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As an AOTA member, you are eligible to take advantage of a variety of special benefits and insurance plans. AOTA sponsors these group insurance plans designed especially for your needs.
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Administered by Marsh U.S. Consumer, a service of Seabury & Smith, Inc. *Liberty Insurance Underwriters Inc., a member company of Liberty Mutual Group. 55 Water Street, New York, New York 10041. May not be available in all states. Pending underwriter approval. **Underwritten by The United States Life Insurance Company in the City of New York. ***Underwritten by Hartford Life Insurance Company and Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company, Simsbury, CT 06089

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Visit this AOTA Platinum Sponsor at Booth 624

2012 ANNUAL CONFERENCE & EXPO

APRIL 26–29 INDIANAPOLIS, IN

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CONFERENCE PROGRAM GUIDE

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The AmeriCAn OCCupATiOnAl TherApy AssOCiATiOn 92nd AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

Welcome from AOTA president florence Clark
Thank you for joining us at the AOTA 2012 Annual Conference & Expo! As your AOTA President, it is an honor each year to welcome you to this exceptional event and experience our presence together as a united profession . I’m excited about our progressive theme this year—Science, Innovation, and Evidence—and the great expectation that we will leave transformed by greater confidence and vision for our practice, research, and education .
It is quite clear from the economic and legislative issues we face today that as individuals and as the body of occupational therapy we must be empowered to increase our competitiveness, advocacy, and equitability in health care . From the start, my focus as your President has been to encourage the transformation of occupational therapy into “high definition .” Now, we are taking an even greater step forward with an emphasis on discerning and applying the power of scientific evidence in best practice, an evolution to occupational therapy in high definition in three dimension . Find out more about that at my Presidential Address on Friday . Please take the time to read the Conference Program Guide and take advantage of what it offers . From Pre-Conference Institutes to General Sessions such as the Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture and the Plenary Session on Army Occupational Therapy, to a scope of practice education and networking, these four days can be a groundbreaking experience for you . Also, you have the opportunity to attend an AOTA Town Hall Meeting this Friday to hear updates about our profession’s progress and challenges, ask questions, and share perspectives . Once again, welcome! Let’s get started right now creating and sharing the power that lies within us, and showing the world that we are a high-definition-in-three-dimension profession .

Table of Contents
Conference at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Greetings From the Local Conference Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Conference Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 How To Use This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 General Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Special Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Educational Session Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TAB 1 Wednesday Pre-Conference Institutes and Seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Thursday Educational Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 2012 Conference Corporate Sponsors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Thursday Poster Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Friday Educational Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 SIS Roundtable Discussions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Friday Poster Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Saturday Educational Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 SIS Buzz Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Tech Day I, II, III Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73, 74, 77 Saturday Poster Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Sunday Educational Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 AOTA 2012 Expo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TAB 2 Expo Hall Floor Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 Exhibitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 Indiana Convention Center Floor Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94–95 J .W . Marriott Hotel Floor Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Downtown Indianapolis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 2012 Call for Papers Reviewers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 2013 Call for Papers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 2012 Meetings Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 Presenters Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Advertisers Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Action Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106–107 The 2012 AOTA Annual Conference Program Guide is sponsored by

Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

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Through the USC Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) program, you will learn how to apply new knowledge developed in occupational science to meet the challenges of health needs and changing health care systems. The professional doctorate program is individualized and provides the following four leadership tracks so that each student can chart his or her own future while study with our outstanding faculty who are on the vanguard of occupational therapy practice and occupational science research:

The USC Occupational Science Ph.D. program will prepare you to become an academic leader as a career scientist through immersion in established interdisciplinary funded research groups to support skill development in producing peer reviewed publications and fundable research proposals, managing a research group, and flourishing in the academic work environment. You will benefit from small classes, individual attention, mentoring from career scientists, and interaction and collaboration with fellow students of high academic ability in a community of scholars. You will participate in socially responsive research groups that will train you to take Occupational Science and the professoriate of Occupational Therapy to the next level in:

   

Advanced Clinical Practice Policy/Administrative Leadership Educational Leadership Clinical Research Expertise

All OTD students take at least two courses in other schools or divisions at USC. These courses constitute your cognates which you can choose from USC schools and programs such as:

 Clinical Trials for Occupational Therapy & Rehabilitation  Health Disparities & Cultural Influences on Health &  
Recovery Community Reintegration & Social Participation Engagement, Activity, & Neuroscience Interventions

    

School of Policy, Planning, and Development School of Business School of Gerontology Public Health Program School of Education

TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIPS AVAILABLE!

Total support is about $60,000 per year, including: full tuition coverage, a $28,000 living stipend, and student health and dental benefits.

FELLOWSHIP SUPPORT INCLUDED!

Visit us at Booth 1032

online at www.usc.edu/ot
Visit this AOTA Bronze Sponsor at Booth 1032

tweet @USCOSOT
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2012 Conference At A Glance
WednesdAy, April 25 10:00 am–7:00 pm 12:00 pm–6:30 pm 7:30 pm–9:00 pm ThursdAy, April 26 7:00 am–7:00 pm 7:15 am–7:45 am 7:30 am–9:00 am 8:00 am–11:30 am 9:30 am–11:30 am 12:30 pm–3:30 pm 1:00 pm–3:00 pm 4:00 pm–5:30 pm 5:30 pm–9:00 pm 8:30 pm–10:30 pm fridAy, April 27 6:45 am–7:30 am 7:30 am–9:00 am 7:30 am–5:30 pm 8:00 am–11:00 am 11:00 am–5:30 pm 11:15 am–12:00 pm 12:00 pm–2:45 pm 12:30 pm–1:30 pm 12:30 pm–2:30 pm 2:00 pm–3:00 pm 2:00 pm–5:00 pm 2:00 pm–5:00 pm 3:00 pm–5:00 pm 3:30 pm–5:00 pm 5:15 pm–6:30 pm 8:00 pm–11:00 pm SIS Fitness Event—Bodybalance AOTF Breakfast with a Scholar— Lex Frieden Registration Open Educational Sessions Expo Hall Presidential Address—Florence Clark Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars SIS Roundtable Discussions Poster Session #3 Town Hall Meeting AOTF Research Colloquium Educational Sessions Poster Session #4 Centennial Vision Session (SC226) Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture —Karen Jacobs 2012 AOTF Gala
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sATurdAy, April 28 Registration Open Pre-Conference Institutes & Seminars SIS Networking Reception 6:45 am–7:30 am 7:30 am–5:30 pm 8:00 am–11:00 am 8:30 am–9:30 am Registration Open First-Timers Orientation International Breakfast— Sharon Brintnell Educational Sessions Poster Session #1 Educational Sessions Poster Session #2 Welcome Ceremony & Keynote Address—Joseph F . Coughlin Expo Hall Grand Opening and Welcome Reception Students Un-Conferenced 12:30 pm–2:30 pm 1:30 pm–3:00 pm 1:45 pm–5:15 pm 3:30 pm–5:00 pm 5:30 pm–6:30 pm 6:45 pm–7:45 pm 7:30 pm–10:30 pm sundAy, April 29 7:30 am–10:00 am 8:00 am–11:00 pm Registration Open Educational Sessions 9:30 am–11:00 am 9:30 am–2:30 pm 10:00 am–11:00 am 10:00 am–12:00 pm 10:00 am–12:45 pm 11:15 am–12:00 pm 12:15 pm–1:15 pm Fitness Event— SIS Fun Run & Walk Registration Open Educational Sessions SIS Buzz Sessions #1 Tech Day I Expo Hall SIS Buzz Sessions #2 Poster Session #5 Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars Plenary—Robinette J . Amaker AOTA’s 92nd Annual Business Meeting Poster Session #6 Tech Day II Educational Sessions Tech Day III Annual Awards & Recognition Ceremony Annual Awards & Recognition Reception AOTPAC Night

