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APRIL 11-17, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Money for books
Students raise thousands
to help others. PAGE 7
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Special to The Sun
Seeds to Sew student ambassadors, Adrianna Pirone and Cecelia Verde, sell bracelets at the CHS Flea
Market that women from Seeds to Sew created.
Seeds to Sew
to host dinner
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On April 20, Hopewell Valley
Central High Schools (CHS)
Model World Health Organization
(WHO) and Hopewell-based non-
profit organization Seeds to Sew,
will be hosting a community din-
ner in support of the Kenyan vil-
lage health initiatives, Kakenya
Center for Excellence and the
Trenton Soup Kitchen.
Area chefs will be creating
gourmet soups and breads in sup-
port of the event, coordinated by
Tony Kowalek, director of the
Hopewell Valley Regional School
Districts food services, that will
take place from 5 to 8 p.m. at
Hopewell Valley Central High
School, 259 Pennington-Titusville
Road, Pennington.
Soup will be available for $6 a
cup, and $5 a cup with a canned
goods donation to the Trenton
Soup Kitchen.
Adrianna Pirone and Cecilia
Verde are two of Model WHOs
students who are spearheading
the event.
Seeds to Sew founder Ellyn Ito
chose the Souper Bowl theme
for a reason.
Given communities around
the world only have soup and
bread to eat, we thought it would
be a neat idea to serve that, she
said.
Kakenya Ntaiya, an educator
and activist, will be the featured
speaker for the event. Ntaiya
grew up in Enoosaen, Kenya
where she escaped the tradition
of becoming a young mother and
wife and ventured to the United
States on a scholarship to Ran-
dolph-Macon College to educate
herself and obtain a better life.
Kakenya is one of the individ-
uals that represents how educa-
tion of one girl can make an im-
pact on a whole community, Ito
said. The things that we perceive
and see as challenges here are
nothing compared to the things
that others experience.
She is currently advocating for
her school in Nairobi, and is fo-
cused on building a community
center where men and women
can have a library with access to
the Internet and a place to learn
about health, according to Ito.
Aside from the dinner, the
event will feature the live band
Millhouse, featuring Hopewell
Valley CHS students, dancing and
a selection of artwork the art de-
partment will be donating to
Ntaiya's academy for girls.
In July, a group of Model WHO
students will also be visiting the
academy to deliver the inspiring
posters from the event.
We just really want to raise
awareness about impoverished
countries in Africa, especially
Kenya, Ito said. And we also
want to give individuals in our
community a sense of how others
live.
Seeds to Sew collaborated with
Model WHO to bring awareness
to students about global responsi-
bility to improve living condi-
tions around the world. The bene-
fit programs that Model WHO is
please see DINNER, page 4
APRIL 11-17, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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Special to The Sun
Global climate change was the topic at a recent Hopewell Valley
Lions dinner meeting held at the Runway Restaurant in Ewing. The
speaker, Penningtons Dr. Marjorie Kaplan, associate director of the
Climate and Environmental Change Institute at Rutgers University,
presented scientific evidence of global warming and its effects on
New Jersey. The rising of sea level and loss of beachfront, the inva-
sion of destructive pine beetles in the Pine Barrens and the drowning
of marshlands were some of the consequences that climate change
is bringing to New Jersey. Former Govs. Tom Kean and Jim Florio are
supportive members of the advisory board of this institute. Pictured
above, from left, are Paul Morin, president of the Hopewell Valley
Lions; Dr. Kaplan; and Nancy Mason, president elect for the Hopewell
Valley Lions.
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 11-17, 2012
involved with are supporting the
Keroka region and other pro-
grams at the Academy.
Students from Model WHO also
set a goal for the event called
1,000 for $100, where they would
need to raise $100 from 1,000 peo-
ple.
During the Souper Bowl, the
students will announce how close
they are to reaching their goal.
Dr. David Angwenyi, biology
teacher at HVCHS and founder of
the Model WHO, says the goal of
this event is to raise awareness
about Ntaiaya's cause and living
conditions across the world.
