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Copyright Business in the Community 2005
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
The Index ModeI
St James Ethics Centre is pleased to launch the Corporate Responsibility Ìndex (CRÌ) 2006 in Australia and New Zealand. The Ìndex, developed
and maintained by Business in the Community (BÌTC) in the UK, is a voluntary, business-led benchmark of responsible business practice. Ìt was
developed as a management tool to support companies in improving their social and environmental performance, whilst providing a systematic
approach to managing, measuring and reporting the various impacts that companies have on society and the environment.
The Ìndex is based on a framework that BÌTC developed in 2002 together with businesses, through a series of consultations and workshops
involving over 80 companies and through engagement with a number of additional key stakeholders. Every year feedback from participants in
the UK and abroad, and CRÌ Advisory groups, is used to keep improving the questionnaire and ensure it remains relevant and challenging, while
allowing for year-on-year comparison.
BÌTC has generously donated the Ìndex under a licence agreement to St James Ethics Centre for use in Australia and New Zealand.
The survey covers four key management areas (Community, Environment, Marketplace and Workplace) and 6 key impact areas (3
environmental and 3 social).
Weightings by section are as follows:
Corporate Strategy - 10%
Ìntegration - 22.5%
Management - 22.5%
Performance & Ìmpact Areas - 35%
Assurance & Disclosure - 10%
Weightings within sections are then distributed evenly between each question and sub-question (with very few exceptions).
How to CompIete the Survey
The survey is structured as follows:
CORPORATE STRATEGY (Questions 1 - 6)
Complete every question
INTEGRATION (Questions 7 - 15)
Complete every question
MANAGEMENT (Questions 16 - 42)
Complete as follows:
Community Management - complete every question
Environment Management - complete every question
Marketplace Management - complete 29, 31, and 32, plus two out of 30, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37
Workplace Management - complete every question
PERFORMANCE & IMPACT (Questions 43 - 89)
Complete six impact areas in total (3 environmental and 3 social):
EnvironmentaI Impact Areas (Questions 43 - 67)
Two core environmental impact areas:
- Climate Change (Overall KPÌ) or Climate Change (Ìndividual KPÌs);
- Waste and Resource Management
Plus one additional environmental impact area:
- Biodiversity; or a self-selected environmental impact area
SociaI Impact Areas (Questions 68 - 96)
Two core social impact areas:
- Product Safety;
- Occupational Health and Safety;
- Human Rights in the Supply Chain;
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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- Diversity in the Workplace; or
- Community Ìnvestment
Plus one additional social impact area:
- Any third area chosen from the above; or a self-selected social impact area
ASSURANCE (Question 97a & b)
Complete both questions
SUPPLEMENTARY QUESTIONS
One Line About Your Company - required to complete
Changes That Could Affect Company Performance - not compulsory
Case Study Examples - not compulsory
SIGN-OFF
Chief Executive Sign-off (required)
PubIication of Index ResuIts
Company feedback reports
By the beginning of April 2007 participants will receive a company specific feedback report, benchmarking their company's performance against
their peers and against the overall universe of Ìndex participants. This will include company scores, and sector and Ìndex averages for individual
survey questions/sections. Feedback reports will help identify areas of strength, while highlighting areas for improvement. Companies may also
decide to disclose their feedback reports to demonstrate their commitment to transparency, thereby building stakeholder trust and showing how
business is taking the lead in voluntary public reporting.
PubIication of resuIts
The results of the Corporate Responsibility Ìndex will again be published in The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age on Monday 14 May 2007.
With the entry of New Zealand participants in the Ìndex we will also seek publication in the NZ press. The supplement will provide an overall
picture of companies' performance and highlight examples of good practice.
Executive Summary
As in previous years, St James Ethics Centre will publish an Executive Summary covering the 2006 Ìndex results and key messages. This will
be made available at the National Business Leaders' Forum on Sustainable Development in May 2007 and on our website.
Environment and Community Index resuIts*
Companies that are new to the Ìndex process and not yet ready to complete the full CR Ìndex survey, are offered the opportunity to start by
completing only the Environment and/or Community modules first, before moving on to the full agenda. By default, companies completing the
full CR Ìndex survey will have completed the same questions contained within the separate Environment and/or Community surveys and will
therefore not only enter the main CR Ìndex, but will also receive feedback on their performance in the Environment and/or Community modules
(unless requested otherwise). The Environment and Community module results will be published on the same date, Monday 14 May 2007.
Company information provided by companies will be held and used by St James Ethics Centre and Ernst & Young only for the purpose of this
engagement. Both parties agree to protect the confidential information of the CRI Participants in the same manner as they protect the
confidentiality of their own proprietary and confidential information. In relation to any personal information provided by CRI Participants, St
James Ethics Centre and Ernst & Young will comply with the provisions of the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) and the National Privacy Principles in
relation to this information. A copy of Ernst & Young's Privacy Policy Statement may be obtained on request.
With regards to the survey's Disclosure question (Q97b), please note that St James Ethics Centre will not unilaterally disclose company
feedback reports or submissions. If companies have stated their willingness to disclose, any requests for companies' individual feedback reports
or full submissions will be directed to companies themselves.
*NB: Any questions feeding into your Environment and/or Community Index score are highlighted throughout the survey by EI and CI
accordingly.
2006-07 TimetabIe
18 Sept 06 - Launch of survey online
Sept/Oct 06 - Engagement workshops
- 28 Sept Melbourne
- 29 Sept Sydney
- 3 Oct Adelaide
- 5 Oct Auckland
- 6 Oct Brisbane
24 Nov 06 - Deadline for submissions
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Dec to Feb 07 - Submission reviews by Ernst & Young, including company visits
earIy ApriI 07 - Feedback reports issued to companies
14 May 07 - Results out in The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age supplement
14 May 07 - Executive Summary published, including results and key messages
May 07 - Business Leaders' Forum on Sustainable Development including CEO Roundtable discussion
Company DetaiIs
PIease describe the key characteristics of your business.
Company Name (to be used in aII Index pubIications):
Toyota Australia
Main Business Activities
Manufacture, distribution and sales (domestic and export) of Toyota vehicles, parts and accessories. Distribution and sales of Lexus and
Daihatsu vehicles, parts and accessories.
Listed Business Sector (according to FTSE cIassification)
Automobiles & Parts
Turnover/Revenue (£,E,$ per annum):
7.62 Billion
Number of EmpIoyees
4,512
StructuraI Overview
Toyota Australia is a fully owned subsidiary of Toyota Motor Corporation. Toyota Australia is not a listed company.
Indicate the gIobaI regions where your major operations are Iocated (incIuding joint ventures and subsidiaries in which you have
management controI or infIuence). For UK based companies this may be just the UK:
Australia
Indicate where your major saIes regions are Iocated and whether you use intermediaries such as agents in your major saIes areas:
Australia, Middle East. Dealers and distributors are businesses in their own right.
Confirm the scope of operations covered by your survey submission:
100% of nationaI operations* (for UK, AustraIian businesses etc.)
100% of gIobaI operations* (for gIobaI businesses, Iisted on FTSE or DJSI)
NationaI operations onIy (for gIobaI businesses, not Iisted on neither FTSE nor DJSI)
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* NB: If certain activities only cover parts of your business, this should be reflected by the "business coverage" element within individual survey
questions.
National businesses (UK, Australian, etc): - Businesses that have only a national presence are required to complete the survey based on 100%
of their national operations.
Global businesses, Iisted on FTSE or DJSÌ: - Global businesses that are FTSE listed and/or Dow Jones Sustainability Ìndex sector leaders are
required to complete the survey on the basis of their global operations.
Global businesses, not Iisted on neither FTSE nor DJSÌ: - Global businesses that are neither FTSE listed nor Dow Jones sector leaders may
still be eligible to participate in the Ìndex if they are larger BÌTC members (level 1 or 2). While encouraged to complete the survey on the basis of
their global operations, these companies may limit the scope of their survey submission to the scope covered by their BÌTC membership (e.g.
complete the survey based only on their national operations, if only these are covered by membership). This will be highlighted in the final
results as appropriate.
Indicate your reporting period for this survey (for previous participants this shouId foIIow on from Iast year's submission):
The year prior to 9 September 2006
Last pubIic reporting cycIe (e.g. financiaI reporting year), pIease specify:
Financial year 1 April 2005 to 31 March 2006
Other, pIease specify:
Index Participation
All Ìndex participants will be reported publicly in the CR Ìndex. Ìn addition, by completing the full CR Ìndex survey you automatically be entered
into the Environment Ìndex and the Community Ìndex (provided you have complete the Community Ìnvestment impact area in Section 4).
Ìf you do not wish to be publicly reported in either the Environment or Community Ìndex, please indicate:
Our company does NOT wish to be pubIicIy reported in the Environment Index 2006.
Our company does NOT wish to be pubIicIy reported in the Community Index 2006.
One Line Summary About Your Company
Please provide a summary of a key achievement for your company this year which can be used as part of the public communication of Ìndex
results. This is a chance for you to showcase an achievement that you are particularly proud of.
Please limit your summary to 20 words.
Toyota Australia continued development of a five year environmental action planconsistent with TMC global plans and consolidation of
Toyota Community Spirit. Activity continued to be support through company-wide Balanced Scorecard performancemanagement
processes
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Australia Environment and Community Report 2006 p. 2
Practitioner Contact DetaiIs
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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PIease provide the detaiIs of the person who wiII be the main contact for St James Ethics Centre throughout the Index process.
Main Contact:
TitIe
Ms
First Name
Katarina
Surname
Persic
Job TitIe
Public Affairs Manager
Phone Number
(03) 9647 4222
EmaiI Address
katarina.persic@toyota.com.au
Second Contact (if appIicabIe):
TitIe
First Name
Surname
Job TitIe
Phone Number
EmaiI Address
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Chief Executive Contact DetaiIs
PIease provide the detaiIs of your CEO who, together with your Index practitioners, wiII receive notification of your 2006 Index resuIts.
TitIe
Mr
First Name
Ted
Surname
Okada
Address Line 1
155
Address Line 2
Bertie
Address Line 3
Street
Post Code
3207
Town
Port Melbourne
Country
Australia
1 Corporate VaIues
Definition
Corporate values are high level statements that provide an understanding of 'what the company stands for', 'what the company is prepared to be
responsible for' and 'what the company's future goals and objectives are'. Your company may describe 'Corporate Values' as Vision and Values,
Corporate Purpose, Mission Statement or Goals and Objectives etc. - they all share a common goal of setting the boundaries by which the
company operates.
Does your company have a statement of overaII mission and vaIues, which references your company's commitment to one or more
aspects of corporate responsibiIity?
Please tick all that apply:
Our company has a high IeveI corporate statement which references one or more commitments to corporate responsibiIity (eg do
no harm to the environment, operate with integrity etc)
PIease provide a copy of the statement:
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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see: TMC Guiding Principles
The statement has been signed off by the Chairman, CEO or main Board member with responsibiIity for corporate responsibiIity
The statement is in the pubIic domain
PIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
see: TMC Guiding Principles
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Toyota Motor Corporation Guiding Principles and 2010 Global Vision provide a framework for setting long term business goals and
policy.
The 2010 Global Vision is an ambitious vision for Toyota's journey towards meeting the mobility needs of our society in a way that
respects our earth and all people.
The 2010 Global Vision comprises a set of long-term management policies centred on the basic theme of innovation into the future,
anticipating a transition to a recycle - oriented society on a global scale.
The TMC Earth Charter is based on the Guiding Principles and describes a set of four basic policies:
. Contribute toward a prosperous 21st century society
. Pursue environmental technologies
. Take action voluntarily
. Work in cooperation with society
see: www.environment.toyota.com.au
The Toyota Way defines how the people of Toyota perform and behave in order to support the Guiding Principles. The Toyota Way is
supported by two main pillars - continuous improvement and respect for people. All Toyota employees at every level are expected to
use these two values in their daily work and interactions. Toyota Australia's Code of Ethics supports the Toyota Way. The Code of
Ethics is available publicly.
2 Corporate ResponsibiIity PrincipIes (EI and CI)
Definition
Corporate marketplace principles are statements of a company's high-level commitments to stakeholders which guide the company to conduct
its business activities in a responsible way. They are also called business principles, code of conduct, guiding principles or statement of
principles.
Does your company have corporate responsibiIity principIes that define its commitments to its stakehoIders?
No
Yes, we have high-level CR principles, which outline our commitments to our key stakeholders.
Our corporate responsibiIity principIes cover the foIIowing eIements:
(Please tick all that apply)
Community
Environment
MarketpIace - suppIy chain/ outsourcing/ intermediaries
MarketpIace - customers/ consumers
WorkpIace - empIoyee issues
WorkpIace - occupationaI heaIth and safety
Business Conduct
The statement(s):
Has been signed off by the Chairman, CEO or main Board member with responsibiIity for corporate responsibiIity
Is in the pubIic domain
PIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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see: www.environment.toyota.com.au
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Toyota Motor Corporation Guiding Principles and 2010 Global Vision provide a framework for setting long term business goals and
policy.
The 2010 Global Vision is an ambitious vision for Toyota's journey towards meeting the mobility needs of our society in a way that
respects our earth and all people.
The 2010 Global Vision comprises a set of long-term management policies centred on the basic theme of innovation into the future,
anticipating a transition to a recycle - oriented society on a global scale.
The TMC Earth Charter is based on the Guiding Principles and describes a set of four basic policies:
. Contribute toward a prosperous 21st century society
. Pursue environmental technologies
. Take action voluntarily
. Work in cooperation with society
see: /www.environment.toyota.com.au/environment/articles/0,1811,subÌd%253D1240%2526sectionÌd%253D381,00.html
The Toyota Way defines how the people of Toyota perform and behave in order to support the Guiding Principles. The Toyota Way is
supported by two main pillars - continuous improvement and respect for people. All Toyota employees at every level are expected to
use these two values in their daily work and interactions. Toyota Australia's Code of Ethics supports the Toyota Way. The Code of
Ethics is available publicly.
3a Leadership - ResponsibiIities (EI and CI)
Has your company appointed a board member(s) with responsibiIity for the various components of corporate responsibiIity?
Please complete all that applies:
No Name of board
member
Job TitIe Board member
responsibiIities
formaIIy
confirmed
Board member's
CR roIe reported
pubIicIy (report
page/ web-Iink):
Date of Iast CR
report made to
the Board
Community Bernie O'Connor Executive Director
Corporate
Services
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D967%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html 15 Feb 2006
Environment Mike Harvie Executive Director
Manufacturing
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D967%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html 15 Feb 2006
Human Rights Bernie O'Connor Executive Director
Corporate
Services
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D967%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html 15 Feb 2006
Marketplace -
supply chain
Dave Buttner Executive Director
Sales and
Marketing
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D967%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html 30 March 2006
Marketplace -
customers/consumers
Dave Buttner Executive Director
Sales and
Marketing
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D967%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html 30 March 2006
Workplace -
occupational
health & safety
Bernie O'Connor Executive Director
Corporate
Services
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D967%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html 30 March 2006
Workplace -
employee issues
Bernie O'Connor Executive Director
Corporate
Services
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D967%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html 30 march 2006
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Australia Board members have been allocated responsibility for different corporate responsibility issues. This is formally
confirmed for example by membership of different committees that report to the board such as the Cross Functional Sustainability
Committee (now the Toyota Australia Environment Committee) or by the nature of the operating arm they represent on the Board eg
Bernie O'Connor as Executive Director Corporate Services is responsible for Human Resources - workplace relations and OHS,
Toyota's Corporate Citizenship program Toyota Community Spirit and Toyota's compliance program.
Toyota Australia has included its last CRÌ response on its website. This response contains the names of Directors responsible for
corporate social responsibility issues.
See: www.toyota.com.au/about toyota
Within TMCA, corporate responsibility issues may be discussed as a separate agenda item or as part of a larger review process, but are
reported at least on an annual basis.
Ìn addition Toyota has a Corporate Compliance Committee that reports to the Board.
Toyota is committed to strengthening its image in the market place as a good corporate citizen. Consistent with this image is a strong
commitment to high standards of corporate governance and maintaining a culture of compliance at all levels within the Corporation.
As a result, Toyota Australia has a Compliance Program that enables Toyota employees to:
. perform our duties with integrity and ensure consistency with all legal requirements, Toyota Way, Toyota Australia's Code of Ethics and
other policies, codes and standards;
. be committed to this culture because it is our goal to maintain our reputation and uphold the integrity of Toyota Australia;
. understand and manage the risk of non-compliance to minimise any loss of our reputation and protect against the imposition of
penalties on the Corporation and the individuals;
. learn from past experiences and implement improvements in processes and work practices;
. have a culture with compliance quality built in, not bolted on.
Compliance is recognised as a fundamental basis of our corporate strategy for achieving Toyota's vision, mission, corporate values and
business objectives.
As compliance is now included in the Balanced Scorecard and/or personal objectives of each division and employee annually, each
employee is held accountable for their compliance obligations.
The Compliance and Risk Management program is managed by Legal and Secretarial Division, which is headed by the Company
Secretary, Damien Bayard. He reports to Executive Director, Corporate Services.
Other supporting evidence: Senior Executive Management Committee and TMCA Board agendas
3b Leadership - Reporting (EI and CI)
Does your company reguIarIy discuss CR issues at board meetings?
Please tick all that apply and provide examples of supporting evidence below.
Community Environment MarketpIace WorkpIace
There has been a
substantive discussion at
board level in the last year,
of sufficient depth to
warrant inclusion in the
minutes.
The board has reviewed
our key CR issues in the
last year (e.g. as part of a
formal CR review).
The board has approved
specific actions relating to
the key CR issues
identified.
The board has discussed
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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specific KPÌs to measure
our performance on CR
issues.
ExampIes of specific CR actions approved by the Board:
See : Corporate Balanced Scorecard and on-line system
ExampIes of specific KPIs discussed by the Board:
Community Support, Corporate Compliance plans and activities, including environmental performance.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Within TMCA, corporate responsibility issues(community, environment, market place and workplace) may be discussed as a separate
agenda item or as part of a larger review process, but are reported at least on an annual basis.
Ìn addition Toyota has a Corporate Compliance Committee that reports to the Board.
Toyota is committed to strengthening its image in the market place as a good corporate citizen. Consistent with this image is a strong
commitment to high standards of corporate governance and maintaining a culture of compliance at all levels within the Corporation.
As a result, Toyota Australia has a Compliance Program that enables Toyota employees to:
. perform our duties with integrity and ensure consistency with all legal requirements, Toyota Way, Toyota Australia's Code of Ethics and
other policies, codes and standards;
. be committed to this culture because it is our goal to maintain our reputation and uphold the integrity of Toyota Australia;
. understand and manage the risk of non-compliance to minimise any loss of our reputation and protect against the imposition of
penalties on the Corporation and the individuals;
. learn from past experiences and implement improvements in processes and work practices;
. have a culture with compliance quality built in, not bolted on.
Compliance is recognised as a fundamental basis of our corporate strategy for achieving Toyota's vision, mission, corporate values and
business objectives.
As compliance is now included in the Balanced Scorecard and/or personal objectives of each division and employee annually, each
employee is held accountable for their compliance obligations.
Other supporting evidence: Senior Executive Management Committee agendas and minutes
Specific KPÌs are identified on the Corporate Balanced Scorecard. These are discussed and reviewed by the TMCA Board as part of
the normal Balanced Scorecard monitoring and review process. Example KPÌs relate to compliance, workplace issues, OHS, corporate
reputation, community involvement.
4 Advocacy
Has your company demonstrated Ieadership in corporate responsibiIity?
No
Yes, our company:
Please tick all that apply.
