vast collection of local art-
work and our guests just love it. We’ve had
numerous requests for the artists’ names and
for more information on many of the pieces on
display in the lobby and EDGE Restaurant.”
Barbara Lewis and Liz Graham, principals
of LewisGraham Art Consultants, were
brought into the project early in its planning
phase, not only to acquire the art but also to
ensure that it would be fully integrated into
the hotel’s fabric. Their broad knowledge of
their state’s art community allowed them to
deliver to their client arguably the largest and
most diverse collection of Contemporary
Colorado art ever assembled, in media includ-
ing glass, marble, bronze, metal, oils, pastels,
photography and giclee prints.
Lewis and Graham said, “The Four Seasons
project couldn’t have happened at a better
time for the Denver art community. Many
local artists and galleries were experiencing
hard times with the economic down turn. We
were commissioning pieces and purchasing
art at a time when artists and galleries really
needed to sell work. There was also a lot of
excitement about having a prestigious Four
Seasons Hotel opening in Denver. Local
artists were thrilled to be associated with the
project and happy to have a brand new high
end venue to display their work.”
The hotel’s designers carefully provided for
the display of the collection in a variety ways.
Backlit niches were created in Guest Floor
Elevator Lobbies to receive Helen Gillespie’s
constructs of Colorado vineyard vines with
patina and Ty Gillespie’s mixed media model
boat hulls. A multi-paneled giclee on board
covered in resin by Grant Louwagie and Jared
Hankins was installed in the First Floor Lobby
Bar in such a way that its segments could be
moved to reveal large screen televisions. A
blown-up photo image of a smoothly polished
rock was placed in the hotel’s spa as a whim-
sical nod to the Rocky Mountain Hot Stone
treatment offered therein.
The size, scale and statement of larger
pieces were closely considered in their siting.
The strong verticality of Denver artist Trine
Bumiller’s soaring paired pieces “Winterval,”
abstracted images of trees in winter that flank
the hotel’s open grand staircase, perfectly fits
with the movement associated with that key
architectural feature. Bumiller said, “I use oils
and layer the paint with as many (at least 40)
transparent glazes, slowly building up color to
a rich state, while trying to retain luminosity.
The different panels separate the image into
slightly different sections, suggesting the pro-
grammed way in which we view nature. It also
echoes the growth pattern of trees, reaching up
and out as they mature. I wanted to create
something mysterious and earthy, mechanical
and measured, a painting that transcends land-
scape and opens a door into a world beyond.”
Artist Doug Trujillo, commenting on his
bronze work Armada in the First Floor Lobby,
said, “This piece is part of an evolving series
of sculptural work that I have done about sea
forms, I am incredibly interested in how
things move on and in the water. Artistically
speaking I believe that the space that artwork
is shown in is often just as important as the art
itself as they are both unique and can either
come together to create a stunning visual
event or really fight with each other for atten-
tion. In this case it was great to see that my
style worked cohesively with the vision of the
design team that orchestrated all of this and I
believe that form and function really came
together beautifully in this project.”
A catalog of the Four Seasons Hotel Denver
Art Collection may be found at http://lewis-
grahamart.com/clients/four-seasons-denver-
art-collection.
Four Seasons Hotel Denver is located at
1111 14th St., Denver, Colo., near the Denver
Performing Arts Complex, historic Larimer
Square, and the Colorado Convention Center.
For more information visit www.foursea-
sons.com/denver or call (303) 389-3000.
AND REMEMBER: “Every exit is an entry
somewhere else.” — Tom Stoppard.
Susan Cohn is a member of Bay Area Travel
Writers and North American Travel Journalists
Association. She may be reached at susan@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
COURTESY LEWISGRAHAMART CONSULTANTS
‘Armada.’ Doug Trujillo. Steel with silver patina. Four Seasons Hotel Denver.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
24
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SATURDAY, APRIL 7
Pancake Breakfast. 8 a.m. to 11
a.m., behind the Burlingame Lions
Hall, 990 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. Entertainment by
Twinkie Dee Star, Leo the Lion and
the San Mateo Elks Lodge Band. $7
adults, $4 children. For more infor-
mation call 558-7300.
Belmont’s Big Egg Adventure. 8:30
a.m. Twin Pines Park, 1225 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. There will be bounce
houses, face painting, an arts and
crafts booth, basketball toss and spe-
cial prizes. Starting at 9 a.m. sharp,
join the Easter Bunny on a quest for
eco-friendly eggs. For children ages 3
to 10. Free. For more information call
595-7441.
Egg Hunt at Central Park. 9 a.m. to
1 p.m., Central Park, corner of Fifth
Avenue and El Camino Real, San
Mateo. Free Eggstravaganza! Egg
hunts for all ages, arts. Games and
Entertainment. Community parade at
10:30 a.m. Rain or shine. Sponsored
in part by the Daily Journal. Free. For
more information call 522-7470.
Pancake Breakfast. 9 a.m. to 11
a.m., Central Park, corner of Fifth
Avenue and El Camino Real, San
Mateo. Sponsored by the San Mateo
Sunrise Rotary. After breakfast enjoy
free arts, crafts and egg hunts for
children in Central Park. $8 adult, $4
child. For more information call 522-
7470.
Easter Egg hunt. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.,
Washington Park, behind the
Burlingame Lions Hall, 990
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Free
fun filled egg hunts for the entire
community, featuring more than
4,000 chocolate eggs. Egg hunts by
age group, starting at 9 a.m. for tod-
dlers. For more information call 558-
7300.
‘Breathe Deep.’ 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Purisima Creek Redwoods, Higgins-
Purisima entrance (for directions to
the meeting location visit www.open-
space.org/activities). Find out why
you’ll be breathing some of the clean-
est air in the world. Get to know the
secrets a redwood forest holds with
docents Bob Segalla, Paul Billig and
Sam Berry on the Craig Britton and
Harkins Ridge Trails. Free.