Greetings from the local Conference Committee
Welcome to Indianapolis!
On behalf of the AOTA 2012 Indianapolis Local Conference Committee, we are thrilled to host the 92nd Annual Conference & Expo of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) . Downtown Indianapolis has spectacular shopping, dining, and entertainment venues to host major events . We pride ourselves on our many exciting attractions and Hoosier hospitality . We encourage you to take time before and after the conference to explore everything Indianapolis has to offer . One of the first things people notice about our amazing capital city is the Indianapolis International Airport (IND) . It is the first new international airport built after 9/11, resulting in more spacious and accessible security areas, and offering a wide variety of shopping and dining options . A 15-minute cab or shuttle ride from the airport brings you to the heart of our beautiful, pedestrian-friendly city . Indianapolis has been heralded as a model city for its spotlight on disability issues and establishment of accessible services, programs, and facilities . No matter what the weather is, you are sure to stay dry and find something to do in the Circle City! All of the hotels being utilized for the 2012 AOTA Annual Conference & Expo are connected by accessible sky bridges to the Indiana Convention Center and the four-level Circle Centre Mall . Downtown Indianapolis has over a hundred dining options with many more just blocks away in the trendy Fountain Square and Massachusetts Avenue neighborhoods . There are several notable attractions in Central Indiana . The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, the largest children’s museum in the world, has something for children of all ages . Located just blocks from the convention center, The Indianapolis Zoo is ranked among the nation’s top zoos . Home of the Indianapolis Colts and the 2012 Super Bowl, Lucas Oil Stadium is just one of the facilities that have helped Indianapolis build its world renowned reputation in both amateur and professional sports . The Indianapolis Motor Speedway is host to the world’s 1st and 2nd largest single-day sporting events, the Indianapolis 500 and the Brickyard 400 . The AOTA 2012 Indianapolis Local Conference Committee welcomes you to Indy and is ready to extend our Hoosier hospitality . Please stop by the Information/Hospitality/Accessibility Services Booth, located in the registration area, if you have any questions or just want to find out more about our city . Welcome to Indianapolis! Kate DeCleene, OTD, MS, OTR AOTA 2012 Local Conference Committee Chair

Conference Charities

CHAMP Camp (http://www.champcamp.org) is a private, non-profit organization funded by the generosity of individuals and corporations, grants from foundations, and through special events . Campers have the freedom to explore the many facets of the outdoor environment by participating in activities that include fishing, boating, canoeing, creative arts, swimming, horseback riding, and nature study . Each camper sets his own goal and pace . Many of the campers have unique physical challenges so CHAMP Camp is a community where victories, big and small, are celebrated! Campers build faith in themselves and trust in others… and it’s where accomplishments happen because of imagination and motivation . Counselors are healthcare professionals, such as nurses, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, child life specialists, teachers, recreation professionals, and physicians . At camp, they are also friends and mentors . CHAMP Camp is held in mid-June at Bradford Woods in Martinsville, IN . Teachers’ Treasures (http:// teacherstreasures.org) began in 2000 when a former teacher and a principal had a dream of a free school supply store funded by businesses and citizens in the community . She observed during her years in education how learning was stunted and self-esteem lowered when students did not have adequate resources . Teachers’ Treasures, a free store for teachers in grades K-12, collects unwanted school supplies and surplus merchandise and distributes them to teachers . For a minimal annual fee, teachers of qualifying schools are able to “shop” free of charge once per month . No value limits are put on the items they select . On average, 600 teachers shop each month, taking over $350 worth of supplies back to their classroom . In the past 11 years, Teachers’ Treasures has distributed over $25 million dollars in supplies to teachers in Central Indiana . Teachers utilize these items in their classrooms for projects or to distribute to their students . Items include: office supplies, stationery, books for all ages, writing utensils, etc . Bring your donation items to the Information & Hospitality Booth, in the AOTA Registration Area, at the Indiana Convention Center.

Thank you
AOTA extends a heartfelt thank you to our hundreds of volunteers, presenters, proposal reviewers, and Conference planning committee members . Special thanks to the Local Conference Committee Chair—Kate DeCleene, OTD, MS, OTR; Hospitality Chairperson—Rebecca Barton, DHS, OTR; People Power Co-Chairpersons—Jennifer Fogo, PhD, OTR; Lori Breeden, MS, OTR; and Julie Carson, MA, OTR; and Accessibility Services Chairperson—Angie Kidd, COTA, CAPS .

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Conference information
Registration
Location and Hours Registration will be open at the Indiana Convention Center, in the WABASH lobby on the main level, during the following dates and times: Wednesday, April 25 10:00 am–7:00 pm Thursday, April 26 7:00 am–7:00 pm Friday, April 27 7:30 am–5:30 pm Saturday, April 28 7:30 am–5:30 pm Sunday, April 29 7:30 am–10:00 am Expo Hours Thursday, April 26 5:30 pm–9:00 pm Friday, April 27 11:00 am–5:30 pm Saturday, April 28 9:30 am–2:30 pm

Selection of Sessions for Presentation
AOTA Annual Conference & Expo sessions are selected for presentation each year by more than 150 volunteers in the Call for Papers review (with the exception of AOTA, AOTF, and SIS sessions) . This blind peer-reviewed process includes general-related submissions reviewed by four separate individuals and research-related sessions reviewed by two separate doctoral-prepared researchers . With a highest rating available of 45 points, all sessions that score higher than 37 points are considered for scheduling . Scheduling is then based on primary topic categories such as children and youth, productive aging, and others; space availability, and a balanced program that meets the diverse needs of the attendees . Practitioners and educators are invited to join the volunteer review team . If you are interested in volunteering, please send an email to conference@aota .org . At the conclusion of the review process, you will receive a letter documenting your participation .

Conference Ribbons
Attendees who qualify to wear special designation ribbons at the Conference can pick them up in the Member Resource Center in the Expo .

Food and Beverage Services Within the Convention Center
Food and beverage services are available during Conference hours and dining outlets will be open to serve beverages, breakfast, and lunch items . The Expo Opening Reception on Thursday will include an array of hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar . If you prefer to leave the Convention Center for a meal, stop by the Information Booth in the Registration area for names and locations of nearby restaurants .

Guest Registration
Attendees may register a guest by completing a Guest Registration Form available in the Registration Area at the Convention Center during regular registration hours . People who qualify as guests attend the Conference in a social capacity only . Guests may not be members of AOTA, occupational therapy practitioners, or enrolled in an occupational therapy educational program . Guests also may not attend professional program sessions . Guest registration allows admittance to the Welcome Ceremony and Keynote Address and unlimited entrance to the Expo. $85 .00 per person

Conference Filming and Photography
AOTA staff members, as well as official photographers/videographers, will photograph and film events and education sessions throughout the Conference and will be identified by Conference name badges . The photographs and videos taken at the Conference are used exclusively by AOTA for promotional purposes and continuing education offerings . They may be used in the Association’s publications or on its Web site, and they may appear in programs or other AOTA promotional materials . If you are at an event or session at which an AOTA photographer is present and you do not wish to be photographed, please identify yourself to the photographer and your request will be respected.

Badge and Event Tickets
To be admitted to any Conference activity, you must wear your official 2012 Annual Conference & Expo name badge .

Accessibility Services Center
Accommodations for individuals with accessibility needs have been made available to enable access to all scheduled programming . As is our policy, it is the responsibility of the attendee to make any accessibility needs known prior to attendance at the Conference . Advance notification provides AOTA adequate time to ensure that it can arrange for requested services . Please stop by the Information & Hospitality Booth in the Registration Area of the Indiana Convention Center for any additional assistance .

Fitness Events Waiver
AOTA recognizes that many Conference attendees enjoy participating in fitness-related events to promote their own individual health and wellness . Towards that end, AOTA is pleased to offer these types of events . However, participation is at your own risk . AOTA encourages you to participate at a
AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO 7

level that is consistent with your general physical health and abilities . By participating in the fitness events you do hereby release and forever discharge AOTA, its agents and employees, from any and all claims in connection with the AOTA fitness events .

Lost and Found
Attendees are responsible for the safekeeping of their personal property . The Lost and Found area is located at the Registration Help Desk . After the Conference, unclaimed articles will be turned over to the Convention Center’s Security Services Department .

Going Green
AOTA listened carefully to your Conference feedback about concern for a healthier environment and lessening of our carbon footprint . We have taken a number of steps to be better stewards of our environment by “going green” with our Annual Conference & Expo . This will be the 4th year that handouts are no longer provided on site . They are available online at www .aota .org/conference and will remain available for four (4) weeks following the Conference .

