4344 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO.

11, NOVEMBER 2009
Modeling and Control of PV Charger
System With SEPIC Converter
S. J. Chiang, Hsin-Jang Shieh, Member, IEEE, and Ming-Chieh Chen
Abstract—The photovoltaic (PV) stand-alone system requires a
battery charger for energy storage. This paper presents the mod-
eling and controller design of the PV charger system implemented
with the single-ended primary inductance converter (SEPIC). The
designed SEPIC employs the peak-current-mode control with the
current command generated from the input PV voltage regulating
loop, where the voltage command is determined by both the PV
module maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control loop and
the battery charging loop. The control objective is to balance the
power flow from the PV module to the battery and the load such
that the PV power is utilized effectively and the battery is charged
with three charging stages. This paper gives a detailed modeling
of the SEPIC with the PV module input and peak-current-mode
control first. Accordingly, the PV voltage controller, as well as the
adaptive MPPT controller, is designed. An 80-W prototype system
is built. The effectiveness of the proposed methods is proved with
some simulation and experimental results.
Index Terms—Maximum power point tracking (MPPT), power
balance control, single-ended primary inductance converter
(SEPIC), stand-alone.
I. INTRODUCTION
S
OLAR POWER is more and more attractive due to the
severer environmental protection regulation and the pre-
dictable shortage of conventional energy sources [1], [2]. As a
result, many research works have addressed the development of
solar power system in recent years. Many types of photovoltaic
(PV) power conversion systems have been developed including
the grid-connected system for reducing the power from the
utility [3]–[6] and the stand-alone system for providing the
load power without the utility [6]–[8]. The stand-alone system
requires battery for energy storage to supply the load power dur-
ing the period without or shortage of solar power. Because the
P−V characteristic of the PV module is varied with the insola-
tion level as well as the temperature [9], [10], if the peak power
voltage of the PV module does not match with the battery volt-
age, the energy conversion efficiency of the PV module will be
reduced using the direct connection of the PV module and the
battery. Therefore, a battery charger is required to track the peak
Manuscript received October 31, 2007; revised August 11, 2008. First
published September 23, 2008; current version published October 9, 2009.
This work was supported by the National Science Council, Taiwan under Grant
NSC95-2221-E-239-048.
S. J. Chiang is with the Department of Electrical Engineering, National
United University, Miaoli 360, Taiwan (e-mail: sjchiang@nuu.edu.tw).
H.-J. Shieh is with the Department of Electrical Engineering, National Dong
Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan (e-mail: hjshieh@mail.ndhu.edu.tw).
M.-C. Chen is with the FSP Technology Inc., Taoyuan, Taiwan (e-mail:
m9323003@gmail.com).
Color versions of one or more of the figures in this paper are available online
at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org.
Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/TIE.2008.2005144
power of the PV module in all operation conditions [11]. In
addition, the battery charging needs control for achieving high
state of charge (SOC) and, consequently, longer lifetime of the
battery [12].
This paper explores the charger system implemented with
the single-ended primary inductance converter (SEPIC) [13].
Although the boost converter usually has higher efficiency than
the SEPIC, however, it is only applicable for cases where the
battery voltage is higher than the PV module voltage. The
buck–boost feature of the SEPIC widens the applicable PV
voltage and thus increases the adopted PV module flexibility.
The comparison of various buck–boost converters from differ-
ent points of view is shown in Table I. Among these converters,
although the SEPIC is not the best from the views of efficiency
and cost, it still has the merits of noninverting polarity, easy-to-
drive switch, and low input-current pulsating for high-precise
MPPT that makes its integral characteristics suitable for the
low-power PV charger system. This paper will investigate the
SEPIC with the PV module input and the peak-current-mode
control that was seldom presented in previous studies. The
small-signal model of such a SEPIC will be derived, and upon
which, the PV voltage controller and the MPPT controller will
be designed.
Another important issue of the PV charger system is the
power balance control that was faced commonly for multiple-
source system, such as fuel-cell hybrid vehicle [14], hybrid
PV and fuel-cell power system [15], hybrid wind, solar, and
distributed-generation power system[16], and so on. For the PV
charger system, MPPT and battery charging must be coopera-
tive, and the load demand must be considered simultaneously
such that the PV power can be utilized effectively and the
battery is suitably charged. Jiang and Dougal [17] treat this
issue as a multiobjective problem. It classifies the system into
various states based on the operating conditions of the PV
module, the battery, and the load. By judging the state and
setting the related control goal, the power will be balanced to
satisfy the MPPT control and battery charging requirement.
However, the multiobjective control algorithm requires sense
of many states and sophisticated state judgment, and thus, needs
software programming. This paper will present a power balance
control method that achieves the same functions as that in [17]
but with only a simple control circuit. In addition, the proposed
power balance control can also be extended to the system with
more sources like those shown in [14]–[16]. Furthermore, all
power sources can be utilized with the preset priority based on
their importance to the system.
An 80-W prototype charger system implemented with some
analog circuits and Matlab real-time control is designed and
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CHIANG et al.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4345
TABLE I
COMPARISON OF VARIOUS BUCK–BOOST CONVERTERS
Fig. 1. Circuit configuration of the proposed PV charger.
built. The effectiveness of the proposed system is proved with
some PSIM [18] simulation and experimental results.
II. CIRCUIT CONFIGURATION AND POWER BALANCE
CONTROL OF THE CHARGER
The circuit configuration of the proposed PV charger is
shown in Fig. 1. The SEPIC converter employs the peak-
current-mode control with an outer PV voltage regulating loop,
where the voltage command (V

p
) is generated by combining
the MPPT control loop and the battery charging loop. The com-
bination of MPPT and charging control is for instantaneously
balancing the system power to charge the battery with three
stages, namely, constant-current, constant-voltage, and floating-
charge stages.
Based on the PV power generation, the battery SOC, and
the load condition, the designed controller shown in Fig. 1
can operate the system in three operation modes, as shown
in Fig. 2. Fig. 2(a) shows the discharging mode wherein the
available maximum PV power is less than the load power. The
insufficient power will be automatically supplied by the dis-
charge of the battery. Fig. 2(b) shows the partial charging mode
wherein the available maximum PV power is larger than the
load power and the excessive power will charge the battery, but
the charging current is still less than the preset charge current
command (I

b
). In the aforementioned two modes, because the
battery current (I
b
) in Fig. 1 cannot reach its current command
(I

b
), the signal generated by the battery current controller that
is a proportional and integral (PI) controller will go positive
and be limited to be zero. It results that the voltage command
(V