Reservations are required. For more
information visit
www.openspace.org.
International Gem and Jewelry
Show. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo
Event Center, 2495 S. Delaware St.,
San Mateo. Tickets can be purchased
in advance or at the show. Cash only
if purchased at the door. $8 for all
three days. For more information call
574-3247 or visit smeventcenter.com.
Third Annual Easter Day
Celebration. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Harbor
Village Mall, 270 Capistrano Road,
Half Moon Bay. Easter Egg Hunt
starts at 1 p.m. for ages 1-3, 1:05 p.m.
for ages 4-6, 1:10 for ages 6 and up.
Easter Bunny appearance all day;
catch him if you can. Pictures with
him at 1:30 p.m. RSVP requested to
provide sufficient materials for chil-
dren participating in egg hunt. To
RSVP email hmbtaffy@gmail.com or
call 726-2284.
Serra vs. Burlingame Lacrosse
Game. 2 p.m. Burlingame High
School, 1 Mangini Way, Burlingame.
One of the biggest games for both
teams this year and has been a rivalry
game ever since lacrosse has started
up at Burlingame. For more informa-
tion call 722-4295.
Easter Egg Coloring Class. 2 p.m.
to 3 p.m. New Leaf Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road., Half
Moon Bay. Many Hipkins for Well
Kiddos will lead a hands-on kid’s
class for ages 3 and over. Join us for
a fun afternoon of coloring eggs with
natural food colors. Reservations
required. To register or for more
information visit www.newleaf.com
or call 726-3110 ext. 101.
Titanic Anniversary Ball. 7 p.m.
San Mateo Masonic Lodge Ballroom,
100 N. Ellsworth Ave., in San Mateo.
After a dance lesson, Bangers and
Mash plays a variety of Edwardian
waltzes, sizzling Ragtime and other
vintage ballroom dances from the
Titanic’s own 1912 set list. Vintage or
modern evening dress is admired but
not required. Event includes dance
performances, a light snack buffet,
and a no-host bar. $15 in advance,
$20 at the door. For more information
call (510) 522-1731.
San Francisco Banjo Band. 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Molloy’s Tavern, 1655
Mission Road, Colma. Will perform
variety of music ranging from dix-
ieland to ’60s music. No cover or
drink minimum. Free. For more
information call 692-3460.
Coastal Rep Theatre presents
‘Artichoke.’ 8 p.m. Coastal
Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St.,
Half Moon Bay. ‘Artichoke’ is a
warm-hearted portrait of a family
finding its way through betrayal to
understanding. $20 to 25. For more
information visit coastalrep.com.
Richard Bean and Sapo with
Ruckatan and 40 Watt Hype. 8 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $14. For more information 369-
7770.
SUNDAY, APRIL 8
Celebrate Easter. 6 a.m., 9 a.m. and
11 a.m., First Presbyterian Church of
Burlingame, 1500 Easton Drive (one
block west of El Camino),
Burlingame. 6 a.m. outdoor sunrise
service. 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. church
services with orchestra and choir.
Free. For more information call 342-
0875 or visit www.burlpres.org.
Easter Services. 6:30 a.m., 10 a.m.,
Hillsdale United Methodist Church,
303 W. 36th Ave., San Mateo. 6:30
a.m.: Sunrise Service. Greet the new
day in prayer. 8 a.m.: Easter Potluck
brunch. 10 a.m. Worship, Halleluiah!
Christ is Risen! 11:45 a.m. Easter
Egg Hunt. Free. For more informa-
tion call 345-8514.
Easter Services. 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11:15 a.m., Central Peninsula
Church, Foster City Campus, 1005
Shell Blvd., Foster City. Tomb
Raiders: Nic, Joe, Mary & Pete. Free.
For more information call 349-1132
or visit www.cpcweb.org.
Celebrate Easters. 8 a.m. and 10:15
a.m., The Episcopal Church of Saint
Matthew, 1 S. El Camino Real, San
Mateo. Celebrate Easter with us.
There’s no better than Easter to expe-
rience the joy of communion with
Jesus Christ. 8 a.m. Choral Service.
10:15 a.m. Choral Service with nurs-
ery care and Sunday school. Free. For
more information call 342-1481 or
visit www.episcopalstmatthew.org.
Easter Sunday Worship. 8:30 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m., Hope Lutheran
Church, 600 W. 42nd Ave., San
Mateo. Visitor’s Welcome. Free. For
more information call 349-0100.
Easter Sunday Celebration
Services. 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. First
Presbyterian Church, 25th and
Hacienda avenues, San Mateo. A one-
hour celebration of Christ’s journey
from the tomb to the resurrection,
with choir, orchestra, hand bells,
drama and a message of hope. For
more information contact Annette
Tornborg at 207-0612.
Easter Morning Service. 9 a.m., St.
Elizabeth’s Episcopal Church, 260
Country Club Drive, South San
Francisco. Free. For more informa-
tion call 583-3720.
Easter Services. 9:15 a.m. and 11
a.m., Central Peninsula Church,
North Campus, 300 Piedmont Ave.,
San Bruno. Tomb Raiders: Nic, Joe,
Mary and Pete. Free. For more infor-
mation call 349-1132 or visit
www.cpcweb.org.
Easter Sunday Celebration of
Hope. 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m., Open
Door Church, 4150 Piccadilly Lane
(near Mollie Stone’s), San Mateo.
Free. For more information visit
www.odcsm.org.
Resurrection Sunday Worship
Service. 10 a.m., Grace Bible
Church, 2225 Euclid Ave. (behind
RiteAid), Redwood City. Nursery
care available. Free. For more infor-
mation call 366-9923 or visit
www.gracebibleonline.org.