As a native of Kenya, my early
educational experience was
unique, and different from that of
my students, so it became neces-
sary for me to found the Model
World Health Organization club
as a forum to engage more stu-
dents on issues of health and edu-
cation, Angwenyi said. The
world has millions of people that
live on less than a dollar a day, so
it is important for our young peo-
ple to know that the rest of the
world is not like the United
States, and we have a responsibil-
ity as global citizens.
In 2007, Angwenyi organized
the schools first trip to Kenya,
where Model WHO students visit-
ed villages to prevent the spread
of malaria. The students won a
$30,000 grant from Exxon Mobil,
which helped them purchase
5,000 mosquito bed nets for the
Keroka region.
This July, Model WHO students
will be re-visiting Kenya to do-
nate the posters front the event to
Ntaiyas academy. They will also
be visiting the Keroka region to
bring clean, disease-free drinking
water.
We've seen students profound-
ly changed by the trip, co-adviser
of Model WHO and HVCHS
teacher Lindsey Makofka said.
They return home and they can't
look at the world in the same way
anymore. Helping others,
whether locally or international-
ly, takes us outside ourselves and
reminds us of our connection to
those beyond our Facebook feed.
On April 22, Model WHO will
be screening the unreleased
movie called, One World, for
free. Tickets will be given out to
those who attend the Souper
Bowl.
DINNER
Continued from page 1
Dinner benefits Kenyan
village health initiatives
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
Officer William Gaskill re-
sponded to Pennington Road for
the report of a one-car motor ve-
hicle crash on March 26. An in-
vestigation found the driver of a
Toyota Venture northbound
along Pennington Road when she
fell asleep. The Toyota ran off the
road, struck two traffic signs and
a utility pole. She was transport-
ed by the Pennington First Aid
Squad to a local hospital where
she was treated and later released
for a minor leg injury. She was is-
sued a summons for careless driv-
ing, which will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
Detective Michael Sherman
charged a 13-year-old boy with the
possession of marijuana (under
50 grams) and possession of drug
paraphernalia on March 8. Sher-
man observed the boy smoking
marijuana on Mercer Street. He
was processed at police headquar-
ters and was later released into
the custody of a relative, police
said.
The case will be heard in fami-
ly court.
Officer Joseph Maccaquano re-
sponded to Route 612 on a report
of a disabled motorist on March
26. Maccaquano says he arrived
and found the driver asleep in the
car. The man had the odor of alco-
hol on his breath and was placed
under arrest after performing
field-sobriety tests, police said.
The man was processed at po-
lice headquarters and was
charged with drunken driving,
reckless driving and failure to
produce credentials.
He was later released to a rela-
tive, and this case will be heard in
municipal court.
Sgt. William Springer respond-
ed to a Brookside Drive address to
serve a warrant on March 26.
Springer took the wanted woman
into custody on an outstanding
Princeton Borough criminal war-
rant. She was processed at police
headquarters and was later re-
leased after posting bail.
Officer Gerard Infantino re-
sponded to a Cherokee Drive ad-
dress on a report of criminal mis-
chief on March 26. Sometime
overnight, someone knocked
down a mailbox in front of the
home. Police say a witness said he
saw a dark-colored full-size pick
up with a loud exhaust near the
mailbox around 11:55 p.m. on
March 25. An estimate of the
damage was unavailable.
APRIL 11-17, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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6 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 11-17, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Ed Lynes
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Joe Eisele
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
W
hile virtually no one antici-
pates property values to
skyrocket anytime soon,
there are signs that the housing mar-
ket is beginning to get back on its feet.
Prices are up. Sales are solid. And
while foreclosures and short sales will
keep a lid on prices for some time, it
appears the market is moving in the
right direction. A report from The As-
sociated Press cited the National Asso-
ciation of Realtors point that Febru-
arys sales pace was the second high-
est since May 2010.
So what does that matter? Obviously
it matters a lot if youre buying or sell-
ing a home. But, even if youre not,
your homes value affects how you
handle your budget.
From a practical side, a higher
value might allow you to tap into your
homes equity. You might spend that
extra cash on home improvements, for
example, which helps to boost the
economy.
