The White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release March 31, 2012

WEEKLY ADDRESS: Passing the Buffett Rule so that Everyone Pays Their Fair Share
WASHINGTON, DC— In this week’s address, President Obama calls on Congress to pass the Buffett Rule, a principle of fairness that ensures that millionaires and billionaires do not pay less in taxes as a share of their income than middle class families pay. The President believes our system must ask the wealthiest to pay their fair share, while protecting 98 percent of Americans from seeing their taxes go up at all. That is why the President proposed the Buffett Rule, which will help make our system reflect our values so that all Americans get a fair shot, play by the same rules, and pay their fair share. Remarks of President Barack Obama Weekly Address The White House March 31, 2012 Hello. Over the last few months, I’ve been talking about a choice we face as a country. We can either settle for an economy where a few people do really well and everyone else struggles to get by, or we can build an economy where hard work pays off again – where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules. That’s up to us. Today, I want to talk to you about the idea that everyone in this country should do their fair share. Now, if this were a perfect world, we’d have unlimited resources. No one would ever have to pay any taxes, and we could spend as much as we wanted. But we live in the real world. We don’t have unlimited resources. We have a deficit that needs to be paid down. And we also have to pay for investments that will help our economy grow and keep our country safe: education, research and technology, a strong military, and retirement programs like Medicare and Social Security. That means we have to make choices. When it comes to paying down the deficit and investing in our future, should we ask middle-class Americans to pay even more at a time when their budgets are already stretched to the breaking point? Or should we ask some of the wealthiest Americans to pay their fair share?

That’s the choice. Over the last decade, we’ve spent hundreds of billions of dollars on what was supposed to be a temporary tax cut for the wealthiest two percent of Americans. Now we’re scheduled to spend almost a trillion more. Today, the wealthiest Americans are paying taxes at one of the lowest rates in 50 years. Warren Buffett is paying a lower rate than his secretary. Meanwhile, over the last 30 years, the tax rates for middle class families have barely budged. That’s not fair. It doesn’t make any sense. Do we want to keep giving tax breaks to the wealthiest Americans like me, or Warren Buffett, or Bill Gates – people who don’t need them and never asked for them? Or do we want to keep investing in things that will grow our economy and keep us secure? Because we can’t afford to do both. Now, some people call this class warfare. But I think asking a billionaire to pay at least the same tax rate as his secretary is just common sense. We don’t envy success in this country. We aspire to it. But we also believe that anyone who does well for themselves should do their fair share in return, so that more people have the opportunity to get ahead – not just a few. That’s the America I believe in. And in the next few weeks, Members of Congress will get a chance to show you where they stand. Congress is going to vote on what’s called the Buffett Rule: If you make more than $1 million a year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle class families do. On the other hand, if you make under $250,000 a year – like 98 percent of American families do – your taxes shouldn’t go up. You’re the ones struggling with the rising cost of everything from college tuition to groceries. You’re the ones who deserve a break. So every Member of Congress is going to go on record. And if they vote to keep giving tax breaks to people like me – tax breaks our country can’t afford – then they’re going to have to explain to you where that money comes from. Either it’s going to add to our deficit, or it’s going to come out of your pocket. Seniors will have to pay more for their Medicare benefits. Students will see their interest rates go up at a time when they can’t afford it. Families who are scraping by will have to do more because the richest Americans are doing less. That’s not right. That’s not who we are. In America, our story has never been about what we can do by ourselves – it’s about what we can do together. It’s about believing in our future and the future of this country. So tell your Members of Congress to do the right thing. Call them up, write them a letter, pay them a visit, and tell them to stop giving tax breaks to people who don’t need them and start investing in the things that will help our economy grow and put people back to work. That’s how we’ll make this country a little fairer, a little more just, and a whole lot stronger. Thank you.

