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Name: Jake Elliott Grade Level/Subject: 3rd grade, Native Americans Approximate Time: 30 minutes Student Objectives/Student Outcomes:

1. The student will be able to participate in brainstorming ideas to add to our KWL chart 2. The student will be able to discuss the Native American video after watching it Materials/Resources/Technology: Smart board and computer Brain Pop website Implementation: Opening of lesson: (20 minutes) Tell students that we are going to begin our Native American unit by completing a KWL chart Explain to students that a KWL chart will show us what we know about Native Americans, what we want to know, and that we will fill in our learn side after we complete our unit to discover what we have learned. Ask students what is the main question they have about Native Americans is. Have students work with the people around them to complete the first two columns Give about 5 minutes for this and walk around to ensure they are participating with their peers and contributing to discussion and writing down ideas. Bring students back to a large discussion. Write on the smart board and color code the columns in order for all students to navigate the chart easier. Color-coding will especially help some students pay attention and separate our know column and our want to know column.

Procedures: (5minutes) Have students come to the front, call them by groups in order to keep some students from racing to places on the floor. Play students the Brain Pop video, entitled Native Americans. Closing (5 minutes)

When the movie is over, ask students what they thought. Ask students specifically what they are most excited to learn about Native Americans.

Assessment 1. Informal assessment of participation in brainstorming and discussion 2. Informal assessment in student participation after the video Accommodations: Continuously move around the room to keep order

Name: Jake Elliott Grade Level/Subject: 3rd grade, Native Americans Approximate Time: Two 30-minute sessions Student Objectives/Student Outcomes: 3. The student will be able to explain the place of Totem Poles in Native American Culture 4. The student will work to create their own story using Native American symbols in place of words Content Standards: 18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture. Materials/Resources/Technology: Totem Poles, By Jennifer Frantz Sheets describing animal symbols 1 cardboard tube for each student Construction paper Markers Glue / tape Implementation: Opening of lesson: (15 minutes) Ask students if they know what a totem pole is Read Totem Poles while circulating around the room

Discuss the meaning of Totem Poles with students, including the meaning they held to Native Americans Ask: What is the importance of Totem Poles in Native Americans culture?

Procedures: (40 minutes) Show students an example of the final product Totem Pole, and tell students the story that the Totem Pole tells. Tell students that we are going to be making our own totem poles to tell our own stories. Pass out the sheet describing the meanings of symbols and different animals that students can use to create their own stories. Give them a minute to look over Write a story as a class using the smart board and symbols that could be used on a totem pole to model what is expected of all students Have students spend about 15 minutes creating their own ideas for stories using symbols. Explain that they should draw the symbol, as well as write the word underneath for their outline. Allow students to work in pairs and decide on a story to create for a shared totem pole. They can use construction paper to cut out different animals and symbols to glue onto their own cardboard tube. They must have their story checked before beginning to create the final product. Closing (5 minutes) Save the last 5 or 10 minutes for students to share stories. If there are many volunteers, use the Box O` Names to choose a few students to share. Assessment 3. Informal assessment in student participation in discussion regarding significance and meaning of Totem Poles in Native American culture 4. Formal assessment based on contribution to completion of Totem Pole Accommodations: When reading the story, circulate the room Partner students who is are slightly above level to help guide other students through the lesson

Name: Jake Elliott

Grade Level/Subject: 3rd grade, Native Americans, Navajo Prerequisite Knowledge: Native Americans is a general term for many tribes Approximate Time: 30 minutes Student Objectives/Student Outcomes: 5. The student will participate in reading and discussion of the Navajo tribe Content Standards: 18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture. Materials/Resources/Technology: Social studies book Smart board Implementation: Procedures: 25 minutes Tell students to open to page 74 in their social studies books Explain that we are going to learn about the Navajo. Ask students to look at the map on page 74 and raise their hand if they can tell me where the Navajo live today. Ask if students have any idea what the weather might be like for Navajos. Tell students as we read we are going to create a web to organize the information we learn about the Navajo. Call on students to read about the Navajo, one paragraph at a time. Circulate the room, pointing to the place we are in the paragraph to students who are not following along. After each paragraph, ask if there is anything we learned about the Navajo that we want to remember. Add it to the smart board web to restate important information, and write it out so that they can visually see the information laid out in an organized manner. Ask: What are the most important aspects of Navajo people that help us understand their way of life?

