Chapter 10

Controlling Motors with Arduino
So far, we’ve created projects that have had an impact on the real world. We’ve made LEDs shine, and we’ve controlled devices using infrared light. In this chapter, we’ll create an even more intense experience: we’ll control motors that will actually move things. We won’t go so far as to build a full-blown autonomous robot, but we’ll create a small device that does something useful and funny. First, though, you’ll learn a bit about the basics of different motor types and their pros and cons. Today you can choose from a variety of motor types for your projects, and this chapter starts with a brief description of their differences. We’ll concentrate on servo motors, because you can use them for a wide range of projects and they’re cheap and easy to use. You’ll learn to use the Arduino servo library and to control a servo using the serial port. Based on these first steps, we’ll then build a more sophisticated project. It’s a blaming device that uses nearly the same hardware as the first project in the chapter but more elaborate software. You’ll probably find many applications for it in your office!

10.1

What You Need
1. A servo motor such as the Hitec HS-322HD 2. Some wires 3. A TMP36 temperature sensor (it’s optional, and you need it only for the exercises) 4. An Arduino board such as the Uno, Duemilanove, or Diecimila 5. A USB cable to connect the Arduino to your computer

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I NTRODUCING M OTORS

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Figure 10.1: All the parts you need in this chapter

10.2

Introducing Motors
Depending on your project’s needs, you can choose from a variety of motors today. For hobby electronics, you’ll usually use DC motors, servo motors, or stepper motors (in Figure 10.2, on the next page, you see a few different types of motors; no DC motor is shown). They mainly differ in speed, precision of control, power consumption, reliability, and price. DC motors are fast and efficient, so you can use them in drill machines, electric bicycles, or remote-control cars. You can control DC motors easily, because they have only two connectors. Connect one to a power supply and the other to ground, and the motor starts to spin. Swap the connections, and the motor will spin the other way around. Add more voltage, and the motor spins faster; decrease voltage, and it spins slower. DC motors aren’t a good choice if you need precise control. In such cases, it’s better to use a stepper motor, which allows for precise control in a range of 360 degrees. Although you might not have noticed
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Figure 10.2: Motor types from left to right: standard servo, continuous rotation servo, stepper

it, you’re surrounded by stepper motors. You hear them when your printer, scanner, or disk drive is at work. Controlling stepper motors isn’t rocket science, but it is a bit more complicated than controlling DC motors and servos. Servo motors are the most popular among hobbyists, because they are a good compromise between DC motors and steppers. They’re affordable, reliable, and easy to control. You can move standard servos only in a range of 180 degrees, but that’s sufficient for many applications. With continuous rotation servos, you can increase the range to 360 degrees, but you lose the ease of control. In the next section, you’ll learn how easy it is to control standard servo motors with an Arduino.

10.3

First Steps with a Servo Motor
The Arduino IDE comes with a library for controlling servo motors that we’ll use for our first experiments. In Figure 10.3, on the following page,

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Figure 10.3: Basic circuit for a 5V servo motor

you can see a basic circuit for connecting an Arduino to a servo motor. Connect the ground wire to one of the Arduino’s GND pins, connect power to the Arduino’s 5V pin, and connect the control line to pin 9. Please note that this works only for a 5V servo! Many cheap servos use 9V, and in this case, you need an external power supply, and you can no longer connect the servo to the Arduino’s 5V pin. If you have a 9V servo, attach an external power supply such as an AC-to-DC adapter or a DC power supply to your Arduino’s power jack. Then connect the servo to the Vin pin.1 You should also check the specification of your Arduino board. For example, you should not use an Arduino BT2 to control motors, because it can only cope with a maximum of 5.5V. Figure 10.4, on the next page shows how to connect your servo motor to your Arduino using wires. You can also use pin headers, but wires give you more flexibility. Controlling servo motors is convenient, because you can set the motor’s shaft to an angle between 0 and 180. With the following sketch, you can send a degree value via the serial port and move the servo motor accordingly:

1. 2.

http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/WhatAdapter http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardBluetooth

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Figure 10.4: Plug three wires into the servo’s connector to attach it to the Arduino.