[PRESIDENTIAL WEEKLY ADDRESS ASSESSMENT PHASE A.a START OF]
ag·nos·tic [ag nó stik] (plural ag·nos·tics) noun
1. somebody denying God's existence is provable: somebody who believes that it is impossible to know whether or not God exists 2. somebody denying something is knowable: somebody who doubts that a question has one correct answer or that something can be completely understood  I'm an agnostic concerning space aliens.

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release March 31, 2012

Microsoft® Encarta® 2009. © 1993-2008 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

WEEKLY ADDRESS: Passing the Buffett Rule so that Everyone Pays Their Fair Share
1rule \'rül\ n [ME reule, fr. AF, fr. L regula straightedge, rule, fr. regere to keep straight, direct — more at right] (13c) 1 a : a prescribed guide for conduct or action b : the laws or regulations prescribed by the founder of a religious order for observance by its members c : an accepted procedure, custom, or habit d (1): a usu. written order or direction made by a court regulating court practice or the action of parties (2): a legal precept or doctrine e : a regulation or bylaw governing procedure or controlling conduct eve·ry·one [é vvree wù n] or eve·ry·bod·y [évvree bò ddee] pronoun
every person: every person, whether of a defined group or in general  Everyone is going to come to the office party.  This is not just for one area; it will affect everyone around the country.

And i am hiding for many years in my host's head...

Russian notebooks with Stalin on cover cause stir
Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/04/06/russian-notebooks-with-stalin-oncover-cause-stir/?test=latestnews#ixzz1rHfjrSe5 Good as a Political Cover bad as a History or Military Lesson... A Man whose only order to his generals was : "If you can not win this shoot yourself or else i will". A Man who fought to the death the only man he could call a 'Friend'... A Man whose Power was based on common capitalist needs based on Survival and not a "Total Struggle between Fascism and Communist Ideals"... A Man who led more than 5 million people to their deaths unarmed against what was at the time the most Awesome military force in Europe with Potentials conquering the World... A Man who did nothing but waiting killing and waiting still harvesting whatever Lenin brought from the Czar's Gulags as the first Soviet Treasure only 20 years ago... A Man who reinspired Mortal Monotheism in the name of what they now call Dialectic Materialism: Simply Put if you will not praise me you will not get food or a job or Siberia is right there... A man waiting for the Nation he never was part of to reinvent itself and become by itself a natural Great Power Again... A Man who Abolished basic Soviet Values and Set the Corrupted Foundations to Waste after 45 years the Vast Military and Scientific Arsenal of the Country while making sure he will be loved as the “king” of 200 Million People he was never deserved to be or become. Events we still review on a daily basis even 20 years after the abandonment of Joseph’s Personal Nightmare… Comrade Stalin We Owe nothing To you... Fuck You to the Death... Товарищ Сталин Мы кредита ничего не стоит ... Пошел на хуй до смерти ...

I the Fuhrer! And the People will remember my call after i die... To Die Again... And Again... Untill there is noone left... I Aryan... Anything but German... A False Aryan Under a True German Sky.... My Poem, The People's Death... And Now that I Died , Die!

WASHINGTON, DC— In this week’s address, President Obama calls on Congress to pass the Buffett Rule, a principle of fairness that ensures that millionaires and billionaires do not pay less in taxes as a share of their income than middle class families pay.
[14th century. < Old Norse innkoma "arrival"; later < in-2 + come]
sys· tem \'sis-təm\ n [LL systemat-, systema, fr. Gk systēmat-, systēma, fr. synistanai to combine, fr. syn- + histanai to cause to stand — more at stand] (1603) 1 : a regularly interacting or interdependent group of items forming a unified whole ‹a number ~›: as a (1): a group of interacting bodies under the influence of related forces ‹a gravitational ~› (2): an assemblage of substances that is in or tends to equilibrium ‹a thermodynamic ~› b (1): a group of body organs that together perform one or more vital functions ‹the digestive ~›

The President believes our system must ask the wealthiest to pay their fair share, while