He Is Risen. 10:30 a.m., Grace
Church of the Bay Area, 411 Airport
Blvd., Burlingame. Join us in cele-
brating the resurrection of Christ on
Easter Sunday. Free. For more infor-
mation call 532-3444 or visit
www.gracebayarea.org.
Easter Sunday Celebration. 10:30
a.m., Congregational Church of
Belmont, 751 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Make yourself at home with
us this Easter! Celebration with a
children’s Easter Egg Hunt and bagel
breakfast to follow. Free. For more
information call 593-4547.
International Gem and Jewelry
Show. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. San Mateo
Event Center, 2495 S. Delaware St.,
San Mateo. Tickets can be purchased
in advance or at the show. Cash only
if purchased at the door. $8 for all
three days. For more information call
574-3247 or visit smeventcenter.com.
Easter Morning Service. 11 a.m., St.
Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 1600
Santa Lucia Ave., San Bruno. Free.
For more information call 583-6679.
Malibu Castle Annual Free Easter
Egg Hunt. Registration from 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 320 Blomquist St.,
Redwood City. Includes photos with
Easter Bunny and mascot Maliroo,
facepainting and balloon animals pro-
vided by entertainers from ‘Magic
Princess’ and raffles every hour start-
ing from 1:30 p.m. Free. For more
information call 367-1906.
Coastal Rep Theatre presents
‘Artichoke.’ 2 p.m. Coastal
Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St.,
Half Moon Bay. ‘Artichoke’ is a
warm-hearted portrait of a family
finding its way through betrayal to
understanding. $15 to 20. For more
information visit coastalrep.com.
Easter Vigil. 8 p.m., St. Elizabeth’s
Episcopal Church, 260 Country Club
Drive, South San Francisco. Free. For
more information call 583-3720.
Silly Sunday (Comedy). 8 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$10. For more information call 369-
7770.
MONDAY, APRIL 9
Samaritan House Free Tax
Preparation for San Mateo County
Residents. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 4031
Pacific Blvd., San Mateo, second
floor. Samaritan House is providing
confidential tax preparation with cer-
tified tax preparers for individuals
and families with income in 2011
under $54,000. Free. To make an
appointment call 523-0804.
Lecture: Important Immunizations
for Seniors. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Lisa Wong,
pharmacist of Walgreens Pharmacy,
San Mateo, will discuss the impor-
tance of four essential immunizations
for seniors: flu, pneumonia, whoop-
ing cough and shingles shots. Free.
To register call 522-7490.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 2012
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Although you can ac-
complish a lot for yourself right now, it might not be a
good day to mend fences with a co-worker. The other
party needs much more time to be able to heal.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Instead of doing things
that could add to your resources and turn a proft,
you might do anything but. Don’t let your emotions
override your common sense.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- The only way to get oth-
ers to follow you is to lead by example. If you attempt
to be overly assertive or dictatorial, all you’ll do is
create more problems for yourself.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you’re fearful of
being taken advantage of by others, there’s a chance
you could conduct yourself in ways that exploit other
people frst. Don’t do it.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It’s generally unwise to do
business with friends, but this could be one of those
days when you’ll do so anyway. If that’s what you
feel you have to do, be extremely careful.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Take care not to do
anything that makes you look good at the expense of
another. Even if you get away with it for the moment,
it will cost you dearly down the line.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Although you might do
some nice things for others based on a personal
desire to get something from them, nothing will
change and the world will treat you the same as it
always did.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Even if you usually do
everything for yourself, you might have to depend on
others to open doors for you at this time. Unfortu-
nately, their priorities and yours could differ.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- When it comes to
partnership arrangements, you’re going to have to be
frm and decisive in order to succeed at getting what
you want. If you aren’t, you won’t.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Don’t look to others
to quell your emotional distress, because it isn’t likely
they would be up to that kind of assignment. Only
time will heal what ails you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Avoid at all costs
arguing with friends over silly, minor social issues.
An innocent discussion could quickly turn nasty if
someone says the wrong thing.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you hope to fnalize
a matter of critical importance, it is going to take
strong willpower on your part. Coasting along won’t
work this time.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
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ACROSS
1 Meryl, in “Out of Africa”
5 Banned bug spray
8 Flower container
12 Iditarod terminus
13 Epoch
14 “What’s -- -- for me?”
15 Seafood entree
16 High voice
18 Fix up an old house
20 PTA member
21 Get a tan
22 Yellow fruits
25 Caustic substance
28 Get smart with
29 Sleep like -- --
33 Cafe -- --
35 Doglike scavenger
36 Wash
37 Sizzled
38 Ugh!
39 Ocean sound
41 Double curve
42 Erupted
45 A Kennedy
48 Stomach muscles
49 Of Holland
53 Tin ore
56 Untainted
57 Gourmet appetizer
58 Paleo opp.
59 Plenty, to a poet
60 Big hunk
61 AARP members
62 Break of day
DOwN
1 Growth (abbr.)
2 Hurting
3 Memsahib’s nanny
4 Skewer bit
5 Telephone trio
6 Plays
7 Claws
8 Strive to win
9 Picnic intruders
10 In -- (as found)
11 007’s alma mater
17 Wee, in Dundee
19 Yacht spot
23 “Mona Lisa” crooner
24 Utters
25 Frilly
26 Winter festival
27 TVA supply
30 -- majeste
31 Wallet stuffers
32 Rambles around
34 Sighs of relief
35 Kind of gun
37 Pillbox or bowler
39 Worm seekers
40 Expulsion
43 Skillet
44 Taken in
45 Kitchen meas.
46 Term paper abbr. (2 wds.)
47 Computer fodder
50 Luncheon salad
51 Cornfeld menace
52 Rough-cut
54 Corn Belt st.
55 Aurora, to Plato
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
SUNSHINE STATE®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 25
THE DAILY JOURNAL
26
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVERS
VARIOUS ROUTES
SAN MATEO COUNTY
PENINSULA
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required. Must have
valid license and appropriate insurance coverage
to provide this service in order to be eligible.