Download Motors/SerialServo/SerialServo.pde Line 1 5 10 15 20 25 -

#include <Servo.h> const const const const unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned int int int int MOTOR_PIN = 9; MOTOR_DELAY = 15; SERIAL_DELAY = 5; BAUD_RATE = 9600;

Servo servo; void setup() { Serial.begin(BAUD_RATE); servo.attach(MOTOR_PIN); delay(MOTOR_DELAY); servo.write(1); delay(MOTOR_DELAY); } void loop() { const int MAX_ANGLE = 3; char degrees[MAX_ANGLE + 1]; if (Serial.available()) { int i = 0; while (Serial.available() && i < MAX_ANGLE) { const char c = Serial.read(); if (c != -1 && c != '\n') degrees[i++] = c;

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B UILDING A B LAMINATR
delay(SERIAL_DELAY); } degrees[i] = 0; Serial.print(degrees); Serial.println(" degrees."); servo.write(atoi(degrees)); delay(MOTOR_DELAY); } }

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We include the Servo library, and in line 8, we define a new Servo object. In the setup( ) function, we initialize the serial port, and we attach( ) the Servo object to the pin we have defined in MOTOR_PIN. After that, we wait for 15 milliseconds so the servo motor has enough time to process our command. Then we call write( ) to move back the servo to 1 degree. We could also move it back to 0 degrees, but some of the servos I have worked with make some annoying noise in this position. The main purpose of the loop( ) function is to read new degree values from the serial port. These values are in a range from 0 to 180, and we read them as ASCII values. So, we need a string that can contain up to four characters (remember, strings are null-terminated in C). That’s why we declare the degrees string with a length of four in line 21. Then we wait for new data to arrive at the serial port and read it character by character until no more data is available or until we have read enough. We terminate the string with a zero byte and print the value we’ve read to the serial port. Finally, we convert the string into an integer value using atoi( ) and pass it to the write( ) method of the Servo object in line 34. Then we wait again for the servo to do its job. Compile and upload the sketch, and then open the serial monitor. After the servo motor has initialized, send some degree values such as 45, 180, or 10. See how the motor moves to the angle you have specified. To see the effect a bit better, turn a wire or a piece of paper into an arrow, and attach it to the motor’s gear. It’s easy to control a servo via the serial port, and the circuit we’ve built can be the basis for many useful and fun projects. In the next section, we’ll use it to build an automatic blaming device.

10.4

Building a Blaminatr
Finger-pointing isn’t nice, but it can be perversely satisfying. In this section, we’ll build a device that I call Blaminatr. Instead of blaming
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Arduino Arts You can use the Arduino not just for gadgets or fun projects but also in artistic ways. Especially in the new-media art area you will find many amazing projects built with the Arduino. One of them is Anthros,∗ a responsive environment that observes a small area using a webcam. The area contains some “tentacles,” and whenever a person crosses the area, the tentacles move into the person’s direction. Servos move the tentacles, and an Arduino controls the servos. For all people interested in new-media art, Alicia Gibb’s thesis “New Media Art, Design, and the Arduino Microcontroller: A Malleable Tool”† is a must-read.
∗. †. http://www.richgilbank.ca/anthros http://aliciagibb.com/thesis/