[15th century. < Latin protect-, past participle of protegere "cover in front" < tegere "to cover"]

protecting 98 percent of Americans from seeing their taxes go up at all. That is why the President proposed the Buffett Rule, which will help make our system reflect our values so that all Americans get a fair shot, play by the same rules, and pay their fair share.
1same \'sām\ adj [ME, fr. ON samr; akin to OHG sama same, L simulis like, simul together, at the same time, similis like, sem- one, Gk homos same, hama together, hen-, heis one] (13c) 1 a : resembling in every relevant respect b : conforming in every respect — used with as 2 a : being one without addition, change, or discontinuance : identical b : being the one under discussion or already referred to 3 : corresponding so closely as to be indistinguishable 4 : equal in size, shape, value, or importance — usu. used with the or a demonstrative (as that, those) in all senses

[Late 16th century. < French remarquer < marquer "to mark"]

Remarks of President Barack Obama Weekly Address [14th century. Via Old French adresser < assumed The White House Vulgar Latin addrictiare "direct to" < Latin directus March 31, 2012
(see direct)]

hel· \hə-'lō, he-\ n, pl hellos [alter. of hollo] (1877) : an lo expression or gesture of greeting — used interjectionally in greeting, in answering the telephone, or to express surprise

Hello.

[ Old English læ stan "last, follow" < Germanic]

Over the last few months, I’ve been talking about a choice we face as a country. We can either settle for an economy where a few people do really well and everyone else struggles to get by, or we can build an economy where hard work pays off again – where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules. That’s up to us.

1rule \'rül\ n [ME reule, fr. AF, fr. L regula straightedge, rule, fr. regere to keep straight, direct — more at right] (13c) 1 a : a prescribed guide for conduct or action b : the laws or regulations prescribed by the founder of a religious order for observance by its members c : an accepted procedure, custom, or habit d (1): a usu. written order or direction made by a court regulating court practice or the action of parties (2): a legal precept or doctrine e : a regulation or bylaw governing procedure or controlling conduct

[ Old English tō dæge "(this) day"]

1coun· \'kən-trē\ n, pl countries [ME contree, fr. AF try cuntree, contré, fr. ML contrata, fr. L contra against, on the opposite side] (13c) 1 : an indefinite usu. extended expanse of land : region ‹miles of open ~› 2 a : the land of a person's birth, residence, or citizenship b : a political state or nation or its territory 3 a : the people of a state or district : populace b : jury c : electorate 2 4 : rural as distinguished from urban areas ‹prefers the ~ to the city› 5 : country music — coun· ish \-trē-ish\ adj try·

Today, I want to talk to you about the idea that everyone in this country should do their fair share.
[ Old English scearu "division, portion" < Indo-European, "to cut"]

[13th century. Directly or via French < Latin perfectus < perficere "make completely, finish" < facere "make"]

un· it· \-'li-mə-təd\ adj (15c) lim· ed 1 : lacking any controls : unrestricted ‹~ access› 2 : boundless infinite ‹~ possibilities› 3 : not bounded by exceptions : undefined ‹the ~ and unconditional surrender of the enemy —Sir Winston Churchill› — un· it· ly adv lim· ed·

Now, if this were a perfect world, we’d have unlimited resources. No one would ever have to pay any taxes, and we could spend as much as we wanted. But we live in the real world.
spend \'spend\ vb, spent \'spent\ spend· [ME, fr. OE -spendan, fr. ML ing expendere to disburse, use up, fr. L, to measure by weight, pay out — more at expend] vt(13c)
[ Old English libban, lifian < IndoEuropean, "to stick"]

[Early 17th century. < French ressource < Latin resurgere "rise again, be replenished" < surgere "rise up from below"]