p
) is determined completely by the MPPT controller, and
thus, the PV module is operated in the MPPT point, as shown
in Fig. 2(a) and (b). As the available peak power of the PV
module is larger than the battery charging and load requirement,
the battery current in Fig. 1 will reach its command (I

b
),
and the signal generated by the battery current controller will
go negative and will now add voltage to increase the voltage
command generated by the MPPT controller. As a result,
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4346 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009
Fig. 2. Operation modes of the charger system. (a) Discharging mode.
(b) Partial charging mode. (c) Charging mode.
the PV module will discard the MPPT because the voltage
command (V

p
) is shifted to a higher level than the MPPT
voltage, and finally, the generated PV power will balance the
load and charging requirement in the charging mode shown in
Fig. 2(c).
The charging controller is a PI controller. The limiter behind
the charging controller will set the charging current command
(I

b
) to be a maximum charging current level as the battery
voltage (V
b
) has not reached its maximum charged voltage
command (V

b
). In this case, and if the power condition is
sufficient as Fig. 2(c), the system will operate in the constant-
current charge stage. As the battery voltage approximately
reaches the voltage command (V

b
), the limiter will enter the
linear region, and the charging current command (I

b
) will
reduce. This stage is called the constant-voltage charge stage.
Finally, as the battery voltage reaches the voltage command
(V

b
) and the limiter output (I

b
) is reduced to be approxi-
mately zero, the battery is in the floating-charge stage, i.e., the
fully SOC.
Through the proposed control arrangement, the PV module
will operate at MPPT, and the MPPT is discarded only when
the available PV power is larger than the total power for battery
charge and supplying the load. This is the most effective way
for utilizing the PV power. In addition, the battery will not
be overcharged and will stay at a high SOC voltage level if
the PV power is enough. On the other hand, to guarantee no
overdischarge of the battery as the PV power is insufficient, a
load switch controlled with a hysteretic comparator is used in
Fig. 1 to disconnect the load as the battery voltage is lower than
a low SOC level and reconnect the load if the battery voltage is
larger than a safety level (V

bL
) higher than the low SOC level.
The proposed power balance control method shown in Fig. 1
can be easily extended to the system with more sources. Fig. 3
shows the extension that two PVcharge circuits charge the same
battery, and the related operation modes are shown in Fig. 4. By
passing the signal (V
L
) generated by the positive limiter to the
negative limiter, the V
L
signal can be distributed to be two as
V
L1
and V
L2
. These two signals are then used to correct the
signals generated by both MPPT controllers to produce the PV
voltage commands for both chargers as that done in Fig. 1. If
the positive limiter’s output is zero, then both MPPT controllers
will not be affected by the charge controller, and both PV
modules will be at MPPT. The operation modes shown in
Fig. 4(a) and (b) both belong to this case. If the positive limiter’s
output is negative and is not limited by the negative limiter, V
L2
will be zero, and V
L1
will shift the MPPT of PV module 1.
Therefore, PV module 2 is at MPPT, but PV module 1
is not, as shown in Fig. 4(c). If the positive limiter’s output is
negative and limited by the negative limiter, V
L2
will not be
zero. V
L1
and V
L2
will shift the MPPT of both PV modules.
If the level of V
L1
exactly shifts PV module 1 to be the open-
circuit voltage, then the total power is only contributed by PV
module 2, as shown in Fig. 4(d). The power balance control
method shown in Fig. 3 can also be applied to the system with
more sources just by distributing the signal V
L
. It allows the
sources with different power characteristics. In addition, the
power source utilization can be assigned with priority, as done
in Fig. 3, where PV module 2 will be utilized first and then PV
module 1. This feature is not proposed by all previous studies
[14]–[17].
III. MODELING AND CONTROLLER
DESIGN OF CHARGER
SEPIC is a buck–boost-derived converter that possesses a
right-half-plane (RHP) zero in the continuous conduction mode
(CCM), even with the peak-current-mode control in the output-
voltage regulation mode [19]. Following the averaged switch
modeling technique presented in [19], the control-to-output
transfer function of the SEPIC in CCM with output-voltage
regulation can be derived from Fig. 1 to be the following form:
˜
V
B
˜
D
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
˜
V
P
=
˜
V
Cs
=0
=
V
P
−V
B
D
2
_
1 −s
DL
D

R
L
_
_
1 +s
L
D
2
R
L
+s
2
LC
o
D
2
_ (1)
where D is the duty ratio of the switch, with D

= 1 −D.
Here, for deriving (1) from Fig. 1, the battery is changed to be
an output-filter capacitor C
o
, the input voltage V
p
is changed
to be a constant-voltage source, and the inductors are set to
be L
1
= L
2
= L for simplification. Equation (1) possesses
an RHP zero located at D