someone directly, you can tell the Blaminatr to do so. In Figure 10.5, on the following page, you can see the device in action. Tell it to blame me, and it moves an arrow, so it points to “Maik.” Blaminatrs are perfect office toys that you can use in many situations. For software developers, it can be a good idea to attach one to your continuous integration (CI) system. Continuous integration systems such as CruiseControl.rb3 or Luntbuild4 help you continuously check whether your software is in good shape. Whenever a developer checks in changes, the CI automatically compiles the software and runs all tests. Then it publishes the results via email or as an RSS feed. You can easily write a small piece of software that subscribes to such a feed. Whenever someone breaks the build, you’ll find a notification in the feed, and you can use the Blaminatr to point to the name of the developer who has committed the latest changes.5 In the previous section, you learned all about servo motors you need to build the Blaminatr. Now we only need some creativity to build the device’s display, and we need more elaborate software. We start with
3. 4. 5. http://cruisecontrolrb.thoughtworks.com/ http://luntbuild.javaforge.com/ At http://urbanhonking.com/ideasfordozens/2010/05/19/the_github_stoplight/, you can see an

alternative project. It uses a traffic light to indicate your project’s current status.

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Figure 10.5: The Blaminatr: blaming has never been easier.

a class named Team that represents the members of our team; that is, the potential “blamees”:
Download Motors/Blaminatr/Blaminatr.pde Line 1 5 10 15 -

const unsigned int MAX_MEMBERS = 10; class Team { char** _members; int _num_members; int _positions[MAX_MEMBERS]; public: Team(char** members) { _members = members; _num_members = 0; char** member = _members; while (*member++) _num_members++;

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B UILDING A B LAMINATR
const int share int pos = share for (int i = 0; _positions[i] pos += share; } } int get_position(const char* name) const { int position = 0; for (int i = 0; i < _num_members; i++) { if (!strcmp(_members[i], name)) { position = _positions[i]; break; } } return position; } }; = / i = 180 / _num_members; 2; < _num_members; i++) { pos;

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The code defines several member variables: _members contains a list of up to ten team member names, _num_members contains the actual number of people on the team, and we store the position (angle) of the team member’s name on the Blaminatr display in _positions. The constructor expects an array of strings that contains the team members’ names and that is terminated by a NULL pointer. We store a reference to the list, and then we calculate the number of team members. We iterate over the array until we find a NULL pointer. All this happens in lines 13 to 16. Then we calculate the position of each team member’s name on the Blaminatr’s display. Every team member gets their fair share on the 180-degree display, and the Blaminatr will point to the share’s center, so we divide the share by 2. We store the positions in the _positions array that corresponds to the _members array. That means the first entry of _positions contains the position of the first team member, and so on. With the get_position( ) method, we get back the position belonging to a certain name. We walk through the _members array and check whether we have found the right member using the strcmp( ) function. As soon as we’ve found it, we return the corresponding entry of the _positions array. If we couldn’t find a team member with the name we are looking for, we return 0. Implementing a Blaminatr class is easy now:

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Download Motors/Blaminatr/Blaminatr.pde

#include <Servo.h> const unsigned int MOTOR_PIN = 9; const unsigned int MOTOR_DELAY = 15; class Blaminatr { Team _team; Servo _servo; public: Blaminatr(const Team& team) : _team(team) {} void attach(const int sensor_pin) { _servo.attach(sensor_pin); delay(MOTOR_DELAY); } void blame(const char* name) { _servo.write(_team.get_position(name)); delay(MOTOR_DELAY); } };

A Blaminatr object aggregates a Team object and a Servo object. The constructor initializes the Team instance while we can initialize the Servo instance by calling the attach( ) method. The most interesting method is blame( ). It expects the name of the team member to blame, calculates his position, and moves the servo accordingly. Let’s put it all together now:
Download Motors/Blaminatr/Blaminatr.pde Line 1 5 10 15 -

const unsigned int MAX_NAME = 30; const unsigned int BAUD_RATE = 9600; const unsigned int SERIAL_DELAY = 5; char* members[] = { "nobody", "Bob", "Alice", "Maik", NULL }; Team team(members); Blaminatr blaminatr(team); void setup() { Serial.begin(BAUD_RATE); blaminatr.attach(MOTOR_PIN); blaminatr.blame("nobody"); } void loop() { char name[MAX_NAME + 1];