Our company is an active member of a sectoraI or business-Ied forum, which considers corporate responsibiIity as one of their key
issues
ExampIe:
ACF Business Leaders Rountable on Climate Change. Futher examples in Toyota Australia Environment and Community Report 2006,
p8
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Our company has impIemented some form of company-wide internaI communication to spread awareness of the company's CR
activities during the Iast reporting year.
ExampIe:
Green Office program, ECO- Buy Business program-founding member, World Environment Day activities
Our company has advocated its commitment to corporate responsibiIity through the substantive pubIic activities of AT LEAST ONE
of our board members or senior executives (e.g. they may have given pubIic speeches, spoken at conferences, participated in a
company community activity)
ExampIe:
Ted Okada (President) officiated at the launch of ECO- Buy program and as the founding member of ECO-Buy Business with the
Deputy Premier and Minister for Environment, Water and Communities, John Thwaites
Our company has advocated its commitment to corporate responsibiIity through the substantive pubIic activities of TWO OR MORE
of our board members or senior executives (e.g. they may have given pubIic speeches, spoken at conferences, participated in a
company community activity)
ExampIe:
President Ted Okada - corporate performance including environment and community at CEDA Oct 2005; Exec Dir Alan McGarrigle at
Community Spirit Gallery opening 8 Dec 2005
Our company gets invoIved in shaping poIicy/commenting on government consuItation papers (reIating to corporate responsibiIity)
in a way that is consistent with our corporate vision and responsibiIities
ExampIe:
Vic Govt and Ìndustry Greenhouse Roundtable
Our company has received third party recognition for our performance on a key aspect of our CR agenda during the Iast reporting
year.
ExampIe:
Banksia Environmental Awards 2005. Category- Business Environmental Responsibility and Leadership winner
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Banksia Environmental Awards 2005. Category- Business Environmental Responsibility and Leadership winner
see
Environment and Community report 2006 P. 8
5 Risk Management Process
Has your company integrated corporate responsibiIity issues into its overaII business risk evaIuation process?
Our company has identified the 'materiaI' risks and opportunities arising from its CR issues and affecting its share vaIue, and has
assessed them as part of our ongoing risk management process, which covers the foIIowing:
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees)
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Risk/opportunity
review involved
dialogue with senior
managers
Ìnvolved dialogue with
key external
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stakeholders where
we have operations,
supply chains or
markets
Risk/opportunity
review covered
community issues
Risk/opportunity
review covered
environmental issues
Risk/opportunity
review covered
marketplace issues
Risk/opportunity
review covered
workplace issues
Processes are in
place to review
corporate
responsibility issues
at least yearly at
board level
The company can
demonstrate it has an
independent review
process in place (e.g.
independent internal
audit process that
covers CR issues)
In support of your answers, pIease indicate one significant risk/opportunity identified in each of the areas beIow. Where your risk
evaIuation process has confirmed no significant issues, pIease indicate accordingIy and expIain.
5.9 Community:
Corporate reputation - maintaining good relationships with community stakeholders
5.10 Environment:
Resource efficiency
5.11 MarketpIace:
Product quality and safety
5.12 WorkpIace:
Health and safety
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List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis for key corporate issues or opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some
Divisions more frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
As well as internal audit processes, Toyota has a Corporate Compliance Committee that monitors compliance issues. The annual
Environment and Community Report is independently audited.
Toyota is committed to strengthening its image in the market place as a good corporate citizen. Consistent with this image is a strong
commitment to high standards of corporate governance and maintaining a culture of compliance at all levels within the Corporation.
As a result, Toyota Australia has a Compliance Program that provides us with a framework to:
. perform our duties with integrity and ensure consistency with all legal requirements, Toyota Way, Toyota Australia's Code of Ethics and
other policies, codes and standards;
. be committed to this culture because it is our goal to maintain our reputation and uphold the integrity of Toyota Australia;
. understand and manage the risk of non-compliance to minimise any loss of our reputation and protect against the imposition of
penalties on the Corporation and the individuals;
. learn from past experiences and implement improvements in processes and work practices;
. have a culture with compliance quality built in, not bolted on.
Compliance is recognised as a fundamental basis of our corporate strategy for achieving Toyota's vision, mission, corporate values and
business objectives.
As compliance is now included in the Balanced Scorecard and/or personal objectives of each division and employee annually, each
employee is held accountable for their compliance obligations.
6 PoIicies (EI and CI)
Definition
A policy is a plan, procedure or programme to guide decisions and actions and give rise to the company's objectives and targets on a specific
aspect of corporate responsibility. Policies are a means by which corporate values are translated into practice.
Does your company have a written corporate poIicy statement(s) that covers the foIIowing key areas of corporate responsibiIity?
Please tick one box in each row.
No Yes and can confirm A
and B
Yes and can confirm A,
B, C, D
Yes and can confirm ALL
statements
Community
Environment
Human Rights
Marketplace - supply chain
Marketplace -
customers/consumers
Workplace - occupational,
health & safety
Workplace - employee
issues
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QuaIifying Statements
Our corporate policy statements:
A. Address relevant company activities and significant impacts or issues identified.
B. Are approved by relevant board member.
C. Are available internally throughout the company.
D. Are regularly reviewed (at least annually).
E. Are available in the public domain.
For statement E, pIease use the space beIow to indicate where poIicies can be found in the pubIic domain, specifying report
pages/web-Iinks.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Code of Ethics defines Toyota Australia's position and guidelines regarding the understanding, promotion and practice of ethical
business standards by Toyota employees. The Code of Ethics is supported by a wide range of policies and guidelines. When the Code
of Ethics was developed a check was made to ensure the Code and policies/guidelines were consistent. All of the items listed in this
question are covered in the Code of Ethics.
All policies and guidelines, as well as the Code of Ethics are available on the Toyota intranet site. Code of Ethics training has also been
provided to employees.
Code of Ethics available on www.toyota.com.au
See Corporate section within About Toyota.
The Code of Ethics is also consistent with the Teamwork Charter that was developed as part of the Toyota Workplace Agreement. Ìn
matters of ethical conduct, the Teamwork Charter remains the principal document for Award-based employees.
All non-Award employees refer to the Code of Ethics as the principal document, and it can be read in conjunction with the Teamwork
Charter.
Toyota Australia incorporates human rights issues into our workplace policies and supply chain policies. Ìt is not separated as an issue
in its own right as it is not meaningful to do it in that way for our business operations. These are also incorporated into the Toyota Code
of Ethics and within the Workplace Agreement, particularly the Toyota Teamwork Charter.
7 Integration of Corporate ResponsibiIity PrincipIes
Does your company have a process in pIace to ensure that your Corporate ResponsibiIity PrincipIes (see Question 2) are integrated
and upheId throughout the organisation?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc.)
Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company has undertaken the foIIowing:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Staff have received a
copy of our corporate
responsibility
principles in the local
language (or business
language)
Our corporate
responsibility
principles have been
reviewed at the
SBU/country level and
have been adapted to
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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meet any specific
cultural issues,
without breaching
their spirit
We have asked our
staff whether they
believe we live up to
our corporate
responsibility
principles, and can
demonstrate that we
have taken steps to
address areas of
concern
We have asked other
key stakeholders
whether they believe
we live up to our
corporate
responsibility
principles, and can
demonstrate that we
have taken steps to
address areas of
concern
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Way awareness training is provided to employees. The Toyota Way is also included in the Toyota Leaders program - an
integrated management development program.
All Non-Award employees have received a copy of the Code of Ethics - Available on www.toyota.com.au See Corporate Section: About
Toyota. This was communicated to employees at the Division and Department level via face to face presentations where copies of the
Code of Ethics booklet were given to each employee and a supporting video was shown.
Each Award employee also receives a copy of the Toyota Workplace Agreement. Ìncluded in the WPA is the Toyota Teamwork Charter
that is consistent with the Code of Ethics.
Employees were also able to provide feedback on the Code and the communication process.
Employee Satisfaction Ìndex (ESi)- All employees are surveyed annually. The ESi includes questions that ask employees about how
Toyota lives up to its values. Results are communicated throughout the company. As well as an overall company result, results can be
provided for each Division and Department so that local action plans can be implemented to address local issues.
Ìnitiatives to address ESi issues are incorporated into the Balanced Scorecard System ensuring individuals are accountable for
addressing ESi issues.
Toyota participates in annual reputation research. This research asks stakeholders how well we live up to our values. Toyota use the
Reputation Quotient tool as a means of benchmarking our reputation against our competitors and wider Australian industry peers. Ìn
2005, Toyota ranked No1 in Australia. Action plans are developed to address risks and opportunities identified by the RQ research. A
corporate reputation measure is included on the corporate balanced scorecard. This measure is reviewed at least quarterly.
Toyota also participated in the inaugural Australian Corporate Responsibility Ìndex and the third CRÌ survey round.
8 Business Conduct
Definition
Business conduct are the behaviours and procedures that ensure a company and its employees adopt the highest standards of business
integrity and responsible business practice, especially in its relationships with employees, customers/consumers, shareholders/investors and
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suppliers.
Has your company impIemented procedures to support and ensure that its empIoyees Iive up to company standards of business
behaviour whiIst conducting company business?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by no. of employees, etc.)
Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
We have a published
code governing the
conduct of our
employees, including
agents/intermediaries
and major contractors
We have confidential
reporting mechanisms
in place (e.g. whistle
blowing mechanisms)
We prohibit the giving
and receiving of
bribes, including gifts
(adapted to special
conditions in certain
cultures)
We monitor
compliance with our
code governing the
conduct of our
employees
We have disciplinary
procedures in place in
the event improper
business conduct is
identified
We regularly review
our codes or values
relating to business
conduct
PIease provide a copy of your Code of Conduct. If it is in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page/web-Iink beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Code of Ethics defines Toyota Australia's position and guidelines regarding the understanding, promotion and practice of ethical
business standards by Toyota employees. The Code of Ethics is supported by a wide range of policies and guidelines. When the Code
of Ethics was developed a check was made to ensure the Code and policies/guidelines were consistent.
All policies and guidelines, as well as the Code of Ethics are available on the Toyota intranet site.
All Non-Award employees have received a copy of the Code of Ethics - Available on www.toyota.com.au See Corporate Section: About
Toyota. This was communicated to employees at the Division and Department level via face to face presentations where copies of the
Code of Ethics booklet were given to each employee and a supporting video was shown.
Each Award employee also receives a copy of the Toyota Workplace Agreement. Ìncluded in the WPA is the Toyota Teamwork Charter
that is consistent with the Code of Ethics.
Employees were also able to provide feedback on the Code and the communication process.
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Code of Ethics available on www.toyota.com.au
See Corporate section within About Toyota.
The Code of Ethics is also consistent with the Toyota Teamwork Charter that was developed as part of the Toyota Workplace
Agreement. Ìn matters of ethical conduct, the Teamwork Charter remains the principal document for Award-based employees.
All non-Award employees refer to the Code of Ethics as the principal document, and it can be read in conjunction with the Teamwork
Charter.
The Code includes the process for raising a complaint. Ìt also prohibits the giving or receiving of bribes. Toyota does not expect gifts or
gratuities as part of an effective business relationship and Toyota empoyees are prohibited from requesting or soliciting in any way gifts
or gratuities in connection with Toyota business.
No Toyota employee shall make a political contribution on behalf of Toyota Australia unless permitted by law and as aprroved, in writing
by the President of Toyota Australia.
A company wide Compliance Program has been implemented. This is monitored by the Corporate Compliance Committee that reports
to the Board.
9 Performance Management (EI and CI)
Are corporate responsibiIity issues Iinked to peopIe's performance reviews/appraisaIs across the company?
Please tick all that apply, and provide examples of supporting evidence below.
Community Environment MarketpIace WorkpIace
CR issues are explicitly
included in the appraisal of
staff with direct functional
responsibility
CR issues are explicitly
included in the appraisal of
senior managers
CR issues are explicitly
included in the
performance review of
board member(s)
The above often occurs through the use of CR objectives and targets that are integrated into employees' roles and objectives, or by examining
employees' compliance with the company's business principles and policies.
If your company has an aIternative formaI system for ensuring that responsibiIities are deIegated and understood throughout the
organisation, pIease cIarify beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Balanced Scorecard objectives, measures and targets are cascaded from the Board of Directors through Operating Arms, Divisions and
Departments to the individual. Employee performance measurement and reward and recognition systems are linked to the achievement
of balanced scorecard objectives.
TMCA's Balanced Scorecard System takes corporate objectives from the Corporate Balanced Scorecard and cascades them through
the Operating Arms, Divisions and Departments to individual objectives.
TMCA's employee reward and remuneration system is linked to the balanced scorecard system. Employee performance is measured
against the achievement of balanced scorecard objectives. Reward and remuneration is influenced strongly by employee performance
against balanced scorecard objectives. This process includes members of the Board.
Marketplace issues such as customer satisfaction and compliance issues are explicitly included in the appraisal of senior managers and
Board members. These issues might include: compliance with Trade Practices Act or the Voluntary Ìndustry Code for Automotive
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Advertising. Like all other corporate objectives and targets they are managed as part of the Balanced Scorecard System and
achievement of targets is linked to the employee appraisal and performance review process.
10 Remuneration and Bonus Systems (EI and CI)
Do your remuneration or bonus systems Iink to peopIe's CR objectives and targets (see Q9) to support the integration of corporate
responsibiIity issues across the company's operations?
Please tick all that apply, and provide examples of supporting evidence below.
Our remuneration or bonus system Iinks to peopIe's CR objectives and targets, for:
Community Environment MarketpIace WorkpIace
Staff with functional
responsibilities
Senior Managers
Board Members
For board members your response should be consistent with what is reported in your company's remuneration report, and should reflect
whether board members are given KPÌs for corporate responsibility issues.
If your company has an aIternative formaI system for rewarding staff for their performance on CR issues, pIease cIarify beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
TMCA's Balanced Scorecard System takes corporate objectives from the Corporate Balanced Scorecard and cascades them through
the Operating Arms, Divisions and Departments to individual objectives.
TMCA's employee reward and remuneration system is linked to the balanced scorecard system. Employee performance is measured
against the achievement of balanced scorecard objectives. Reward and remuneration is influenced strongly by employee performance
against balanced scorecard objectives. This same process includes senior managers and board members.
11 Strategic Decision Making (EI)
Does your company's strategic decision-making process incIude, as a minimum standard, an environmentaI and sociaI assessment
for each decision?
Our company:
(please tick all that apply)
Has considered the
environmentaI impact of the
decision
Has considered the sociaI
impact of the decision
Can provide an exampIe where
it has affected our
decision/impIementation
programme*
For investments in new countries,
new markets, mergers and
acquisitions
When downsizing, restructuring or
dis-investing from a market or
country
Ìn the research & development of
new products and services
When considering new business
partners
Ìn the selection of pension fund
managers
* Please provide examples below. Where CR issues were considered in the decision-making process but did not affect the final outcome, please
explain.
ExampIes of how CR issues have been considered in:
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Investments etc:
Social - Community investment directed to mitigation of negative impacts of the company's core business e.g. road safety: Community
Road Safety Council Networking Forum
Environment - Ìdentification of key environmental risks is part of the process of acquiring property such as new dealership sites. An
environmental assessment is performed.
Ìn addition, environmental features are considered for inclusion in new buildings or current property being renovated.
Downsizing etc:
Movement of Port Melbourne manufacturing operations to Altona manufacturing plant continued during 2005. This required investment
in new plant equipment. Value: Respect for people Principle 5. Foster a corporate culture that enhances individual creativity and
teamwork value, while honouring mutual trust and respect between labour and management. Considerable liaision was done with
employee representatives to understand and address employee issues and concerns such as redundancy, training for new positions. An
Action Learning Team comprising management and employees was established to support the consolidation process. After the
consolidation arrangements were announced, the ALT continues to manage and address employee issues and concerns. Value:
Continuous improvement Principle 3: Dedicate ourselves to providing clean and safe products and to enhancing the quality of life
everywhere through our activities. Environmental issues were also included and addressed as part of the consolidation of Altona and
Port Melbourne manufacturing elements. These issues were manged as part of Toyota's environmental management system and
environment improvement plan.
Research & DeveIopment etc:
Value: Continuous improvement Principle 4: Create and develop advanced technologies and provide outstanding products and services
that fulfil the needs of customers worldwide Toyota recognises that environmental technology is the future of the automotive industry
and ids regarded as a leader in developing this technology. Toyota is developing new technology such as Hybrid vehicles (Toyota
Prius), fuel cells and petrol engines with lower emissions such as VVTi technology (Variable Valve Timing).
Business partners etc:
Value: Respect for people 1. Honour the language and spirit of the law of every nation and undertake open and fair corporate activities
to be a good corporate citizen around the world. 2. Respect the culture and customs of every nation and contribute to economic and
social development through corporate activities in local communities. Corporate reputation is considered when selecting potential
community or business partners such as a supplier. A corporate reputation measure is on the corporate balanced scorecard Toyota also
applies environmental selection criteria to its supply chain and works with suppliers to encourage them to develop their own
Environmental Management System.
SeIection of pension fund managers etc:
Social - Pension fund trustees are trained each year in corporate governance and compliance issues. Same sex partners have pension
rights in the Toyota Superannuation fund, for example access to death benefits. Toyota's Superannuation Fund has its Australian
Prudential Regulatory Authority licence.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Supporting evidence is included in each answer above.
12 Training & DeveIopment
Has your company impIemented training and deveIopment programmes to support the integration of corporate responsibiIity
throughout the company?
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Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. no. of employees that receive training). Please select 0% if a statement does not
apply.
Our company provides:
0% 1 - 25% 26 - 50% 51 - 75% > 75%
Training on corporate
values
Training on business
principles
Training on business
conduct
Specific CR
training/briefing on
topics as they arise
e.g. disability,
environmental
legislation, etc.
NB: Placing information on the intranet does not qualify as 'training', unless there is a formal, interactive feedback/learning mechanism in place
that ensures uptake across the business.
PIease provide exampIes of your training programmes beIow, describing how they cover corporate responsibiIity issues.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota's induction training includes training on the Toyota Way and Toyota's Guiding Principles. Non-Award employees receive training
in Toyota's Code of Ethics (business conduct) and Award employees receive training on the Toyota Temawork Charter with the
Workplace Agreement (business conduct.)
Training and development needs are linked to the requirements of each position description. Position descriptions, roles and
responsibilities are linked to the balanced scorecard requirements.
Ìn addition Toyota has provided training on the following:
Code of Ethics
Toyota Way
Compliance Training
Workplace relations issues such as diversity
Environmental training - manufacturing employees, internal auditors, pilot green office program
Sustainability training - All employees have received some formal sustainability training the extent depends on their role in the company.
Toyota Leaders Program - A structured leadership program for all non-Award employees.
Corporate induction training
13 Senior Management and Board Members Training/Briefing
Do your senior managers and board members receive training/briefings to support their understanding of corporate responsibiIity
issues across the company?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. no. of senior managers and board members that receive training). Please select
0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Senior managers'
training/ development/
leadership courses or
forums cover relevant
corporate
responsibility issues
for the business
Board members
receive training on
relevant corporate
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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governance issues
Board members
receive training or
formal briefings that
cover relevant
corporate
responsibility issues
PIease cIarify who are considered to be 'senior managers' in your organisation, and provide exampIes of your training programmes
beIow, describing how they cover CR and corporate governance issues.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Training and development needs are linked to the requirements of each position description. Position descriptions, roles and
responsibilities are linked to the balanced scorecard requirements.
Ìn addition Toyota has provided training on the following:
Code of Ethics
Toyota Way
Compliance Training
Environmental training - manufacturing employees, internal auditors, pilot green office program
Sustainability training - All employees have received some formal sustainability training the extent depends on their role in the company.