We don’t have unlimited resources. We have a deficit that needs to be paid down. And we also have to pay for investments that will help our economy grow and keep our country safe: education, research and technology, a strong military, and retirement programs like Medicare and Social Security.
se·cu·ri·ty [sə ky ətee] (plural se·cu·ri·ties) noun
1. state or feeling of safety: the state or feeling of being safe and protected 2. freedom from worries of loss: the assurance that something of value will not be taken away  job security 3. something giving assurance: something that provides a sense of protection against loss, attack, or harm  the security of knowing that the vehicle has been thoroughly checked 4. safety: protection against attack from without or subversion from within  a matter of national security 5. precautions to maintain safety: precautions taken to keep somebody or something safe from crime, attack, or danger  security measures

1mil· tary \'mi-lə-"ter-ē\ adj [ME, fr. L militaris, i· fr. milit-, miles soldier] (15c) 1 a : of or relating to soldiers, arms, or war b : of or relating to armed forces ; esp: of or relating to ground or sometimes ground and air forces as opposed to naval forces

1choice \'chȯis\ n [ME chois, fr. AF, fr. choisir to choose, of Gmc origin; akin to OHG kiosan to choose — more at choose] (13c) 1 : the act of choosing : selection ‹finding it hard to make a ~› 2 : power of choosing : option ‹you have no ~› 3 a : the best part : cream b : a person or thing chosen ‹she was their first ~›

6.That means weor an organization entrusted When it comes to paying down the deficit and investing guards: people have to make choices. with the job of protecting somebody middle-class in our future, should we ask or something, Americans to pay even more at a time when their especially a budgets are building orstretched to the breaking point? Or should we ask some of the wealthiest already institution, against crime  If you don't leave, I'll call security. 7. asset deposited to guarantee repayment: something pledged to guarantee fulfillment of an [12thobligation, especially an asset guaranteeing century. Via Old French payer repayment of pacare < becomes the property of "pacify" < Latin a loan that pax "peace"] the creditor if the loan is not repaid 8. guarantor: somebody who pledges to fulfill somebody else's obligation should that person fail to do so 9. financial instrument: a tradable document that shows evidence of debt or ownership, e.g. a stock certificate choice. That’s theor bond Over the last decade, we’ve

Americans to pay their fair share?

[ Old English āscian < Indo-European, "to wish"]

[ Old English < Indo-European]

spent hundreds of billions of dollars on what was supposed to be a temporary tax cut for the wealthiest two percent of Americans. Now we’re scheduled to spend almost a trillion more. Today, the wealthiest Americans are paying taxes at one of the lowest rates in 50 years. Warren Buffett is paying a lower rate than his
1low \'lō\ vi [ME loowen, fr. OE hlōwan; akin to OHG hluoen to moo, L calare to call, summon, Gk kalein] (bef. 12c) : moo 2low n (1549) : the deep sustained sound characteristic esp. of a cow

secretary. Meanwhile, over the last 30 years, the tax rates for middle class families have barely budged.
1last \'last\ vb [ME, fr. OE lǣstan to last, follow; akin to OE lāst footprint] vi(bef. 12c) 1 : to continue in time 2 a : to remain fresh or unimpaired : endure b : to manage to continue (as in a course of action) c : to continue to live

[15th century. Via French < medieval Latin (pro) rata (parte) "(according to a) fixed (part)" < Latin ratus, past participle of reri "calculate"]

1fair \'fer\ adj [ME fager, fair, fr. OE fæ ger; akin to OHG fagar beautiful] (bef. 12c) 1 : pleasing to the eye or mind esp. because of fresh, charming, or flawless quality 2 : superficially pleasing : specious ‹she trusted his ~ That’s not fair. It doesn’t make any sense. Do we want to keep giving tax breaks to the promises› wealthiest Americans like me, 3 aWarrenpure ‹~ sparkling water› – peoplelegibledon’t need them or : clean Buffett, or Bill Gates b : clear who and never asked for them? Or 4 : not stormy or foul investing in things that will grow our do we want to keep : fine ‹~ weather›

economy and keep us secure? Because we can’t afford to do both.