Other green initiatives include: n Fewer printed materials are being distributed in the Member Resource Center (MRC)/AOTA Marketplace . To access needed information, you can go to the AOTA Web site using the Cyber Café computers in the MRC/AOTA Marketplace . n The Conference Program Guide has fewer pages with more information being provided on the Web site, such as learning objectives and poster session descriptions . n Your name badge is made of biodegradable material . n Whenever possible, pitchers of water are being used rather than bottled water . n AOTA is using recycled paper that is manufactured using 30% post-consumer waste for its Conference publications . n Recycling containers for cans, bottles, and paper are available throughout the Indiana Convention Center and the JW Marriott . n The 2012 Conference tote bag is made from recycled materials and can be used as a multi-purpose carry-all at home after Conference . n Post Conference surveys are done electronically . n More of the Conference promotional mailings were done by e-mail rather than mail .

how to use This Guide
The Conference Program Guide helps maximize your Conference experience . With more than 650 Conference sessions and activities to choose from, we suggest that you plan your schedule by determining the subject areas, presenters, and networking groups of most interest to you . This is your opportunity to create a unique Conference experience tailored to your needs and interests . The Guide is sponsored by
n

n n

in-depth presentations with varying formats . Institutes are ticketed sessions and are available for an additional registration fee . Seminars also have a materials fee . General Sessions include the Welcome Ceremony and Keynote Address, Presidential Address, Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture, Plenary, Annual Business Meeting, and the Annual Awards and Recognition Ceremony . These sessions are of interest to all attendees and do not compete with educational sessions . Workshops are 3-hour presentations with formats that vary by presenter . Short Courses are typically 1 .5 hours in length . There may be a few exceptions . Check the specific session information for length of the Short Course . Research Platforms are three 20-minute research papers or four 20-minute research papers that are presented together with common themes . Each individual Research Platform is either a 1-hour or 1 .5-hour session . Research Papers are 25-minute presentations followed by a 5-minute question-and-answer period . Posters are on display during select hours from Thursday through Saturday . Thursday Poster Sessions are located in 500 Ballroom of the Convention Center . Friday and Saturday Poster Sessions are located in Exhibit Halls BCDE . Presenters will be available for 2-hour blocks at scheduled times throughout these three days . Check pages 37–46, 63–68, 81–84, and 84–86 for specific times and locations .

Sessions
Session Listings, Availability & Locations n Programs and sessions are organized chronologically by day and time . n Sessions are available to all Conference registrants depending upon seating room . Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis . n All educational sessions will be held at the Indiana Convention Center or the JW Marriott Hotel . The location for each session is listed with its description . Types of Sessions n Pre-Conference Institutes and Seminars are 6-hour,
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n

n n

Coded Sessions
Sessions coded as shown below are sponsored and presented by specific groups to address particular areas . They are identified by the following codes throughout the Conference Program Guide: n (AOTA) – American Occupational Therapy Association sessions n (AOTF) – American Occupational Therapy Foundation sessions n (SIS) – AOTA Special Interest Section sessions (AOTA) sessions address critical issues brought to AOTA by its members . Session speakers have either been invited by or include AOTA staff members . These sessions address topics such as the Centennial Vision, political advocacy, reimbursement, regulatory issues, AOTA Board Certification and AOTA Specialty Certification, the Older Driver Initiative, continuing competence, evidence-based practice, and emerging practice areas . (AOTF) sessions are conducted by the American Occupational Therapy Foundation with invited or staff member speakers . They include the AOTF Research Colloquium (see p . 14) and the AOTF Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) (see p . 88) . (SIS) sessions are sponsored by the Special Interest Section (SIS) groups within AOTA . There are 11 SIS communities and four subsections, each of which have identified sessions with invited speakers . Other SIS sessions include: business meetings that are held as part of each SIS workshop; the SIS Networking Reception (see p . 13); SIS Buzz Sessions (see p . 72); and SIS Roundtable Discussions with very limited seating (see p . 56 for topics) . SIS Roundtable Discussion tickets are free and are included with Conference registration but must be picked up in advance at the Information Booth in the Registration Area from 12:00 pm–4:00 pm on Thursday and 7:30 am–11:30 am on Friday .

discussed . Intermediate and Advanced mean that the material is geared to experienced clinical practitioners, educators, or researchers and may not be appropriate for those just beginning their professional careers . Content Focus: Each session is identified by its primary area of concentration . The content focus of a session may designate a specialized area of practice or an application to a specific age group of clients .

Handouts
Speakers are encouraged to provide handouts but it is not required . Therefore, based on the decisions of Conference speaker(s), handouts will not be posted for some sessions . Please feel free to check with the speaker(s) on whether there is access to presentation handouts .

Presenters Index
If you are looking for a specific speaker, check the Presenters Index on pages 101–104 .

Session Etiquette
Please adhere to the following session protocol to show respect to Conference presenters and session attendees . Once you enter a session, please remain until the presenter(s) announce a break, and please turn off cell phone ringers while you are listening to a presentation . No Standing or Sitting on the Floor—Please! The Indianapolis fire code regulations prohibit attendees from standing or sitting on the floor during any educational session . Please use all available seating . Thank you for your cooperation .

Expo Halls BCDE
Conference registration includes admittance to the AOTA Expo located in Exhibit Halls BCDE . Expo unopposed hours are available daily and do not compete with educational programming . Unopposed hours are among the busiest in the Expo because they provide free time to explore exhibits and meet with friends and colleagues . The AOTA Marketplace and Member Resource Center is the central hub in the Exhibit Hall . It is your onsite source of member value and top-quality AOTA products at special Conference pricing . Check out the Expo tab for a list of exhibitors and Expo events .

Conference Highlight Sessions
Conference Highlight Sessions are considered to be of special interest to attendees in particular practice areas and can be easily identified by locating the COnferenCe hiGhliGhT box throughout the Conference Program Guide .

Session Levels and Content Focus
Each session in the Conference Program Guide identifies its session level and content focus to help you select those that meet your continuing education needs and interests . We suggest that you review and mark the sessions that meet your criteria, and eliminate conflicting sessions . We recommend Conference-at-a-Glance on p . 5 for ease of planning . Session Levels: Session levels are identified as introductory, intermediate, or advanced. Introductory means either that the presenter will provide some background information (if needed) for the audience, or that the content does not require more than a basic understanding of the concepts

Meetings
AOTA business is discussed at numerous meetings during the Conference . All official committee and commission meetings of AOTA are open for audit by the membership, except when deliberations are of a confidential nature . All meetings are listed on page 100 .

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Alumni Receptions
Alumni gatherings are held at the discretion of each educational program . Please visit the Information & Hospitality Booth in the Registration area to see if your school has scheduled an alumni reception .
n

to help you use this valuable tool to build your complete schedule online . We have changed the times when attendees can obtain tickets for the highly popular SIS Roundtables . In addition, the capacity of each Roundtable has been doubled . n Conference volunteers can find more helpful information on the AOTA Web site, and the sign-up process to volunteer has been made much easier . n AOTA is making greater use of social media during Conference, including a Conference blog on OT Connections . We are encouraging attendees to follow us on Twitter, and to post comments on Facebook and the Conference blog . n AOTA continues to focus on making our Conference greener and more environmentally friendly . n Speakers are being encouraged to make their sessions as interactive as possible . n A greater effort has been made to recognize our first-time Conference attendees and make sure all of their questions are answered in a timely manner . n The Tech Day set up has been reorganized and placed in a larger room in order to allow the attendees better access to the various presentations . n Attendees are able to make changes to their registration online for the first time this year . n Four student-only sessions were created . n AOTA is hosting the first consumer-related session – an expert panel on Arthritis . n The AOTA Board of Directors is hosting a Town Hall Meeting on the Centennial Vision progress and other issues facing the profession . Approximately ten days after Conference, you will receive a Conference Survey e-mail from AOTA and ask that you provide your feedback at that time . Your participation is important for AOTA to continue making improvements to the Annual Conference & Expo each year . Thank you in advance for your response!

Statement of Ethics and Conduct
The American Occupational Therapy Association is a nonprofit professional membership organization . As a professional organization, AOTA has an official document, the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards by which occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants, and students are expected to abide . The purpose of the Code and Ethics Standards is to promote and maintain high standards of professional conduct . AOTA expects that each participant follows the Code and Ethics Standards, as well as his or her own personal code of honor for attendance and participation in Conference, educational events and meetings sponsored by AOTA . Sharing of a name badge, attending educational sessions without paying the appropriate registration fee, and/or reproduction and use of handout information without the author/speaker’s express permission are examples of unethical conduct and may result in disciplinary action by the Association.

Assistance
Thank you for attending the AOTA 2012 Annual Conference & Expo! If we can be of assistance, please come to the Attendee Help Desk in the Registration area and speak to an AOTA representative . We will help you in any way possible to make this a valuable and pleasant Conference experience!