Coverage of training programs
Training tailored to individual role: All
Toyota Leaders program - All
Ethics Training program - All
Toyota Way training - All
Toyota Leaders Program - A structured leadership program for all non-Award employees (includes training in Toyota Way).
Corporate induction training
Board Members have also received detailed training on governance and compliance issues. The Board has also received briefings on
community relations and environmental performance.
14 StakehoIder Engagement (CI)
Does your company activeIy invoIve its stakehoIders in shaping its views and responses on various aspects of corporate
responsibiIity?
Our company activeIy invoIves its stakehoIders:
(Please tick all that apply)
Community Environment MarketpIace WorkpIace
Ìn the identification of risks
and opportunities
Ìn the development of
policies
Ìn the identification and
monitoring of key
performance indicators
Ìn shaping our company
reporting of corporate
responsibility issues
PIease provide exampIes of how you have invoIved your stakehoIders in the different CR areas, outIining who the stakehoIders were
and how their views were taken into account.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
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Toyota participates in a range of Government, industry and community forums including Govt roundtables, Govt Sustainability
Committees, Federal Chamber of Automotive Ìndustries forums, business groups including Business Council Of Australia and VECCÌ
and community forums such as the RoadSafe Community Road Safety Council Networking Forum hosted by Toyota.
Community Liaison Committee - members include regulatory bodies and local residents. CLC developed TMCA's first Environment
Ìmprovement Plan launched in Dec 2003. Plan identifies risks and opportunities and sets measures and targets.Ìnitiatives include
environmental performance and community involvement. This plan is reviewed every two months by the Community Liaison
Committee.
See: www.environment.toyota.com.au for a copy of the Environment Ìmprovement Plan.
Toyota participates in annual reputation research. This research asks stakeholders how well we live up to our values. Toyota use the
Reputation Quotient tool as a means of benchmarking our reputation against our competitors and wider Australian industry peers.
Toyota Australia was ranked No1 in 2005. Action plans are developed to address risks and opportunities identified by the RQ research.
A corporate reputation measure is included on the corporate balanced scorecard. This measure is reviewed at least quarterly.
Toyota also participated in the inaugural Australian Corporate Responsibility Ìndex and the third CRÌ survey round.
TMCA's relationship with the Australian Manufacturing Workers Union is based on open communication and mutual respect. The AMWU
is the union representing the majority of TMCA employees. The current workplace agreement was recognised by the Ìndustrial Relations
Commission as a successful process for both employees and the company.
See also: Environment and Community Report 2006 pp19 and 25-30 Community and Stakeholder Engagement.
www.environment.toyota.com.au
15a Reporting
Does your company pubIicIy report its position on corporate responsibiIity issues?
No
Yes, our company publicly reports progress and performance across the CR agenda.
Our pubIic reports incIude the foIIowing (please tick all that apply):
Corporate context, e.g. an overview of the company's structure and operations, major products and/or services, geographic
Iocations etc.
The process used to identify and understand our key sociaI risks and opportunities.
The process used to identify and understand our key environmentaI risks/opportunities.
How the company has decided which environmentaI and sociaI issues to report on.
Report page/web-Iink:
Page 7 of the Environment and Community Report 2006 describes the use of the Balanced Scorecard Strategy Management System
A description of how the company is managing its key social and environmental risks, including:
Governance and management structure.
Monitoring and audit processes.
Report page/web-Iink:
Page 7 Environemnt and Community Report
A description of our approach to stakeholder engagement, including:
Identification of key stakehoIders.
How the company engages with key stakehoIders.
How the company responds to stakehoIder feedback.
Report page/web-Iink:
page 8 & 25- 30 Environment and Community Report
An independent opinion on the reliability and accuracy of information in the report, covering:
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
Page 22 //
Company activities.
The compIeteness, materiaIity and responsiveness of the report, and incIudes stakehoIders in the assurance process (e.g. AA1000
approach)
Report page/web-Iink:
Page 31 Environemnt and Community Report
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
TMCA is not a public company and does not produce an Annual Report. However, it voluntarily produces an Environment and
Community Report.
See: TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006
Report and more information available on www.environment.toyota.com.au
More information about Toyota Australia available on www.toyota.com.au - See: Corporate Section under About Toyota.
SWOT analysis for risks and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions more
frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
Ìn addition, company information such as significant milestones or community activities are released as media statements or as
speeches at special events.
Toyota Australia has published on its website its response to the first,second and third CRÌ and both confidential feedback reports. This
covers some of this material.
Page 7 of the Environment and Community Report 2006 describes the use of the Balanced Scorecard Strategy Management System to
translate long term goals and values into specific, measurable and rewardable annual commitments. A key tool in the annual BSC
process is Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) which specifically asks all Operating Arms, Divisions and
Departments to specifically consider strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to TMCA being a Good Corporate Citizen. Ìssues
and opportunities identified during this process drive root cause analysis which then drive Objectives, Measures and Targets; all of
which are managed through the Online Balanced Scorecard, using the Plan Do Check Act (PDCA) cycle - which then informs the next
round of business planning.
15b Scope of Reporting (CI)
Does your company's reporting on corporate responsibiIity cover the foIIowing eIements?
Please tick all that apply:
Description of key
issues
Key performance
data
Progress against
targets
Third party
independent
statement covers
data assurance
DiscIosures account
for > 75% operations
Community
Environment
Marketplace - supply
chain
Marketplace -
customers/consumers
Workplace -
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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occupational, health
and safety
Workplace -
employee issues
In support of your answers, pIease indicate reIevant report pages/web-Iinks beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Australia has published on its website its survey response to the CRÌ and its confidential feedback report.
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles
Toyota Australia is not a public company and does not produce an annual report. An annual TMCA Environment and Community
Report is produced.
www.environment.toyota.com.au
Community partnership performance against objectives and targets is also published on www.toyota.com.au.
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1610%2526sectionÌd%253D230,00.html
Other corporate information is provided on the company website.
www.toyota.com.au in Corporate Section of About Toyota
Toyota and the other local car manufacturers and importers participate in market research on customer purchase intention and other
customer issues. Results are shared within the industry but cannot be shared with external parties. For example, companies cannot
base advertising campaigns or news releases on the results.
Toyota also shares high level OHS results with govt and regulatory authorities as well as the unions and employee representatives.
Workplace issues: Diversity reporting
Toyota was invited by the Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations, Kevin Andrews to participate in the Employer Roundtable
for People with disabilities and the development of the Employer Demand Action Plan in 2005.
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Community (CI)
16 Key Issues
Definition
Community relates to the interface between business and society, which can be both positively or negatively affected by a project, product or
investment on a local or global level. A community is a group of individuals bound by a common experience who affect, or are affected by, the
business operations. As such, a community may be bound by geographic proximity (city, town, local neighbourhoods), historical relationship
(partners/recipients of corporate investment activities) or common characteristic (ethnicity, gender, disability etc).
What are your company's key community issues, i.e. your business risks and opportunities that either affect or are affected by your
'significant' community stakehoIders, and how do these reIate to community needs/concerns?
The number of issues will not be scored, but please refer to them in your community responses throughout your submission. Please list at least
three key issues in order of priority.
Key Issue 1
Issue
Corporate reputation- Maintaining good relationships with community stakeholders
Business risk/opportunity
Building and maintaining relationhips with external stakeholders such as governments, regulators,other agencies and the community to
ensure continued support of manufacturing and sales operations
ReIevant community need or concern
Certainty that TMCA is operating legally, ethically and consistent with community values while providing products and services that meet
the market's needs and expectations
Key Issue 2
Issue
Good neighbour in local community
Business risk/opportunity
Build and maintain transparent and cooperative channels with local stakeholders to provide ongoing support to business operations and
employees who live in the region
ReIevant community need or concern
Certainty that TMCA is contributing to the local community as a valued commercial, social and environmental operation
Key Issue 3
Issue
Partnering with local councils and not for profit organisations
Business risk/opportunity
Develop pro-active, mutually beneficial partnerships with key stakeholders
ReIevant community need or concern
Certainty that TMCA is contributing to the local community as a valued commercial, social and environmental operation
Key Issue 4
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Issue
Ìdentifying community needs and matching to business objectives
Business risk/opportunity
Development of effective Community program that addresses key community need through partnering programs such as Toyota
Community Spirit
ReIevant community need or concern
Certainty that TMCA is contributing to the local community as a valued commercial, social and environmental operation
Key Issue 5
Issue
Employee development and morale through community programs
Business risk/opportunity
Build awarenss and cross participation in TMCA's community engagement activities supporting reputation and professional and
personal development
ReIevant community need or concern
Developing a motivated, engaged skilled workforce
What methodoIogy has your company used to determine the above Key Issues?
This question is scored. Please select one statement:
Issues reviewed in response to the Index process, not connected with any formaI review process.
Issues reviewed in response to the Index process, but incorporating a cross-functionaI review process.
Issues identified as part of a reguIar formaI risk evaIuation process (pIease see Q5).
Issues identified as part of a reguIar formaI risk evaIuation process, and community needs/concerns identified through diaIogue
with our significant community stakehoIders.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis for risks and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions more
frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
17 Strategy
Has your company deveIoped a strategy to address the community issues you have identified in Question 16?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc.)
Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Our community
strategy addresses
SOME of our
business risks and
opportunities.
Our community
strategy addresses
ALL of our key
business risks and
opportunities.
Our community
strategy is reviewed
and updated at least
annually
Our community
strategy is in the
public domain*
NB: Rows 1 and 2 are no longer mutually exclusive - please treat SOME as a subset of ALL.
(For example, if your strategy addresses all of your issues across the entire business, please tick >75% in both rows).
*If your community strategy is in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page/web-Iink beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Community Spirit is Toyota's corporate citizenship strategy. Ìt provides opportunities for Toyota employees and dealers to
participate in issues important to the Australian community. The program includes national and state community partnerships, local
community programs and an employee volunteer program.
· Toyota Environment and Community Report 2006
· www.environment.toyota.com.au > Community and Stakeholders
See also www.toyota.com.au
See Toyota Community Spirit under Corporate in About Toyota.
Senior Executive Management Committee Meeting (TMCA Board) 15 Feb 2006- Toyota Community Spirit Paper
18 Integration
Has the deveIopment of your community strategy incIuded a review of the foIIowing key business activities?
Please tick all that apply and provide examples accordingly.
EmpIoyment - e.g. empIoying from a IocaI area or disadvantaged groups
ExampIe:
Opportunities for employee training and development, such as off-site pro bono placements
Sourcing/ purchasing - e.g. IocaI sourcing, sourcing from disadvantaged communities (disabIed, ethnic minorities etc.)
ExampIe:
Sourcing/purchasing: part of overall business strategy of sourcing local content for Camry and Aurion
Product and service deveIopment, use and deIivery - e.g. sociaI incIusion, improved access to products essentiaI for
socio-economic deveIopment (e.g. pharmaceuticaI drugs, financiaI education, water, gas, eIectricity), improved physicaI access for
peopIe with speciaI needs (e.g. wheeIchair access etc.)
ExampIe:
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Toyota globally is developing vehicles with improved physical access. Toyota Australia is seeking to bring these products to market in
Australia. Toyota Australia is working to address perceptions of disability by working with the Australian Paralympics Committee and
other relevant bodies.
FaciIities' siting and management - e.g. deveIopments in underserved or emerging communities
ExampIe:
Programs and projects are tailored to needs of local community especially Hobsons Bay and Port Phillip
FinaciaI investment and fiscaI contributions - e.g. investing a portion of a company's cash on a short or Iong term basis in various
investment vehicIes that have community benefits
ExampIe:
Toyota Community Spirit is the investment vehicle used by Toyota Australia to invest in initiatives that deliver community benefits.
Corporate Community Investment - e.g. empIoyee voIunteering, donations etc.
ExampIe:
Full range of in-kind opportunities considered when developing partnerships and projects under Community Spirit program.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Community Spirit is Toyota's corporate citizenship program. Ìt provides opportunities for Toyota employees and dealers to
participate in issues important to the Australian community and Toyota Australia. The program includes national and state community
partnerships, local community programs (particularly in the communities where there are major Toyota Australia sites) and an employee
volunteer program.
Toyota Community Spirit aims to create multifaceted partnerships that provide more than just funding or brand recognition. Partnerships
aim to meet the business objectives or statements of purpose of Toyota and our community partners.
· Toyota Environment and Community Report 2006 www.environment.toyota.com.au > Community and Stakeholders
See also www.toyota.com.au
See Toyota Community Spirit under Corporate in About Toyota.
Board Meeting 15 Feb 2006- Toyota Community Spirit paper
Corporate community investment: refer to TMCA Environmental and Community Report 2006, p.25- 30 'Community Engagement
19 Targets
Definition
Management targets are the detailed management requirements that have been developed by a company in order to manage a particular area.
These are set in order to achieve objectives.
Has your company deveIoped management targets to impIement the community strategy covered in Question 17?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc.)
Please select "0%" if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Our community
management targets
reflect SOME of our
key business risks/
opportunities.
Our community
management targets
reflect ALL of our key
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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business risks/
opportunities.
Targets are reviewed
and updated at least
annually.
Targets are in the
public domain.
NB: Rows 1 and 2 are no longer mutually exclusive - please treat SOME as a subset of ALL.
(For example, if your targets reflect all of your community risks/opportunities across the entire business, please tick >75% in both rows).
PIease provide exampIes of your targets. If these are in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Community involvement is an objective on the Corporate Services Operating Arm balanced scorecard. Each BSC objective has
measures and targets which are reviewed quarterly to ensure progress is being made and that the measures and targets are
appropriate.
Toyota Community Spirit was developed in a business framework to provide opportunities for Toyota to participate in issues important to
the Australian community and Toyota Australia.
Evaluation criteria is developed for each community partnership agreement. Ìmplementation of partnership activities is reported publicly,
for example in the annual Community and Environment Report. See pp27- 28 for performance against key focus areas in 2006.
Partnerships are evaluated formally each year and adjusted in response to new requirements or recommendations from the evaluation
reports.
Performance against individual partnership objectives and targets is published on www.toyota.com.au
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1610%2526sectionÌd%253D230,00.html
20 Community Programme
Definition
A community programme is the means of delivering the community strategy. It describes the specific means of enabling employees (including
contractors) to achieve the company's community objectives and targets. This involves internal communication, training and assignment of clear
responsibilities within job descriptions. The programme should also include a strategy for engaging relevant community partners.
Does your company have programmes in pIace to impIement your community strategy and targets?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by no. of employees).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our community programme:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Ìncludes internal
communication and
dialogue with
employees on our
community related
activities.
Assigns people with
specific
responsibilities for
community issues.
Provides relevant
training to those with
specific community
responsibilities.
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List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Employee and dealer participation are key elements of Toyota Community Spirit. Each community partnership or local program project
is developed to ensure there are opportunities for employees to participate in Toyota Community Spirit. Opportunities to participate are
promoted to employees via internal communication mechanisms such as face to face briefings, intranet or newsletters such as Toyota
Today.
Ìn addition, the activities of the Altona Community Liaison Committee are communicated via internal newsletters and CLC visits to
different areas of the Plant.
There is a community involvement initiative on the Corporate Services Operating Arm Balanced Scorecard. Balanced Scorecard
objectives, measures and targets are cascaded through Operating Arms, Divisions and Departments to the individual. Employee
performance measurement and reward and recognition systems are linked to the achievement of balanced scorecard objectives.
Training and development needs are also linked to the requirements of each position description. Position descriptions, roles and
responsibilities are linked to the balanced scorecard requirements.
21 Monitoring
Definition
Monitoring is the process of regularly collecting information to check performance against your company objectives.
Is there a monitoring process in pIace to review the impIementation of your community strategy and its effectiveness in addressing
your key issues?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by no. of employees.)
Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Reviews take place at
local business level.
Review findings are
reported centrally.
We can demonstrate
how the reviews have
resulted in action for
improvement or
replication of a
successful activity.
We can produce a
third party
independent
statement* indicating
the company's
effectiveness in
implementing our
community strategy.
* If you have seIected the Iast row, pIease provide a copy of the independent statement or, if it is in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate
report page or direct web-Iink beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Regular meetings are held with communitypartners to monitor progress against measures and targets identified in each partnership
agreement. An evaluation report is prepared for each partnership annually.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards that are
updated monthly and/or quarterly.
See assurance statement:
p31 2006 Environment and Community Report
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Environment (EI)
22 Key Issues
Definition
Environment is the world's ecosystems and natural resources that can be directly and indirectly affected by a company's operations, products
and services.
What are the key environmentaI issues (risks and opportunities) for your company?
Please note that this question provides an indication of the issues that affect your company, and will not be scored. However, the methodology
you have used to identify these issues will be scored.
Please list in order of priority and complete the rest of this section in relation to the issues identified below.
Key Issue 1
Resource efficiency (energy)
Key Issue 2
Resource efficiency (water)
Key Issue 3
Emissions from plant (VOC)
Key Issue 4
Recycling (waste reduction)
Key Issue 5
Emissions from vehicle
What methodoIogy has your company used to determine the above risks/opportunities?
Review of issues carried out as a specific response to the Index process, and not connected with any formaI internaI review
process.
Review of issues carried out as a specific response to the Index process, but incorporating a cross functionaI review process.
ReguIar environmentaI risk assessment (pIease see question 5), and/or formaI environmentaI impact review, which covers the
whoIe of the business.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis for key risks and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions
more frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
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that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.12, 'Vehicle lifecycle diagram' and key environmental highlights pp9- 10
www.environment.toyota.com.au
23 Objectives
Definition
Environmental objectives are the overall goals arising from the environmental policy, that an organisation sets itself and which are quantified
where practicable [Source: BS EN ISO 14001/EMAS]
Does your company have corporate environmentaI objectives?
No
Yes, our company:
Is deveIoping environmentaI objectives that refIect its significant environmentaI impacts and can confirm statements A and B.
Has set environmentaI objectives that refIect its significant environmentaI impacts and can confirm statements A, B and C.
For C, pIease state how often:
Has set environmentaI objectives that refIect its significant environmentaI impacts and can confirm ALL of the statements beIow.
For C, pIease state how often:
TMCA objectives are reviewed annually, and performance against targets is measured monthly.
For D, pIease indicate page of report or exact web address:
See TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006 pp3-4
QuaIifying Statements
A.Our company can demonstrate how objectives are being developed (e.g. aspects and impacts register, discussion paper to the board,
correspondence, etc.)
B.Our company can demonstrate how its significant impacts were selected.
C.Our company's objectives are reviewed and updated regularly.
D.Our company's objectives are in the public domain and we produce regular progress reports.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis for risks and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions more
frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific,
objectives, measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards that are
updated monthly and/or quarterly.
Environmental objectives are cascaded from the corporate scorecard through the operating arm to the division, from the division to the
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department level and then to individual personal scorecards.
Objectives and targets are published in the annual Environment and Community Report.
pp3-4 Key environmental and community highlights
Australia Ltd, Environment and Community Report 2006
see: www.environment.toyota.com.au
24 Targets
Definition
Environmental management targets are the detailed performance requirements, which arise from the environmental objectives and which need
to be met in order to achieve those objectives. Targets should ideally apply the SMART principle, namely they should be Specific, Measurable,
Attainable, Relevant and have a Time scale [Source: BS EN ISO 14001/EMAS/EPE Executive Briefing]
Has your company set corporate environmentaI management targets (or targets for each of its strategic business units), arising from
your environmentaI objectives?
No
Yes, our company:
Is in the process of deveIoping corporate environmentaI management targets, and can confirm statement A.
Has set corporate environmentaI management targets, and can confirm the statements A and B.
ExampIe of a corporate management target (incIuding time scaIes):
Has set both management and performance targets in order to reduce our environmentaI impacts, and can confirm statements A, B,
C, D and E.