Closing (5 minutes) Review information included in the web by asking students questions. The answers are present on the smart board and we already discussed them, so all students have the opportunity to succeed.

Assessment 5. Informal assessment of participation in discussion of ideas and reading along

Name: Jake Elliott Grade Level/Subject: 3rd grade, Reading/Native Americans Guided Reading Group Approximate Time: 25 minutes Student Objectives/Student Outcomes: 6. The student will be able to effectively answer questions regarding Nez Perce throughout discussion 7. The student will be able to work with a partner to match words to definitions previously discussed Content Standards: 1.A.2b Clarify word meaning using context clues and a variety of resources including glossaries, dictionaries and thesauruses. Materials/Resources/Technology: 5 Nez Perce books 2 sets of word cards Implementation: Opening: (6 minutes) Find what students previously know about the Nez Perce by asking questions such as: o Where are the Nez Perce from? o What are some features of the homeland? o What are some food sources? o What are some items they use to make clothing? o How does Nez Perce express their culture? o What new things were introduced to them through trade? Procedures: (17 minutes)

Give each pair a set of word cards upside down. Explain that it is going to be a race to see who can correctly match each word with its meaning fastest. This will help to motivate these students who tend to be less motivated to work on their reading skills. Remind students that if they are unsure, they can use their book to help them When students think they are finished, check the cards and tell them the ones that are incorrect. When both groups are finished, go over the words and definitions together, giving students turns to read the words and definitions. Closing (2 minutes) Remind students that we are going to continue to use these words throughout the unit, and that they are very important for understanding the Native American way of life. Ask students to quietly return to their seats Assessment 6. Informal assessment of participation answering discussion questions 7. Informal assessment of word and definition knowledge, as well as effort in participation and completing the activity.

Name: Jake Elliott Grade Level/Subject: 3rd grade, Poetry/Navajo Prerequisite Knowledge: Navajo Approximate Time: 30 minutes Student Objectives/Student Outcomes: 8. The student will be able to effectively demonstrate knowledge of 2-word poetry 9. The student will be able effectively demonstrate knowledge of the Navajo Native Americans Content Standards: 3.B.2b Establish central idea, organization, elaboration and unity in relation to purpose and audience. Materials/Resources/Technology:

Social studies book page 74-77 Paper pencil Smart board

Implementation: Opening of lesson: (5 minutes) Tell students that we are going to be working on a new form of poetry that they may not have seen before Emphasize that if they dont anticipate that they will enjoy writing poetry, or that it is hard, etc, that they will be pleasantly surprised with this type of poetry. Tell students we will be writing 2-word poetry. There are only 2 words in each line, and each word describes the topic. Display the example 2-word poem School Fair on the smart board, and read it aloud. Ask students to show thumbs up if they think this kind of poem looks easier to write than they thought. Procedures: (20 minutes) Write an example of a 2-word poem on the smart board as a class. Remind students that since each line only consists of 2 words, all other words such as the, as, a, etc can be left out. Now tell students that they are going to try to write a poem on their own. They should take out their social studies book and turn to page 74. They should also take out their Navajo web organizer that we made. Explain to students that they are going to write a 2-word poem based on the Navajo Native Americans. This will help them to review what they have learned in social studies while trying out a new form of poetry. Ask for a silent hand of examples of words they could use to include in the poem. After a few examples such as o Grew food o Sacred nature o Celebration ceremonies Ask students what the key important information about Navajo is that people should know when reading short descriptions of them may be. Tell students to brainstorm words on their own. They can plan out their poem before writing it. It needs to be at least 6 lines long. Closing (5 minutes) Save the last 5 minutes for students to share poems in order to hold ownership over their

work. Ask for volunteers. Assessment 8. Formal assessment of completion and accuracy of a two word poem 9. Formal assessment of accuracy of Navajo information included in two word poem