Papers are available for pickup in San Mateo at
3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
PROCESS SERVER (deliver legal
papers) car and insurance, reliable,
swing shift PT/FT immediate opening
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
We’re a top, full-service
provider of home care, in
need of your experienced,
committed care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits
Call for Greg at
(650) 556-9906
www.homesweethomecare.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Fax resume (650)344-5290
email info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES
Experienced, bilingual
sales person wanted.
Must have excellent
customer service
skills. Work on the
Peninsula.
Call (650)533-4424
Ask for Oleg
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY
RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 513003
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Evan A. Simpson and Joanna D.
Simpson
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Evan A. Simpson and Joanna
D. Simpson filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: John Paul Simpson
Proposed name: John Paul Jerzy Simp-
son
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 17,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/05/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/05/2012
(Published 04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12,
04/28/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249296
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Groupbookers, 2)
Groupbookers.com, 644 Spruce Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
EFS Consulting, INC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/04/2011
/s/ Edwin Salgado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249361
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Epic Swing, 2) Epic Swing Night,
100 N. Ellsworth Ave., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Silicon Valley Swing Dance,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Audrey Kanemoto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249327
The following person is doing business
as: A&A Services, 735 Hickey Blvd.
#302, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Peter
Alicbusan, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Peter Alicbusan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249232
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: I and F Excellence Janitorial
Services, 851 N. Amphlett Blvd. #221,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Ingnacio
Cobian and Filomena Duarte, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
Husband and Wife. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Filomena Duarte /
/s/ Ingnacio L. Cobian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249004
The following person is doing business
as: Christmas Markets Travel, 303 Twin
Dolphin Dr. 6th floor, REDWOOD
SHORES, CA 94065 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Barbara Cray,
165 Glasgow Ln., San Carlos, CA 94070.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Barbara Cray /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249330
The following person is doing business
as: Communication Concierge, 115
Camellia Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Micaela Musante, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Micaela Musante /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249248
The following person is doing business
as: Seesaw Games, 1801 Murchison Dr.
#100, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Seesaw Media, INC., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Stephanie Cheng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/17/12, 03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249504
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Dynolight Designs, 1457 El Ca-
mino Real, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Charles Jeffrey Whittaker, 1631 No-
tre Dame Ave., BELMONT, CA 94002
and Ricahrd Corwin Gong, 3325 Plateau
Dr., BELMONT, CA 94002. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Jeff Whittaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12, 04/14/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249436
The following person is doing business
as: Good Sense Events, 721 Old County
Rd., Suite C, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kimathea R. Dault, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Kimathea R. Dault /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/31/12, 04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12).
27 Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee Sale
Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name Change,
Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday,
April 17, 2012 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Blvd., San Bruno, CA and take action on the following
items. All interested persons are invited to attend.
1999 Earl Avenue & APN 019-043-490. Request for a Tem-
porary Use Permit to allow off-site construction staging areas
per SBMC Section 12.84.030. Environmental Determination:
Categorical Exemption
442 San Mateo Avenue. Request for a Use Permit Amend-
ment to allow alcohol beverage sales in conjunction with a res-
taurant expansion, and a Parking Exception to allow conver-
sion from a retail establishment to a restaurant without provid-
ing additional parking. SBMC Section 12.96.120.C.12 and
12.100.120. Environmental Determination: Categorical Ex-
emption
574 San Mateo Avenue. Request for a Parking Exception to
allow conversion from a retail store to a hair salon without pro-
viding additional parking. SBMC Section 12.100.120. Environ-
mental Determination: Categorical Exemption
Receive Report and Take Public Comment on the Draft Envi-
ronmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the Draft Transit Corridors
Specific Plan. Final Planning Commission Review of the EIR
Will Occur at a Future Meeting, After the 45-day Public Com-
ment Period.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, April 7, 2012.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249379
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Horizon Technology Enterpris-
es, 1755 Lake St., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Debbie Kelsey and Daniel
Alex Luebke, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Husband & Wife.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/2000
/s/ Debbie Kelsey /
/s/ Daniel Alex Luebke /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/31/12, 04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249516
The following person is doing business
as: 1) McKenzie Brewing Company, 2)
McKenzie River Brewing Company, 333
California Dr., BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Golden State Brewing Company,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Cordy Jensen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/31/12, 04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249621
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Shear Sisters, 2) SatayaB
Nails, 4060 S. El Camino Real, Suite 25,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Miriah
Keeling, 10 Robert Pl., Millbrae, CA
94030 and Sataya Baumann, 725 Ellis
St., apt. 104, San Francisco, CA 94109.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Miriah Keeling /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/31/12, 04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249496
The following person is doing business
as: Pangaea Peninsula, 1401 Braodway
Ave., #3, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Sharon Leilani Baines May, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Sharon L. B. May /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/24/12, 03/31/12, 04/07/12, 04/14/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249581
The following person is doing business
as: Chef On Command, 235 Westlake
Center, Suite 201, DALY CITY, CA
94015 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Sylvia Mania, 655 John Muir
Dr., E410, San Francisco, CA 94132.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Sylvia Mania /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12, 04/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249772
The following person is doing business
as: A Method To The Madness, 839
Canada Rd., WOODSIDE, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Laurie Helene Greenblat, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Laurie Greenblat /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12, 04/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249565
The following person is doing business
as: AmeriTrans Bus Services, 274 Pine
St., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mirtha
Cabrera, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Mirtha Cabrera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/07/12, 04/14/12, 04/21/12, 04/28/12).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Hubert D. Forsyth
Case Number 122196
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Hubert D. Forsyth. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Thomas Forsyth, John Forsyth & Laura
Bolin in the Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo. The Petition for
Probate requests that Thomas Forsyth,
John Forsyth & Laura Bolin be appointed
as personal representative to administer
the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble for examination in the file kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection of the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 7, 2012 at
9:00 a.m., Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo, 400 County Cen-
ter, Redwood City, CA 94063. If you ob-
ject to the granting of the petition, you
should appear at the hearing and state
your objections or file written objections
with the court before the hearing. Your
203 Public Notices
appearance may be in person or by your
attorney. If you are a creditor or a con-
tingent creditor of the decedent, you
must file your claim with the court and
mail a copy to the personal representa-
tive appointed by the court within four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters as provided in Probate Code sec-
tion 9100. The time for filing claims will
not expire before four months from the
hearing date noticed above. You may
examine the file kept by the court. If you
are a person interested in the estate, you
may file with the court a Request for
Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing
of an inventory and appraisal of estate
assets or of any petition or account as
provided in Probate Code section 1250.