ExampIe of a corporate management target (incIuding time scaIes):
ExampIe of a corporate performance target (incIuding time scaIes):
Has set both management and performance targets in order to reduce our environmentaI impacts, and can confirm ALL of the
statements beIow.
PIease indicate where corporate environmentaI management targets are in the pubIic domain, and where progress against them is
reported pubIicIy (report page/web-Iink):
See: 2006 Environment and Community Report
PIease indicate where corporate environmentaI performance targets are in the pubIic domain, and where progress against them is
reported pubIicIy (report page/web-Iink):
See: 2006 Environment and Community Report
QuaIifying Statements
Our company can:
A. Demonstrate how management targets are being developed.
B. Produce a summary of corporate environmental management targets.
C. Show that management and performance targets have been set to reflect the significance of the business's environmental impacts.
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D. Demonstrate that processes are in place to regularly review and refine management and performance targets.
E. Produce a brief summary of corporate performance targets.
F. Show where performance against targets is reported publicly.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Motor Corporation Australia Ltd Environment and Community Report 2006 (whole document; specifically pp.9-10 and
17-18)www.environment.toyota.com.au
25 EmpIoyee EnvironmentaI Programme
Definition
An employee programme describes the specific means of enabling employees (including contractors) to achieve environmental objectives and
targets. It includes a description of the measures taken or envisaged to achieve such objectives and, where appropriate, the deadlines set for
implementation of such measures. Employee programme refers here to internal communication, training and assignment of responsibilities in
job descriptions [Source: EMAS]
Does your company have an empIoyee environmentaI programme?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees,etc.)
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Provides internal
communication of
environmental issues
to ensure general
environmental
awareness
Assigns people with
specific environmental
responsibilities
Provides relevant
environmental training
to those with specific
environmental
responsibilities
Consults employees
(as internal
stakeholders) on
environmental issues
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Employee Consultation mechanisms:
Employee participation in risk identification and target setting as part of Balanced Scorecard process
Divisional Environmental Committees
Ìmprovement Ìdeas scheme in Manufacturing- 2005 TEMS Award (See Report p17- 20)
1. 'Toyota Today' publication
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au
3. Environment and Community Report 2006 p5
There is an environmental initiative on the Corporate Services Operating Arm Balanced Scorecard. Balanced Scorecard objectives,
measures and targets are cascaded through Operating Arms, Divisions and Departments to the individual. Employee performance
measurement and reward and recognition systems are linked to the achievement of balanced scorecard objectives. Training and
development needs are also linked to the requirements of each position description. Position descriptions, roles and responsibilities are
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linked to the balanced scorecard requirements.
26 Communication with ExternaI StakehoIders
Definition
'Stakeholders' are those who either affect, or are affected by, the activities of a company. They include customers and consumers, lenders and
insurers, investors and analysts, government, regulators, local communities, NGOs, the media, and suppliers. Regular environmental
communication ranges here from the periodic provision of information to full-scale dialogue with stakeholders [Source: UNEP/IEPAC, Technical
Report No.24].
Does your company communicate with the foIIowing groups specificaIIy about environmentaI impact issues?
Please indicate your company's level of communication with ALL of the stakeholder groups below, selecting only one column for each
stakeholder group:
LittIe or no
communication
One-way communication Two-way communication
(TaiIored)
Two-way communication
(DiaIogue)
Customers and/or
Consumers
Financial (Lenders /
insurers)
Financial (Ìnvestors /
analysts)
Government and/or
Regulators
Local communities
NGOs and/or Media
Key Suppliers/Contractors
NB: DiaIogue goes beyond taiIored communication. Ìt is an interactive process with the company actively seeking and receiving
opinion/involvement of stakeholders before decisions are made.
If diaIogue is indicated, pIease provide exampIes beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Customers/consumers: e.g. Fleet conferences and forums, dealership customer feedback
Financial lenders/insurers: As part of our risk management process, insurers are involved in two way dialogue with Toyota Australia.
This is covered in the publication: Managing Risks and Opportunities at Toyota and in the Risk Assessment Process and Tools.
Financial (investors/analysts): TMCA is not publicly listed in Australia but parent company Toyota Motor Corporation is the Dow Jones
Sustainability Ìndex automotive leader and is the sole shareholder in Toyota Australia. TMC places specific environmental criteria on
each Toyota affiliate and there is frequent two way communication (dialogue) between TMC and Toyota Australia.
Govt/Regulators/Community/NGOs - Altona Community Liaison Committee
Community - Participation in community activities through Toyota Community Spirit eg partnership with Conservation Volunteers
Australia
Govt/NGOs: Participation in roundtables/forums
Online feedback website: www.environment.toyota.com.au
Websites are backed by the annual Community and Environment Report and the corporate brochure. Media releases are also prepared
for significant company milestones.
Supplier forums - formal (such as Toyota Suppliers' Annual Conference, supplier network meetings - sub groups meet at least 6 times
per year - and informal meetings
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27 EnvironmentaI Management System
Definition
An environmental management system is the part of the overall management system which includes the organisational structure,
responsibilities, practices, procedures, processes and resources for determining and implementing the environmental policy [source: EMAS].
Does your company have an environmentaI management system (EMS)?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, environmental risk, etc). Please tick 0% if a
statement does not apply.
Our company:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has an EMS in place,
which covers our
significant
environmental
impacts, and has
identified individuals
responsible for the
EMS.
Has an EMS, which
has been
independently
assessed/ assured*.
Has an EMS in place,
which has been
externally certified to
ÌSO 14001 (or EMAS,
or equivalent standard
- please specify
below).
NB: Ìndependent assessment may include a formal review by an independent internal audit department or external, third party verifiers.
*If you have ticked row 2, pIease indicate the independent assessor/ assurer beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Toyota Environment Management Systems at the Altona and Port Melbourne sites are subject to regular internal and external
audits to ensure Toyota maintains its ÌSO 14001 accreditation. Altona and Port Melbourne account for more than 75% of Toyota
Australia's environmental risk.
TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, pp.17- 20
www.environment.toyota.com.au
28 Audit
Definition
An internal environmental audit process is a management tool comprising a systematic, documented, periodic and objective evaluation of the
performance of the management system and processes designed to protect the environment. It can be carried out either internally or by an
independent consultant.
Is there an internaI environmentaI audit process in pIace in your company?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc.)
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has an internal
environmental audit
process in place
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Can demonstrate how
the audits resulted in
action for
improvement
Can produce an
independent third
party verification
statement, indicating
the effectiveness of
the environmental
audit system*
*NB: Third party verification need not take place annually, but should be periodic and provide a level of confidence that the internal audit process
is robust, independent and objective.
If you have ticked row 3, pIease provide a copy of the verification statement.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Ìnternal audit processes are performed by 30 independant registered internal auditors.
See: TMCA Environment and Community Report 2005 17- 20p www.environment.toyota.com.au
The Toyota Environmental Management System at Altona and Port Melbourne are subject to regular internal and external audits to
ensure Toyota maintains ÌSO 14001 accreditation. Ìn 2005 external surveillance audits found no non-conformances and both sites
maintained their certification.
Ìndependent 3rd party verification statement - see back cover of TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006
www.environment.toyota.com.au
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MarketpIace (compIete 29, 31 & 32 and seIect two out of 30, 33-37)
29 Key Issues
PIease compIete ALL of questions 29, 31 and 32 and TWO questions from 30, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37.
Definition
Corporate responsibility in the marketplace is about how companies manage business, consumer and supplier relationships, from product
development to sourcing, buying, marketing, selling and promotion of products and services. It also relates to how companies influence the rules
of the marketplace in which they operate.
What are the key issues (risks and opportunities) for your company reIating to deveIoping, purchasing, seIIing and marketing of your
products or services?
Please note that this question provides an indication of the issues that affect your company, and will not be scored. However, the methodology
you have used to identify these issues will be scored. Please list in order of priority and complete the rest of this section in relation to the key
issues identified below.
Key Issue 1
Customer service and satisfaction
Key Issue 2
Ìncreased globalisation of marketplace
Key Issue 3
Product quality and safety
Key Issue 4
Responsibilities to suppliers and business partners such as fostering improved environmental performance
Key Issue 5
Accuracy of marketing material and compliance with advertising standards
What methodology has your company used to determine the above risks/opportunities?
Review of issues as a specific response to the Index process not connected with any formaI internaI review process
Review of issues as a specific response to the Index process incorporating a cross functionaI review process
Risk/opportunities derived from a reguIar formaI risk review process (pIease see question 5)
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis of key issues and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions
more frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
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Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
30 SociaI Stewardship of Core Products and Services
OPTIONAL - can be chosen as one of two additional Marketplace questions.
Definition
Social stewardship means considering and influencing the social impacts that arise directly or indirectly from a company's products, processes
or services, from their development, use and disposal.
Has your company conducted an assessment of the negative and positive sociaI impacts of your core products and services across
the business?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
We have conducted
an assessment of the
negative and positive
social impacts of our
core
products/services,
from their
development/design,
delivery, use and
disposal, on our
consumers or on
society in general.
We have taken action
to reduce the negative
impacts and enhance
the positive impacts
identified.
We can provide
examples where the
social impact of our
products has
influenced our
strategic decision
making process.
We undertake regular
engagement with our
company's key
stakeholders (or
representative
organisations) during
the development of
our products and
services.
31 EnvironmentaI Stewardship of Products, Processes and Services (EI)
MANDATORY - this question must be answered to complete the Marketplace section
Definition
Environmental stewardship means considering and influencing the environmental impacts that arise directly or indirectly from a company's
products, processes or services, from their development, use and disposal.
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Does your company practice environmentaI stewardship?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has introduced more
environmentally
responsible products,
processes and/or
services.
Has influenced
customers to use our
products and/or
services in a more
responsible manner.
Has formally
confirmed
environmental
stewardship as a
corporate requirement
(i.e. there is a formal
company commitment
to reduce the
environmental impact
of its processes,
products and/or
services).
Can provide
examples of how
environmental
considerations have
influenced our
strategic decision
making.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.13 Design and Development: Vehicle recyclability & resource use, fuel
consumption, new technology such as the Hybrid Prius, increasing customer demand for cleaner vehicles (TMCA Environment and
Community Report 2006)
TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.15, Supply Chain and Purchasing eg Supplier Environmental Management Policy
The TMCA Sustainability Cross-Functional Committee influences strategic decision making by providing recommendations to the TMCA
Board on sustainability issues.
Environmental leadership is included in the President's Goals. The goals are the basis of the Long Term Business Plan. Specific
objectives, measures and targets are defined for each Operating Arm, and Division.
32 EnvironmentaI SuppIier Programme (EI)
MANDATORY - this question must be answered to complete the Marketplace section
Definition
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An environmental supplier programme refers to the integration of environmental factors into the purchasing process of an organisation. It can
take the form of information exchange, help and encouragement to suppliers, and co-stewardship agreements.
In this context, suppliers are defined as those companies that have been assessed and prioritised on the basis of potential business
risk/opportunity or environmental risk criteria due to their product or process, e.g. volume of business, value to business or some form of
environmental risk criteria.
Has your company impIemented an environmentaIIy focused suppIier programme?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by supplier spend, turnover, etc. but for final 5 rows use % of prioritised
suppliers). Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company -
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has a policy that
includes
environmental
procurement criteria,
is approved by the
board and is reviewed
at least annually.
Has made the policy
available in the public
domain*.
Has identified people
with key supply chain
responsibilities and
included
environmental
objectives within their
job descriptions.
Has provided relevant
people with training
on environmental
supply chain issues.
Has a risk and
opportunity
assessment process
to priortise its key
suppliers and
contractors, or the
products and services
procured, on the basis
of environmental
criteria.
Requires prioritised
suppliers and
contractors to provide
information on their
environmental
practices and
performance.
Supports prioritised
suppliers and
contractors to help
them improve their
environmental
practices and
performance.
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Can confirm that
performance of
prioritised suppliers
and contractors is
reviewed on a regular
basis.
Actively encourages
suppliers and
contractors to
implement the above
principles down their
own supply chain.
* PIease attach your poIicy. If it is in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page or web-Iink:
http://partner.toyota.com.au/index.html
In support of your answers, pIease provide exampIes of how your company:
Requires prioritised suppIiers and contractors to provide information on their environmentaI practices and performance (Row 6):
See above - and also pg. 15- 16 , Environment and Community Report2006
Supports prioritised suppIiers and contractors to heIp them improve their environmentaI practices and performance (Row 7):
See above - and also pg. 15- 16 , Environment and Community Report 2006
ReguIarIy reviews prioritised suppIiers and contractors' performance (Row 8):
P. 16 2006 report- Waste management service provider- Collex serice agreement with Toyota requires weekly, monthly and quartery
waste reports that include recommendations for improvement-
ActiveIy encourages suppIiers and contractors to impIement the above principIes down their own suppIy chain (Row 9):
See above - and also pg. 15- 16 , Environment and Community Report 2006
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Supplier Environmental Management Policy categorises suppliers according to their degree of environmental impact and specifies
the timeframe for attaining each of the five levels of the policy. Toyota provides support to encourage suppliers to improve their
environmental performance and to continue this approach down their supply chain. This is done via Supplier forums, Supplier
environmental award, site visits (related to EMS auditing) Toyota has a Global Action Plan to remove 4 substances of concern (lead,
mercury, cadmium and hexavalent chromium) from our vehicles by 2007. This means working with our supply chain to identify where in
the chain these substances occur and possible alternative materials.
TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.15-16, Supply Chain and Purchasing: Supplier Environmental Management,
Supplier Environmental Management Policy
www.environment.toyota.com.au
Supplier website: http://partner.toyota.com.au/index.html
Suppliers are encouraged to foster environmental responsibility in their supply chain by sharing the knowledge they have gained
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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working with Toyota Australia on improving their own environmental systems and processes.
33 SociaI SuppIier Programme
OPTIONAL- can be chosen as one of two additional Marketplace questions.
Definition
A supplier programme refers to the integration of social factors into the purchasing process of an organisation. It can take the form of information
exchange, help and encouragement to suppliers, and co-stewardship agreements.
In this context, suppliers are defined as those companies that have been assessed and prioritised on the basis of potential business
risk/opportunity or social risk criteria due to their product, service or process e.g. volume of business, value to business or some form of social
risk criteria.
Has your company impIemented a sociaIIy focused suppIier programme?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by supplier spend, turnover, etc. but for final 5 rows use % of prioritised
suppliers). Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company -
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has a policy, which
includes social
procurement criteria,
is approved by the
board and is reviewed
at least annually.
Has made the
procurement policy
available in the public
domain*.
Has identified people
with key supply chain
responsibilities and
has included social
objectives within their
job descriptions.
Has provided relevant
people with training
on social, labour
rights and OHS
supply chain issues
(as relevant).
Has a risk and
opportunity
assessment process
to prioritise its key
suppliers and
contractors, or the
products and services
procured on the basis
of social criteria.
Requires prioritised
suppliers and
contractors to provide
information on their
social practices and
performance (as
relevant).
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Supports prioritised
suppliers and
contractors to help
them improve their
social practices and
performance.
Can confirm that
performance of
prioritised suppliers
and contractors is
reviewed on a regular
basis.
Actively encourages
suppliers and
contractors implement
the above principles
down their own supply
chain.
Reviews our
treatment of suppliers
to ensure that we
treat them equitably
and fairly.
* PIease attach your poIicy. If it is in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page or web-Iink:
In support of your answers, pIease provide exampIes of how your company:
Requires prioritised suppIiers and contractors to provide information on their sociaI practices and performance (Row 6):
Supports prioritised suppIiers and contractors to heIp them improve their sociaI practices and performance (Row 7):
ReguIarIy reviews prioritised suppIiers and contractors' performance (Row 8):
ActiveIy encourages suppIiers and contractors to impIement the above principIes down their own suppIy chain (Row 9):
34 ResponsibIe SeIIing
OPTIONAL - can be chosen as one of two additional Marketplace questions.
Definition
Responsibility in selling refers to the adherence of codes and application of ethical and moral standards in the pricing, distribution and selling of
your products and services.
Does your company practice responsibIe behaviour in the seIIing of your products and services?
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees). Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has reviewed our
selling practices to
identify areas of
concern.
Has developed a
statement of
principles on the
selling/mis-selling of
our products and
services.
Has a mechanism in
place to collect
information on our
selling/mis-selling
practices that could
have a material
impact on our
business.
Uses these
mechanisms to inform
our decision-making
process.
Provides training to
staff, intermediaries
and agents with
responsibilities for
selling our products
and services to
ensure they are not
mis-sold.
Has some form of
independent
monitoring process to
ensure that our
employees and
intermediaries do not
mis-sell our products
or services.
Has not been
prosecuted for
mis-selling practices
in the last year.
PIease provide a copy of your statement of principIes on seIIing/mis-seIIing. If it is in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page or
web-Iink beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Code of Ethics includes a statement of duty of the company to its customers. Ìt covers issues like product quality, maintaining and
promoting ethical business standards, acting honestly and obeying the law. Ìn addition, Sales and Marketing staff have been trained in
how the Toyota Way applies in Sales and Marketing activities.
Toyota Australia also participates in industry-wide customer satisfaction research. As well as product related information, this research
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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also seeks feedback on the customers's expereince of the sales and service activity in the dealership.
Toyota Australia also has a toll-free Customer Relations number for customer to provide feedback.
The Corporate Compliance program is the means to manage the selling/miss-selling practices of the business that could have an impact
on the business. Non-conformances or opportunities to improve are identified as part of the Plan, Do, Check, Act cycle and may also be
included as initiatives on the Balanced Scorecard. For example, the Customer First project is based on opportunties identified as part of
the Customer Satisfaction Research.
We train dealership staff on the features of each model introduced to the market, to ensure that communication with customers at the
dealership level is accurate.
35 ResponsibIe Marketing
OPTIONAL - can be chosen as one of two additional Marketplace questions.
Definition
Responsibility in marketing refers to the adherence to codes and the application of ethical and moral standards in the marketing of company
brands, products and services, including advertising, communication, promotion, sponsorship, public relations, customer service, etc.
Does your company practice responsibIe marketing of your products and services?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has reviewed our
marketing practices
and is prioritising our
activities in this area
for action.
Has processes in
place to ensure that
marketing of our
products and services
adheres to the
principles of legal,
decent, honest and
truthful
Has a reporting
mechanism to collect
information on
marketing practices
which could have a
material impact for
our business, and to
ensure they align with
our corporate values
Uses these
mechanisms to inform
the decision making
process
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Valid System is an internal review process to ensure accuracy of marketing, promotional and advertising information with a specific
focus on matters including compliance and governance, industry codes of practice and trade practices legislation. Ìt is the means to
ensure materials are not released without being approved for policy and fact.
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Toyota has implemented a company-wide compliance program - Both the Toyota sales and marketing team as well as the
suppliers/agencies that support the team have received training in compliance issues especially in relation to the Trade Practices Act
and the voluntary automotive industry advertising code.
Toyota to participates in the industry wide ARMS research. This provides industry wide information on purchase intent and other
customer issues. Ìn addition, market research is conducted to identify customer trends and measure the impact of advertising
campaigns.
Opportunities or risks identified are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
36 InfIuencing the RuIes of the MarketpIace
OPTIONAL - can be chosen as one of two additional Marketplace questions.
Definition
Influencing the rules of the marketplace refers to the way in which companies formally and informally seek to influence the nature of the rules
that govern the market. Within this context we are interested in the approach a company takes to influence public policy through lobbying, and
the extent to which they are transparent about their practices.
Does your company's Iobbying aIign with its CR vaIues and princpIes?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company -
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Has a policy covering
corporate lobbying.