RL/(DL). Opposite to output-
voltage regulation as the conventional converter, the proposed
PV charger regulates the input voltage. The CCM operation is
preferred here for reducing the input-current ripple and reduced
the switch-current stress. As will be seen in the following,
opposite to the output-voltage capacitor charged by the diode
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CHIANG et al.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4347
Fig. 3. Proposed power balance control method applied for two PV charger systems.
current of the output regulation structure, there is no RHP zero
problemof the proposed PVcharger because the input capacitor
current is charge controlled with the input inductor current,
and the input is a PV current source for the input regulation
structure. In the following, the analysis and design are based on
the CCM operation mode.
A. Design of Power Circuit
Referring to Fig. 1, the voltage transfer ratio of the SEPIC in
CCM is [20]
M =
V
B
V
p
=
D
1 −D
(2)
where D is the duty ratio of the switch. If the input inductor is
designed based on the idea that the SEPIC is operated in CCM
within the prescribed power range, then the input inductor L
1
will satisfy the following relation:
Δi
L1,pp
= 2I
p,min
=
2P
pv,min
V
p
=
V
p
L
1
D
max
T
s
(3)
where Δi
L1,pp
is the peak-to-peak value of the input inductor
current. P
pv,min
is the prescribed minimum PV power. I
p,min
is
the PV module current corresponding to P
pv,min
. The inductor
L
2
is designed to couple with L
1
as a flyback transformer to
reduce the volume. The turn ratio is one (L
1
= L
2
) to make
both inductors enter into CCM simultaneously. Substituting (2)
into (3) results in
L
1
= L
2
=
V
2
B
2M(M + 1)P
pv,min
f
s
. (4)
The input-voltage ripple is caused by the charge and dis-
charge of the capacitor C
s
, as well as the ripple caused by
the equivalent series resistance (ESR) of the capacitor. The
electrolytic capacitor having nonnegligible ESR is adopted
here, and the input-voltage ripple is caused mainly by it at the
adopted switching frequency (40 kHz). As a result, the input
capacitor is selected based on the ESR value (R
e
) and the
voltage ripple demand (ΔV
p
) as [20]
R
e
=
ΔV
p
Δi
L1,pp
=
ΔV
p
2I
p,min
. (5)
Once ESR is determined, the capacitance (C
p
) can be de-
signed from the datasheet of the capacitor. The voltage ripple is
specified with the precision of the MPPT. A larger ripple will
render a larger fluctuation around the MPPT operation point.
As for the coupling capacitor C
s
, it has to flow the maximum
input current pulse, and a small ESR is required for reducing
the loss. In this paper, it is selected to be the same as the input
capacitor C
p
.
It should be noted that if the switching frequency of the
converter is high enough such that the capacitance of the
input capacitor can be reduced significantly, the tantalum and
the ceramic capacitors with lower ESR can be adopted cost
effectively. The design of capacitor can then be changed to be
with charge and discharge of the capacitor but not with the ESR.
B. Modeling and Control of SEPIC
The equivalent circuit of the PV cell is shown in Fig. 5
[21], where R
sh
and R
s
are the intrinsic shunt and series
resistances of the cell, respectively. Usually, the value of R
sh
is very large, and that of R
s
is very small; hence, they may
be neglected to simplify the analysis. PV cells are grouped in
larger units called PV modules which are further interconnected
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4348 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009
Fig. 4. Operation modes of two PV charger systems. (a) Discharging mode.
(b) Partial charging mode. (c) Charging mode with PV module 1 not at MPPT.
(d) Charging mode with two PV modules not at MPPT.
in a parallel–series configuration to form PV arrays. The PV
array mathematical model can be represented as follows [22]:
I
p
= n
p
I
ph
−n
p
I
sat
_
exp
_
q
KAT
V
p
n
s
_
−1
_
(6)
where I
p
is the PV module array output current (in amperes),
V
p
is the PV array output voltage, n
s
is the number of modules
connected in series, n
p
is the number of modules connected
in parallel, q is the charge of an electron, K is Boltzmann’s
constant, A is the p-n junction ideality factor, T is the cell
temperature (in kelvins), and I
sat
is the cell reverse saturation
current.
The peak-current-mode control with input PV voltage reg-
ulation of the SEPIC is shown in Fig. 6(a), where the PV
module is represented as a current source modeled by (6), with
n
s
= n
p
= 1. The PV input power is
P
pv
= V I
p
. (7)
Fig. 5. Equivalent circuit of the PV cell.
Fig. 6. Feedback control of the SEPIC.
Under a fixed insolation condition, a small perturbation of (7)
can be found as
¯
P
pv
=
¯
V I
p
+
¯
I
p
V. (8)
Equation (8) can be rearranged to represent the small-signal
expression of the PV module current
¯
I
p
=
−I
p
V
¯
V +
¯
P
pv
V
. (9)
One can obtain the input capacitor current from Fig. 6(a) as
C
p
dV
dt
= I
p
−I
L1
. (10)
The small-signal expression of (10) is
C
p
d
¯
V
dt
=
¯
I
p

¯
I
L1
. (11)
Substituting (9) into (11) yields
C
p
d
¯
V
dt
=
−I
p
V
¯
V +
¯
P
pv
V

¯
I
L1
. (12)
The transfer function of the inductor current I
L1
to the voltage
V can be found from (12) as
V (s)
I
L1
(s)
¸
¸
¸
¸
˜
P
pv
=0
= −
R
p
1 +sC
p
R
p
, R
p
=
V
I
p