A Request for Special Notice form is
available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
John A. Hartog., (State Bar #88598)
4 Orinda Way, Suite 250-B
ORINDA, CA 94563
(925)523-1717
Dated: 04/02/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 7, 14, 21, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND AT Chase Bank parking lot in
Burlingame 3 volume books "temple" and
others 650 344-6565
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
295 Art
6 FRAMED colored modern art pictures
36" by 26" $90 for all or $15 each
(650)345-5502
296 Appliances
CHOPPERS (4) with instructions $7/all.
(650)368-3037
ELECTRIC HEATER - Oil filled electric
heater, 1500 watts, $30., (650)504-3621
JACK LA LANNE JUICER NEVER
USED $20 (650)458-8280
LARGE REFRIGERATOR works good
$70 or B/O (650) 589-1871
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
296 Appliances
WASHER & DRYER - Kenmore, electric,
heavy duty, runs great, SSF, $100. each,
SOLD!
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $50
each or best offer.(650)589-8348
65 EUROPEAN Used Postage Stamps.
Some issued before 1920. All different.
Includes stamps from England, France,
and Germany. $5.00 SOLD!
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
DECORATIVE COLLECTOR BOTTLES
- Empty, Jim Beam, $8. each, (650)364-
7777
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard (650)834-4926
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
PRECIOUS MOMENTS vinyl dolls - 16”,
3 sets of 2, $35. each set, (650)518-0813
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
PRINTER - Epson Stylus NX1000, copy,
print, scans, includes some ink cartridg-
es, $25. obo, (650)349-6969
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
VINTAGE FISHING LURES - (10) at be-
tween $45. & $100. each, CreekChub,
Helin Tackle, Arbogast, some in original
boxes, (650)257-7481
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
19" TOSHIBA LCD color TV $99
(650)343-4461
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
PS2 GAME console $75.00
SOLD!
TOSHIBA 42” LCD flat screen TV HD in
very good condition, $300., Call at
(650)533-9561
TV SET Philips 21 inch with remote $40.,
(650)692-3260
ZENITH TV 12" $50 650 755-9833 (Daly
City). (650)755-9833
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ADJUSTABLE BED. Full size, pillow top
w/ remote + massage. $2800 new. Must
sell $500 OBO (in Daly City)
call (650)646-8169
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BEAUTIFUL ORIENTAL Table. 32" by
32" 12" legs, Rosewood, Lightweight,
$75 650 871-7200
BED - King size, Somma Infinity Flota-
tion bed, includes 10 large tubes, foam
enclosure with plastic covers & indented
foam mattress cover, SOLD!
BOOKSHELF $10.00 SOLD!
BREAKFAST NOOK DINETTE TABLE-
solid oak, 53”X66”, $19., (650)583-8069
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30” x 58”, light oak,
heavy, 1980’s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all. 650-520-7921,
650-245-3661
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DOUBLE BED mattress and box spring
$25., SOLD!
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRESSER - darkwood six drawer dress-
er with mirror and matching nightstand,
$30., (650)574-4439
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
650-692-1942
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATTRESS TOPPER chrome full size
$15., (650)368-3037
304 Furniture
MIRROR, NICE, large, 30”x54”, $15.
SSF (650)583-8069
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BED SET - including box springs
and mattresses, night stand and chest of
drawers. Made of solid wood with inter-
esting detailing. White. $500., SOLD!
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
25 LOVELY Vases all sizes $1 to $3
each ( Florist Delight ) 650 755-9833
3 LARGE Blue Ceramic Pots $10 each
650 755-9833
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
LAMPS - 2 southwestern style lamps
with engraved deer. $85 both, obo,
(650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUSHI SET - Blue & white includes 4 of
each: chopsticks, plates, chopstick hold-
ers, still in box, $9., (650)755-8238
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $80. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
3,450 RPM $50 (650)347-5373
HAND DRILL $6.00 (415) 333-8540
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
308 Tools
MEDIUM DUTY Hand Truck $50
650 593-7553
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
10 WALL shelfs with brackets 24" to 50"
by 5" wide $30 for all, SOLD!
100 SPORT Books 70's thru 90's A's,
Giants, & 49ers $100 for all
650 207-2712
100 SPORT Photo's A's, Giants, & 49ers
$100 for all 650 207-2712
12 DAYS of Christmas vintage drinking
Glasses 1970 Color prints Prefect
condition original box $25 (650)873-8167
1970 TIFFANY style swag lamp with
opaque glass, $59., (650)692-3260
2 TODDLER car seats, hardly used.
Both for $75.00. (650)375-1246
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used, $25. (650)871-7200
29 BOOKS - Variety of authors, $25.,
(650)589-2893
3 CRAFT BOOKS - hardcover, over 500
projects, $40., (650)589-2893
30 ADULT Magazines, 18 Adult VHS
movies & $ Dvds $40., also 50 Computer
Game Magazines $40., (650)574-3141
30 DISNEY Books $1.00 each
650 368-3037
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
5 CUP electric coffee marker $8.00
650 368-3037
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln war years books, $90., B/O must
see, (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ANGEL WITH lights 12 inches High $12.