Has made the policy
available in the public
domain.
Publicly reports its
position on the issues
it lobbies on.
Publicly reports how it
decides which
lobbying positions to
disclose.
Monitors its lobbying
positions to ensure
they are in line with
the company's CR
values and principles.
PIease provide a copy of your poIicy on corporate Iobbying. If it is in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
If you pubIicIy report your Iobbying positions (Row 3), or how you decide which positions to discIose (Row 4), pIease indicate report
page or direct web-Iink:
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37 Business Behaviour Where LegisIation is Absent or Not Enforced
OPTIONAL - can be chosen as one of two additional Marketplace questions.
How does your company operate in countries where minimum IegisIative standards (e.g. environmentaI, Iabour or consumer issues)
are absent or poorIy enforced?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company -
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Requires its business
units to meet
minimum legal
requirements
Has a policy
statement or code
determining how we
operate in the
absence of minimum
legislation/
enforcement
Has made the policy
statement or code
available in the public
domain
Has established
standards for our
operations, which are
higher than local legal
requirements
Engages with
governments to help
raise local minimum
standards or support
better enforcement of
legislation, where
these are below
internationally
recognised norms
PIease provide a copy of your poIicy on how to operate in the absence of minimum IegisIation or enforcement. If this is in the pubIic
domain, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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WorkpIace
38 Key Issues
Definition
Workplace is the environment into which individuals are recruited and developed both professionally and personally with full entitlement to
employment rights.
What are the key empIoyee reIated issues (risks and opportunities) for your company?
Please note that this question provides an indication of the issues that affect your company, and will not be scored. However, the methodology
you have used to identify these issues will be scored. Please list in order of priority andcomplete the rest of this section in relation to the key
issues identified below.
Key Issue 1
Workplace relations
Key Issue 2
Health and safety
Key Issue 3
Attracting and retaining staff
Key Issue 4
Career development and training
Key Issue 5
Diversity
What methodoIogy has your company used to determine the above risks/opportunities?
Review of issues as a specific response to the Index process not connected with any formaI internaI review process
Review of issues as a specific response to the Index process incorporating a cross functionaI review process
Risk/opportunities derived from a reguIar formaI risk review process (pIease see question 5)
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis for key risks and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions
more frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
39 Objectives
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Definition
Corporate workplace objectives are the overall goals of the organisation arising from any workplace policies, mission statements or corporate
values/principles that the company has developed and which are quantified where practicable.
Has your company deveIoped corporate workpIace objectives reIating to the key issues identified in Question 38?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
The company's
workplace objectives
reflect SOME of our
key business risks
and opportunities
The company's
workplace objectives
reflect ALL of our key
business risks and
opportunities
The company's
workplace objectives
are reviewed and
updated regularly
The company's
workplace objectives
are in the public
domain
NB: Rows 1 and 2 are not mutuaIIy excIusive - pIease treat SOME as a subset of ALL.
Please provide examples of your objectives below. Ìf these are in the public domain, please indicate report page or direct web-link.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions more frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
Corporate values/principals relating to workplace objectives are included in the Code of Ethics/Teamwork Charter
40 Targets
Definition
Management targets are the detailed performance requirements, which arise from the objectives and which need to be met in order to achieve
those objectives.
Does your company have workpIace management targets, arising from the objectives indicated in Question 39?
Please select as all that apply % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees). Please select 0% if a statement doesn't apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
The company's
workplace targets
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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reflect SOME of our
key business risks
and opportunities
The company's
workplace targets
reflect ALL of our key
business risks and
opportunities
The company's
workplace targets are
reviewed and updated
regularly
The company's
workplace targets are
in the public domain
NB: Rows 1 and 2 are not mutually exclusive - please treat SOME as a subset of ALL.
PIease provide exampIes of your targets beIow. If these are in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions more frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards that are
updated monthly and/or quarterly.
41 EmpIoyee Programme
Definition
An employee programme describes the specific means of enabling employees (including contractors) to achieve their objectives and targets. It
includes a description of the measures taken or envisaged to achieve such objectives and, where appropriate, the deadlines set for the
implementation of such measures. Employee involvement refers here to the internal communication, training and assignment of responsibilities
within job descriptions.
Does your company have empIoyee programmes to impIement its workpIace poIicies, objectives and targets?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our company:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Provides
communication and
consultation with
employees and
contractors on health
and safety issues
Provides
communication and
consultation with
employees and
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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contractors on
relevant employee
issues, e.g.
remuneration,
training, redundancy
etc.
Assigns people with
specific
responsibilities for its
employees.
Provides relevant
training to those with
specific workplace
responsibilities
Has introduced
confidential grievance
procedures for
workers to raise
concerns about
employment
conditions
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Senior Consultative Committee
TMCA has implemented a joint consultative committee referred to as the Senior Consultative Committee (SCG). This committee
comprises senior representatives from TMCA management including the President and Directors and Senior employee representatives
from the AMWU. The principles objectives of the SCG are identified in the Workplace Agreement at clause 15.2
1. facilitate communications between its company and employees
2. Opportunity for representatives to be kept informed of Toyota's plans and performance.
3. Provide advice and ideas to assist Toyota become more effective and successful.
4. A forum for representatives to provide views on policy and its application in the workplace.
5. A forum for consultation on Toyota Production and Management Systems.
6. Consider and advise on solutions to difficulties which might otherwise lead to conflict.
7. Where matters emerge of a policy nature and affect employees, they will be addressed at the SCG.
The SCG is an important mechanism that encourages communication between management, employees and stakeholders. The SCG
helps to create a workplace environment which encourages stakeholder involvement in determining goals, values and strategies,
assessing and improving workplace processes and ensuring a culture of creativity and innovation.
Toyota Australia has been recognised for its achievement in industrial relations. Toyota received a commendation from the Premier of
Victoria for Partnerships at Work. This award was presented in June 2002 and relates to the previous Workplace Agreement. Toyota's
achievements can be summarised by the following comments from Commissioner Foggo during the process of certification of Toyota's
2002 Workplace Agreement:
" Ìn listening to the submissions of the parties this morning Ì was struck by firstly how long some of you people, as Ì look around, have
been involved in negotiations at the workplace level, and secondly, how much things change or have change at this workplace and other
Toyota workplaces over the past few years, the sorts of words that have been used by the unions this morning and by the company,
even for mean old Commissioners, really do give you goose bumps.
Ì mean to have the union, the major union involved at the Altona site coming out with some of the words and complimenting Toyota
management is fantastic, nothing short of that;to hear the involvement of such a wide range of people on behalf of the union and on
behalf of management in the working parties, and all the way through, and carrying an agenda which is reflected in your agreements,
not only shows that the aspirations of the employees and the company, where they are properly understood, can be complementary to
each other and that it is not a them and us situation." (AG2002/1814).
During the last enterprise bargaining negotiations, Toyota Australia introduced a new approach to negotiations. Rather than attempt to
resolve the issues at the maintable consisting of the traditional negotiating group, working parties were established. All employee
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
Page 53 //
representatives (shop stewards) were involved in at least one working party.
This approach increased the opportunity for employee representatives to be involved in decisions and implemented more effective
communication to the broader workforce. Rather than concentrate on the positions of the company and the union, working parties were
established to talk about the issues, hence the move from positional to interest based bargaining.
For the first time during enterprise bargaining negotiations in Australia, Toyota Australia did not experience any industrial action. This is
a significant outcome for Toyota Australia. Managers, employee representatives and union representatives were recognised and
rewarded for their contribution via a presentation by the President of TMCA.
The Workplace Relations team, located in the Human Resources Division manages WPA negotiations, industrial relations matters,
diversity programs etc.
Training and development needs are linked to the requirements of each position description. Position descriptions, roles and
responsibilities are linked to the balanced scorecard requirements.
Additional information is available in the 2005 WPA section Problem Resolution and Disputes Avoidance Procedure section on p19.
Ìn addition, employees may use the Code of Ethics Ethical Questions and Complaint Resolution Guidelines if relevant to their concern.
42 Monitoring
Definition
Monitoring is the process of regularly collecting information to check the company's performance against certain criteria.
Is there internaI monitoring process in pIace to review the impIementation of your company's workpIace poIicies, objectives, targets
and practices?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0 % 1 - 25% 26 - 50% 51 - 75% > 75%
Reviews take place at
strategic business
level.
There is a mechanism
to centrally report
non-conformances or
key issues arising out
of reviews.
We can demonstrate
how the reviews have
resulted in action for
improvement.
We can produce an
independent
statement indicating
the effectiveness of
implementation.
For statement 4, please provide a copy of the independent statement in support of your answer. Ìf it is in the public domain, please provide
reference to report page or direct web-link below.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis for risks and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions more
frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
Page 54 //
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
Toyota Australia has been recognised for its achievement in industrial relations. Toyota received a commendation from the Premier of
Victoria for Partnerships at Work. This award was presented in June 2002 and relates to the current Workplace Agreement. Toyota's
achievements can be summarised by the following comments from Commissioner Foggo during the process of certification of Toyota's
2002 Workplace Agreement:
" Ìn listening to the submissions of the parties this morning Ì was struck by firstly how long some of you people, as Ì look around, have
been involved in negotiations at the workplace level, and secondly, how much things change or have change at this workplace and other
Toyota workplaces over the past few years, the sorts of words that have been used by the unions this morning and by the company,
even for mean old Commissioners, really do give you goose bumps.
Ì mean to have the union, the major union involved at the Altona site coming out with some of the words and complimenting Toyota
management is fantastic, nothing short of that; to hear the involvement of such a wide range of people on behalf of the union and on
behalf of management in the working parties, and all the way through, and carrying an agenda which is reflected in your agreements,
not only shows that the aspirations of the employees and the company, where they are properly understood, can be complementary to
each other and that it is not a them and us situation." (AG2002/1814).
During the last enterprise bargaining negotiations, Toyota Australia introduced a new approach to negotiations. Rather than attempt to
resolve the issues at the maintable consisting of the traditional negotiating group, working parties were established. All employee
representatives (shop stewards) were involved in at least one working party.
This approach increased the opportunity for employee representatives to be involved in decisions and implemented more effective
communication to the broader workforce. Rather than concentrate on the positions of the company and the union, working parties were
established to talk about the issues, hence the move from positional to interest based bargaining.
For the first time during enterprise bargaining negotiations in Australia, Toyota Australia did not experience any industrial action. This is
a significant outcome for Toyota Australia. Managers, employee representatives and union representatives were recognised and
rewarded for their contribution via a presentation by the President of TMCA.
Introduction to EnvironmentaI Impact Areas
This section of the survey deals with environmental performance and impact within all the operational activities under the management control of
the corporate entity.
PIease compIete three environmentaI impact areas:
Two Core EnvironmentaI Impact Areas:
Climate Change (Overall KPÌ) or
Climate Change (Ìndividual KPÌs)
Waste & Resource Management
PIus One AdditionaI EnvironmentaI Impact Area:
Biodiversity or
Self-Selected Environmental Ìmpact Area
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Impact Area: CIimate Change - OveraII KPI (EI)
43 Measurment and Reporting
Companies are at distinct stages in aggregating their climate change data, this element is also flexible and companies can choose to report
either on their overall - KPÌ (Questions 43-47), OR on three individual KPÌs (Questions 48-52), segregating the data related to transport, energy
and process emissions. Companies should choose to answer either Questions 43-47 or Questions 48-52.
Do you measure your impact in this area?
No.
Yes, our company measures its impact in this area and can confirm the following:
Please tick all that apply.
Yes, it is measured.
Yes, it is aggregated centraIIy.
Yes, it is reported pubIicIy.
If reported pubIicIy, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p 17
PIease state your KPI:
AbsoIute figure* (e.g. 3,560,000)
8.54
Unit of measurement (e.g. Tonnes of CO2)
GJ/vehicle
Data Period (e.g. Jun.05-JuI.06)
April 05- March 06
PIease Iist the sources of emissions covered by the totaI stated above:
manufacturing processes associated with vechicle manufacturing includeing boilers, aluminium foundry and paint curing ovens
* If not stating absoIute figures recommended on the guidance notes or on the heIp avaiIabIe on-Iine, pIease expIain why (this wiII
NOT affect your score).
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p 17
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au >Vehicle Lifecycle> Manufacturing> Altona Data (subsection 'Reducing Energy Consumption')
Toyota measures its CO2 on a per vehicle manufactured basis. Ìn 2005/06 this was 1.642tonnes of CO2 per car. This compares with
1.824 tonnes in 2000.-
Toyota is also a member of the Federal Government's Greenhouse Challenge Plus Program. This is a voluntary program commiting
participants to reporting and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.
see
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
Page 56 //
http://www.greenhouse.gov.au/challenge/members/membernetwork.html
44 Scope of Information
PIease indicate how much of your worId-wide operations (e.g. percentage by turnover, no. of empIoyees, etc.) is covered by your KPI
quoted in question 43 and 47.
0%
1 - 25%
26 - 50%
51 - 75%
> 75%
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Ìnformation shown refers to our Altona and Port Melbourne manufacturing operations that account for over 75% of Toyota Australia's
climate change emissions. Environmental action plans for other areas of our business have been developed to ensure a whole of
company approach to environment, including investment in technology to reduce CO2 emissions in the use phase of our products.
For global info refer TMC Environment Report.
See: www.toyota.co.jp
45 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the quaIity of the information used to derive your KPI in this impact area.
Impact not measured or mostIy based on estimates
Based on a combination of estimates and verifiabIe data (approx. 50:50%)
MostIy based on verifiabIe data (accounting for > 75% of the totaI)
IndependentIy verified
If data has been independentIy verified, pIease expIain how and provide a copy of the verification statement. If it is in the pubIic
domain, pIease indicate report page/direct web-Iink:
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.31, Statement of Assurance (Jo Cain, Senior Principal, URS)
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.31, Statement of Assurance (Jo Cain, Senior Principal, URS)
46 Targets
With respect to this impact area, has your company set performance improvement targets in addition to your management targets?
Please select all that apply as a % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees,etc). Please select 0% if a statement does not
apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Performance targets
apply to individual
business units/
geographic regions
Performance targets
are in the public
domain
Please give examples of your targets. Ìf these are in the public domain, please indicate report page or direct web-link:
www.environment.toyota.com.au
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
Page 57 //
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Performance targets are developed on a per unit manufactured basis and are set over a 5 year period. Performance against targets is
reviewed on a monthly basis and regularly reviewed by senior management. We also conduct international benchmarking to review
opportunities for improvement and information sharing on a global basis.
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Overview > Vision and Management
3. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Vehicle Lifecycle > Manufacturing > Overview > Environment Ìmprovement Plan
47 Performance Improvement
Companies can achieve both management and performance improvements. In order to capture both, this question is split accordingly.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your MANAGEMENT of this impact area?
We CANNOT demonstrate any improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
We CAN demonstrate an improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your PERFORMANCE in this impact area?
NB: This question asks about continuous performance improvement, which should relate to the scope of information covered in question 44.
We cannot demonstrate any performance improvement.
Yes, we can provide evidence of continuous performance improvement:
Over the Iast year.
Over the Iast two years.
Over the Iast three years.
PIease provide reIevant trend data in support of your answer:
NB: The first year of data collection is the baseline - i.e. if you have data for 2005 and 2006 only, this would qualify for one year improvement, if
an improvement has indeed been made. To demonstrate a performance improvement over the last 3 years, data is therefore required for the
last 4 years.
Year NormaIised figure (e.g. 740) Unit of measurement (e.g.
Tonnes CO2 / tonnes of
production)
Reporting period 1 - LATEST (e.g.
2005)
2005/6 8.54 GJ/vehicle
Reporting period 2 (e.g. 2004) 2004 9.510 GJ/Vehicle
Reporting period 3 (e.g. 2003) 2003 9.688 GJ/vechicle
Reporting period 4 (e.g. 2002) 2002 11.941 GJ/vehicle
* If not stating normaIised figures/metrics recommended on the guidance notes or on the heIp avaiIabIe on-Iine, pIease expIain why
(this wiII NOT affect your score).
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The figures above include both Port Melbourne and Altona data. This data is published as separate Port Melbourne and Altona data on
the website www.environment.toyota.com.au. Ìt is has been combined here for easier verification.
Please note with the advent of reporting according to the japanese fiscal year (April- March) there is an associated adjustment in
reported figures
See also 1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.17, 'Reducing Energy Consumption'(diagram) - This data is for Altona
only.
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Toyota Australia manages its energy use (and climate change emissions) on a per vehicle basis. This accounts for the majority of our
climate change emissions ie. greater than 75%.
Voluntary actions we have taken include Toyota Australia being a signatory to the AGO Greenhouse Challenge and participant in the
Federal Govenment Energy Efficiency Opportunities assessment development program in 2005/06
http://www.greenhouse.gov.au/reporting/index.html
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Impact Area: CIimate Change - IndividuaI KPIs (EI)
48 Measurement and Reporting
Companies are at distinct stages in aggregating their climate change data, this element is also flexible and companies can choose to report
either on their overall - KPÌ (Questions 43-47), OR on three individual KPÌs (Questions 48-52), segregating the data related to transport, energy
and process emissions. Companies should choose to answer either Questions 43-47 or Questions 48-52.
Companies compIeting this section are required to provide answers for energy and transport at a minimum. If process emissions are
not appIicabIe to your business, pIease expIain beIow and Ieave the 'process emissions' eIements bIank throughout this section (this
wiII not affect your score).
Do you measure your impact in this area?
Please tick all that apply.
No Yes, it is measured. Yes, it is aggregated
centraIIy
Yes, it is reported
pubIicIy
If data is reported
pubIicIy, pIease
indicate report
page/web-site:
Energy
Transport
Process Emissions
PIease state your KPI:
AbsoIute figures* (e.g.
3,560,000)
Unit of measurement (e.g. KWh;
miIes; tonnes CO2)
Data Period (e.g. Jun.05-JuI.06)
Energy
Transport
Process Emissions
* Ìf not stating absolute figures recommended on the guidance notes or on the help available on-line, please explain why (this will NOT affect
your score).
49 Scope of Information
PIease indicate how much of your worIdwide operations (e.g. by turnover, no. of empIoyees etc) is covered by the KPIs quoted in
questions 48 and 52:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Energy KPÌ
Transport KPÌ
Process emissions
KPÌ
50 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the quaIity of the information used to derive your KPIs in this impact area.
Impact not measured or
mostIy based on
estimates
Based on a combination
of estimates and
verifiabIe data (approx.
MostIy based on
verifiabIe data
(accounting for >75% of
IndependentIy verified*
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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50:50%) totaI)
Energy
Transport
Process emissions
* If data has been independentIy verified, pIease expIain how and provide a copy of the verification statement. If it is in the pubIic
domain, pIease indicate report pageor direct web-Iink beIow.
51 Targets
With respect to this impact area, has your company set performance improvement targets in addition to your management targets?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage of overall business (e.g. by turnover, no of employees etc)
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our performance targets* have been set for individuaI business units/ geographic regions, for:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Energy
Transport
Process emissions
AND, our performance targets are in the pubIic domain**, for:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Energy
Transport
Process emissions
* PIease proide exampIes of your performance targets beIow.
** If these are in the pubIic domain, pIease indicate report pages or direct web-Iink.
52 Performance Improvement
Companies can achieve both management and performance improvements. In order to capture both, this question is split accordingly.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your MANAGEMENT of this impact area?
We CANNOT demonstrate any improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
We CAN demonstrate an improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your PERFORMANCE in this impact area?
NB: This question asks about continuous performance improvement, which should relate to the scope of information covered in question 49.
We cannot demonstrate
any improvement
We can demonstrate
performance
improvement over the
Iast year.