V
p
I
p
(13)
where R
p
is the equivalent load resistor seen by the PV module.
The relation between V and V
p
can be found by considering the
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CHIANG et al.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4349
ESR of the capacitor as
¯
V +R
e
C
p
d
¯
V
dt
=
¯
V
p
. (14)
The transfer function fromI
L1
to V
p
can be found by combining
(13) and the transfer function of (14) as
H(s) =
V
p
(s)
I
L1
(s)
¸
¸
¸
¸
¯ P
pv
=0
= −
R
p
(1 +sC
p
R
e
)
1 +sC
p
R
p
. (15)
Equation (15) is a first-order system that includes a pole and
a zero. The pole is determined by the capacitor C
p
and the
equivalent load resistor R
p
. As compared with that in (1), the
zero here is determined by C
p
and the ESR value R
e
that is a
left-half-plane (LHP) zero. The UC3846 control IC is adopted
for realizing the peak-current-mode control. The switch current
is sensed with the resistor R
s
. A low-pass filter formed by
R
f
−C
f
is added to reduce the leading-edge spike caused by
the discharge of the internal capacitor of the switch and the
diode recovery current. The slope compensation signal is added
to the sensed current to prevent the subharmonic oscillation, as
the duty cycle is larger than 0.5. The slope compensation signal
is provided by the ramp signal coupled with a capacitor C
d
.
The level of compensation is adjusted with the ratio of resistors
R
c1
and R
c2
. The compensated current signal is amplified three
times and then compared with the voltage error signal V
ea
of
the voltage controller to reset the flip-flop which is set pulse by
pulse by the clock signal v
CLK
and to finally determine the duty
ratio of the switch. Because the peak current of the inductor L
1
is the same as that of the switch, the transfer function from V
ea
to I
L1
can be found as
K =
I
L1
(s)
V
ea
(s)
=
1
3R
s
_
1 +
m
a
m
1
_ (16)
where m
1
and m
a
are the slopes of the sensed current and
the compensated signal, respectively. For assuring a stable
current loop under any PV voltage, m
a
/m
1
≥ 0.5 is chosen.
Combining (15) and (16), the transfer function of the voltage
loop can be derived as
v
p
(s)
V
ea
(s)
= P(s) = k
v
kH(s) = −
k
v
R
e
3R
s
_
1+
m
a
m
1
_
_
s +
1
C
p
R
e
_
s +
1
C
p
R
p
(17)
where v
p
is the sensed PV voltage (V
p
). The voltage sensing
factor is k
v
. The negative gain in (17) desires a positive-
feedback control of the input voltage. The low-pass filter, as
in the following, is adopted as the compensator of the voltage
controller
G
v
(s) =
V
c
V
o
=
1
R
1
C
v
s +
1
C
v
R
2
. (18)
Its pole is designed to cancel the zero of (17), i.e., R
2
C
v
=
R
e
C
p
. Considering that the gain and the pole of (17) will drift
Fig. 7. Adopted incremental conductance MPPT control algorithm.
with the PV voltage, the gain R
2
/R
1
of the error amplifier
should be designed to satisfy the stability and provide a suitable
bandwidth of the voltage loop.
C. MPPT Controller Design
The proposed MPPT controller tracks the peak power of the
PV module based on the power–voltage (P−V
p
) characteristic
shown in Fig. 7 and the incremental conductance algorithm
[22], [23]. In the positive-slope region (dP/dV
p
> 0), the op-
eration voltage is increased. On the other hand, in the negative-
slope region (dP/dV
p
< 0), the operation voltage is decreased.
The peak power point starting from any operating point will
be finally reached through a few steps of voltage adjustment.
In this paper, for increasing the tracking speed as well as the
precision, the voltage adjusting speed is slope dependent. In the
positive-slope region, the adjusting speed will be slower than
the negative-slope region because the positive slope is smaller
than the negative slope in amplitude. The adjusting speed will
be slowed down near the peak power point. This is effective
to prevent the tracking oscillation near the peak power point
to increase the MPPT precision. The aforementioned MPPT
control algorithm implemented with the Matlab real-time con-
trol (the details will be described in Section IV) is shown in
Fig. 8. For avoiding error adjustment caused by the voltage and
current ripples, the voltage and power are processed using a
fourth moving-average filter before the slope calculation. The
slope ΔP/ΔV
p
is calculated and then multiplied by a gain
(Gain 1) and limited by a limiter (Limiter 1) to find the direction
and set the voltage change in each step. The direction value is
accumulated with a memory and then scaled with Gain 2 to fit
the required voltage range. To make the MPPT start from the
open-circuit voltage, the Init voltage nearing the open-circuit
voltage is adopted to set the initial voltage command before the
start of the converter. The voltage command is finally limited
by Limiter 2 to limit the attainable PV voltage.
IV. IMPLEMENTATION AND VERIFICATION
An 80-W PV charger system is designed and built and tested
with a 75-W Siemens SP75 PV module in this paper. The
specification of the SEPIC is listed as follows:
V
p
=10 ∼ 22 V V
B
= 12 V f
s
= 40 kHz
k
v
=0.1 R
s
= 0.05 V
B
= 12 V
P
pv,min
=10 W I
p,min
= 0.5 A ΔV
p
= 0.2 V. (19)
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4350 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009
Fig. 8. Proposed MPPT control algorithm implemented with the Matlab real-time control.
The PV voltage may be lower or higher than the battery voltage,
and the duty ratio range can be calculated with (2) as
M =
_
V
B
V
p
_
max
=
12
10
=
D
max
1 −D
max
, D
max
= 0.545.
(20)
The inductor value is then calculated with (4) as L
1
= L
2
=
68 μF. With the specification of ΔV
p
and (5), the required R
e
=
0.2 Ω. Accordingly, the capacitor is found as
C
p
=
40 ×10
−6
R
e
= 200 μF (21)
where 40 ×10
−6
can be determined from the capacitor
datasheet. The typical value is 30−80 ×10
−6
. The real value
of C
p
is 220 μF in this paper. The coupling capacitor C
s
has
the same value as the C
p
.
The voltage controller in (18) is designed with (17). How-
ever, the parameters in (17) are varied with the operating point
of the PV module. For considering this factor, Fig. 9 shows five
P−V curves of the SP75 module corresponding to the cases of
PV peak powers of 75, 60, 40, 30, and 10 W, respectively. Three
lines on the right side of each curve are chosen to calculate the
equivalent output resistor value (R
p
) of the PV module. The
resistor value is determined based on the slope of the V −I
curve. The voltage controller in (18) is then designed based
on (17) and these resistor values. The MPPT in 75 W (R
p1
)
is adopted as the nominal case. The design procedure is as
follows: 1) Set the crossover frequency (f
c
) to be one-tenth
of the switching frequency (f
s
); 2) find the value R
2
/R
1
=
1/|KH(f
c
)|; 3) assign R
1
and then calculate R
2
with the ratio
R
2
/R
1
; and 4) set the pole to be R
2
C
v
= C
p
R
e
and then
find C
v
. The designed result of G
v
is shown in Fig. 10, in
which the bode plots of P(s) in (17) with various values of R
p
and the closed-loop response (G
v
P) of the nominal case are
also provided. The closed-loop response of the nominal case
Fig. 9. Five P−V curves corresponding to the cases of PV peak power of 75,
60, 40, 30, and 10 W, respectively.
satisfies the aforementioned design. It can be examined that the
closed-loop response for various cases is also stable.
The whole system is verified with the PSIM simulation first
before implementation. It is constructed based on the aforeasaid
design. For verifying the circuit modeling, the open-loop re-
sponse of the voltage loop in the aforementioned nominal case
is ac swept with the PSIM simulation, as shown in Fig. 11(a), in
which the PVmodule is modeled as a voltage-controlled current
source possessing the prescribed SP75 module V −I curve. The
current command is set to satisfy the 75-W input. Fig. 11(b)
shows the sweep of the voltage loop that is closed further.
The sweep results are very close to the theoretic results shown
in Fig. 10, confirming the previous modeling and controller
design.
The implementation of the whole system in the developing
stage is shown in Fig. 12. The MPPT controller of the SEPIC
charger is implemented with the Matlab real-time control on
PC; other circuits of the SEPIC are implemented with the
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CHIANG et al.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4351
Fig. 10. Open- and closed-loop responses of the voltage.
Fig. 11. AC sweep of the voltage loop. (a) Open loop. (b) Closed loop.
analog circuit. Fig. 13 shows the measured MPPT response at
50 W. The waveforms of the PVmodule voltage and current and
the P−V trace prove that the response of the proposed MPPT
controller is fast. The precision of the MPPT controller is found
to be up to 99.2% even at low PV power.
The measured waveforms for demonstrating the power bal-
ance feature are shown in Fig. 14. Fig. 14(a) shows that the load
Fig. 12. Implementation of the whole system.
Fig. 13. MPPT response of the charge.
power (84 W) is larger than the available PV power (MPPT,
60 W), the insufficient power is supplied by the battery (24 W),
and the PV module is operated at MPPT. Fig. 14(b) shows that
the load power is small and that the PV module discards the
MPPT (20 W) to keep the battery charged in constant current
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4352 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009
Fig. 14. Measured waveforms for demonstrating the power balance feature.
(a) Load power is larger than the available PV power. (b) Sum of the load power
and the charge power is less than the peak power of the PV module.
(0.6 A). These all demonstrate that the proposed power balance
control is effective.
V. CONCLUSION
This paper has presented a PV charger implemented with the
SEPIC converter. The system has been proved to be effective in
the MPPT and power balance control. The proposed modeling
method of the converter with the PV module input and peak-
current-mode control, the adaptive MPPT control method, as
well as the power balance control method can also be applied to
the charger with other types of converter. The MPPT controller
was implemented with the Matlab real-time control in this
paper, and it will be changed to be implemented with the mi-
croprocessor or DSP and integrated with the voltage controller
and PWM to make the system more practical in the future.
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S. J. Chiang was born in Tainan, Taiwan in
1965. He received the B.S. and Ph.D. degrees
in electrical engineering from National Tsing Hua
University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, in 1987 and 1994,
respectively.
From 1995 to 2000, he was an Associate Professor
with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Na-
tional United University, Miaoli, Taiwan, where he
has been a Professor since 2001. His current research
interests include power electronics, motor drives, and
control systems.
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CHIANG et al.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4353
Hsin-Jang Shieh (M’02) received the B.S. and Ph.D.
degrees in electrical engineering from National Cen-
tral University, Chung-Li, Taiwan, in 1992 and 1997,
respectively.
From 1997 to 2002, he was with the Mechani-
cal Industry Research Laboratories, Industrial Tech-
nology Research Institute, Hsinchu, Taiwan, as a
Researcher. Since August 2002, he has been with
the Department of Electrical Engineering, National
Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, and is cur-
rently an Associate Professor. His research interests
include drive and control of piezoelectric mechanisms, power converters,
photovoltaic systems, and control theory applications.
Dr. Shieh is a member of the Taiwan Power Electronics Association and the
Chinese Automatic Control Society of Taiwan. He was the recipient of the 2007
Taiwain Power Electronics Conference Best Paper Award.
Ming-Chieh Chen was born in Taichung, Taiwan in
1980. He received the B.S. degree in electrical en-
gineering from National United University, Miaoli,
Taiwan, in 2004 and the M.S. degree in electrical
engineering from National Dong Hwa University,
Hualien, Taiwan, in 2006.
He is currently an Electronic Engineer with FSP
Technology Inc., Taoyuan, Taiwan. His research in-
terest includes power electronics.
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where the voltage command (Vp∗ ) is generated by combining the MPPT control loop and the battery charging loop. because the battery current (Ib ) in Fig. It results that the voltage command (Vp∗ ) is determined completely by the MPPT controller. and floatingcharge stages. 2(a) shows the discharging mode wherein the available maximum PV power is less than the load power. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. and the signal generated by the battery current controller will go negative and will now add voltage to increase the voltage command generated by the MPPT controller. 2(b) shows the partial charging mode wherein the available maximum PV power is larger than the load power and the excessive power will charge the battery. but the charging current is still less than the preset charge current ∗ command (Ib ). 1. The effectiveness of the proposed system is proved with some PSIM [18] simulation and experimental results.CHIANG et al. As a result. 1 cannot reach its current command ∗ (Ib ). namely. 1 will reach its command (Ib ). constant-current. The combination of MPPT and charging control is for instantaneously balancing the system power to charge the battery with three stages. Restrictions apply. the designed controller shown in Fig. constant-voltage. Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. the signal generated by the battery current controller that is a proportional and integral (PI) controller will go positive and be limited to be zero. Fig. as shown in Fig. the battery SOC. As the available peak power of the PV module is larger than the battery charging and load requirement. . The SEPIC converter employs the peakcurrent-mode control with an outer PV voltage regulating loop. 2(a) and (b). 1. C IRCUIT C ONFIGURATION AND P OWER B ALANCE C ONTROL OF THE C HARGER The circuit configuration of the proposed PV charger is shown in Fig. Circuit configuration of the proposed PV charger.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4345 TABLE I COMPARISON OF VARIOUS BUCK–BOOST CONVERTERS Fig. In the aforementioned two modes. 1 can operate the system in three operation modes. built. II. Based on the PV power generation. ∗ the battery current in Fig. the PV module is operated in the MPPT point. Fig. and thus. as shown in Fig. 2. The insufficient power will be automatically supplied by the discharge of the battery. Downloaded on October 10. and the load condition.