A homes value also has a psycho-
logical impact. Even though your
home might not be on the market,
there is a sense of security knowing
that you have your homes value to fall
back on if times get tough. That, in
turn, might prompt you to feel more
comfortable about buying new furni-
ture, taking a vacation, etc. Again, all
of these things help to spur the econo-
my.
To issue an all is well with the
housing market proclamation would
be premature. The aforementioned
distressed properties will continue to
be a burden. Credit is still tight. Inter-
est rates remain low, but could rise, sti-
fling a robust recovery.
But, hopefully, the days of watching
your homes value plummet are over,
or about over. The economy is showing
signs of growing albeit at a modest
pace. The reports indicate that more
people once again are looking at home
ownership as they feel better about
their employment status.
All of which is good news for home-
owners.
Home, sweeter home?
The numbers show that the real estate market might be stabilizing
Maybe the worst is over
Its not yet time to pronounce the
housing market as cured, but recent
reports indicate that it perhaps has
stabilized. Thats good news for both
homeowners and an economy that
continues to grow.
BRIEFS
Lets Chat discussion group
meets on April 13
The Lets Chat group, with Vivian
Greenberg, LCSW, will meet on Friday,
April 13, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Hopewell
Valley Senior Center at 395 Reading St., in
Pennington.
Stop by for a lively discussion and some
refreshments. All are welcome. No regis-
tration required.
For more information, contact senior
services at (609) 737-0605, ext. 692, or email
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
Fundraising dinner benefits
scholarship fund on April 28
Hopewell United Methodist Church will
host a fundraising dinner to benefit the
Joanne Davison Memorial Scholarship
Fund on Saturday, April 28 from 4:30 to 7
p.m. Purchase tickets at the door. Adults
pay $10 and children 6 to 12 are $5. Children
5 and younger eat free.
Join us for a fine Italian meal: Three
kinds of pasta, regular and whole grain
spaghetti, fettuccine, baked ziti; three
kinds of sauce, meat, plain and Alfredo.
Meatballs are also included. Tossed salad,
Italian bread and homemade desserts. Din-
ner is served buffet style.
For more information, visit
www.hopewellmethodist.org/events or call
(609) 466-0471.
Artists Choice group
meets on Tuesdays
The Artists Choice group will meet
every Tuesday in April from 1:30 to 4:30
p.m. Hopewell Township residents Bob
Barish and Sue Ewart co-facilitate the
group. Group members work independent-
ly on projects and can request critiques
from facilitators or other group members.
The theme for April will be skies. All lev-
els welcome.
Pre-registration is encouraged, but not
required. Contact senior services at 737-
0605, ext. 692, or awaugh@hopewelltwp.org
for more information about the group.
Poet of Poverty event
set for April 15 at library
The Pennington Public Library will host
a screening and discussion of Poet of
Poverty on Sunday, April 15, at 3 p.m. in
borough hall.
The public is invited to attend this en-
gaging community event, which will ex-
plore important policy issues with local
impact. Refreshments will be served.
Please call to reserve a seat.
Poet of Poverty is a documentary film
narrated by Martin Sheen that explores
the experience of poverty in the City of
Camden through the writings of the Rev.
Michael Doyle.
Among other things, Doyle argues Cam-
den has, over time, become home to
sewage, trash, and scrap metal processing
facilities, and used as a dumping ground
by the surrounding suburban communi-
ties.
A post-screening discussion based on
the historical, cultural, and ethical themes
and questions raised by the film will follow,
facilitated by Mark Krasovic, assistant re-
search professor of American studies at
Rutgers-Newark.
As a participant in Face to Face: Com-
munity Conversations, a program of the
New Jersey Council for the Humanities
(NJCH), a state partner of the National En-
dowment for the Humanities, Pennington
Library will be able to offer this event at no
cost to participants.
For more information on this program
or NJCHs Face to Face program, visit
Pennington Public Library at www.pen-
ningtonlibrary.org or the NJ Council for
the Humanities at www.njch.org/faceto
face. html.
Timberlane eighth-graders
have been recognized with the
Scholastic companys Presidents
Award for raising more than
$4,400 to buy hundreds of books
for kids with special needs.