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W HAT I F I T D OESN ’ T W ORK ?
if (Serial.available()) { int i = 0; while (Serial.available() && i < MAX_NAME) { const char c = Serial.read(); if (c != -1 && c != '\n') name[i++] = c; delay(SERIAL_DELAY); } name[i] = 0; Serial.print(name); Serial.println(" is to blame."); blaminatr.blame(name); } }

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We define a list of member names that is terminated by a NULL pointer. The list’s first entry is “nobody,” so we don’t have to deal with the rare edge case when nobody is to blame. Then we use members to initialize a new Team object and pass this object to the Blaminatr’s constructor. In the setup( ) function, we initialize the serial port and attach the Blaminatr’s servo motor to the pin we defined in MOTOR_PIN. Also, we initialize the Blaminatr by blaming “nobody.” The loop( ) function is nearly the same as in Section 10.3, First Steps with a Servo Motor, on page 225. The only difference is that we do not control a servo directly but call blame( ) in line 28. That’s it! You can now start to draw your own display and create your own arrow. Attach them directly to the motor or—even better—put everything into a nice box. Compile and upload the software and start to blame. Of course, you can use motors for more serious projects. For example, you can use them to build robots running on wheels or similar devices. But you cannot attach too many motors to a “naked” Arduino, because it is not meant for driving bigger loads. So if you have a project in mind that needs a significant number of motors, you should consider buying a motor shield6 or use a special shield such as the Roboduino.7

10.5

What If It Doesn’t Work?
Working with motors is surprisingly easy, but still a lot of things can go wrong. The biggest problem is that motors consume a lot of power,
6. 7.

You can find them at http://adafruit.com or http://makershed.com.
http://store.curiousinventor.com/roboduino.html
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E XERCISES

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More Motors Projects Motors are fascinating. Search the ’net and you’ll find numerous projects combining the Arduino with them. A fun project is the Arduino Hypnodisk.∗ It uses a servo motor to rotate a hypno disc—a rotating disk with a spiral printed on it that has an hypnotic effect. An infrared rangefinder changes the motor’s speed, so the closer you get to the disc, the faster it spins. A useful and exciting project is the USB hourglass.† It uses an Arduino and a servo motor to turn a sand timer, and it observes the falling sand using an optical sensor. Whenever all the sand has fallen through, the device turns the timer automatically. That’s all nice, but the device’s main purpose is to generate true random numbers. Falling sand is a perfect basis for generating true randomness (see the sidebar on page 73), and the USB hourglass uses the signals from its optical sensor to generate random numbers, sending them to the serial port.
∗. †. http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevino/4583084700/in/pool-make http://home.comcast.net/~hourglass/

so you cannot simply attach every motor to an Arduino. Also, you cannot easily drive more than one motor, especially not with the small amount of power you get from a USB port. If your motor does not run as expected, check its specification, and attach an AC or DC adapter to your Arduino if necessary. You also shouldn’t attach too much weight to your motor. Moving an arrow made of paper is no problem, but you might run into problems if you attach bigger and heavier things. Also, be careful not to put any obstacles into the motor’s way. The motor’s shaft always needs to move freely. Some motors have to be adjusted from time to time, and usually you have to do that with a very small screw driver. Refer to the motor’s specification for detailed instructions.

10.6

Exercises
• Add an Ethernet shield to the Blaminatr so you can blame people via Internet and not only via the serial port. Pointing your
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Figure 10.6: A motorized thermometer

web browser to an address such as http://192.168.1.42/blame/Maik should blame me, for example. • Create a thermometer based on a TMP36 temperature sensor and a servo motor. Its display could look like Figure 10.6; that is, you have to move an arrow that points to the current temperature. • Use an IR receiver to control the Blaminatr. For example, you could use the channel key of your TV set’s remote control to proceed the Blaminatr from one name to the other.

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