but PV module 1 is not. Opposite to outputvoltage regulation as the conventional converter. In addition. and finally. the generated PV power will balance the load and charging requirement in the charging mode shown in Fig. opposite to the output-voltage capacitor charged by the diode Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. Here. 1 to be the following form: ˜ VB ˜ D DL 1 − s D RL VP − VB L D2 o 1 + s D 2 RL + s2 LC2 D = ˜ ˜ VP =VCs =0 (1) where D is the duty ratio of the switch. 4. Restrictions apply. and the inductors are set to be L1 = L2 = L for simplification.e. the battery is changed to be an output-filter capacitor Co . The power balance control method shown in Fig. Following the averaged switch modeling technique presented in [19]. 1. and both PV modules will be at MPPT.4346 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS. It allows the sources with different power characteristics. with D = 1 − D. Operation modes of the charger system. If the positive limiter’s output is negative and is not limited by the negative limiter. The limiter behind the charging controller will set the charging current command ∗ (Ib ) to be a maximum charging current level as the battery voltage (Vb ) has not reached its maximum charged voltage command (Vb∗ ). 2(c). As the battery voltage approximately reaches the voltage command (Vb∗ ). a load switch controlled with a hysteretic comparator is used in Fig. to guarantee no overdischarge of the battery as the PV power is insufficient. the proposed PV charger regulates the input voltage. the limiter will enter the ∗ linear region. the PV module will discard the MPPT because the voltage command (Vp∗ ) is shifted to a higher level than the MPPT voltage. 1. Equation (1) possesses an RHP zero located at D RL/(DL). VL2 will not be zero. By passing the signal (VL ) generated by the positive limiter to the negative limiter. If the positive limiter’s output is negative and limited by the negative limiter. In addition. Finally. i. 2. 3 can also be applied to the system with more sources just by distributing the signal VL . 1 to disconnect the load as the battery voltage is lower than a low SOC level and reconnect the load if the battery voltage is ∗ larger than a safety level (VbL ) higher than the low SOC level. NOVEMBER 2009 Fig. The CCM operation is preferred here for reducing the input-current ripple and reduced the switch-current stress. and if the power condition is sufficient as Fig. The operation modes shown in Fig. In this case. and the charging current command (Ib ) will reduce. the fully SOC. and the related operation modes are shown in Fig. 3. PV module 2 is at MPPT. 4(d). the control-to-output transfer function of the SEPIC in CCM with output-voltage regulation can be derived from Fig. VOL. the PV module will operate at MPPT. Through the proposed control arrangement. 1 can be easily extended to the system with more sources. even with the peak-current-mode control in the outputvoltage regulation mode [19]. 2(c). M ODELING AND C ONTROLLER D ESIGN OF C HARGER SEPIC is a buck–boost-derived converter that possesses a right-half-plane (RHP) zero in the continuous conduction mode (CCM). If the level of VL1 exactly shifts PV module 1 to be the opencircuit voltage. the power source utilization can be assigned with priority. (a) Discharging mode. This stage is called the constant-voltage charge stage. NO. then both MPPT controllers will not be affected by the charge controller. the system will operate in the constantcurrent charge stage. as done in Fig. and the MPPT is discarded only when the available PV power is larger than the total power for battery charge and supplying the load. the VL signal can be distributed to be two as VL1 and VL2 . and VL1 will shift the MPPT of PV module 1. This is the most effective way for utilizing the PV power. As will be seen in the following. If the positive limiter’s output is zero. Downloaded on October 10. for deriving (1) from Fig. Fig. the input voltage Vp is changed to be a constant-voltage source. 56. where PV module 2 will be utilized first and then PV module 1. then the total power is only contributed by PV module 2. as shown in Fig. The charging controller is a PI controller. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. These two signals are then used to correct the signals generated by both MPPT controllers to produce the PV voltage commands for both chargers as that done in Fig. . VL2 will be zero. Therefore. 11. the battery will not be overcharged and will stay at a high SOC voltage level if the PV power is enough. (c) Charging mode. 3 shows the extension that two PV charge circuits charge the same battery. as the battery voltage reaches the voltage command ∗ (Vb∗ ) and the limiter output (Ib ) is reduced to be approximately zero. The proposed power balance control method shown in Fig. as shown in Fig. III. 4(a) and (b) both belong to this case. On the other hand. VL1 and VL2 will shift the MPPT of both PV modules. (b) Partial charging mode. 4(c).. This feature is not proposed by all previous studies [14]–[17]. the battery is in the floating-charge stage.