The group has won the
Scholastic Presidents Award for
Exceptional Performance in the
One for Books program for their
outstanding fundraising project
during last falls Scholastic Book
Fair, which was organized by par-
ent volunteer Sheri Crerand.
At the fair in November, the
eighth-grade homerooms compet-
ed against each other to raise
money to buy books and class-
room supplies for the Ewing Chil-
drens Day School. The Ewing
schools students, who come from
districts throughout Mercer
County, have behavioral problems
that make it difficult for them to
be in a standard school setting. In
many cases, the students are also
economically disadvantaged.
The eighth-grade homerooms
raised $4,291, with students do-
nating funds they earned from
babysitting, confirmation, holi-
day and bat mitzvah gift money,
and other sources. Toward that
total, two students, Ethan Jeffs
and Peter Ryseck, raised $184 of it
by running a hot chocolate stand
on a Saturday morning and do-
nating all proceeds.
Also, students collected funds
at lunchtime and during parent
teacher conferences, netting
roughly another $120.
Teacher Lauren Kofskys
homeroom came in first, raising
$1,283.
One for Books coordinators
Jamie Courts and Debbie Liwosz,
both teachers, took the Timber-
lane money and purchased hun-
dreds of books and educational
materials at Scholastics ware-
house in Robbinsville.
The Adirondacks eighth-grade
team, which raised the most
money, earned the honor of wrap-
ping all the gifts.
Childrens Day School staff
picked up and delivered the pres-
ents in time for the December hol-
idays. The Day Schools students,
approximately 70, each received
from eight to 11 wrapped books, at
the appropriate reading levels.
For some kids at the day
school, these books were their
only holiday gifts, Courts said.
That made it really special for
our kids.
Timberlane will receive more
than $2,300 in cash for its own use
earned through sales at the book
fair, as well as a $500 Scholastic
buck book bonus.
For winning the Presidents
Award, the school will receive an-
other $500 to be spent on Scholas-
tic materials, and a certificate.
Our students were so enthusi-
astic, it was a really an amazing
experience for them, Liwosz said
of the eighth-graders. Our kids
really got into the friendly compe-
tition of trying to raise as much
as possible, and almost every sin-
gle one of our more than 300 kids
donated. We are really proud of
them.
APRIL 11-17, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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ST. MATTHEWS
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Where everyone is welcome!
Worship Services: Sundays 8 & 10am
Take a look at our new website!
stmatthewspennington.org
300 S. Main St, Pennington, NJ
(Across from Toll Gate Grammar School)
L00K|NC F0R A
FR|EN0LY 6hUR6h?
Students raise money for books
Poison Control Center
(800) 222-1222
PSA
The Hopewell Valley Regional
School District has announced its
winners of the Governors Recog-
nition Program for 2012.
The Governors Teacher/Edu-
cational Services Professional
Recognition Program is a
statewide event. It acknowledges
teachers and other educational
staff in districts across the state
who demonstrate outstanding
performance year after year. It is
the districts highest honor.
Hopewells recipients are:
Robert OBoyle, Hopewell Valley
Central High School, art; Nancy
Greener, Timberlane Middle
School, science; Amy Ciavaglia,
Bear Tavern Elementary, fifth-
grade; Jane-Ellen Lennon,
Hopewell Elementary, exception-
ally able, advanced level reading
and basic skills math; Marci
Thomas, Stony Brook Elemen-
tary, media specialist/librarian;
Georgine Johnson, Toll Gate
Grammar, special education.
The award winners will be
honored at the April 16 Board of
Education meeting and on May 11
at the E2 Awards Dinner hosted
by the Hopewell Valley Education
Foundation and Educational Test-
ing Service.
The public is invited to attend
the dinner.
For more information, log on to
the education foundations web-
site at hvef.org.
WEDNESDAY APRIL 11
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
THURSDAY APRIL 12
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
Hopewell Public Library Board of
Trustees meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Public Library, 13 E.
Broad St. Open to the public. For
more information call (609) 466-
1625 or visit www.RedLibrary.org.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
FRIDAY APRIL 13
Open Play Time: All ages. 11 a.m. to
noon at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. A
time for parents and children to
socialize in the childrens activity
room. Toys and coloring supplies
available.