We can demonstrate
performance
improvement over the
Iast 2 years.
We can demonstrate
performance
improvement over the
Iast 3-5 years.
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Energy
Transport
Process emissions
PIease provide reIevant trend data in support of your answer:
NB: The first year of data collection is the baseline - i.e. if you have data for 2005 and 2006 only, this would qualify for one year improvement, if
an improvement has indeed been made. To demonstrate a performance improvement over the last 3 years, data is therefore required for the
last 4 years.
Energy KPI:
Year NormaIised figure (e.g. 740) Unit of measurement (e.g. KWh
/ tonnes of production)
Reporting period 1 - LATEST (e.g.
2005)
Reporting period 2 (e.g. 2004)
Reporting period 3 (e.g. 2003)
Reporting period 4 (e.g. 2002)
Transport KPI:
Year NormaIised figure (e.g. 740) Unit of measurement (e.g. miIes
traveIIed / tonnes of
production)
Reporting period 1 - LATEST (e.g.
2005)
Reporting period 2 (e.g. 2004)
Reporting period 3 (e.g. 2003)
Reporting period 4 (e.g. 2002)
Process Emissions KPI:
Year NormaIised figure (e.g. 740) Unit of measurement (e.g.
Tonnes CO2 / tonnes of
production)
Reporting period 1 - LATEST (e.g.
2005)
Reporting period 2 (e.g. 2004)
Reporting period 3 (e.g. 2003)
Reporting period 4 (e.g. 2002)
* If not stating normaIised figures/metrics recommended on the guidance notes or on the heIp avaiIabIe on-Iine, pIease expIain why
(this wiII NOT affect your score).
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Impact Area: Waste & Resource Management (EI)
53 Measurement and Reporting
This section refers to a company's impIementation of the waste hierarchy: waste reduction, recovery and re-use of materiaIs,
recycIing or purchasing products and materiaIs with recycIed content, and disposaI of soIid waste.
Do you measure your impact in this area?
Please tick all that apply.
No Yes, it is measured. Yes, it is aggregated
centraIIy
Yes, it is reported
pubIicIy
If data is reported
pubIicIy, pIease
indicate report
page/web-site:
Waste generated/
disposed
P.17 Environment and
Community report 06
Waste re-used/
recycled
P.17 Environment and
Community report 06
PIease state your KPI:
AbsoIute figures* (e.g.
3,560,000)
Unit of measurement (e.g.
tonnes of waste
generated/disposed; % of waste
re-used/recycIed)
Data Period (e.g. Jun.05-JuI.06)
Waste generated/ disposed 12.51 kg/veh Apr 05-Mar 06
Waste re-used/ recycled 273.0 kg/veh Apr 05-Mar 06
* Ìf not stating absolute figures recommended on the guidance notes or on the help available on-line, please explain why (this will NOT affect
your score).
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The majority of waste is generated as part of the manufacturing activites. Almost 96% of this waste is recycled, the vast majority being
steel offcuts from pressing panels. Other recycling streams include Aluminium castings, foundry sand and Paint Solvent, as well as
cardboard and plastic packaging.
Remaining wastes, which are disposed off to landfill, include industrial sludges as well as general waste from canteens and other
operations. Waste performance is measured and reported monthly.
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.17, 'Reducing Waste to landfill'.
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Vehicle Lifecycle > Manufacturing > Altona data > Reducing Waste to Landfill
3.http://www.environment.toyota.com.au/environment/articles
See p21 &24 of the 2006 Environment and Community report, for some recycling figures related to After Sales and Distribution
Logistics.
54 Scope of Information
PIease indicate how much of your worIdwide operations (e.g. by turnover, no. of empIoyees) are covered by the KPIs quoted in
questions 53 and 57:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Waste generated/
disposed KPÌ
Waste re-used/
recycled KPÌ
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. Ìnformation shown is only for Australian operations. For global info refer TMC Environment Report.
See: www.toyota.co.jp
55 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the quaIity of the information used to derive your KPIs in this area:
Impact not measured or
mostIy based on
estimates
Based on a combination
of estimates and
verifiabIe data (approx.
50:50%)
MostIy based verifiabIe
data (accounting for
>75% fo totaI)
IndependentIy verified*
Waste generated/
disposed
Waste re-used/ recycled
* If data has been independentIy verified, pIease expIain how beIow and provide a copy of the verification statement. If this is in the
pubIic domain, pIease indicate report page/web-Iink.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.31, Statement of Assurance (Jo Cain, Senior Principal, URS)
See p21 & 24 of the 2005 Environment and Community report, for some recycling figures related to After Sales and Distribution
Logistics.
56 Targets
With respect to this impact area, has your company set performance improvement targets in addition to your management targets?
Please tick all that apply as % of overall business coverage (e.g. by turnover, no of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
Our performance targets* have been set for individuaI business units/geographic regions, for:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Waste generated/
disposed
Waste re-used/
recycled
AND, our performance targets are in the pubIic domain**, for:
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Waste generated/
disposed
Waste reused/
recycled
* PIease give exampIes of your performance targets beIow.
** If these are in the pubIic domain, pIease aIso indicate report page or direct web-Iink.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
Page 64 //
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.17, 'Reducing waste to landfill'
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Vehicle lifecycle > Manufacturing > Altona Data > Reducing waste to landfill (diagram)
Waste re-use and recycling performance contributes to overall waste disposal reduction, hence data is reported in terms of waste
reduction not materials re-used or recycled.
57 Performance Improvement
Companies can achieve both management and performance improvements. In order to capture both, this question is split accordingly.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your MANAGEMENT of this impact area?
We CANNOT demonstrate any improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
We CAN demonstrate an improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your PERFORMANCE in this impact area?
NB: This question asks about continuous performance improvement, which should relate to the scope of information covered in previous
questions.
We cannot demonstrate
any improvement.
We can demonstrate
performance
improvement over the
Iast year.
We can demonstrate
performance
improvement over the
Iast 2 years.
We can demonstrate
performance
improvement over the
Iast 3 years.
Waste generated/
disposed
Waste reused/ recycled
PIease provide reIevant trend data in support of your answer:
NB: The first year of data collection is the baseline - i.e. if you have data for 2005 and 2006 only, this would qualify for one year improvement, if
an improvement has indeed been made. To demonstrate a performance improvement over the last 3 years, data is therefore required for the
last 4 years.
Waste generated/disposed KPI:
Year NormaIised figure (e.g. 740) Unit of measurement (e.g.
Tones of waste / tonnes of
production)
Reporting period 1 - LATEST (e.g.
2005)
2005/06 12.51 kg/vehicle
Reporting period 2 (e.g. 2004) 2004 12.56 kg/vehicle
Reporting period 3 (e.g. 2003) 2003 12.3 kg/vehicle
Reporting period 4 (e.g. 2002) 2002 17.19 kg/vehicle
Waste re-used/recycIed KPI:
Year NormaIised figure (e.g. 740) Unit of measurement (e.g. %
waste recycIed / tonnes of
production)
Reporting period 1 - LATEST (e.g.
2005)
2005 273.0 kg/vehicle
Reporting period 2 (e.g. 2004) 2004 242.7 kg/vehicle
Reporting period 3 (e.g. 2003) 2003 260.5 kg/vehicle
Reporting period 4 (e.g. 2002) 2002 290.2 kg/vehicle
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* If not stating normaIised figures/metrics recommended on the guidance notes or on the heIp avaiIabIe on-Iine, pIease expIain why
(this wiII NOT affect your score).
Waste recycling is recorded on a project by project basis rather than as part of an overall KPÌ
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.10, 'Reducing waste to landfill'
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Vehicle Lifecycle > Manufacturing > Altona data > Reducing Waste to landfill (diagram)
Toyota measures its trade waste on a per vehicle basis.
Ìn 2005/06 this figure was 12.51kg per car. This compares with 17.41 in 2001.
Toyota measures this impact area by focussing on reducing waste generated/disposed of. All waste targets relate to this, rather than
specific targets for waste reuse or recycling. Ìnternal recycling and yield rate KPÌs exist for certain processes ie: steel.
Nonetheless, the results of some recycling inititatives, which have diverted waste from landfill can be found in the Environment and
Community Report 2006 pg 17
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SeIf SeIected EnvironmentaI Impact (EI)
Guidance for seIf-seIected impact
As your third environmental impact area, you can either complete the Biodiversity section (Questions 63 to 67), or choose another self-selected
impact area (Questions 58 to 62) in this section.
Ìf completing Questions 58 to 62, please choose an additional environmental impact area significant to your business. Note that this impact area
must be different to the core impact areas already covered (i.e. CO
Unknown element: 'sub'. (textitem)
emissions, waste generated/disposed and waste re-used/recycled). BiE will NOT accept duplicate information.
Ìn choosing an impact area to report on, companies should focus on the most significant impact to their sector. Based on previous years'
responses, BiE recommends the impact areas below (according to each sector / economic group). Other impact areas will be accepted provided
companies explain the reason for their choice.
Basic MateriaIs:
- Chemicals: Emissions to air; unplanned environmental incidents, water pollution
- Mining: Biodiversity; water consumption
- Oil & Gas: Unplanned environmental incidents; emissions to air; water pollution
Consumer Goods:
- Automobiles & Parts: Emissions to air; water consumption
- Beverages: Water consumption
- Food Producers & Processors: Water consumption
- Tobacco: Biodiversity; water consumption
Consumer Services:
- Food & Drug Retailers: Biodiversity, Ozone Depletion
- General Retailers: Resource use; water consumption' chemical use; biodiversity; ozone depletion
- Leisure & Hotels: Water consumption; local impact, indirect impact; resource use
- Media & Entertainment: Water consumption; resource use
FinanciaIs:
- Banks: Water consumption; indirect impact; resource use
- Ìnsurance: Water consumption; indirect impact; resource use
- Real Estate: Biodiversity; contaminated land; local impact; water consumption
- Speciality & Other Finance, Life Assurance and Ìnvestment Companies: Water consumption; indirect impact; resource use
IndustriaIs:
- Construction & Building Materials and Steel & Other Metals : Biodiversity; water consumption; emissions to air; resource use; unplanned
environmental incidents; design
- Diversified Ìndustrials; Aerospace & Defence and Engineering & Machinery: Emissions to air; unplanned environmental incidents; chemical
use; water consumption
- Support Services and Government: Unplanned environmental incidents; resource use, water pollution, water consumption; local impact
- Transport: Water consumption; emissions to air; local impact
HeaIth Care:
- Pharmaceuticals & Biotechnology and Personal Care & Household Products : Ozone depletion; water consumption
ProfessionaI Services:
- Accountants & Consultants: Resource use; indirect impact; water consumption
TechnoIogy:
- Ìnformation Technology Hardware and Software & Computer Services : Ìndirect impact; resource use; design
TeIecommunications:
- Telecommunication Services: Ìndirect impact; local impact; water pollution
UtiIities:
- Electricity: Emissions to air; unplanned environmental incidents
- Utilities - Other: Biodiversity; unplanned environmental incidents; resource use, water consumption
SeIf SeIected EnvironmentaI Impact Area
PIease note that if you chose to compIete questions 58 to 62 as your seIf-seIected third environmentaI impact area, you shouId NOT
answer the Biodiversity impact area (Questions 63 to 67), and vice-versa.
SeIect Impact Area*
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Emissions to air
What criteria did you use to seIect this area, e.g. does it Iink to your key risks or impacts?
ÌSO 14001 aspect and impact assessment
Are these impacts covered by the corporate objectives and targets previousIy identified in the environmentaI management section?
Yes
No
* If not seIecting an impact area, according to the sector specific guidance notes or the heIp avaiIabIe on-Iine, pIease expIain why (this
wiII NOT affect your score).
N/A
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.17
58 Measurement and Reporting
Do you measure your impact in this area?
No.
Yes, our company measures its impact in this area and can confirm the following:
(Please tick all that apply)
Yes, it is measured.
Yes, it is aggregated centraIIy.
Yes, it is reported pubIicIy*.
If reported pubIicIy, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
Environment and Community Report 2006 pg 18
PIease state your KPI:
AbsoIute figure*
37.6
Unit of measurement
g/m2
Data Period (e.g. Jun.05-JuI.06)
Apr 05 - Mar 06
* If not stating absoIute figures recommended on the guidance notes or on the heIp avaiIabIe on-Iine, pIease expIain why (this wiII
NOT affect your score).
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.18, 'Reducing Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Vehicle Lifecycle > Manufacturing > Altona data > Reducing Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)
Emissions
The unit is the mass of emissions per m2 of vehicle painted.
59 Scope of Information
PIease indicate how much of your worId-wide operations (e.g. by turnover, no. of empIoyees) is covered by your KPI quoted in
questions 58 and 62.
0%
1-25%
26-50%
51-75%
> 75%
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. Ìnformation shown is only for Australian operations. For global info refer TMC Environment Report.
See: www.toyota.co.jp
60 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the quaIity of the information used to derive your KPI for this impact area.
Impact area not measured and mostIy based on estimates
Based on a combination of estimates and verifiabIe data (approx. 50:50%)
Based mostIy on verifiabIe data (accounting for > 75% of totaI)
IndependentIy verified*.
* Ìf data has been independently verified, please explain how and provide a copy of the verification statement. Ìf this is in the public domain,
please indicate report page or direct web-link.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.31, Statement of Assurance (Jo Cain, Senior Principal, URS)
61 Targets
With respect to this impact area, has your company set performance improvement targets in addition to your management targets?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Our performance
targets* apply to
individual business
units/geographic
regions
Our performance
targets are in the
public domain**
*PIease provide exampIes of your perfromance targets beIow.
**If these are in the pubIic domain, pIease aIso indicate report page or direct web-Iink.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.18, Reducing Volatile Organic Compound Emissions
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Vehicle Lifecycle > Manufacturing > Altona data > Reducing Volatile Organic Compound
Emissions
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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62 Performance Improvement
Companies can achieve both management and performance improvements. In order to capture both, this question is split accordingly.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your MANAGEMENT of this impact area?
We CANNOT demonstrate any improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
We CAN demonstrate an improvement in the management of this impact area over the Iast year.
Can you demonstrate improvement in your PERFORMANCE in this impact area?
NB: This question asks about continuous performance improvement, which should relate to the scope of information covered in question 59.
We cannot demonstrate any improvement in performance.
Yes, we can provide evidence of an improvement in our environmental performance:
Over the Iast year.
Over the Iast two years.
Over the Iast three years.
PIease provide reIevant trend data in support of your answer:
NB: The first year of data collection is the baseline - i.e. if you have data for 2004 and 2005 only, this would qualify for one year improvement, if
an improvement has indeed been made. To demonstrate a performance improvement over the last 3 years, data is therefore required for the
last 4 years.
Year NormaIised figure Unit of measurement
Reporting period 1 - LATEST (e.g.
2005)
2005/06 37.6 g/m2
Reporting period 2 (e.g. 2004) 2004 37.95 g/m2
Reporting period 3 (e.g. 2003) 2003 46.15 g/m2
Reporting period 4 (e.g. 2002) 2002 57.1 g/m2
* If not stating normaIised figures/metrics recommended on the guidance notes or on the heIp avaiIabIe on-Iine, pIease expIain why
(this wiII NOT affect your score).
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. TMCA Environment and Community Report 2006, p.17, Reducing Volatile Organic Compound Emissions (see diagram)
2. www.environment.toyota.com.au > Vehicle Lifecycle > Manufacturing> Altona data > Reducing Volatile Organic Compound
Emissions (see diagram)
Toyota measures its VOC emissions on a per m2 of vehicle painted basis. Ìn 2005/06 this figure was 37.6 g/m2 per car. This compares
with 63.94g/m2 in 2001.
Please note: when a there is a new model introduced, it creates a spike in all environmental figures. Toyota Australia can demonstrate
that performance has improved over a three to five year period and that there is improvement when spike years (when new models are
introduced to the manufacturing plant)are compared.
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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Impact Area: Biodiversity (EI)
Biodiversity
Please note that if you chose to complete the Biodiversity questions 63 to 67 as your self-selected third environmental impact area, you should
NOT answer the questions 58 to 62, and vice-versa.
If you have chosen to compIete the foIIowing questions on biodiversity as your seIf-seIected* environmentaI impact area, couId you
pIease indicate if you are compIeting it primariIy with regards to:
Direct impacts (for exampIe through Iand that you own, use or manage)
Indirect impacts (for exampIe through your suppIy chain and/or investments)
* Ìf not selecting an impact area, according to the sector specific guidance notes or the help available on-line, please explain why (this will NOT
affect your score).
63 Measurement and Reporting
Definition
Biodiversityis an abbreviation of 'biological diversity.' It means the variety of living things - the different plants, animals and micro-organisms, the
genes they contain and the ecosystems of which they are part (English Nature, Earthwatch).
Do you assess and manage your impact on biodiversity?
No
Yes, it is assessed across reIevant business operations, but not managed within a corporate strategy.
Yes, it is assessed across reIevant business operations and managed within a corporate strategy. Our impact is measured as
foIIows:
Please state your KPÌ:
Corporate Indicator (quaIitative or quantitative)
Performance Measure
Data Period
Yes, it is assessed across reIevant business operations and managed within a corporate strategy, which is pubIicIy avaiIabIe. Our
impact is measured as foIIows:
Please state your KPÌ:
Corporate Indicator (quaIitative or quantitative)
Performance Measure
Data Period
Report page or direct web-Iink in the pubIic domain:
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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64 Scope of Information
PIease indicate what percentage of your reIevant business operations, assessed as having an impact on biodiversity, is covered by
the performance measure stated in questions 63 and 67.
0%
1-25%
25 -50%
51-75%
> 75%
65 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the quaIity of the information used to derive the performance measure for biodiversity:
Performance not measured or mostIy based on estimates
Based on a combination of estimates and verifiabIe data (approx. 50:50%)
Based mostIy on verifiabIe data (accounting for > 75% of totaI)
IndependentIy verified*.
* Ìf data has been independently verified, please explain how below and provide a copy of the verification statement. Ìf it is in the public domain,
please also indicate report page/web-link.
66 Targets
Do you have targets for action regarding your impact on biodiversity?
No
Yes, we have an action pIan/strategy, which incIudes targets that cover LESS than 75% of our reIevant business operations with a
biodiversity impact.
Yes, we have an action pIan/strategy, which incIudes targets that cover MORE than 75% of our reIevant business operations with a
biodiversity impact.
Yes, we have an action pIan/strategy, which incIudes targets that cover MORE than 75% of our reIevant business operations with a
biodiversity impact and are pubIicIy avaiIabIe.
Please give examples of your targets below. Ìf these are in the public domain, please also indicate report page or direct web-link.
67 Performance Improvement
Which phrase most cIoseIy describes your company' s performance on biodiversity?
We cannot demonstrate any improvement in performance
Yes, we can provide evidence of an improvement in our performance on biodiversity:
Over the Iast year.
Over the Iast two years.
Over the Iast three years.
Using your indicator reported in Q58, please provide relevant information in support of your answer.
Introduction to SociaI Impact Areas
This section of the survey deals with social performance and impact within all the operational activities under the management control of the
corporate entity.
PIease compIete three sociaI impact areas:
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Two Core SociaI Impact Areas (seIect 2 out of 5):
Product Health and Safety
Occupational Health and Safety
Human Rights in the Supply Chain
Diversity in the Workplace, or
Community Ìnvestment
PIus One AdditionaI SociaI Impact Area:
One from the Core Social Ìmpact Areas; or
Self-Selected Social Ìmpact AreaOne from the Core Social Ìmpact Areas; or
Self-Selected Social Ìmpact Area
SociaI Impact Areas by Industry Sector:
Ìn selecting which impact areas to report on, companies should focus on the most significant impacts within their sector. Based on previous
years' responses we recommend the impact areas below. Other impact areas will be accepted if companies provide a compelling reasons that
the area answered is more significant to their business.