If the input inductor is designed based on the idea that the SEPIC is operated in CCM within the prescribed power range. as well as the ripple caused by Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. (4) The input-voltage ripple is caused by the charge and discharge of the capacitor Cs . and that of Rs is very small. It should be noted that if the switching frequency of the converter is high enough such that the capacitance of the input capacitor can be reduced significantly. Ppv. the input capacitor is selected based on the ESR value (Re ) and the voltage ripple demand (ΔVp ) as [20] Re = ΔVp ΔVp = . The electrolytic capacitor having nonnegligible ESR is adopted here. Ip. Modeling and Control of SEPIC The equivalent circuit of the PV cell is shown in Fig.min . The voltage ripple is specified with the precision of the MPPT. . A larger ripple will render a larger fluctuation around the MPPT operation point. The turn ratio is one (L1 = L2 ) to make both inductors enter into CCM simultaneously. the voltage transfer ratio of the SEPIC in CCM is [20] D VB = M= Vp 1−D (2) the equivalent series resistance (ESR) of the capacitor. ΔiL1. then the input inductor L1 will satisfy the following relation: ΔiL1.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4347 Fig. Design of Power Circuit Referring to Fig. it is selected to be the same as the input capacitor Cp .min = 2Ppv. the tantalum and the ceramic capacitors with lower ESR can be adopted cost effectively.min (5) where D is the duty ratio of the switch. and a small ESR is required for reducing the loss. hence. A. the analysis and design are based on the CCM operation mode. there is no RHP zero problem of the proposed PV charger because the input capacitor current is charge controlled with the input inductor current. they may be neglected to simplify the analysis. As a result. the value of Rsh is very large.min fs . In this paper. Restrictions apply.pp 2Ip. 3.CHIANG et al.pp is the peak-to-peak value of the input inductor current. Downloaded on October 10. current of the output regulation structure. respectively. Substituting (2) into (3) results in L1 = L2 = 2 VB Once ESR is determined. 5 [21]. 1.min is the prescribed minimum PV power. it has to flow the maximum input current pulse. and the input is a PV current source for the input regulation structure. Proposed power balance control method applied for two PV charger systems. where Rsh and Rs are the intrinsic shunt and series resistances of the cell.pp = 2Ip. B. the capacitance (Cp ) can be designed from the datasheet of the capacitor. As for the coupling capacitor Cs .min Vp = Dmax Ts Vp L1 (3) where ΔiL1. The design of capacitor can then be changed to be with charge and discharge of the capacitor but not with the ESR. The inductor L2 is designed to couple with L1 as a flyback transformer to reduce the volume.min is the PV module current corresponding to Ppv. Usually. In the following. PV cells are grouped in larger units called PV modules which are further interconnected 2M (M + 1)Ppv. and the input-voltage ripple is caused mainly by it at the adopted switching frequency (40 kHz).

4348 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS. (d) Charging mode with two PV modules not at MPPT. (a) Discharging mode. (c) Charging mode with PV module 1 not at MPPT. The PV input power is Ppv = V Ip . (7) Substituting (9) into (11) yields Cp Ppv −Ip dV = V + − IL1 . 6(a) as Cp dV = Ip − IL1 . . K is Boltzmann’s constant. The PV array mathematical model can be represented as follows [22]: Ip = np Iph − np Isat exp q Vp KAT ns −1 (6) The small-signal expression of (10) is Cp dV = Ip − IL1 . 6(a). 56. ns is the number of modules connected in series. 11. VOL. Equivalent circuit of the PV cell. np is the number of modules connected in parallel. The peak-current-mode control with input PV voltage regulation of the SEPIC is shown in Fig. a small perturbation of (7) can be found as Ppv = V Ip + Ip V. dt (10) in a parallel–series configuration to form PV arrays. V V (9) One can obtain the input capacitor current from Fig. The relation between V and Vp can be found by considering the Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. Ppv −Ip V + . NO. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. (8) Equation (8) can be rearranged to represent the small-signal expression of the PV module current Ip = Fig. Under a fixed insolation condition. q is the charge of an electron. Operation modes of two PV charger systems. Feedback control of the SEPIC. dt (11) where Ip is the PV module array output current (in amperes). Restrictions apply. A is the p-n junction ideality factor. dt V V (12) The transfer function of the inductor current IL1 to the voltage V can be found from (12) as V (s) IL1 (s) =− Rp . Fig. with ns = np = 1. where the PV module is represented as a current source modeled by (6). 6. T is the cell temperature (in kelvins). 5. 4. (b) Partial charging mode. 1 + sCp Rp Rp = V Vp ≈ Ip Ip (13) ˜ Ppv =0 where Rp is the equivalent load resistor seen by the PV module. Downloaded on October 10. NOVEMBER 2009 Fig. Vp is the PV array output voltage. and Isat is the cell reverse saturation current.