[ Old English wyllan < Indo-European]

1keep \'kēp\ vb, kept \'kept\ keep· [ME kepen, fr. OE cēpan; perh. akin ing to OHG chapfēn to look] vt(bef. 12c) 1 : to take notice of by appropriate conduct : fulfill: as a : to be faithful to ‹~ a promise› b : to act fittingly in relation to ‹~ the Sabbath› c : to conform to in habits or conduct ‹~ late hours› d : to stay in accord with (a beat) ‹~ time›

In most cases people behaves as a plural, as in People are funny; you never know what they will do. When people means "a group of human beings sharing one specific nationality, culture, or language," however, it is regarded as a singular and when used in the plural, takes an s plural ending: a Native American people of the Southwest, one of several such peoples noted for their peaceableness. The possessive of people is formed by adding an apostrophe + s if one people is stipulated: the people's choice of a new president. If many peoples are stipulated, the possessive is formed by adding an apostrophe after the s: various Caribbean peoples' representatives at the conference. People is the preferred form in designating human beings in the plural generally: Thousands of people [not persons] jammed the stadium.What on earth will people [not persons] think if you do that? Use persons only in certain narrow, typically legalistic or otherwise official, contexts: the Bureau of Missing Persons;the arrest of three suspicious persons loitering outside the White House gates.

Now, some people call this class warfare. But I think asking a billionaire to pay at least the

same tax rate as his secretary is just common sense. We don’t envy success in this country. We aspire to it. But we also believe that anyone who does well for themselves should do their fair share in return, so that more people have the opportunity to get ahead – not just a few.
[14th century. Via French < Latin justus < jus "law, right"]

1re· turn \ri-'tərn\ vb [ME, fr. AF returner, fr. re- + turner, tourner to turn — more at turn] vi(14c) 1 a : to go back or come back again ‹~ home› b : to go back in thought, practice, or condition : revert 2 : to pass back to an earlier possessor 3 : reply retort

[ Old English belyfan, alteration of gelēfan < Germanic, "to love, trust"]

That’s the America I believe in. And in the next few weeks, Members of Congress will get a chance to show you where they stand. Congress is going to vote on what’s called the Buffett Rule: If you make more than $1 million a year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle class families do.
[ Old English middel]

shall \shəl, 'shal\ vb, past should \shəd, 'shụd\ pres sing & pl shall [ME shal (1st & 3d sing. pres. indic.), fr. OE sceal; akin to OHG scal (1st & 3d sing. pres. indic.) ought to, must, Lith skola debt] verbal auxiliary(bef. 12c)

reporting past viewpoint about future: used when reporting something such as 5. somebody's words or thoughts from a past perspective about a future event  It was intended that the library should be for the use of everyone.  He was eager that I should meet his publisher friend. 6. used to soften harsh words: used to soften a blunt statement or make one more polite  I should hope you're sorry now.

On the other hand, if you make under $250,000 a year – like 98 percent of American families do – your taxes shouldn’t go up. You’re the ones struggling with the rising cost of everything from college tuition to groceries. You’re the ones who deserve a break.
1break \'brāk\ vb, broke \'brōk\ bro· ken \'brōkən\ break· [ME breken, fr. OE brecan; akin to ing OHG brehhan to break, L frangere] vt(bef. 12c) 1 a : to separate into parts with suddenness or violence b : fracture ‹~ an arm› c : rupture ‹~ the skin› d : to cut into and turn over the surface of ‹~

1re· cord \ri-'kȯrd\ vb [ME, lit., to recall, fr. AF recorder, fr. L recordari, fr. re- + cord-, cor heart — more at heart] vt(14c) 1 a (1): to set down in writing : furnish written evidence of (2): to deposit an authentic official copy of ‹~ a deed› b : to state for or as if for the record ‹voted in favor but ~ed certain reservations› c (1): to register permanently by mechanical means ‹earthquake shocks ~ed by a seismograph› (2): indicate read ‹the thermometer ~ed 90°›