Name: Jake Elliott Grade Level/Subject: 3rd grade, Native Americans, Cherokee Prerequisite Knowledge: Native Americans is a general term for many tribes Approximate Time: one 30 minute session, one 60 minute session Student Objectives/Student Outcomes: 10. The student will participate in reading and discussion of the Navajo tribe 11. The student will actively listen and respond to our guest speaker Content Standards: 18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture. Materials/Resources/Technology: Social studies book Smart board Guest Speaker Paper Pencil Implementation: DAY 1 Procedures: 25 minutes Tell students to open to page 88 in their social studies books Explain that we are going to be learning about the Cherokee Native Americans. A guest speaker is a Cherokee Native American and he will be coming in to talk to us and show us some things about the Cherokee culture. This makes it extremely important that we learn background

information about Cherokees today in order to understand what Guest Speaker is talking about, and be prepared to ask him questions. Ask: Students should have a paper and pencil handy to write down any key questions they may come up with during the presentation. Call on students to read about the Cherokee, one paragraph at a time. Circulate the room, pointing to the place we are in the paragraph to students who are not following along After each paragraph, ask if there is anything we learned about the Cherokee that we want to remember. Just like for the Navajo, add it to the smart board web to restate important information, and write it out so that other students can visually see the information laid out in an organized manner.

Closing (5 minutes) Review information included in the web by asking students questions. The answers are present on the smart board and we already discussed them, so all students have the opportunity to succeed. Ask students what essential information they learned from the presentation is Assessment 10. Informal assessment of participation in discussion of ideas and reading along DAY 2 Procedures: Set up expectations for students. Explain that it is extremely important that they be respectful of our guest, listen to what he says, and follow any directions he may give. There will be no talking unless asked to do so. Show guest speaker that we are almost fourth graders. Introduce guest speaker to the class. Allow guest speaker to present, This first person account of a present day Native American will allow all students to gain a better understanding of a real persons story as well a present day Native Americans Closing Thank guest speaker for coming to our class. Assessment The following day, have students write respectful thank you letters. They will mention 3 things that they learned from guest speaker

Name: Jake Elliott Grade Level/Subject: 3rd grade, Native American summative assessment Prerequisite Knowledge: The different Native American Tribes Approximate Time: 30 minutes, plus homework Student Objectives/Student Outcomes: 12. The student will be able to effectively demonstrate knowledge of a Native American tribe of their choice by creating a flipbook of their way of life Content Standards: 18.A.2 Explain ways in which language, stories, folk tales, music, media and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture. Materials/Resources/Technology: Flipbook outline (Class #) Paper Pencil Smart board/previous tribe webs Implementation: Opening of lesson: (4 minutes) Review the organized webs that were created of each tribe (Cherokee, Navajo, Nez Perce) Tell students that they are going to use the notes they have, worksheets they have done, things they have learned in reading groups, and books to create a flipbook of one tribe. They will be allowed to choose the tribe rather than assigning them in order to create more interest in the project. Ask: Think about what tribe you were most interested in. What interested you? Can you take that information that you found so interesting and include it in your flipbook? Procedures: (25 minutes) I will show my example of a flipbook that I have made on the Navajo tribe. Included is information on homeland, trade, dress, traditions, etc. Students will create a similar flipbook of a tribe of their choice.

Tell students to write all their ideas on notebook paper, and when finished they may get it checked to receive a flipbook outline. After writing in the flipbook, they can illustrate it as well. Remind students that this is an independent activity, so there should be no talking. They will have the rest of this class to get started, and the rest of the flipbook is homework. If they would like to stay in during recesses for my assistance they have that option since some students do not get the support they need at home. Remind students that this is an assignment to show me how much they know about one of the Native American tribes that we studied, so they need to use a lot of effort and take their time to write in their neatest handwriting. Allow students to begin Continuously circulate the classroom to assist all students. Closing: (1minute) Collect the flipbooks that are done. Instruct students that if they have not finished then they need to take it home and finish it for homework

Assessment 11. Formal assessment of flipbook exhibiting knowledge of a Native American tribe