(650)368-3037
AREA RUG - 8x8 round, 100% wool pile,
color ivory, black, SOLD!
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others $10 each
650-364-7777
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD hard-
back books. 4 at $3.00 each or all for
$10., Call (650)341-1861
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ GILL with Cover 31/2' wide by 3'
tall hardly used $49. 650 347-9920
BBQ KETTEL Grill, Uniflame 21” SOLD!
BBQ SMOKER BBQ Grill, LP Coleman,
Alaskan Cookin’ Machine, cost $140 sell
$75. 650-344-8549
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 650-344-8549
28
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Human mind
7 Petty
disagreement
15 Show whose
original house
band was The
Buckaroos
16 Shoe parts
17 Phrase that gets a
caller’s attention?
18 Clancy’s Jack
Ryan, e.g.
19 Closer
20 Round Stic maker
21 Frond part
22 __ jure
23 Nut crackers
25 Modify
26 21st Greek letter
27 Hairstyles like
MacGyver’s
29 Understand
30 Upright citizen?
32 Meshed dividers
34 Words from the
head of a line
35 Kind of justice
39 Work that can’t be
done alone
41 Undermine
42 Wagner’s “__
Rheingold”
45 Pump pick
47 Rabbit friend
48 Marine predator
50 Leg strengthener
51 Streamlet
52 City in Florida’s
horse country
54 Carrier letters
55 Enter
56 Home
entertainment
piece
58 Delivery class?
59 Regularly
monitored, in a
way
60 Brings out
61 City near the
Khyber Pass
62 Shooting locale?
DOWN
1 City where a
Pauline letter was
received
2 Ranking angels
3 Reminiscent of
the 1919 poem
“The Second
Coming”
4 City with a
California State
campus
5 Dish of leftovers
6 Lea bleater
7 Talkative
8 Popular financial
software
9 Hagen of the
stage
10 “Immediately!”
11 “I made more
lousy pictures
than any actor in
history” speaker,
familiarly
12 Homogenizes
13 “Of Mice and
Men” rabbit lover
14 Impressive
spread
20 Middle manager?
23 Raid squad
24 Run an errand,
say
27 Error
28 It’s often preceded
by a warning
31 “Pushing Daisies”
pie maker
33 Ninth in a series:
Abbr.
36 Japanese
restaurant order
37 Adored
38 Hipster’s trait
40 Only word heard
in a 1958 song
of the same
name
41 Reunión
attendees
42 Genre
characterized by
nonsense
syllables
43 Recherché
44 Works near an
arena, perhaps
46 Assemble, as
troops
49 To whom many
pray
51 Clean again
53 Vibes
55 Island brew
57 “Immediately!”
58 The Once-__:
“The Lorax”
character
By Peter A. Collins
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/07/12
04/07/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5” long X 17”
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BIRD FEEDER 3" high, free standing,
sturdy, and never used $15
(415) 333-8540
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - “Fighting Aircraft of WWII”,
Jane’s, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMPING CUPS and plates (NEW)-B/O
SOLD!
CAMPING EQT - Eureka Domain 3
dome tent, med sleeping bag, pad; $25;
(650)343-1746
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
COLEMAN PROPANE camp stove
$25.00 SOLD!
COLEMAN PROPANE lantern $15.00
SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DUFFEL BAGS - 1 Large Duffel Bag ,1
Xtra Lg. Duffel w Wheels, 1 Leather
weekender Satchel, SOLD!
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FOAM SLEEP roll (2)-$10.00/each
SOLD!
FOOD SLICER. Oxo Mandolin. Little
used. $15. (650)630-2329
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HANGING PLANTER. 2-black plastic-
coated steel, 20" wide, 10" deep. With
chains, hooks. Both for $35
(650)630-2329
HARDBACK BOOKS - Complete set, 6
volumes, by Winston S. Churchill, 2nd
WW, published 1948-1953, great condi-
tion, dustjackets, $90.all, SOLD
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JANET EVANOVICH (4) hardback
books $3/each (8) paperback books
$1/each 650-341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45”L, 20”W, 3”H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LARGE PRINT. Hard Cover. Mystery
Books. Current Author. (20) $1 each
650-364-7777
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MAGNIFYING MIRROR. Swivel, wall
mount, 5Xx1X. Satin nickel finish. New,
in box. $20. (650)630-2329
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MEN'S ASHTON and Hayes leather
briefcase new. Burgundy color. $65 obo,
(650)343-4461
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $50
(650)593-7553
310 Misc. For Sale
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PR. MATCHED PEWTER GOBLETS by
Wilton. Numbered. 7-1/2-in ht.
Excellent bridal gifts or mantel vases.
No polishing. $10/ea.or $18/pr.
(650)341-3288
REMOTE CONTROL car "Traxxas", paid
$200 will accept $40., (650)574-3141
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER POOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TENT $30.00 SOLD!
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE TV /RADIO TUBES - 100 of
them for $100. total, (415)672-9206
WALGREENS BRAND Water Pitcher
Royal Blue Top 2 Quart New in Box $10
Ea use all brand Filters 650-873-8167
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALKER. INVACARE 6291-3f, dual re-
lease walker. Fixed 3" wheels & glider
tips. Brand new. $50. (650)594-1494
WINE CARBOYS, 5 gal. $5 ea., have 2
Daly City (415)333-8540
310 Misc. For Sale
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ELECTRIC STARCASTER Guitar
black&white with small amplifier $75.