Your Feedback Makes a Difference!
Every year, AOTA asks attendees to fill out an electronic survey and provide feedback on their experience at AOTA’s Annual Conference & Expo . There is an average response rate of 25% . Based upon this feedback, AOTA has made the following changes for 2012: n New advanced-level educational sessions will focus on best practices for the arthritic hand and adult cognition . n Sessions with handouts have been made easier to identify . In addition, a more concerted effort has been made to ask the speakers to provide some type of handout . n The onsite Conference Program Guide continues to be streamlined and has new features that will make it easier to use . n The Web-based Conference program is more robust, intuitive, and user friendly . It makes it easier for attendees to plan their program prior to attending Conference . You can now download the handouts for the individual educational sessions as you build your online program schedule, and you can download the special events in addition to individual sessions . Instructional videos are available

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

General sessions
Events labeled Ce carry continuing education credit . ThursdAy, April 26 4:00 pm–5:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG fridAy, April 27 11:15 am–12:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG

Welcome Ceremony and Keynote Address Envisioning the Next Generation of OT Professionals for a New Generation of Older Americans
Joseph F . Coughlin, PhD Director, Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab While perpetually youthful, the baby boomers are no longer young . Born between 1946 and 1964 one baby boomer is now turning 66 years old nearly every seven seconds . This new older generation expects to live longer and better . Older boomers expect to continue working, contributing, be mobile and engaged for a lifetime . But, the realities of an explosive rate of chronic conditions and natural aging may temper those great expectations . Occupational therapy practitioners are set to be a critical part of the new future of old age . Next generation occupational therapy practitioners will be partners with employers, insurers, and wellness providers to keep older Americans active Americans—they will also become sources of trusted information on how to manage physical longevity as well as what technologies and services may be available to live their lives to the fullest longer . How will the occupational therapy profession achieve this—who will be new partners, what will be the new revenue streams, how will future professional education respond, and how might the disruptive demographics of aging transform the profession? Dr . Joseph F . Coughlin is a world-renowned researcher, teacher, and author . In his inspiring keynote address, attendees will hear about the remarkable research done by MIT AgeLab and the translation of research into practical application for occupational therapy and our aging clients .
Sponsored by Marsh Affinity Group Services

Presidential Address Ce Beyond High Definition: Attitude and Evidence Bringing OT in HD-3D
Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Florence Clark’s term as AOTA President has thus far focused on the paths to building confidence, power, and competitive excellence, all of which describe the attitude that will be necessary for transforming occupational therapy in the 21st century . Like any good transformation allegory, however, fully realizing the AOTA Centennial Vision will require more than just an internal attitude adjustment . Now more than ever, a solid grounding in the external evidence base is an absolute must . Just as high–definition three– dimension (HD-3D) picture technology harnesses the human brain’s ability to perceive depth by merging two similar images into a unified whole, OT in HD-3D describes the way in which today’s occupational therapy practitioners are challenged to simultaneously “see” the convergence of an empowered attitude and scientific evidence base within their everyday practices .

Sponsored by Signature Healthcare

Included with Conference registration . Earn up to .75 contact hour . 5:15 pm–6:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG

Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture Ce PromOTing Occupational Therapy: Words, Images & Actions
Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA To be successful in promoting occupational therapy, each of us must make a commitment to communicate our value in words, images, and actions . More importantly, how we communicate the importance of occupational therapy to society must be meaningful . Inter-professional theories of health communication and promotion will be used to analyze how we have promoted our profession in the past and to generate strategies for promoting science-driven, evidence-based best practices in the future . Included with Conference registration . Earn up to 1 contact hour .

Included with Conference registration . 5:30 pm–9:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE

Expo Grand Opening and Reception
Join us in the Expo Hall after the Welcome Ceremony for an Opening Reception that abounds with socializing with colleagues, enjoying delicious hors d’oeuvres and drinks from a cash bar, meeting AOTA leaders and staff in Marketplace and the Member Resource Center, and exploring hundreds of great exhibits! This is one of the most exciting events at Conference each year . You won’t want to miss this special time together! Included with Conference registration .

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sATurdAy, April 28 11:15 am–12:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG

2012 AOTA & AOTF Award Recipients
Health Advocate Award Award of Merit
Paula Kramer, PhD, OTR, FAOTA Christopher Callahan, MD, FACP Jeffrey L. Tomlinson, OTR, CSW, FAOTA

Plenary Session Ce Going the Distance: Army Occupational Therapy in Today’s Garrison and Deployed Environments
Robinette J . Amaker, Colonel, PhD, OTR/L, CHT, FAOTA, Academy of Health Sciences, Joint Base San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas Army occupational therapy has transformed in the past ten years and this Plenary Session will enlighten you to the new developments in behavioral health, mild traumatic brain injury, amputee rehabilitation, and polytrauma . You will learn about the new concussion care centers in Afghanistan that are run by occupational therapy practitioners, and the great training that Army OTs and OTAs receive to make sure they are prepared to take care of our Wounded Warriors and beneficiaries . Please join us for this exciting plenary as we learn how Army OT’s go the distance! There will be surprise co-presenters . Included with Conference registration . Earn up to .75 contact hour . 12:15 pm–1:15 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG

Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship Award Roster of Fellows

Certificate of Appreciation
Virginia and Roland Dykes David D. Gale, PhD, FASAHP

Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA Jeanine Beasley, EdD, OTR, CHT Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT Gerry Conti, PhD, OTR/L Leslie Freeman Davidson, PhD, OTR/L Carole Dennis, ScD, OTR/L Gail Fisher, MPA, OTR/L Catherine Gardner, MPA, OT Kristine Haertl, PhD, OTR/L E. Adel Herge, OTD, OTR/L Amy Lamb, OTD, BS, OTR/L James Lenker, PhD, OTR/L Teresa A. May-Benson, ScD, OTR/L Nancy Vandewiele Milligan, PhD, OTR/L Janet M. Powell, PhD, OTR/L Tammy Richmond, MS, OTR/L Cynthia “Cyndy” Robinson, MS, OT/L Laura Schluter Strickland, EdD, OTR/L, CLT Margaret Swarbrick, PhD, OTR Eve A. Taylor, PhD, OTR/L Debra Tupe, PhD, MPH, MS, OTR/L Jennifer L. Womack, MA, MS, OTR/L, SCDCM

Cordelia Myers Writer’s Award
Elizabeth A. Barstow, MS, OTR/L, SCLV

Jeanette Bair Writer’s Award

Cynthia Lau, PhD, OTR/L, BCP

Special Interest Section Quarterly Writer’s Award

Leonard N. Matheson, PhD, CRC, CVE Matthew B. Dodson, OTD, OTR/L Timothy J. Wolf, OTD, MSCI, OTR/L

AOTA’s 92nd Annual Business Meeting
Join AOTA’s Board of Directors and other Association leaders for the Annual Business Meeting . Learn about the Association’s progress toward the Centennial Vision and how you can become involved in our continued progress . Sit with colleagues from your state and proudly announce “Present” during roll call, then feel free to come to a microphone to ask questions and give feedback . Your Association needs you to help create a positive future for the profession . Come join the excitement! Included with Conference registration . 5:30 pm–6:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG

Academy of Research

Anita Bundy, ScD, OTR, FAOTA Sherrilene Classen, PhD, MPH, OTR/L Dorothy Farrar Edwards, PhD Annette Majnemer, PhD, OT(C), FCAOT

AOTF/Patterson Award for Community Volunteerism
Evelyn Jaffe, MPA, OTR/L, FAOTA

Annual Awards & Recognition Ceremony
AOTA and AOTF take great pride in honoring our colleagues who have made significant contributions to the profession . Join friends, family, and colleagues as we gather to pay tribute to those whose achievements have enriched the field of occupational therapy . This important ceremony provides a wonderful opportunity for each of us to reconnect with our profession and reflect not only on the accomplishments of others, but our own capacity for achievement . Open to the public . A reception follows: See page 15 for details. Ceremony and Reception Sponsored by Visiting Nurse Service of New York

Roster of Honors Award

Jeanne M. Rehr, BA, COTA/L

A. Jean Ayres Award

Recognition of Achievement Award
Coralie “Corky” Glantz, OT/L, BCG, FAOTA Nancy Z. Richman, OTR/L, FAOTA Jodie K. Williams, OTR/L, MHA

Shelley E. Mulligan, PhD, OTR/L Grace Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

AOTF Service Commendation

Nancy Snyder, MS, OTR/L

Lindy Boggs Award

Certificate of Appreciation
Jane Case-Smith, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Pamela Sue Roberts, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES, CPHQ, FAOTA

AOTF Meritorious Service Award
Melissa Oliver, MS, OTR/L

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

special events
Events labeled Ce carry continuing education credit . WednesdAy, April 25 6:30 pm–9:30 pm JW White River Ballroom HIJ