Combining (15) and (16). The low-pass filter. in the negativeslope region (dP/dVp < 0). The compensated current signal is amplified three times and then compared with the voltage error signal Vea of the voltage controller to reset the flip-flop which is set pulse by pulse by the clock signal vCLK and to finally determine the duty ratio of the switch.min = 10 W Rs = 0. Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. The slope compensation signal is added to the sensed current to prevent the subharmonic oscillation. MPPT Controller Design The proposed MPPT controller tracks the peak power of the PV module based on the power–voltage (P −Vp ) characteristic shown in Fig.5. The negative gain in (17) desires a positivefeedback control of the input voltage. . the zero here is determined by Cp and the ESR value Re that is a left-half-plane (LHP) zero.e. IV. The direction value is accumulated with a memory and then scaled with Gain 2 to fit the required voltage range. is adopted as the compensator of the voltage controller Gv (s) = Vc = R1 Cv . A low-pass filter formed by Rf −Cf is added to reduce the leading-edge spike caused by the discharge of the internal capacitor of the switch and the diode recovery current. the operation voltage is decreased. i. As compared with that in (1). In the positive-slope region (dP/dVp > 0).5 A ΔVp = 0. 7 and the incremental conductance algorithm [22]. In the positive-slope region.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4349 ESR of the capacitor as V + Re Cp dV = Vp . Because the peak current of the inductor L1 is the same as that of the switch. respectively. the Init voltage nearing the open-circuit voltage is adopted to set the initial voltage command before the start of the converter. The switch current is sensed with the resistor Rs . 8. Adopted incremental conductance MPPT control algorithm.. the gain R2 /R1 of the error amplifier should be designed to satisfy the stability and provide a suitable bandwidth of the voltage loop. Considering that the gain and the pole of (17) will drift VB = 12 V (19) Ip. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. For avoiding error adjustment caused by the voltage and current ripples. The adjusting speed will be slowed down near the peak power point. The specification of the SEPIC is listed as follows: Vp = 10 ∼ 22 V VB = 12 V kv = 0. For assuring a stable current loop under any PV voltage. 1 + sCp Rp (15) Fig. This is effective to prevent the tracking oscillation near the peak power point to increase the MPPT precision. ma /m1 ≥ 0.5 is chosen. 7. Equation (15) is a first-order system that includes a pole and a zero. the adjusting speed will be slower than the negative-slope region because the positive slope is smaller than the negative slope in amplitude. The pole is determined by the capacitor Cp and the equivalent load resistor Rp . Restrictions apply. I MPLEMENTATION AND V ERIFICATION An 80-W PV charger system is designed and built and tested with a 75-W Siemens SP75 PV module in this paper. The voltage command is finally limited by Limiter 2 to limit the attainable PV voltage. the transfer function of the voltage loop can be derived as 3Rs vp (s) = P (s) = kv kH(s) = − Vea (s) kv Re 1+ ma m 1 s+ 1 Cp Rp 1 Cp Re s+ (17) where vp is the sensed PV voltage (Vp ). as in the following.05 fs = 40 kHz ma m1 where m1 and ma are the slopes of the sensed current and the compensated signal. the operation voltage is increased. dt (14) The transfer function from IL1 to Vp can be found by combining (13) and the transfer function of (14) as H(s) = Vp (s) IL1 (s) =− Ppv =0 Rp (1 + sCp Re ) .2 V. To make the MPPT start from the open-circuit voltage. The slope ΔP/ΔVp is calculated and then multiplied by a gain (Gain 1) and limited by a limiter (Limiter 1) to find the direction and set the voltage change in each step.1 Ppv. On the other hand. the voltage and power are processed using a fourth moving-average filter before the slope calculation. for increasing the tracking speed as well as the precision. R2 Cv = Re Cp . The voltage sensing factor is kv . In this paper. Vo s + Cv1R2 1 (18) Its pole is designed to cancel the zero of (17). The slope compensation signal is provided by the ramp signal coupled with a capacitor Cd . The UC3846 control IC is adopted for realizing the peak-current-mode control. the transfer function from Vea to IL1 can be found as K= IL1 (s) 1 = Vea (s) 3Rs 1 + (16) with the PV voltage.CHIANG et al. C. [23]. Downloaded on October 10. The peak power point starting from any operating point will be finally reached through a few steps of voltage adjustment. as the duty cycle is larger than 0.min = 0. The level of compensation is adjusted with the ratio of resistors Rc1 and Rc2 . The aforementioned MPPT control algorithm implemented with the Matlab real-time control (the details will be described in Section IV) is shown in Fig. the voltage adjusting speed is slope dependent.

The coupling capacitor Cs has the same value as the Cp . The voltage controller in (18) is then designed based on (17) and these resistor values.4350 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS. respectively. It is constructed based on the aforeasaid design. 11(b) shows the sweep of the voltage loop that is closed further. With the specification of ΔVp and (5). The real value of Cp is 220 μF in this paper. The whole system is verified with the PSIM simulation first before implementation.545.2 Ω. 60. However. 11. satisfies the aforementioned design. The resistor value is determined based on the slope of the V −I curve. in which the bode plots of P (s) in (17) with various values of Rp and the closed-loop response (Gv P ) of the nominal case are also provided. 10. The closed-loop response of the nominal case Fig. 40. 30. NO. Fig. VOL. respectively. Accordingly. 8. The implementation of the whole system in the developing stage is shown in Fig. the open-loop response of the voltage loop in the aforementioned nominal case is ac swept with the PSIM simulation. For considering this factor. 9 shows five P −V curves of the SP75 module corresponding to the cases of PV peak powers of 75. 3) assign R1 and then calculate R2 with the ratio R2 /R1 . and 4) set the pole to be R2 Cv = Cp Re and then find Cv . The PV voltage may be lower or higher than the battery voltage. It can be examined that the closed-loop response for various cases is also stable. in which the PV module is modeled as a voltage-controlled current source possessing the prescribed SP75 module V −I curve. The current command is set to satisfy the 75-W input. The design procedure is as follows: 1) Set the crossover frequency (fc ) to be one-tenth of the switching frequency (fs ). 10 1 − Dmax Dmax = 0. 56. The designed result of Gv is shown in Fig. 30. and 10 W. 40. Three lines on the right side of each curve are chosen to calculate the equivalent output resistor value (Rp ) of the PV module. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. confirming the previous modeling and controller design. 9. The voltage controller in (18) is designed with (17). the parameters in (17) are varied with the operating point of the PV module. 10. For verifying the circuit modeling. the required Re = 0. and 10 W. 11(a). as shown in Fig. Proposed MPPT control algorithm implemented with the Matlab real-time control. The typical value is 30−80 × 10−6 . The MPPT in 75 W (Rp1 ) is adopted as the nominal case. 2) find the value R2 /R1 = 1/|KH(fc )|. 12. the capacitor is found as Cp = 40 × 10−6 = 200 μF Re (21) where 40 × 10−6 can be determined from the capacitor datasheet. (20) The inductor value is then calculated with (4) as L1 = L2 = 68 μF. and the duty ratio range can be calculated with (2) as M= VB Vp = max Dmax 12 = . Five P −V curves corresponding to the cases of PV peak power of 75. Downloaded on October 10. The MPPT controller of the SEPIC charger is implemented with the Matlab real-time control on PC. other circuits of the SEPIC are implemented with the Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. 60. Restrictions apply. . The sweep results are very close to the theoretic results shown in Fig. NOVEMBER 2009 Fig. Fig.