Basic MateriaIs
Chemicals: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Development
Mining: Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Business-Related Community Programmes, Responsible Products &
Services
Oil & Gas: Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Development
Consumer Goods
Automobiles & Parts: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain
Beverages: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Development
Food Producers: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment
Tobacco: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain, Responsible Products & Services (youth access, alternative
products)
Consumer Services
Food & Drug Retailers: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment
General Retailers: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee
Welfare
Leisure & Hotels: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Welfare
Media & Entertainment: Labour Rights in Supply Chain, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Social Ìnclusion (customer diversity),
Responsible Products & Services (responsible service delivery), Employee Development
FinanciaIs
Banks: Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Social Ìnclusion (Financial Ìnclusion), Responsible Products & Services
(SRÌ), Employee Development, Employee Welfare
Ìnsurance (incl. Life Assurance): Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Responsible
Products & Services (SRÌ), Employee Development, Governance (bribery & corruption)
Ìnvestment Services: Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in the Supply Chain, Workplace Diversity, Responsible Products & Services (SRÌ),
Governance (bribery & corruption)
Real Estate: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Development, Business-Related
Community Programmes
Speciality & Other Finance: Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment
IndustriaIs
Construction & Materials and Steel & Other Metals: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee
Development, Employee Welfare, Business-Related Community Programmes (community engagement)
Aerospace & Defence, Diversified Ìndustrials and Engineering & Machinery: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Community Ìnvestment,
Employee Welfare
Support Services and Government: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Development,
Employee Welfare, Social Ìnclusion (training & employment)
Transport: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Development, Employee Welfare, Social
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Ìnclusion (disability access)
HeaIth Care
Personal & Household Goods and Pharmaceuticals & Biotechnology: Occupational H&S, Product H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain,
Community Ìnvestment, Social Ìnclusion (access to medicine)
ProfessionaI Services
Accountants & Consultants: Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Employee Development, Business-Related
Community Programmes (impact in outsourcing communities)
TechnoIogy
Ìnformation Technology Hardware and Software & Computer Services: Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment,
Economic Development, Business-Related Community Programmes
TeIecommunications
Telecommunication Services: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Labour Rights in Supply Chain, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment,
Social Ìnclusion (Digital Ìnclusion)
UtiIities
Electricity: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Social Ìnclusion (access to services), Employee
Development
Gas, Water & Multi-utilities: Product H&S, Occupational H&S, Workplace Diversity, Community Ìnvestment, Social Ìnclusion (access to services)
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Impact Area: Product HeaIth & Safety
68 Product Components
Are systems in pIace to review the potentiaI heaIth and safety risks of your products, their ingredients or functionaI specifications?
No, we have no formaIised procedures to review the heaIth and safety impacts of our products.
Yes, we reguIarIy review the heaIth and safety impacts of our products.
If you have selected "Yes", please tick all that apply:
We can demonstrate that we have reviewed the heaIth & safety impacts of our products and have made product improvements to
reduce these impacts
PIease provide recent exampIes of issues and product improvements:
All products sold by Toyota Australia are reviewed and tested prior to sale to ensure compliance with relevant Australian or international
safety standards
We can demonstrate that we work with industry, consumer, heaIth and safety groups to reduce the inherent heaIth/safety risks
associated with our products to an acceptabIe IeveI
We undertake/commission research into the heaIth & safety of our products
We keep abreast of ongoing safety concerns in the marketpIace as new scientific information comes to Iight
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1. All products sold by Toyota Australia are reviewed and tested prior to sale to ensure compliance with relevant Australian or
international safety standards. Any non-comformities in a model are rectified prior to placing the model on the market. Processes are in
place to ensure that no vehicles are supplied to the market before all required compliance approvals are received from Federal
Government.
2. Toyota is an active participant in the Federal Chamber of Automotive Ìndustries product safety committees. Toyota also maintains
strong links with the Federal and State Departments of Transport and motorist bodies such as the RACV or NRMA.
3. Reviewing and testing of new models is undertaken prior or placing the product in the marketplace to ensure compliance with
Australian and Ìnternational safety standards. Ìn addition, TMC global designs incorporate standards in excess of international
requirements through development of Global Outstanding Assessment (GOA) Toyota standards. Toyota is a member of the Australian
National Crash Ìn-Depth Study conducted by Monash University Accident Research Centre, investigating the performance of vehicle
safety systems in actual crashes.
4. Review of issues and trends in product safety is part of the role of Toyota's Technical Services Operations. Through our external
stakeholder relationships we monitor and review current developments in industry-related research, in areas such as vehicle
crashworthiness and emissions technology.
69 Design and DeveIopment
Is there a heaIth & safety pIanning system in pIace, which addresses aII stages of product deveIopment from project concept, design,
deveIopment, to customer use/disposaI, to ensure that the products you deveIop are safe?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Testing of our
products meets
country specific
legislation and
standards where we
market and distribute
our products.
Testing of products
meets international
legislation and
standards on product
health & safety in the
countries in which we
market and distribute
our products.
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We have systems in
place to keep
informed on and
implement the latest
developments in
product health &
safety.
Our company works
with national and
international
standards
organisations on
product safety, or with
industry forums to
publicise and share
good practice and
lessons learned
(whilst protecting
trade secrets and
confidential and
proprietary
information).
We do not sell
products banned in
developed countries
to developing
countries.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
1& 2. All products sold by Toyota Australia are reviewed and tested by TMCA, TMC and our suppliers prior to sale to ensure compliance
with relevant Australian or international safety standards. Any non-conformities in a model are rectified prior to placing the model on the
market. Processes are in place to ensure that no vehicles are supplied to the market before all required compliance approvals are
received from Federal Government.
3. Toyota Australia regularly participates in Ìndustry forums to ensure that we are aware of current and potential future changes in
legislative requirements. There are formal communication processes in place to report Australian requirements to TMC and to receive
information about other market requirements. Toyota is a member of the Australian National Crash Ìn-Depth Study conducted by
Monash University Accident Research Centre, investigating the performance of vehicle safety systems in actual crashes.
4. Review of issues and trends in product safety is part of the role of Toyota's Technical Services Operations. Through our external
stakeholder relationships we monitor and review current developments in industry-related research, in areas such as vehicle
crashworthiness and emissions technology.
5. This question is not relevant to our company or industry.
70 Monitoring HeaIth & Safety Performance
Does your company have systems in pIace to monitor the heaIth & safety impacts of your products?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
We monitor our
products to ensure
they comply with our
health and safety
standards (please
provide data below)
We monitor the other
brands/products/components
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we sell to ensure they
meet our own health
and safety standards
We co-operate with
our distributors and
suppliers to pass on
health and safety
related information on
product risks to
customers, and there
is a mechanism for
customers to feed
back any safety
related concerns
A mechanism is in
place for customers to
feed back any safety
related concerns
(please provide data
below)
We have a product
recall system in place
throughout our
distribution network
In support of your answers, pIease provide data obtained as a resuIt of monitoring
Ìnstances of non-compliance of our products with our health and
safety standards:
The PERC (Product Evaluation and Review Committee) process isin
place to manage matters relating to product non-compliance or health
and safety standards. This committee has the authority to take action
to rectify aproblem or if necessary initiate a product recall
Customer concerns or complaints: Dealer Product Reporting System for centrally managing customer
inquiries or concerns. They can comethrough a dealership, or the
Customer Service operation
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Australia monitors and manages the product safety of all Toyota, Lexus and Daihatsu vehicles sold in Australia to ensure they
meet relevant Australian and international standards.
Toyota also has strict procedures in place to ensure that all locally manufactured and imported vehicles conform to specification and
compliance approvals granted. These procedures are audited by the Federal Govt. This ensures that each vehicle supplied to the
market place meets all relevant Australian and international standards.
Toyota also has a process in place to capture in-service issues from the marketplace in order to provide systematic input to design
improvements.
Detailed product information including health and safety related information related to our product, including the risks of inappropriate
use of our products is included in the owner's handbook provided with each vehicle. We train dealership staff to enable them to provide
to customers comprehensive information on all our models.
Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) liaises with all Toyota affiliates on product safety matters and manages international product recalls or
customer satisfaction exercises. Toyota Australia applies the advice or solution recommended by TMC and ensures the proposed
solution meets Australian standards and requirements. Toyota Australia applies the Federal Chamber of Automotive Ìndustries Code of
Practice for product recalls.
This process includes communication with dealers and customers. Ìn addition, dealers have access to a Dealer Product Reporting
system so that safety issues or other matters can be managed and addressed centrally. Customers concerns are managed via this
system. They might be received via the dealership or through the Customer Relations Centre: 1800 252 097.
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71 Consumer Education
Do you have systems in pIace to ensure that adequate guidance/IabeIIing on the human heaIth & safety impacts is provided to
consumers/customers during the IifecycIe of your products?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please tick 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
We provide
guidance/labelling on
safe use and disposal
of our products in the
countries where our
products are sold
Guidance/labelling is
provided in the
language of usage
where our products
are sold or distributed
We provide full and
accurate product
information and apply
the same levels of
rigour and detail
throughout all the
countries where we
sell our products
Our products comply
with national and
international
regulations on product
labelling in the
jurisdictions in which
we operate
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Detailed owner handbooks are provided with each vehicle sold in domestic or export markets. This provides information on the safe
operation of all elements of the vehicle. The information is provided in the language of usage where products are sold or distributed.
For all markets the preferred language for handbooks is English. However, individual product labels are provided in the local language
where required in accordance with national regulations.
Ìn addition Toyota marks the parts in each vehicle to indicate their recyclability to assist with the disposal process. (See p13 of Toyota
Australia Environment and Community Report 2006)
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Impact Area: OccupationaI HeaIth & Safety
72 OccupationaI HeaIth & Safety Management System
An Occupational Health & Safety Management System (OHSMS) provides a framework for managing OHS responsibilities so that they become
more integrated into business operations.
There are three dimensions on which companies can broadly invest in health and well-being: safety (reducing accidents at work etc.), ill-health
(preventing work-related illness and curing sickness, decreasing absence) and good health (improving and maximising good health, promoting
productivity and retention).
Does your company have a formaI OccupationaI HeaIth & Safety Management System (OHSMS), designed to manage aII your key
OHSMS risks?
Please tick all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc.)
Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Our company has an
OHSMS in place
The OHSMS covers
the majority of our
safety issues
The OHSMS covers
the majority of our
health issues
Our company can
identify the individuals
responsible for the
management system
within each strategic
business unit (SBU)
We provide relevant
training to staff with
specific OHS
responsibilities
We consult with our
employees on OHS
issues
The OHSMS has
been externally
certified according to
OHSAS 18001 or
other recognised
standard
In support of your answer, pIease Iist your key issues.
Safety Issues:
HeaIth Issues:
73 Measurement and Reporting
Do you measure your performance in your key OccupationaI HeaIth and Safety areas?
No.
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Yes, we measure our performance in this area and can confirm the following:
(please tick all that apply)
We have deveIoped Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to evaIuate our OHS profiIe. These reIate to reguIatory requirements for
heaIth and safety data (eg RIDDOR).
ExampIes of KPIs:
Our KPIs go beyond reguIatory requirements and we measure other data eg absenteeism causes, stress etc to understand the
heaIth reIated issues for our business
ExampIes of safety KPIs that go beyond reguIatory requirements:
ExampIes of heaIth KPIs that go beyond reguIatory requirements:
Information on KPIs is coIIated centraIIy
We benchmark our OHS performance against our peers
PIease describe how:
We pubIicIy report SOME of our reguIated OHS KPIs
We pubIicIy report ALL of our reguIated OHS KPIs
We pubIicIy report other heaIth reIated KPIs
PIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
NB: PIease treat SOME as a subset of ALL (i.e. if you publicly report "all" your regulated KPÌs, you automatically qualify for a tick for "some")
74 Scope of Information
PIease indicate how much of your business operations (e.g. prioritised by potentiaI for Ioss) are covered by your KPIs Iisted in
Question 73.
Please select all that apply as % coverage across overall business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc). Please select 0% if a statement
doesn't apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Measurement of
regulated KPÌs across
the business
Measurement of
non-regulated safety
KPÌs across the
business
Measurement of
non-regulated health
KPÌs across the
business
Extent of public
reporting on regulated
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OHS KPÌs
Extent of public
reporting on
non-regulated OHS
KPÌs
75 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the quaIity of the information used to derive your KPIs in Question 73.
Please select only one.
Impact not measured
LargeIy based on estimates
Based on verifiabIe data coIIection accounting for LESS than 75% of the totaI
Based on verifiabIe data coIIection accounting for MORE than 75% of the totaI
IndependentIy verified or externaIIy certified according to OHSAS 18001 or other recognised standard
If data has been independentIy verified, pIease indicate how and provide a copy of the verification statement. If this is in the pubIic
domain, pIease indicate report page/ web-Iink:
76 Targets
Has your company set performance improvement targets in addition to your management targets for occupationaI, heaIth and safety?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc). Please select "0%" if a statement doesn't
apply.
0% 1-25 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Performance
improvement targets
have been set for
safety
Performance
improvement targets
have been set for
health
Targets have been
achieved across the
business during the
last year
OHS targets are in
the public domain
Performance against
targets is reported
publicly
PIease provide exampIes of your OHS targets for the Iast reporting year, pIus reIevant data to demonstrate that targets have been
achieved:
If OHS targets and performance against them are reported pubIicIy, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
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Impact Area: Labour Rights in the SuppIy Chain
77 Code of Conduct
This impact area is particularly relevant to companies that have supply chains outside developed countries and operate in the following sectors:
retail, apparel, sports goods, toy manufacture, food and tobacco, electronic, computer and telecommunications.
Has your company deveIoped a code which requires suppIiers to uphoId Iabour standards that meet core ILO conventions on Iabour
rights?
No
We are in the process of deveIoping a Code of Conduct which requires our suppIiers to uphoId core commitments reIating to Iabour
standards. The areas which wiII be covered are provided beIow (pIease provide date for impIementation)
Yes, we have deveIoped a Code of Conduct which requires our suppIiers to uphoId core commitments reIating to Iabour standards.
It has not yet been disseminated to aII our suppIiers. The areas covered are provided beIow
Yes, we have deveIoped a Code of Conduct which requires our suppIiers to uphoId core commitments reIating to Iabour standards.
It has been transIated and disseminated to aII our suppIiers. The areas covered are provided beIow
Yes, we have deveIoped a Code of Conduct which requires our suppIiers to uphoId core commitments reIating to Iabour standards.
It has been transIated and disseminated to aII our suppIiers, and their empIoyees. The areas covered are provided beIow
Please state the areas covered by your Code of Conduct and provide a copy of it in support of your answer:
78 Measurement and Reporting
Do you monitor your suppIiers operations/faciIities to assess their compIiance with your suppIier code of conduct?
No
We have an ad-hoc process to monitor or are in the process of deveIoping systems to prioritise our suppIiers to compIy with our
Code of Conduct.
Yes, we monitor whether our prioritised suppIiers (existing suppIiers) compIy with the core Iabour standards within our Code of
Conduct.
Yes, we monitor whether our prioritised suppIiers (existing and new suppIiers) compIy with core Iabour standards within our Code
of Conduct.
Yes, we monitor whether our prioritised suppIiers (existing and new suppIiers) compIy with core Iabour standards within our Code
of Conduct, and we pubIicIy report on our activities in this area.
Ìf you report on supplier monitoring, please indicate report page or provide direct web-link:
Please provide details of your monitoring programme below.
79 Scope of Information
PIease indicate how much of your prioritised gIobaI suppIy chain operations have been monitored in the Iast two years, to ensure
compIiance with your code of conduct.
0%
1-25%
26 - 50%
51- 75%
> 75%
80 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the method of monitoring your suppIy chain as indicated in Q.78.
We do not coIIect information on this impact area
Information derived from media or NGO pubIicity
Based on internaI monitoring conducted by our company
Based on internaI monitoring conducted by our company incorporating interviews with workers
Based on internaI monitoring and confidentiaI interviews with workers through third parties (e.g. by NGOs, consuItants)
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Please describe your monitoring process below, indicating any third parties that may be involved.
81 Remediation PIans
Does your company have remediation pIans in pIace in the event that Iabour rights concerns are identified in your suppIy chain?
No
Yes, we are deveIoping remediation pIans in association with our suppIiers in countries where Iabour rights issues may be of
concern
We have deveIoped remediation pIans in association with our suppIiers
We have deveIoped remediation pIans in association with our suppIiers, and we can demonstrate we have procedures in pIace to
prevent actuaI/future occurrences
Please describe your remediation plans below, and for statement 4, the procedures you have in place to prevent further occurrences.
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Impact Area: Diversity in the WorkpIace
82 Corporate Commitment
How does your company demonstrate Ieadership on diversity issues through your business?Please select all that apply.
Our company has a board IeveI individuaI who 'champions' our company's diversity activities
PIease name champion:
Our company:
Please select all that apply.
Has an equaI opportunities poIicy
Has a diversity poIicy (pIease upIoad or provide web-Iink beIow)
The diversity poIicy is avaiIabIe in the pubIic domain.
PIease indicate where this can be found in the pubIic domain:
Has set management objectives on diversity.
PIease give exampIes of objectives:
Works with a reIevant organisation on a key strand of diversity.
PIease specify organisation and strand of diversity:
Works with a reIevant organisation on a second key strand of diversity (in addition to the one mentioned above).
PIease specify organisation and strand of diversity:
Benchmarks performance on one or more strands of diversity.
PIease describe benchmarking undertaken:
83 Investment in Diversity
Do you have an identifiabIe budget/resource for achieving your goaIs on diversity?
Please tick all that apply.
No identifiabIe budget avaiIabIe
Yes, we have an identifiabIe budget avaiIabIe and:
Our company has deveIoped a business case for working on diversity issues
PIease provide business case
Our company has a range of supportive activities avaiIabIe for staff to promote diversity (deveIopment programmes, mentoring
schemes, career counseIIing, secondments, work shadowing, networks)
PIease describe activities undertaken:
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We can track the take up of staff from different diversity strands who participate in our staff deveIopment programmes, in
jurisdictions where this is IegaIIy possibIe
EmpIoyee time aIIocated to diversity activities which are not part of the individuaI's fuII-time job description, such as equaIity and
diversity representative roIes, is measured and integrated into performance appraisaIs
84 EmpIoyment
Have you mainstreamed diversity ('diversity-proofed') through your empIoyment processes?Please tick all that apply.
CuIturaI awareness and diversity training (incIuding IegaI framework) is provided for staff invoIved in recruitment and seIection
CuIturaI awareness and diversity training (incIuding IegaI framework) is provided to aII supervisors and managers
PIease describe training provided for each statement seIected:
We use a variety of recruitment sources and methods to ensure a diverse range of appIicants
The organisation has reviewed its training and deveIopment processes to ensure they are diversity-proofed
PIease provide a description for each statement seIected:
The organisation has reviewed its seIection process and recruitment strategy to ensure that it is diversity-proofed (eg appIication
forms, appIication/interview/ psychometric questions that couId Iead to bias, assessment centres)
The organisation has reviewed its promotion and succession pIanning processes to ensure they are diversity-proofed
The organisation has reviewed its grievance procedure to ensure it is diversity proofed.
The organisation has reviewed the diversity profiIe of staff Ieaving or made redundant to evaIuate if there is a bias or diversity issue
PIease describe how your company has reviewed the empIoyment processes for each statement seIected:
85 Measurement of Workforce Diversity ProfiIe
Do you measure your current workforce and diversity profiIe (in the jurisdictions where this is IegaIIy possibIe) throughout your
business operations and use this information to support your diversity programmes?