ThursdAy, April 26 7:15 am–7:45 am CC Sagamore Ballroom 3

First-Timers’ Orientation
Get the tips you need to make the most of your first AOTA Annual Conference & Expo during this fast paced 30 minute presentation! Join us at the First-Timers’ Orientation where the AOTA Director of Conferences will be on hand to help guide you through the extensive programming options and answer all of your questions . Sponsored by Geico Direct Included with Conference registration . 7:30 am–9:00 am CC Sagamore Ballroom 4

Doctoral Network Reception & Annual Meeting Ce Everything You Wanted To Know About Working on a Doctorate
Speakers: Winifred Dunn, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Max Ito, PhD, OTR/L; Jane Bear Lehman, PhD, OTR; Shelly J . Lane, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA The panel will provide attendees with helpful ideas on all the issues involved with pursuing a doctoral degree, including the rewards and realities of study, qualities to look for in a doctoral program, the mentoring process, staying on track through the process, and career goals and making them happen . The Doctoral Network is a program of the American Occupational Therapy Foundation . Informal roundtable mentoring sessions will begin at 6:30 pm, followed by the formal reception and meeting at 7:30 pm . The informal mentoring is optional and participants will be provided with additional details prior to coming to the event . $30 per person . Includes refreshments . Earn up to 2 contact hours . 7:30 pm–9:00 pm JW Grand Ballroom 5

International Breakfast Ce The World Report on Disability: An Agenda for the Profession
Sharon Brintnell, Dip P & OT, BOT, MSc, FCAOT, CDMP Spearheaded by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank (WB) and published in 2011, the World Report on Disability (Report) is a seminal document that for the first time presents disability in a comprehensive global context . One billion people, approximately 15% of the world’s population, live with some form of activity limitation, and 80% are in low income countries . The World Report on Disability notes the responsibilities of global professions to be leaders in illuminating the complexities and universality of disability in today’s world, and the great need for partnerships among organizations and our community at large . This presentation highlights the key elements of the World Report on Disability and aligns its principles and recommendations with the WFOT position on occupational justice and human rights . Participants will be encouraged to recognize the social determinants of health and consider partnering with WFOT to ensure that the work the Report challenges us to face begins first at home . $35 per person . Includes breakfast . Earn up to .75 contact hour . 8:30 pm–10:30 pm JW White River Ballroom BCD

Special Interest Sections (SIS) Networking Reception
New and Seasoned SIS Participants! Get your Conference experience off to a great start with this favorite informal event . Take the opportunity to meet and network with both new and experienced colleagues who share your specialty interests . Meet your SIS leadership and explore your own SIS leadership opportunities . Each SIS has a designated gathering area at the reception so you can enjoy networking at its best . Join us! Admission to this event is FREE! Cash bar and free snacks will be available .

Students Un-Conferenced
After your full first day of conference, come join your fellow students for a fun meet-and-greet . Remember, networking is one of those all-important professional skills that doesn’t appear anywhere on your transcript . Start to hone those skills here as you meet your student colleagues from around the country and have a great time . Entertainment provided . Open to registered student attendees . Name badge required . Sponsored by RehabCare Includes cash bar and entertainment .
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Sponsored by CARF International and University of the Sciences

fridAy, April 27 6:45 am–7:30 am JW 101-102

SIS Fitness Event – Bodybalance
This Bodybalance class uses principles of Tai Chi, Yoga, and Pilates to enhance your length, strength, balance and coordination . A perfect start to the day leaving you feeling long and strong, calm and centered! 7:30 am–9:00 am JW Grand Ballroom 2–4

a discussion that relates to your practice today or one that addresses something new that you’ve been curious about . Topics are listed on page 56 . Seating is very limited to allow for close interaction between all participants . Earn up to 1 contact hour .

SIS Roundtable Discussion Tickets
SIS Roundtable Discussion tickets are free and are included with Conference registration but must be picked up in advance at the Information Booth in the Registration Area from 12:00 pm–4:00 pm on Thursday and 7:30 am– 11:30 am on Friday .

18th Annual AOTF Breakfast With a Scholar Ce Evaluating the Americans with Disabilities Act: An Accounting of Progress
Lex Frieden, MA, LLD In this informative annual breakfast event, Professor Lex Frieden will reflect on the implementation and aftermath of the Americans with Disability Act . Drawing on his professional and personal experience as an advocate, scholar, and leader in the disability rights community, Lex Frieden will discuss the meaningful advances and the current threats to policies and practices that have had an impact on the lives of persons with disability . He will particularly address how health care reform and the economic crisis create consequences that can threaten the gains achieved during the past twenty years . Mr . Frieden, an internationally known disability rights advocate and leader who became disabled while an undergraduate student, played an instrumental role in developing and implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act . Currently, he is Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Professor of Rehabilitation at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and Adjunct Professor of Rehabilitation at Baylor College of Medicine . Mr . Frieden also directs the Independent Living Research Utilization (ILRU) Program at TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, Texas .

2:00 pm–3:00 pm CC 103-104

Town Hall Meeting (SC 235) Ce Centennial Vision Progress and Issues Facing the Profession
Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel, PhD, OT, BCMH, FAOTA; Fred Somers In 2006, AOTA leaders had the extraordinary foresight to launch a Centennial Vision journey with towering goals to empower the profession to fulfill its potential and advance it through advocacy and public awareness . Strategic plans for practice, research, and education were mapped out clearly to reach those goals . Now, reaching the six year mark on the journey, your AOTA leaders of today want to meet with you in a special Town Hall Meeting to share the substantial progress we have made and the challenges the profession is facing now . This is an excellent opportunity to ask questions, share perspectives, and contribute ideas about the road we must take now and beyond occupational therapy’s centennial anniversary in 2017 . AOTA wants your feedback . Please take the time to attend this vital session! Included in Conference registration . Earn up to 1 contact hour . 2:00–5:00 pm JW Grand Ballroom 2–4

Proceeds help support AOTF research, scholarship, and leadership programs. $50 per person . Includes breakfast . Earn up to .75 contact hour . 12:30 pm–1:30 pm CC Exhibit Hall DE

2012 AOTF Research Colloquium Ce Translating Cognitive Research Into Clinical Practice
Moderator: Lisa Tabor Connor, PhD Featured Panelists: Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Naomi Josman, PhD, OTR; Becky Russell, OTR/L; Joan Toglia, PhD The 2012 Research Colloquium will focus on the current state of evidence for cognitive assessments and interventions, what needs to be done from a research perspective, and how to implement what is known in clinical practice . This event will extend the Colloquium’s tradition of featuring state-ofthe-science research with abundant opportunity for lively discussion among the presenters and those in attendance . $35 per person . Includes refreshments . Earn up to 3 contact hours .

Special Interest Section (SIS) Roundtable Discussions Ce
Each of the 11 Special Interest Sections, the Hand and Private Practice Subsections, and Driving and Home Modification Networks will hold small group discussions, extended to one hour by popular demand! Current topics in specialty areas of practice will engage participants and provide the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences . Choose
14 AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

3:30 pm–5:00 pm CC 107-108

sATurdAy, April 28 6:45 am–7:30 am

Centennial Vision Session (SC 226) Ce (AOTA) Beyond 2017: A Toolkit for Advancing the Centennial Vision in High Definition
Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel, PhD, OT, BCMH, FAOTA; Timothy M . Kennedy, MS, OTR/L; Gerry E . Conti, PhD, OTR/L; Robert C . Ferguson, OTR/L The Centennial Vision serves as an inspiring plan for the profession as it ends its first century . Building capacity in High Definition beyond 2017 will be the focus of this session . Grassroots efforts in having a strong voice in public policy and legislation, interprofessional research using technology to solve everyday life challenges, and building a Centennial Culture across all practitioners and organizations will provide concrete and inspiring models that can be replicated . This interactive session will begin with presentations by the panelists: a NY State Senator whose legislative efforts reflect the values and expertise of a powerful public servant occupational therapist; an occupational therapy researcher whose collaborative efforts with engineers will highlight future roles for occupational therapy in the application of digital modeling of people with severe movement limitations; and a clinical specialist whose efforts at creating organizational change embedding the Centennial Vision in daily practice is building strategies and tools embodying a new Centennial Culture . Attendees will have the opportunity to interact with the panel and each other to identify individual and organizational opportunities, strategies and tools which contribute to a “powerful, widely-recognized, science-driven and evidencebased profession with a globally-connected and diverse workforce, meeting society’s occupational needs .” Included with Conference registration . Earn up to 1 contact hour . 8:00 pm–11:00 pm Westin Grand Ballroom

SIS Fun Run & Walk
Participants will meet in front of the JW Marriott at the corner of West and Washington Streets. Start your morning off with an invigorating 5K run or walk along one of the canals in Indianapolis . Free T-shirts will be given to the first 300 participants . Don’t forget to bring your own water bottle! Sponsored by Image Sport