650-358-0421
GUITAR - Classical nylon strings, Suzu-
ki, $85., SOLD!
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
MAGNUS TABLE top Organ:: 2-1/2 oc-
taves. Play by number, chords by letters
Excellent condition, 5 starter books. All
$30. (650)341-3288
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
BRIDAL PETTICOAT: Taffeta. Fitted
waist-to-hip above bouffant crinolines;
ruffled taffetas over and under crinoline
Sz: 10 $20. (650)341-3288
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HAT: LADIES wide brim, Leghorn
straw, pouf/bow, pink/red velvet vintage
roses. From “Hats On Post”, SF-- orig.
$75. Yours for $25. OBO.
650-341-3288.
HAT: MEN’S black Stetson wool felt fe-
dora; white satin Stetson lining. Look
like Sinatra! Size 7-3/8-- long oval. $25.
650-341-3288.
316 Clothes
HAT: LADIES’ black wool felt Breton
with 1” grosgrain ribbon above broad
brim. Sophisticated--fin the Easter Pa-
rade! $18., (650)341-3288
LADIES 3 PC. SEERSUCKER, (shorts,
slacks, jacket (short sleeves), blue/white
stripe. Sz 12, Excellent condition. $12.
all, (650)341-3288
LADIES DOWN jacket light yellow with
dark brown lining $35. SOLD!
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES ROYAL blue rain coat with zip-
pered flannel plaid liner size 12 RWC
$15. SOLD!
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MEN’S jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MAN’S SUEDE-LIKE jacket, Brown.
New, XXLg. SOLD!
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 (650)245-3661
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MEN’S PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NINE WEST. 3 black handbags. Very
good condition. All for $10. (650)630-
2329
PICTURE HAT: Leghorn straw, pouf
bow, vintage red/pink velvet roses. Fem-
inine Easter Bonnet! From: “Hats On
Post”, SF @ $75. Steal at $20.,
(650)341-3288
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
316 Clothes
VINTAGE WOMEN'S hats various styles
B/O, Daly City, (650)755-9833
WOMEN'S BLACK Motorcycle Jacket
Size M Stella/Alpine Star $80. obo
(415)375-1617
WOMEN'S VINTAGE clothing $5.00 &
up, Daly City, (650)755-9833
317 Building Materials
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $75.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOYS BOXING gloves $8. 341-8342
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
GOLF BALLS (148) $30 (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS (325) $65 SOLD
GOLF BALLS - 300+, $3. per dozen,
(650)766-4858
GOLF BALLS in new carton Dunlop,
Wilson, & Top Flight $9.00 650 341-8342
GOLF CLUB sets - 2 junior sizes, $15.
each, SOLD!
TENNIS RACKET oversize with cover
and 3 Wilson Balls $25 (650)692-3260
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
YOUTH GOLF Bag great condition with
six clubs putter, drivers and accessories
$65. 650-358-0421
322 Garage Sales
THE THRIFT SHOP
STORE-WIDECLEARANCE
Thursday & Saturday
April 5th & 7th
closed Friday April 6th
for Good Friday
Open Thurs. & Fri 10-2:00
Sat 10-3:00
Episcopal Church
1 South El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 82,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
IVORY WOOL blend rect. 3x5 Blue Wil-
low pattern $50 firm, SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
BAMBOO poles 6 to 8 Ft, 30. $15/all,
(415)346-6038
FLOWER POTS many size (50 pieces)
$15/all, (415)346-6038
GALVANIZED planter with boxed liners
94 x 10 x 9. Two available, $20/all,
(415)346-6038
POTTED PLANTS (7) $5/each
650-207-0897
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
General Dentistry
for Adults
& Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
29 Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 82,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
BANK OWNED
HOMES
FREE LIST
W/ PICTURES!
$500K - $1.2M
www.650foreclosure.com
Lacewell Realty
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
Studio $1125, 1 bedroom $1450. New
carpets, new granite counters, dishwash-
er, balcony, covered carports, storage,
pool, no pets. (650) 592-1271
SAN MATEO - Large 2 Bedroom, 2 bath.
Next to Central Park. Rarely Available.
Prestigious Location & Building. Gated
garage. Deck, No pets, $2,200/mo.
Call (650) 948-2935
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800. per month, near shop-
ping center, (650)697-4758
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
AUTO AUCTION
The following repossessed vehi-
cles are being sold by Patelco Credit
Union on April 10th, 2012 starting at
8am ---2006 Ford Ranger #A76533,
2006 Chrysler 300 #119297, 2007 Au-
di A3 #022787. Sealed bids will be
taken starting at 8am on 04/10/2012.
Sale held at Forrest Faulknor & Sons
Auction Company, 175 Sylvester
Road, South San Francisco. For
more information please visit our web
site at www.ffsons.com.
BMW ‘02 325CI -fully loaded, black
leather interior, auto, heated seats, new
tires, much more! 112K miles. $9,400.
(650)692-7916
BMW 530 ‘95 WAGON - Moon Roof,
automatic, Gray/Black, 165K miles,
$3,850 (650)349-0713
CADILLAC ‘93 Sedan $ 4,000 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
JAGUAR COUPE XKR 2001 Silver,
black interior. Excellent condition,
$11,100.OBO, (650)740-1743
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
SUTTON AUTO SALES
Cash for Cars
Call 650-595-DEAL (3325)
Or Stop By Our Lot
1659 El Camino Real
San Carlos
VOLKSWAGEN GT ‘07 No engine, no
Trans. $100 or B/O SOLD!
625 Classic Cars
1979 CLASSIC Olds Cutlass Supreme.
81K orginal miles, new paint, excellent
condition. $6500 OBO (650)868-0436
RWC.