SATURDAY APRIL 14
Renaissance of Traditional Chi-
nese Culture: 2 to 3 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
about traditional Chinese culture,
which was nearly lost during the
last 60 years. Discover ancient
wisdom as useful today as it has
been throughout history. Learn
how Shen Yun Performing Arts,
the worlds premiere classical
Chinese music and dance compa-
ny, uses the most dynamic and
engaging way to showcase 5,000
years of history.
Family Story Time: 10:30 to 11 a.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Enjoy
stories, songs, rhymes and a craft
for children and their families.
Program runs about 30 minutes.
Online registration required.
MONDAY APRIL 16
Hopewell Township Recreation
Advisory Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Hopewell Municipal
Building, 201 Washington Cross-
ing-Pennington Road. Open to
the public. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time or for more information.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
TUESDAY APRIL 17
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library.
Knitters of all levels welcome.
Join for a cozy evening of stitch-
ing and conversation. For more
information call (609) 466-1625.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Hopewell Township Environmental
Commission meeting: 7:30 or 8
p.m. at the Hopewell Township
Municipal Building, 201 Washing-
ton Crossing-Pennington Rd. the
third Tuesday of the month. Veri-
fy time at hopewelltwp.org.
Historic Preservation Commission
meeting: 7:30 p.m. in the
Hopewell Township Main Admin-
istration Building the third Tues-
day of the month. For more infor-
mation visit hopewelltwp.org.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 APRIL 11-17, 2012
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1735 North Olden Extension

Ewing, NJ
609-895-8811 HOURS: Mon-Fri 7:30am-5pm Sat 8am-Noon
With us your price doesnt change! Price includes tire balance, valves, etc
Wholesale Tires Open to The Public
WHERE HONESTY AND INTEGRITY COMES FIRST!
Tire mounting on premises.
All major and minor brands.
Established 1998
MEMBER, AMERICAN MONTESSORI SOCIETY
|K00KM8 I0K
|hIhI8 - 5 YIK 0IP8
Math Language Skills Art Foreign Language Gym
SUMMER CAMPS
Weekly/Daily Schedule Water Play Minisports
Special Events Academic Enrichment
Kindergarten Program Soccer and more!
Montgomery (609) 252-9696 www.NHMontessori.org
Route 518, Skillman - 1/2 mile from Route 206
Minutes from Hopewell, Pennington and Princeton
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
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rioie coo) vov-+=oe - www.wiLsoi==Le.co:
RobertA.Wilson,ManagerNJ Lic.No.2520 R.AsherWilson,Director,NJLic.No.3823
Browns Upholstery Co. L.L.C.
Custom Upholstery / Window Treatments
Browns Carpet Cleaning
(609) 954-5190 Residential / Commercial
Water and Floor Damge / Pet Stains
1613 Reed Road Pennington, NJ
(609) 737-3773 www.brownsupholsteryco.com
10%
OFF
With this ad.
Expires 4/30/12.
Teachers receive district honor
Families, friends and the gen-
eral public are invited to join
VOICES Chorale in the celebra-
tion of the musical talents of chil-
dren ages 5 to 12 who participate
in the VOICES 24th annual
music composition contest on
Tuesday, April 17, 7 p.m. at Music
Together Headquarters, at 225
Pennington-Hopewell Road, in
Hopewell. Admission to the con-
cert is free.
The family concert features
various choral and instrumental
works written by these young
composers. All of the entries
were reviewed by an established
composer and several were cho-
sen to be performed either by the
children themselves or by mem-
bers of VOICES chorale.
In addition to the childrens
compositions, VOICES will per-
form other works sure to delight
the children, their parents and
their friends.
The winning compositions,
with children ranging in age from
5 to 11, include Universal Song,
by 11-year-old Konstanza Kovalev,
of Pennington, Fairy Tales, by
10-year-old Maddie Connor of
Yardley, and My Belly Button,
by 5-year old Fife Akinyanmi of
Princeton.