8:30 am–9:30 am and 10:00 am–11:00 am

SIS Buzz Sessions Ce Conversations That Matter
The SISs have selected a topic of current interest in their practice area for a brief presentation and facilitated discussion . The focus of these sessions will be to provide lots of opportunity for active participation by attendees with questions, answers and discussions to promote interactive learning amongst colleagues . Included with Conference registration . Earn up to 1 contact hour at each session . 6:45 pm–7:45 pm JW White River Ballroom B-D

Annual Awards & Recognition Reception
Our honored award recipients are ready to celebrate! Please join them and all your colleagues to enjoy an evening of mingling and sharing of good wishes at this wonderful event . $35 .00 per person . (Includes hors d’oeuvers and cash bar .) Sponsored by Visiting Nurse Service of New York continued

2012 AOTF Gala Dancing With the Stars (Indy-Style)
Join the American Occupational Therapy Foundation (AOTF) for this elegant annual celebration . Feast on sumptuous foods and enjoy connecting with friends and colleagues . Then, cast your vote as dance teams compete for bragging rights in AOTF’s 3rd Annual Dancing with the Stars style competition . Vote for your favorite dance team at the Gala or online at www .aotf .org .

Proceeds help support AOTF research, scholarship, and leadership programs. $115 .00 per person $45 .00 per person (Student Discounted Rate)

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9:30 am–11:00 am; 1:30 pm–3:00 pm; 3:30 pm–5:00 pm Tech Day Ce CC 500 Ballroom Attend one or all 3 highly popular Tech Day sessions (see pages 73, 74, and 77) . Experience interactive exploration of high and low technology products that enhance client participation in occupations across the lifespan . Sessions will address technology applications for children and youth and adults of all ages and products and software will be demonstrated by the presenters . Attendees will benefit from handson learning on a variety of topics at multiple work stations . Up to 10 different stations will be set up during each of three 1 .5 hour sessions . Due to the popularity of Tech Day, look for a new room layout and signage that will direct you to the products of interest to you . Included with Conference registration . Earn up to 1 .5 contact hours at each session .

7:30 pm–10:30 pm JW White River Ballroom E

AOTPAC Night: KaraOTe Idol IV Accelerate your experience—rev up for Indianapolis with KaraOTe Idol IV!
Occupational therapy has talent, and we’ve seen it first hand at our annual KaraOTe Idol contests . Up-shift and show us your singing and performing talent in 2012 . New entrants and past entrants are all welcome . Join your friends and colleagues and cheer for our contestants at AOTPAC’s annual celebration and contest mixed in with dancing and music . Individual and group entrants are welcome! We encourage students to put together a group and show your school spirit . Limited spots, so sign up early! Send your name or the name of your group to aotpac@aota.org . Student groups, please include your school name . New this year! We are holding four spots for stand-up-comics . Make us laugh, we need it (let’s keep this PG-13)! Your ticket is a contribution to AOTPAC for our political purposes. Contributions are not tax deductible for federal income tax purposes. OT/OTA $40 per person . Students $25 per person . Includes snacks and cash bar .

Sponsored by Touro University Nevada & Quinnipiac University

DISCOVER
the science of healthcare
Visit us at the SIS Networking Reception.
usciences.edu/samson/AOTA

CPG-5765

AOTA Silver Sponsor 16 AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

Educational Session Overview
Session Listings, Availability & Locations
Programs and sessions are organized chronologically by day and time. n Sessions are available to all Conference registrants depending upon seating room. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. n All educational sessions will be held at the Convention Center or the JW Marriott Indianapolis. The location for each session is listed with its description. See pages 8–10 for more details.
n

Session Content Levels
Introductory content contains background information or requires basic understanding of concepts discussed. Intermediate or Advanced content is appropriate for experienced clinical practitioners, educators, or researchers.

Educational SESSionS

Session Evaluation
You can evaluate individual educational sessions by going to www.aota.org/conference and follow the links to Educational Sessions Evaluations. You will be able to evaluate each session you attend. This feedback will be shared with the presenters.

Presenters Index
The Presenters Index lists all session speakers on pages 101–104.

Types of Sessions
(IN) Pre-Conference Institutes—6-hour presentations; ticketed sessions available for extra fee. See pages 17–19. (S) Pre-Conference Seminars—6-hour presentations; ticketed sessions available for nominal fee. See page 19. (GS) General Sessions—Sessions of interest to all attendees. See pages 11–12. (WS) Workshops—3-hour presentations. (SC) Short Courses—typically 1.5 hours in length with a few exceptions. (RP) Research Platforms—Three or four 20-minute research papers with common themes presented together in 1-hour or 1.5-hour sessions. (PA) Research Papers—25-minute presentations followed by 5-minute Q&As. (PO) Poster Sessions—2-hour displays during selected time slots on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. See pages 37–46, 63–68, and 81–84 for times and locations. (RWP) Research Work in Progress—2-hour displays with Poster Sessions on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. See pages 41–42, 46, and 86 for times and locations. (TD) Tech Day Sessions—1.5 hour sessions grouped in 3 separate time slots on Saturday. See pages 73, 74, and 77.

Continuing Education Credit
Name badges are scanned when entering an education session. Continuing education verification is automatic. Early exit from sessions requires badge to be re-scanned and attendees given partial credit (see guidelines below). Confirmation of continuing education units to be e-mailed no later than June 4, 2012.

Scanning Guidelines
Session ............................................................ Early-Exit Scanning Institute ............................ 30 minutes before scheduled end time Workshop ......................... 20 minutes before scheduled end time . Short Course .................... 15 minutes before scheduled end time Research Platform ........... 15 minutes before scheduled end time . Research Paper ................. 10 minutes before scheduled end time Plenary .............................. 10 minutes before scheduled end time Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars .......................... 10 minutes before scheduled end time . SIS Roundtable Discussions ....................... 10 minutes before scheduled end time SIS Buzz Sessions ............ 10 minutes before scheduled end time Posters ..................................Information will be provided on site Tech Day Sessions ................Information will be provided on site Questions, problems, or concerns can be directed to the Session Scanners counter in the Registration area of the Convention Center.

Session Codes
(AOTA) Sessions organized by American Occupational Therapy Association to address critical issues from members. (AOTF) Sessions conducted by American Occupational Therapy Foundation with invited or staff speakers. (SIS) Sessions sponsored by AOTA Special Interest Section (SIS) groups. Includes 11 SIS community and 4 subsection identified sessions with invited speakers.

Educational Sessions
Pre-Conference Institutes and Seminars.................................... 17 Thursday Educational Sessions................................................... 21 Thursday Poster Sessions ............................................................ 37 Friday Educational Sessions........................................................ 47 SIS Roundtable Discussions ....................................................... 56 . Friday Poster Sessions ................................................................. 63 Saturday Educational Sessions ................................................... 69 Plenary .................................................................................... 11, 69 SIS Buzz Sessions ........................................................................ 72 Tech Day I, II, III Sessions ............................................... 73, 74, 77 Saturday Poster Sessions ............................................................ 81 . Sunday Educational Sessions ..................................................... 87 .

Session Highlights
Conference Highlights are considered of special interest and can be easily identified by locating the CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHT box throughout session listings.

Session Content Focus
Content focus may designate a specialized area of practice or an application to a specific age group of clients.

CPG-5755 PR-137

Visit this AOTA Silver Sponsor at Booth 807

pre-Conference Institutes & seminars Wednesday, April 25
Institutes
2:00 pm–5:00 pm IN 001 CC 123-124 ½ Day Hands-on Lab Session: Custom-Fabricated Orthoses for the Upper Extremity
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Nancy M. Cannon, OTR, CHT; Karen Nordin, OTR, CHT; J. Robin Janson, MS, OTR, CHT; Sally L. Roscetti, OTR, CHT; Lauren C. Koger, MS, OTR; Melissa Stevens, OTR, CHT; Cecily C. Brasseur, all of Indiana Hand To Shoulder Therapy Center, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory This session is intended for the therapist who has limited opportunity to fabricate and fit orthoses to clients. Therapists will be provided with an overview of the indications for common upper extremity orthoses, the key steps to fabricating the orthoses, and a lab session to fabricate specific orthoses. Participants will have an opportunity to fabricate a wrist immobilization orthosis, forearm based wrist, hand and finger orthosis (e.g., resting pan), and an elbow orthosis. This will be a particularly great opportunity for the therapist who has limited or no opportunity to develop or maintain splinting skills. Meuser, PhD, University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory If occupational therapists consider our profession client-centered, all practitioners must consider addressing the critical IADL of driving and community mobility for individuals of all ages. This would include individuals who have never driven, such as teenagers with ADHD or ASD, to individuals who want to keep driving despite functional declines. This Institute will bring together experts who address driving across the life span to describe clinical models of program development, demonstrate evidence-based tools for screening/assessment, discuss latest developments in interventions for the medically-at-risk drivers across the lifespan, and offer resources to improve general practice occupational therapist and driver rehabilitation specialist’s skill sets. Upon completion of this seminar, the participants in this Institute will be able to identify program pathways and resources to address driving and community mobility in their practice. seating/positioning problems, and evidence to support the decisions made in regards to advanced seating/ positioning interventions. pedagogical intent. Infrastructure, support issues, and regulations will be presented through a case illustration.