So every Member of Congress is going to go on record. And if they vote to keep giving tax breaks to people like me – tax breaks our country can’t afford – then they’re going to have to explain to you where that money comes from. Either it’s going to add to our deficit, or it’s going to come out of your pocket. Seniors will have to pay more for their Medicare benefits.
1pock· \'pä-kət\ n [ME poket, fr. AF poket, et pochete, dim. of poke, pouche bag — more at pouch] (15c) 1 a : a small bag carried by a person : purse b : a small bag that is sewed or inserted in a garment so that it is open at the top or side ‹coat ~› 2 : supply of money : means
[14th century. Via Anglo-Norman benfet, Old French bienfait < Latin benefactum "good deed" < bene "well" + facere "do"]

[15th century. Alteration of Anglo-Norman interesse < medieval Latin, "compensation for loss" < Latin, "differ, be important," by association with Old French interest "damage, loss" < Latin, "it matters"]

Students will see their interest rates go up at a time when they can’t afford it. Families who are scraping by will have to do more because the richest Americans are doing less.

Oklahoma: New law banning Sharia dies in committee
Apr 06, 2012 01:07 pm | Robert

The original Oklahoma anti-Sharia law that passed with 70% of the vote in November 2010 was poorly written, and Hamas-linked CAIR and other Islamic supremacists immediately argued before a Leftist judge that the law would infringe upon Muslims' religious rights. They still make headway using that argument with judges and... read more When the Minority Exercises the Freedom of Expression with Voices so Loud the Majority cannot listen their own Voices this is an Oligarchy pretending Freedom Enslaving both Time and Space... From that Aspect are Muslims in the United States a Privileged Community using the Existing Status the Jewish Community has in the United States to gain more rights and lobby the US Government in favor of countries where Islamic Ideologies of all kinds derived perhaps undermining US Influence in the e.g. Middle East Peace Process while if the US Government fails to achieve the outcome the Islamic Community in the United States wants the Mother Countries in the Middle East hail it as one more sign of loss of faith or "The Paper Tiger" exists truly? If you are not American what are you doing in my Country?

[ Old English riht < Indo-European, "go straight"]

That’s not right. That’s not who we are. In America, our story has never been about what we can do by ourselves – it’s about what we can do together. It’s about believing in our future and the future of this country.
1fu· ture \'fyü-chər\ adj [ME, fr. AF & L; AF, fr. L futurus about to be — more at be] (14c) 1 : that is to be ; specif: existing after death 2 : of, relating to, or constituting a verb tense expressive of time yet to come 3 : existing or occurring at a later time ‹met his ~ wife›

[14th century. Via French membre < Latin membrum "limb, part"]

So tell your Members of Congress to do the right thing. Call them up, write them a letter, pay them a visit, and tell them to stop giving tax breaks to people who don’t need them and start investing in the things that will help our economy grow and put people back to work.
[13th century. < Old French cuntrée < assumed Vulgar Latin (terra) contrata "(land) lying opposite" < Latin contra "against"] [ Old English bæ c < Germanic]

That’s how we’ll make this country a little fairer, a little more just, and a whole lot stronger. Thank you.
thank \'thaŋk\ vt [ME, fr. OE thancian; akin to OE thanc gratitude — more at thanks] (bef. 12c) 1 : to express gratitude to ‹~ed her for the present› — used in the phrase thank you usu. without a subject to politely express gratitude ‹~ you for your consideration› or sometimes to emphasize a preceding statement esp. by implying that it is not subject to question ‹likes her job just fine, thank you› — used in such phrases as thank God, thank goodness usu. without a subject to express gratitude or more often only the speaker's or writer's pleasure or satisfaction in something

[PRESIDENTIAL WEEKLY ADDRESS ASSESSMENT PHASE A.a END OF]

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