The childrens pieces are gen-
erally written for solo voice or
chorus, usually with piano ac-
companiment.
On April 15, composer Robert
Maggio will lead the boys and
girls in a young composers mas-
ter class, in which the children
listen to each others music and
articulate things they like or find
interesting about each piece.
They will also receive sugges-
tions from Maggio for future
pieces.
For more information, leave a
message at (609) 637-9383, or email
voiceschoralevp@aol.com.
Choral music lovers and VOIC-
ES patrons who wish to receive
updates on VOICES may sub-
scribe to VOICES newsletter at
www.enewsarchive.com/VOIC-
ES, or learn more by visiting
www.VOICESChorale.org.
APRIL 11-17, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Hours: Thurs & Fri 7-4:30pm Sat 7-4pm
B09-2BS-029B ghone B09-2BS-01S? Iax
Come JoIn us Ior a PIG HOAST
by the Iood Court AgrII 19
th
, 20
th
& 21
st
2885 Rt. 206 Columbus Farmers Market
Columbus, NJ 08022
Visit us at www.jlcrafts.com
Approximately 60 New
Sheds Coming In Soon!
Order your pavillions
and cabanas now!
Free family concert on April 17
Special to The Sun
Above are composers from a previous VOICES composition contest.
The 24th Annual Music Composition Contest will be held on April 17.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
APRIL 11-17, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
Roofing
Home Improvement
LET THE SUNS WORK
FOR YOU!
Call (609) 751-0245
for Advertising info.
Tree Service
Pet Care
CIeaning
Professional Tree Care & Arborist Services
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
Servicing Your Community For Over 20 Years
609-730-8199
www.arborbarbertree.com
A portion of
our proceeds
are donated
to animal
rescue!
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
Certified Arborist
Corrective Pruning
Tree Removal
Cabling & Bracing
Stump Grinding
Cat Rescue
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
Certified Arborist
Corrective Pruning
Tree Removal
Cabling & Bracing
Stump Grinding
Cat Rescue
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 4/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 4/30/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 4/30/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 4/30/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
HIGHEST PRICES PAID for GOLD DIAMONDS SILVER
can be damaged in any condition
With precious metal prices at all time highs now is the
time to turn broken or unwanted
Jewelry Sterling Silver Silver Coins Flatware
Gold Coins Diamonds High End Watches into Cash
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5 Po|ots ham||too Twp at the coroer oI 00akerbr|dge & d|ob0rg 8d. 609-584-8800
OVER 32 YEARS
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EXPERT JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIR
POOLS
New Rebuild Service
Open Close Liners
Paint Removals
Patios Decks
Call: 908-359-3000
HeIp Wanted
Wanted To Buy
Moving Sale
72 Darrah Lane
Lawrence NJ
4/6, 4/7 & 4/20-4/22
8 am- 2pm
Rain or Shine
Garage SaIe
SENIOR CARE MANAGE-
MENT, a private Home
Care/Care Management
Agency is currently seeking
compassionate and reliable
NJ certified home health
aides for cases during the
hours of 7a-5p Mon-Sun
and on-going LVE N
cases, Hospice experience
a plus. Driver's License
required, also will need to
be willing to drive to the
surrounding areas of
Princeton, Skillman,
Hightstown, West Windsor.
Reliable contact phone
number a must.
References and
Experience required.
Competitive pay rate and
benefits available (health
care, RA, paid vacation).
Serving Mercer County.
Call (609) 882-0322 for
application/interview.
103 Waterway Road, Egret Cove, Ocean City NJ $2,895,000
Regarded by many to be one of the finest lagoon front properties in Ocean City,
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Ocean City New Jerseys #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
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Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
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3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
Featured Property
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Drapery & Area Rug Cleaning
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your home smell fresh while reducing
allergy aggravation pollutants such as
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the particulate pollutants left by dust
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Expires 4/30/12.
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ment removes ground in dirt to help
extend life. We are certified to comply with
all major carpet manufacturers cleaning
specifications, including stain resistant
carpets. Minimum charge & fuel
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35% OFF
This exclusive treatment will remove
dust, smoke, pollen, odors and soil, yet
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CLEANING
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