Please select all that apply as % business coverage (e.g. no. of employees).
Please select 0% if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
We measure our
workforce profile by
gender
We measure our
workforce profile by
ethnicity
We measure our
workforce profile for
disability
We measure our
workforce profile by
age
We measure other
employee related
profiles, in addition to
the profile of our
existing workforce
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86 Performance Improvement
Can you demonstrate progress towards achieving your diversity goaIs?
Please answer for two key strands of diversity that your company is focusing on.
Name first diversity strand you are reporting on:
Name second diversity strand you are reporting on:
We cannot demonstrate
progress.
We can demonstrate
progress in the Iast year.
We can demonstrate
progress in the Iast 2
years.
We can demonstrate
progress in the Iast 3
years.
Diversity Strand 1
Diversity Strand 2
We can provide trend data to demonstrate progress towards achieving our diversity goaIs.
Please provide data to support your answer below. The first year of measurement establishes a baseline, i.e. data would be required for the last
4 years to demonstrate progress over the last 3-5 years.
Diversity Strand 1
Year Data Metric
Reporting Period 1 - LATEST
(e.g. 2005)
Reporting Period 2 (e.g. 2004)
Reporting Period 3 (e.g. 2003)
Reporting Period 4 (e.g. 2002)
Diversity Strand 2
Year Data Metric
Reporting Period 1 - LATEST
(e.g. 2005)
Reporting Period 2 (e.g. 2004)
Reporting Period 3 (e.g. 2003)
Reporting Period 4 (e.g. 2002)
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Impact Area: Community Investment (CI)
87 Community Investment Strategy
A.
Does your community investment strategy Iink with your organisation's key risks and opportunities and with your community's key
needs or concerns, as identified in Question 16?
Please select one:
No, we do not have a community investment strategy
Our individuaI business/operating units undertake community investment programmes but this is not Iinked to an overaII strategy
Our community investment strategy partiaIIy Iinks with our key risks and opportunities
Our community investment strategy fuIIy Iinks with our key risks and opportunities
B.
Has your company estabIished strategic partnerships to deIiver your community investment strategy?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by % of your community programmes). Please select "0%" if a statement does
not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Our community
investment programes
include work with a
community partner(s)
We have a formal
agreement in place,
setting out aims and
objectives for each
programme and the
terms of involvement.
There is a formal exit
strategy, including
timescales of
involvement, agreed
by all relevant parties
at the outset of each
programme.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
The Community Spirit program has two National Partnerships. Aims and objectives for each are published yearly on the website.
see below
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1655%2526sectionÌd%253D230,00.html
88 Measurement of Inputs
Does your company measure and centraIIy coIIate the inputs of your corporate community investment activities across your business
operations? These may be in the form of charitabIe gifts, community investment or commerciaI initiatives in the community.
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Select 0% if a statement does not apply.
Please refer to guidance notes for examples of each input.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Cash
Employee time
Gifts in kind
Management costs
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In support of your answers above pIease provide input data for the Iast reporting period:
Total Cash invested (£) $646,599
Total cost of Employee Time (£) $80,000
Percentage of employees volunteering in company time, or in their
own time, on the company's community programmes.
9.96%
Total cost of Gifts in Kind (£) nil
Total Management costs (£) $160,082
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Ìnputs are coordinated under the banner of Toyota Community Spirit. Ìnputs are identified in the Schedules attached to the Partnership
Agreements negotiated with each community partner.
Ìnputs vary depending on the program of activities developed with each community partner each year.
see hard copy in evidence
89 Measurement of Outputs
Do you measure and centraIIy coIIate the outputs from your community investment programmes?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by % of your community programmes).Select "0%" if a statement does not
apply.
Please refer to guidance notes for examples of each output
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
Leverage
Community Benefit
Business Benefit
PIease provide the outputs from the Iast reporting period beIow:
Leverage (e.g. if you run an empIoyee payroII giving scheme, pIease provide the % of empIoyees participating in it)
Toyota Community Spirit national partnerships operate with a goal of community capacity building. Ìnvestments directed to national
partners are specifically targeted into programs that can attract additional investment, resources and commitment from external parties.
Details are included within the schedules of each partnership document and in the Environment and Community Report
Community benefits
Toyota Community Spirit national partnerships operate with a goal of community capacity building. Ìnvestments directed to national
partners are specifically targeted into programs that can attract additional investment, resources and commitment from external parties.
Details are included within the schedules of each partnership document andin the Environment and Community Report
Business benefits
Toyota Community Spirit national partnerships operate with a goal of community capacity building. Ìnvestments directed to national
partners are specifically targeted into programs that can attract additional investment, resources and commitment from external parties.
Details are included within the schedules of each partnership document and in the Environment and Community Report.
Business benefits are also measured as a part of the Balanced Scorecard corporate performance measure and are reviewed by the
board
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List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Evaluation criteria is identified for each community partnership. This is detailed in the Schedules attached to the Partnership Agreement
negotiated with each community partner.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Regular meetings are held with community partners to monitor progress against measures and targets identified in each partnership
agreement. An evaluation report is prepared for each partnership annually.
90 Impact of Programmes
PIease Iist 2 of your community investment programmes and compIete this question with reference to these:
Programme 1
Conservation Volunteers Australia
Programme 2
Australian Business Arts Foundation
Community Impact
Please indicate which of the statements below best describes your performance in this area.
A B C C and D C, D and E
Programme 1
Programme 2
QuaIifying statements:
A We cannot demonstrate any long-term community impact from our programmes.
B We can demonstrate the long-term community impact from our programmes - through anecdotal information.
C There is a formal feedback process in place which demonstrates a positive community impact from our programmes.
ExampIes of positive community impact as a resuIt of investment:
Programme 1
500 people enrolled inVolunteer Certificates in Active Volunterring 1
Programme 2
AbaF- 21 Councils have participated in the Arts Conecting Communities Program. 4 completed program.
D We have regular dialogue with our community stakeholders and use their feedback to evaluate and continually improve our programmes.
ExampIes of improvement:
Programme 1
Partnerships are reviewed annually and revised objectives included in the schedules of the Partnership Agreements
Programme 2
Partnerships are reviewed annually and revised objectives included in the schedules of the Partnership Agreements
E We can provide an independent 3rd party evaluation of the success of our investment programme(s). We are also able to demonstrate a
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positive business benefit from our involvement in these programmes.
ExampIes of 3rd party evaIuation:
Programme 1
Toyota Australia Community and Environment report 2006 Assurance Review - 2006 pg. 65
Programme 2
Toyota Australia Community and Environment report 2006 Assurance Review - 2006 pg. 66
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
See
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1578%2526thirdÌd%253D1596%2526sectionÌd%253D230,00.html
for program schedules
also
Toyota Australia 2006 Assurance Review - 2006
91 Reporting
Do you report your community investment activities?
Please select all that apply as % coverage across business (e.g. by turnover, no. of employees, etc).
Please select "0%" if a statement does not apply.
0% 1-25% 26-50% 51-75% >75%
We communicate our
community
investment activities
internally.
We publicly report our
community
investment activities.
We publicly report the
inputs of our
community
investment activities.
We publicly report the
outputs and, where
relevant, impacts.
We publicly report our
targets in this area.
We publicly report our
performance showing
trends over time.
PIease provide report pages or direct web-Iinks beIow.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Community Spirit was piloted during 2001-2003. Activities undertaken during the pilot have been reported publicly. Reporting of
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activities via the website has increased including performance against partnership objectives and targets.
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1610%2526sectionÌd%253D230,00.html
Examples of supporting evidence
· Copy of company report (TMCA Community and Environment Report 2006, p.25- 30 'Community & Stakeholder Engagement')
www.environment.toyota.com.au > Community and Stakeholders
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SeIf SeIected SociaI Impact
SeIf SeIected SociaI Impact
As your third sociaI impact area, you may either choose to compIete another section from the core sociaI impact areas (Questions 68
- 91), or compIete the foIIowing section on a seIf-seIected impact.
SeIect impact area (generaI):
State impact area (more specificaIIy):
Workplace Relations
What criteria did you use to seIect this area, for exampIe, does it Iink to your key issues?
Ìt is identified in our key issues
Are these impacts covered by the corporate objectives and targets identified in the management sections?
Yes
No
If not seIecting the impact area suggested for your sector in the Guidance Notes or the on-Iine heIp pIease expIain why.
N/A
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Ìt is identified in our key issues
92 Corporate Commitment
Can your company demonstrate a cIear commitment to the specific impact area that you have seIected?
No,
We are not abIe to demonstrate a cIear committment in reIation to the seIected impact area
Yes, and (please tick all that apply):
A cIear poIicy statement or defined standard has been deveIoped in reIation to the impact area
Strategic objectives have been defined at a corporate IeveI
Strategic objectives have been defined within the individuaI parts of the business/business divisions
There are cIearIy defined responsibiIities throughout the corporate entity for the management of this impact area
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
See Toyota Motor Corporation Australia Workplace Agreement (Altona) 2005, Toyota Motor Corporation Australia Workplace
Agreement (Port Melbourne, Sydney & regions), 2005, Toyota Way and Company policy, including Workplace Relationships policy.
Strategic objectives are managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are
developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
Balanced scorecard objectives, measures and targets are cascaded from the Board of Directors through the operating Arms, Divisions,
and Departments to the individual. Employee performance measurement and reward and recognition are linked to the achievement of
the balanced scorecard objectives.
The Plan, Do Check, Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
93 Measurement and Reporting
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Have you impIemented systems throughout the organisation to enabIe the impact area to be measured?
No,
We do not coIIect information on this impact area
Yes, and (please tick all that apply):
We coIIect information reIating to this impact area
We can demonstrate that the information coIIected is used by management to inform their decision making/management decisions
process
We are abIe to measure our performance on this area (eg by setting of KPIs)
PIease provide KPIs:
Nil production days lost to industrial action
Performance improvement targets have been set by those directIy responsibIe for managing the impact area
PIease provide performance improvement targets:
Ìmprovement target is to achieve nil production days lost to industrial action.
We pubIicIy report our progress on this impact area
Reference report page or web-Iink:
No
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
See Toyota Motor Corporation Australia Workplace Agreement (Altona) 2005, Toyota Motor Corporation Australia Workplace
Agreement (Port Melboune, Sydney & regions), 2005, Toyota Way and Company policy, including Workplace Relationships policy.
Strategic objectives are managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are
developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
Balanced scorecard objectives, measures and targets are cascaded from the Board of Directors through the operating Arms, Divisions,
and Departments to the individual. Employee performance measurement and reward and recognition are linked to the achievement of
the balanced scorecard objectives.
The Plan, Do Check, Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
94 QuaIity of Information
PIease indicate the quaIity of the information coIIected to measure your performance in this area. Please tick one.
We do not coIIect information for this impact area
LargeIy based on estimates
Based on a combination of estimates and verifiabIe data coIIection (the Iatter accounting for Iess than 75% of the totaI)
Based on a combination of estimates and verifiabIe data coIIection (the Iatter accounting for more than 75% of the totaI)
IndependentIy verified
If data has been independentIy verified, pIease expIain how and provide a copy of the verification statement. If this is in the pubIic
domain, pIease indicate report page or direct web-Iink:
No
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Performance against Balanced scorecard objectives and targets is reported quarterly to the Board and is supported by Divisional
scorecards that are updated monthly and/or quarterly on the on-line balanced scorecard reporting system.
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95 Coverage
PIease indicate how much of your overaII operations (e.g. percentage by turnover) is covered by the measurement of this impact area.
0%
1-25%
26-50%
51-75%
>75%
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
This applies to all of Toyota Australia's operations
96 Performance Improvement
Which phrase most cIoseIy describes your company's performance in this area?
Please select one.
We cannot demonstrate any performance improvement associated with the management of this area
Management of this impact area is undertaken at a IocaI IeveI, and we do not have reporting mechanisms in pIace to inform the
management chain that the impact area is being managed and business performance is improving
InternaI reporting systems are in pIace that demonstrate and inform the management chain that the impact area is being managed
and business performance is improving (internaI management reporting)
We can demonstrate performance improvement in this impact area:
Please select one.
Over the Iast year
Over the Iast two years
Over the Iast three to five years
PIease provide reIevant trend data in support of your answer:
The first year of data collection is the baseline - i.e. if you have data for 2003 and 2004 only, this would qualify for one year improvement, if an
improvement has indeed been made. To demonstrate a performance improvement over the last 3-5 years, data is therefore required for the last
4 years.
State KPI:
No production days lost due to industrial action
Reporting Period 1 - LATEST (e.g. 2005)
Nil
Reporting Period 2 (e.g. 2004)
Nil
Reporting Period 3 (e.g. 2003)
Nil
Reporting Period 4 (e.g. 2002)
(WPA negotiations)
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List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Strategic objectives are managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are
developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
Balanced scorecard objectives, measures and targets are cascaded from the Board of Directors through the operating Arms, Divisions,
and Departments to the individual. Employee performance measurement and reward and recognition are linked to the achievement of
the balanced scorecard objectives.
The Plan, Do Check, Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Toyota Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards
that are updated monthly and/or quarterly.
97a Assurance Process (EI and CI))
PART A - Assurance
Definition
An assurance management process is a formal system used to provide someone with confidence that all information collected for a particular
purpose is of an acceptable quality and that it addresses all relevant risks. In the case of corporate responsibility, such a system would ensure a
company that information relating to Community, Environment, Marketplace and Workplace is accurate, relevant and reliable.
Do you have a management process in pIace to provide you with assurance that your corporate responsibiIity information is of an
acceptabIe quaIity?
Please tick one in each row.
EstabIished
procedures not in
pIace
Is in the process of
deveIoping
procedures
Yes, and can
confirm statements
A, B and C
Yes and can confirm
statements A, B, C
and D
Yes and can confirm
ALL statements
Community
Environment
Marketplace-
Suppliers
Marketplace -
Customers/consumers
Workplace -
Occupational, health
and safety
Workplace -
Employee issues
QuaIifying Statements
Our company has:
A. Established clear reporting requirements for business units to generate accurate data this area.
B. Established methods/systems for reporting and communicating information in this area.
C. A competent person(s) with appropriate authority who has checked and signed-off that the information for this area is correct.
D. An effective method for collating information from different business units into overall corporate data for this area.
E. An assurance process to ensure quality of information in this area, which is reviewed for effectiveness by an independent group audit or a
third party verification.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
SWOT analysis for risks and opportunities is done by each Division and at the corporate level at least yearly and in some Divisions more
frequently.
Ìssues are then prioritised for impact and urgency.
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Priority issues are included in the Long Term Business Plan and managed through the balanced scorecard system via specific
measures and targets. Supporting initiatives are developed to address priority issues and business opportunities.
The Plan Do Check Act cycle maintains a constant focus on issues and risks and their impact on strategy delivery.
Performance against balanced scorecard targets is reported quarterly to the Board and is supported by Divisional scorecards that are
updated monthly and/or quarterly.
The information that was used in this survey was drawn from the Division or Department responsible and/or verified by the Balanced
Scorecard Reporting System.
Environmental, supplier and community issues and processes are independently verified as part of the production of the Environment
and Community Report.
Environment and Community Report 2006
www.environment.toyota.com.au see Verification statement: p31 and URS audit report and stakeholder feedback report.
Ìn addition, Workplace issues have been independently verified as part of a Global HR Assessment conducted by Toyota Motor
Corporation of Toyota Affiliates.
Toyota Australia also participates in industry wide research into customer satisfaction and product quality. This research test the
effectiveness of customer satisfaction programs and other customer related initiatives. Ìt also enables the company to identify trends
and benchmark itself against other manufacturers or distributors.
97b DiscIosure (EI and CI)
PART B - DiscIosure
The uItimate test of assurance, with regards to information submitted within this survey, is whether companies wouId be prepared to
share information submitted during the Index process.
PIease note that your answer to this question wiII contribute to your overaII Index score.
Please select all that apply.
We wiII put our 2006 CR Index confidentiaI feedback report in the pubIic domain (if not the fuII report, at Ieast the graph
summarising overaII performance).
If you have discIosed this aIready Iast year, pIease indicate where your 2005 Index feedback report is in the pubIic domain:
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1525%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html
We wiII share our fuII survey submission* with any Index participant on a mutuaI basis on request.
If you have aIready done so with your 2005 submission, pIease provide detaiIs:
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1525%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html
We wiII discIose our fuII survey submission* to the investment community on request.
If you have aIready done so with your 2005 submission, pIease provide detaiIs:
http://www.toyota.com.au/corporate/articles/0,2862,subÌd%253D1525%2526sectionÌd%253D880,00.html
*Full submission refers to the PDF of your submission, including any supporting text, but excluding any attached documents. Supporting text can
sometimes include commercially sensitive information, which can be reasonably excluded, i.e. considered outside the term "full submission".
St James Ethics Centre wiII not uniIateraIIy discIose any information without specific permission from the company. However, your
wiIIingness to discIose information may be indicated pubIicIy when the Index resuIts are pubIished.
List of supporting evidence and cIarification
Toyota Australia has placed its previous survey submissions and confidential feedback reports on the Toyota website.
See: www.toyota.com.au/About Toyota
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Factors That CouId Affect Company Performance
This question will not be scored.
Since corporate restructuring and mergers and acquisitions activity might lead to significant changes in company performance in the Ìndex, we
feel that it is important for each company to be able to justify the possible reasons for this. The space below is provided for you to share with us
any important events or happenings over the last year, which could potentially affect this year's performance.
n/a
Case Study ExampIes
Business in the Community recognises that case studies are an effective way of sharing good practice and often makes use of the information
provided by companies in the CR Ìndex either on its web-site or through articles and reports on the results of the CR Ìndex.
The space beIow is provided for you to share an exampIe of how your company has successfuIIy tackIed a specific CR issue. IdeaIIy
this wouId be a short paragraph (approximateIy 300 words) highIighting both environmentaI and/or sociaI impact and key business
benefits.
NB: case studies provided will be part of an internal data-base and your company will be contacted prior to any disclosure of the information.
Community
Environment
MarketpIace
WorkpIace
Feedback - VaIue of Index Participation
We would welcome any feedback on how your company has benefited from its participation in the CR Ìndex. We use such information to track
the value and usefulness of the Ìndex to the business community and to engage potential newcomers. Equally, if you have any complaints or
suggestions for improvement, please let us know.
The space beIow is provided for you to share your company's experiences and comments:
CEO Sign Off
Yes, I've faxed or posted a signed copy of this page.
Please print this page, sign it, then return it to Emily Albert at St James Ethics Centre on the following: fax +61 (0)2 9299 9477, or by post to
GPO Box 3599 Sydney NSW 2001. (Tick this box when the fax or letter has been sent).
St James Ethics Centre require the finaI sign off from the Chairman, Chief Executive or a Board Director responsibIe for Corporate
ResponsibiIity in your organisation. Once we have received this sheet St James Ethics Centre wiII process your survey resuIts.
As part of the assurance process for the survey, you may find it useful to have additional sign off by key senior management staff with specific
responsibilities for the information contained with the survey. This may form part of your normal internal risk management and governance
procedures. We have provided an example sign off sheet for your use to assist you in this process.
I am satisfied that the completed survey is in accordance with our company's commitment to corporate responsibility management. I can confirm
that the information provided herein is true to the best of my knowledge. I also confirm that supporting evidence required by Ernst & Young for
2006 Corporate ResponsibiIity Index - Toyota Motor Corporation AustraIia Limited
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validation purposes will be provided if requested.
Company Name
Toyota Motor Corporation Australia
Signature
Name
Bernie O'Connor
TitIe
Executive director of Corporate Sevices
Date
22 November 2006
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