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $4900 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
NISSAN ‘87 Centura - Two door, man-
ual, stick shift, 150K miles. Clean title,
good body, $1,250., (415)505-3908
PLYMOUTH ‘72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
630 Trucks & SUV’s
TOYOTA HIGHLANDER - ‘08, 2WD
“Sport”, 38K miles, original owner, many
extras, excellent condition, $23,750 obo,
SOLD!
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PLEASURE BOAT, 15ft., 50 horsepow-
er Mercury, $1,300.obo (650)368-2170
PROSPORT ‘97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
RV. ‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiberglass
Bubble Top $2,000. Will finance, small
downpayment. Call for appointments.
(650)364-1374
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
“WE FIX CARS”
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
670 Auto Service
QUALITY COACHWORKS
Autobody & Paint
Expert Body
and
Paint Personalized Service
411 Woodside Road,
Redwood City
650-280-3119
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CARGO COVER, (black) for Acura MDX
$75. 415-516-7060
CHEVY SMALL Block Chrome Dressup
Kit. 1 timing chain cover, 1 large air
cleaner and a set of valve covers. $30.,
(650)574-3141
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Pictures on Yelp
Happy
St. Patrick’s Day
Bath
Grout Cleaning
April Special
Save $$
$150. Single bathroom up to 150 sq ft
• color tile repair and match
• marble and granite restoration
• complete bathroom remodels
KAM Bath Restore - 650-652-9664
Lic 839815
Building/Remodeling
DRAFTING SERVICES
for
Remodels, Additions,
and
New Construction
(650)343-4340
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
* BLANCA’S CLEANING
SERVICES
$25 OFF First Cleaning
• Commercial - Residential
(we also clean windows)
• Good References • 10 Years Exp.
• FREE Estimates
(650) 867-9969
MENA’S
Cleaning Services
(650)704-2496
Great Service at a Reasonable Price
16+ Years in Business
• Move in/out
• Steam Carpet
• Windows & Screens
• Pressure Washing
www.menascleaning.com
LICENSED & INSURED
Professional | Reliable | Trustworthy
HANDY MANDY
Carpet • Upholstery
Rugs • Dryer + Vents •
Tile + Grout Cleaning
Excellentt Workmanship
Good Refferences
• Free Estimates
(650)245-7631 Direct
30 Years in Business
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
BELMONT
CONSTRUCTION
Residential & Commercial
Carpentry & Plumbing
Remodeling &
New Construction
Kitchen, Bath,
Structural Repairs
Additions, Decks,
Stairs, Railings
Lic#836489,
Ins. & Bonded
All work guaranteed
Call now for a free estimate
650-766-1244
Kevin@belmontconstructionca.com
Construction
30
Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Decks & Fences
NORTH FENCE
& DECK CO.
Lic #733213
Specializing in:
• Redwood Fences
• Decks
• Retaining Walls
650-756 0694
W W W .
N O R T H F E N C E C O
. C O M
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SSF, Bill (650)871-7200
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns, Sprinkler
Systems, Clean Ups, Fences, Tree
Trimming, Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Phone: (650) 345-6583
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
Gutter Cleaning - Leaf Guard
Gutter & Roof Repairs
Custom Down Spouts
Drainage Solutions
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Insured
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Water Damage,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
• General Home Repairs
• Improvements
• Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
FERNANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
•Sprinkler systems • New fences
• Flagstone • Interlocking pavers
• New driveways • Clean-ups
• Hauling • Gardening
• Retaining walls • Drainage
(650)385-1402
Lic#36267
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
DE’COR PAINTING
Meticulous Worker,
Decorative eye
Wall covering,
Interior & Exterior.
(650)574-4107
Lic# 762988
Painting
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work
• Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plaster/Stucco
JK PLASTERING
Interior • Exterior
Free Estimates
Lic.# 966463
(650)799-6062
Plumbing
$69 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Sewer trenchless
Pipe replacement
Replace sewer line without
ruining your yard
(650) 898-4444
Lic#933572
Remodeling
PATRICK
BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Quick
n
Easy
650 868 - 8492
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks, tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
31 Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Beauty
Let the beautiful
you be reborn at
PerfectMe by Laser
A fantastic body contouring
spa featuring treatments
with Zerona
®
,
VelaShape II™and
VASER
®
Shape.
Sessions range from $100-
$150 with our exclusive
membership!
To find out more and
make an appointment call
(650)375-8884
BURLINGAME
perfectmebylaser.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR
NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Español
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specific directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
HOUSE OF BAGELS
SAN MATEO
OPEN EVERYDAY 6:30AM-3PM
Bagels,Santa Cruz Coffee,
Sandwiches, Wifi, Kids Corner
Easy Parking
680 E. 3rd Ave & Delaware
(650)548-1100
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
14 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
REVIV
MEDICAL SPA
www.revivmedspa.com
31 S. El Camino Real
Millbrae
(650)697-3339
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
MAYERS
JEWELERS
We Buy Gold!
Bring your old gold in
and redesign to
something new or cash it in!
Watch Battery
Replacement $9.00
Most Watches.
Must present ad.
Jewelry & Watch Repair
2323 Broadway
Redwood City
(650)364-4030
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breech of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL
Mention this ad for $10 off one hour
One hour $60, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Pet Services
BOOMERANG
PET EXPRESS
All natural, byproduct free
pet foods!
Home Delivery
www.boomerangpetexpress.com
(650)989-8983
Pet Services
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
Do you need help
finding the right senior
community for your parent?
I offer personalized guidance to
help make the right choices.
Laurie Lindquist 650-787-8292
Your Senior Housing Resource
A free service to families
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
32 Weekend • April 7-8, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins • Dental Gold • Jewelry • Watches • Platinum • Diamonds
1211 Burlingame Ave • 650-347-7007
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
• Deal With Experts • Quick Service
• Unequal Customer Care
• Estate Appraisals • Batteries
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY • BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$50
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 4/30/12
WE B

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