IN 005 CC 201-202 Tai Chi Fundamentals®: Scientific Evidence for Innovative Use of Tai Chi in Rehabilitation, Recovery, and Wellness
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Charlene Avery, OTR/L, CTI, CLT, Self Employed, Madison, WI; Kristi Rietz, OTL, CPRP, RYT, CTI; Tricia Medow, COTA, both of Wm. S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI; Sandy Matsuda, PhD, OTR/L, GCFP, Three Good Moves Therapy: Feldenkrais, Tai Chi, and Yoga, Columbia, MO; Kelley Hutchison-Maravilla, OTR/L, CTI, Ministry Door County Medical Center, Sturgeon Bay, WI Contributing Author: Tricia Yu, MA Level: Introductory Participants will learn through movement, discussion, and lecture how to use Tai Chi Fundamentals® (TCF®) for OT practice. TCF® offers a systematic, scientific, and innovative approach for mastering Tai Chi basics. Tai Chi is evidence-based for both psychosocial and physical rehabilitation.

IN 008 CC 109-110 Utilizing iPad® Technology To Enhance the Learning and Application of Research Concepts With Occupational Therapy Students
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Patricia Scott, PhD, OT, FAOTA; Susan London, MLS; Tom Janke, MS, all of Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Level: Intermediate The use of iPad technology in academia is the way of the future. In this Institute, participants will use the iPad to: 1. build concept maps to help students organize concepts with research findings and write literature reviews; 2. use concept mapping in qualitative research code and find themes; and 3. search for evidence to support practice.

IN 003 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 Assessing and Treating the Shoulder Complex: A Foundation for Occupational Performance
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Alfred Bracciano, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; Scott McPhee, DrPH, OTR/L, FAOTA, Belmont University, Nashville, TN Level: Intermediate A thorough understanding of the shoulder complex is critical for clinicians to become effective in assessment and treatment of the shoulder complex. This session will use a lab and lecture format to present a dynamic framework to evaluate and assess the shoulder, and it will review anatomy and pathology of the shoulder complex and treatment options.

IN 009 CC 120-121 Psychosocial Occupational Therapy Practices in a Changing Health Care Environment
Content Focus: Mental Health Elizabeth Cara, Phd, OTR/L, MFCC, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA; Toby Ballou Hamilton, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK; Anne MacRae, PhD, OTR/L, BCMH, FAOTA; Winifred Schultz-Krohn, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA, both of San Jose State University, San Jose, CA; Elizabeth Carley, OTD, OTR/L, Occupational Therapy Training Program, Torrance, CA; William Lambert, MA, OTR/L, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA; Anne Burke, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC; Robinette Amaker, PhD, OTR/L, CHT, FAOTA, United States Army, San Antonio, TX; Renee Taylor, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; John White, PhD, OTR/L, Pacific University, Portland, OR Contributing Authors: Allison LaverFawcett, PhD; Suzanne Peloquin, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Shawn Phipps, PhD, OTR/L, MOTA; Elise Holloway, MPH, OTR/L; Mary Vining Radomski, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Sandra Rogers, PhD, OTR/L; Patricia Crist, PhD, OTR, PC, FAOTA; Helen Bryce, MA, OTR/L Level: Intermediate Focused on revitalizing and solidifying the psychosocial core in all practice areas, participants update evidence-based and practical principles for commonly encountered mental health conditions and disorders in a variety of practices. With examples, they develop proposals for their own settings.

12:00 noon–6:30 pm IN 002 CC 208-209 (AOTA) Driving Through the Lifespan: Evidence and Practice Steering the Way
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Anne Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Sherrilene Classen, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Miriam Monahan, MS, CDRS, OTR/L; Craig Velozo, PhD, OTR/L; Desiree Lanford, MSA CDRS, OTR/L; Alexander Crizzle, PhD; Sandra M. Winter, PhD, OTR/L, all of University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Felicia Chew, MS, OTR/L, Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA; Mary Jo McGuire, MS, OTR/L, OTPP, FAOTA, The Rehabilitation and Health Center, Akron, OH; Johnell Brooks, PhD, Clemson University, Greenville, SC; Erica Stern, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Marla Berg-Weger, PhD, LCSW, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO; Thomas

IN 006 CC 105-106 Cell Phones, Tablets and iPods® as Cognitive-Behavioral Assistive Technologies: Practical Applications
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Tony Gentry, PhD, OTR/L, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Level: Introductory This Institute provides a robust introduction to the use of smartphones, iPod Touches®, iPads® and Android tablets as cognitive-behavioral aids in OT practice settings, emphasizing practical considerations for assessment, provision, and training by utilizing a personalized suite of tools and applications.

IN 004 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 Advanced Wheelchair Seating and Positioning for the Adult Wheelchair User: Evaluation, Intervention, and the Evidence
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kimberly Furphy, DHSc, OT, ATP, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ; Dina Mastrogiovanni, OT, ATP; Linda Lantieri, MPT, ATP, both of Magee Rehabilitation, Philadelphia, PA Level: Advanced Proper wheelchair positioning is vitally important to the wheelchair user’s functioning. This Institute addresses advanced assessment processes in wheelchair seating/positioning, interventions for difficult

IN 007 CC 107-108 Are the Digital Natives Getting Restless? Integrating Technology to Create Successful OT Hybrid Courses
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Brenda Coppard, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Keli Mu, PhD, OTR/L; Bette Poutre, MS, all of Creighton University, Omaha, NE Level: Intermediate The Institute is focused on best practices to create hybrid courses that improve student learning and makes class time more productive. Attendees will explore technology to match

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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DAY, DATe / MOrnInG

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AOTA Gold Sponsor

CPG-5683

InsTITuTes & seMInArs / WeDnesDAY, AprIl 25
IN 010 CC 122 Caregiver Health and Wellness: Innovative Strategies To Support Caregivers and Clients Using Occupational Therapy Theory, Evaluation, and Intervention
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Michael Pizzi, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA Level: Introductory This session focuses on innovations in practice, examining the caregiver’s occupational life and the quality of life, while helping them to live in balance while supporting a disabled loved one. Occupational therapy and health promotion theory, assessments, and interventions will be explored as well as strategies for reimbursement and goal planning. Practitioners will gain knowledge in the development and implementation of strategies to address challenging behaviors during evaluation and evidence-based interventions with individuals on the autism spectrum. Individual case development will occur from referral to intervention planning consistent with the practitioner practice context. In order to insure that occupational therapy is a consistent part of the program, CarFit-trained professionals are needed in every state. CarFit training typically requires 2 days and includes technician training and hands-on learning at an actual event. This Seminar, offering classroom instruction and a “conference modified” event, will prepare participants to become trained technicians. In addition, the instructors will explore several challenges and solutions where medical conditions impact person-vehicle fit for both drivers and passengers. The related event coordinator training, WS 302 (April 28 from 8 am–11 am) offers the additional training required to become a CarFit Event Coordinator. Those attending both the Technician Training (S 001) and the Event Coordinator Training (WS 102) will be prepared to work with partner organizations to train volunteers, plan, and host local CarFit events. No experience in driver rehabilitation is required. For more information on the CarFit program, go to www.Car-Fit.org. University, Stony Brook, NY; Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, St. Catherine University, St. Paul, MN; Tia Hughes, MBA, OTR/L, Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences, Orlando, FL Level: Intermediate In response to growing workforce demands (USDE, 2011), the profession is experiencing an expansion in new academic programs at both the OT and OTA level. The purpose of this seminar is to provide participants with the information they will need to make a successful transition from practice to academia.