analog circuit. 14(b) shows that the load power is small and that the PV module discards the MPPT (20 W) to keep the battery charged in constant current Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. (a) Open loop. 12. The precision of the MPPT controller is found to be up to 99. the insufficient power is supplied by the battery (24 W). . Fig. Open. The measured waveforms for demonstrating the power balance feature are shown in Fig. The waveforms of the PV module voltage and current and the P −V trace prove that the response of the proposed MPPT controller is fast. power (84 W) is larger than the available PV power (MPPT. AC sweep of the voltage loop. and the PV module is operated at MPPT. Fig. 14. Downloaded on October 10. Fig. Fig. 60 W). Implementation of the whole system. Restrictions apply.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4351 Fig. 13. 11. Fig. (b) Closed loop. MPPT response of the charge.2% even at low PV power. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore.and closed-loop responses of the voltage. 14(a) shows that the load Fig. 13 shows the measured MPPT response at 50 W. 10.CHIANG et al.

S. vol.” IEEE Trans. [11] J. Teodorescu. “Photovoltaic system for supply public illumination in electrical energy demand peak. pp. [6] H. motor drives. Ozog. Rec. [15] Z. Blaabjerg. IEEE PESC.” Proc.. 2007.” in Proc. Yun. no. “A variable step size INC MPPT method for PV systems. G.” Solar Power Sector Outlook. “Power management of hybrid photovoltaic—Fuel cell power systems. E. C. pp. Power Electron. [4] R. B. Power Appl.. Dougal. 4. Ind. pp. pp. Kalaitzakis. [8] R. 22. Switching Power Supply Design.6 A). and C. M. “Alternative energy distributed generation: Need for multi-source operation. He received the B. (0. vol. and control systems. 55. Lin. vol. pp. F. no. Kalaitzakis. H. Electron. [9] F. and C. R. 1–6. Meeting. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. 7. Sera. P.” in Proc. vol. G./Oct. 55. no. [2] German Advisory Council on GlobalChange. 2003. pp. Liu. vol. Ind. J. Kurokawa. 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The system has been proved to be effective in the MPPT and power balance control.” IEEE Trans.4352 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS. The proposed modeling method of the converter with the PV module input and peakcurrent-mode control. Erickson.. Wang. Jr. Duan. [18] PSIM simulation software. 1997. Y. 2629–2637. 54. Jan. vol. Noda. no. B. 5. Wu. These all demonstrate that the proposed power balance control is effective. IEEE IAS Annu. Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. Ind. K. Jul. 547–551. Voulgaris. [10] D.” IEEE Trans. 14. “Optimized maximum power point tracker for fast-changing environmental conditions. Zhao.. Rogol. 1696–1704. where he has been a Professor since 2001. Xiao. 388–393. 2006. no. Energy Convers. Eng. Taiwan. 56. Jul. in 1987 and 1994.” IEEE Trans. Kjaer. pp. Goshima. 2622–2628. [3] S. Jul. J. pp. Inst. Dec. and S. Hsinchu. NOVEMBER 2009 Fig. 7.. [7] W. 2007. 5. 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K.” IEEE Trans. pp. and G. [12] E. M. respectively. 53. Cruz. J. IEEE Power Eng. [19] R.. Ind. and A. Enslin and D. C ONCLUSION This paper has presented a PV charger implemented with the SEPIC converter. pp. and F. 5. vol. H. Liu. R. as well as the power balance control method can also be applied to the charger with other types of converter. May 2008. 2043–2052. pp. pp. peak power tracker and regulator for PV applications. Power Electron. Rahav. he was an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering. no. IEEE ICVES. Doi. 2005. I. “Research on power balance strategy of fuel cell vehicle powertrain. vol. Ind.—Elect.. New York: Mcgraw-Hill. and Ph. Knoll.” IEEE Trans. Lo. and N.” in Conf. 240–250. and S. 2008. Z. T.. 2004. Zhong. Wai. 38th NAPS. Dec. Wilkinson. 1889–1897. Snyman. K. Koutroulis and K. Jan. no. Downloaded on October 10. 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degrees in electrical engineering from National Central University. photovoltaic systems. Taoyuan. Restrictions apply. and control theory applications. Taiwan.CHIANG et al. Hsinchu. and is currently an Associate Professor. Shieh is a member of the Taiwan Power Electronics Association and the Chinese Automatic Control Society of Taiwan. degree in electrical engineering from National United University.S. degree in electrical engineering from National Dong Hwa University. His research interests include drive and control of piezoelectric mechanisms. and Ph. in 2006. . Miaoli. Hualien.S. His research interest includes power electronics.. he has been with the Department of Electrical Engineering.: MODELING AND CONTROL OF PV CHARGER SYSTEM WITH SEPIC CONVERTER 4353 Hsin-Jang Shieh (M’02) received the B. 2009 at 04:23 from IEEE Xplore. Taiwan. Taiwan in 1980. From 1997 to 2002. Taiwan. Downloaded on October 10. in 2004 and the M. National Dong Hwa University. power converters.D. Taiwan. Chung-Li. Ming-Chieh Chen was born in Taichung. He is currently an Electronic Engineer with FSP Technology Inc. Authorized licensed use limited to: Mepco Schlenk Engineering College. Hualien. He was the recipient of the 2007 Taiwain Power Electronics Conference Best Paper Award. he was with the Mechanical Industry Research Laboratories. Dr. as a Researcher. Since August 2002.S. in 1992 and 1997. He received the B. Taiwan. Industrial Technology Research Institute. respectively. Taiwan.

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