IN 014 CC 127-128 Creating a Successful and Innovative Home Modification Business
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Tracy Van Oss, DHSc, OTR/L, SCEM, CAPS; Tara Glennon, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT; Hector Borrero, MBA, OTR/L, CAPS, AdaptUr-Home, Durham, NC; Marnie Renda, MEd, OTR/L, CAPS, ECHM, Destination Home LLC, Cincinnati, OH; Jennifer DeRosa, OTR/L, CAPS, AdaptABLE for LIFE, Seattle, WA; Mary Jo McGuire, MS, OTR/L, OTPP, FAOTA, Home and Community Based Services, Akron, OH Level: Intermediate This program will present the development of the business plan, marketing strategies, and the financial planning involved in building a thriving community-based private practice including home modifications for the new and seasoned entrepreneur.

Talk About Session
1:00 pm–3:00 pm TA 001 JW Grand Ballroom 7 (AOTA) Talk About: Experts in Arthritis Session
Content Focus: Productive Aging Nancy Baker, ScD, OTR/L, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Introductory Arthritis and other rheumatic conditions are the second most common of musculoskeletal diseases among adults and often lead to serious disabilities. It is estimated that 46 million Americans suffer from arthritis, including 300,000 children, with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile arthritis the most common types. There is no cure for arthritis; however, current treatments and increased understanding about ways to manage the disease have created significant improvements in the quality of life of people with arthritis. “Experts in Arthritis” is an enduring nationwide program that provides the opportunity for people with arthritis to meet with world-class experts in arthritis care. The objective of Experts in Arthritis is to provide accurate information about treatment options to people with arthritis, thus improving their ability to self-manage their disease and live their lives to the fullest. This session offers an opportunity for arthritis experts from different disciplines to dialogue with people with arthritis from the local community. During the “Talk About” session, experts will offer education and answer questions about current scientific evidence for the treatment and self-management of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile arthritis. Clinicians attending will experience the questions and concerns most frequently asked by people with arthritis.

IN 011 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 “Why am I Doing This?” Clinical Reasoning in Pediatric Practice Under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
Content Focus: Children & Youth Barbara Chandler, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC; Gloria Frolek Clark, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA, Private Practice, Adel, IA Level: Intermediate This Institute will provide OTs and OTAs working under IDEA with a clinical reasoning process that can be used to guide daily practice, including ethical issues, in early intervention and school programs. Participants will understand the “why” of school practice as well as the “how.”

S 002 CC 205-206 (AOTA) The Ins and Outs of AOTA Board and Specialty Certification
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Maria Elena Louch, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Margaret Beckley, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, BCPR, SCLV, FAOTA, Ohio Health, Inc. & Barry University, Columbus, OH; Elizabeth Barstow, MS, OTR/L, SCLV, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL; Marcia Cox, MHS, OTR/L, SCFES, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH; Natalie Leland, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Marla Robinson, MSc, OTR/L, BCPR, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL; Joan Tunningley, MEd, OTR/L, BCP, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH Level: Introductory This session will support practitioners in the development of their own certification application. Through large and small group discussion, participants will be able to ask in-depth questions and receive in-depth answers to guide them in the development of an individualized plan for demonstrating achievement of certification requirements.

Seminars
12:00 noon–6:30 pm S 001 JW Grand Ballroom 8 (AOTA) CarFit Technician Training
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jennifer Radloff, OTR, CDRS, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, MN; Susan Touchinsky, OTR/L, CDRS; Wendy Starnes, OTR/L; Felicia Chew, MS, OTR/L, all of Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA; Rachel Norton, OTR, DRS, Indiana University Health, Bloomington, IN; Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Christine Mangone, OTR/L, Carilion Clinic, Roanoke, VA Level: Introductory CarFit is an educational program created by the American Society on Aging and developed in collaboration with AAA, AARP, and AOTA. CarFit helps mature drivers find out how well they currently fit their automobile, learn about the importance of making individualized adjustments, and promotes conversations about driver safety and community mobility. The core of the program is the CarFit event, held in a variety of community settings and collaboratively staffed by a trained team of volunteers and health professionals who work with each participant. Other models are also described, allowing flexibility to meet the needs of various settings, including a 1:1 CarFit.

IN 012 CC 125-126 NICU and Occupational Therapy: Supporting Participation for Everyone
Content Focus: Children & Youth Gerri Duran, MS, OT/L, FAOTA, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Brenda Johnston, OT/L, Private Practice, Orlando, FL Level: Introductory This presentation focuses on OT interventions that promote developmentally/behaviorally supportive care rather than rehabilitative techniques, often inappropriate for pre-term infants. The Synactive Theory, NIDCAP, and the OT Practice Framework will be highlighted. Videos of NICU intervention will be shared and NICU follow-up will be discussed.

IN 013 CC 101-102 Evidence-Based Interventions Addressing Challenging Behaviors in Individuals With an Autism Spectrum Disorder
Content Focus: Children & Youth Scott Tomchek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jocelyn Warren, MEd, OTR/L; Robert Pennington, PhD, all of University of Louisville Autism Center, Louisville, KY Level: Introductory

S 003 CC 203-204 (AOTA) Changing Practice Settings: Becoming an Occupational Therapy Educator
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Janet Jedlicka, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Carol Doehler, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, New England Institute of Technology, Warwick, RI; Jamie Geraci, MS, OTR/L, Stony Brook

AOTF Doctoral Network Reception & Annual Meeting 6:30 pm-9:30 pm JW White River Ballroom HIJ For details see page 13.

speCIAl eVenT

Special Interest Sections (SISs) Networking Reception 7:30 pm-9:00 pm JW Grand Ballroom 5 Sponsored by CARF International and University of the Sciences For details see page 13. AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

speCIAl eVenT

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SALVADOR BOnDOC

You see your clients’ potential. At Quinnipiac, we see yours!
You are invited to attend the following presentations given by members of the Occupational Therapy faculty at Quinnipiac’s School of Health Sciences. Please visit us at booth #626. See PrOgraM fOr ScHedUled TiMeS
AcAdemic & Fieldwork educAtion
Salvador Bondoc w Promoting Self-Regulated Learning to Promote Academic Achievement in Occupational Therapy Students: A Mixed Methods Study Francine Seruya w What Do Students Within Allied Health Professions “Know” About Occupational Therapy?

TARA GLEnnOn

Productive AGinG
Pamela Hewitt, Salvador Bondoc w The Effect of Wii-Based Activities on Participation and Physical Fitness of Prefrail and Frail Older Adults

KIM HARTMAnn

reHAbilitAtion, disAbility & PArticiPAtion
Barbara Nadeau, Salvador Bondoc w Perspectives on Cognition, Cognitive Rehabilitation and Occupational Performances: Strategies and Skills

PAMELA HEWITT

Roseanna Tufano, Barbara Nadeau w Innovation in Mental Health Fieldwork: Linking Research, Education and Practice Tracy Van Oss w The Art and Science of Home Modifications: Innovative Strategies for Student Learning

sis
Many Quinnipiac OT faculty members will be available at the SIS events. We look forward to seeing you there!

BARBARA nADEAu

GenerAl & ProFessionAl issues
Salvador Bondoc w Putting Evidence Into Practice: Join AOTA’s Evidence Exchange
FRAnCInE SERuyA

Tracy Van Oss, Tara Glennon w Creating a Successful & Innovative Home Modification Business

www.quinnipiac.edu/qu-online
To learn more about the Post-Professional Masters in Occupational Therapy online degree program, please call or visit us online.

877.403.4277

ROSEAnnA TuFAnO

HeAltH & wellness
Kim Hartmann w An Overview of Telehealth and Telehealth Technologies within Occupational Therapy
FOLLOW US

w Telehealth Applications Across
Occupational Therapy Practice Areas
TRACy VAn OSS

twitter.com/QU_Online

CPG-5769

Visit this AOTA Bronze Sponsor at Booth 626

educational sessions
Welcome Ceremony and Keynote Address
4:00 pm–5:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG
Sponsored by Marsh Affinity Group Services For details see page 11.

Thursday, April 26
8:00 am–9:30 am SC 103 CC 127-128 Centennial Culture: Embedding the Centennial Vision Into Everyday Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Robert Ferguson, OTR/L, University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI Contributing Authors: Douglas Rakoski, MA, OTR/L, ATP; Erin Muston-Firsch, MS, OTR/L; Christine Wallis, PT Level: Introductory This Short Course introduces the “Centennial Culture.” It is based on a model process for cultural change developed at a major mid-western teaching hospital which is guided by transformational leadership. Developing your own Centennial Culture may help you embed the Centennial Vision into your daily practice. tive, evidence-based practice will be addressed.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 106 CC 109-110 PEDI-CAT: An Assessment for the 21st Century
Content Focus: Children & Youth Wendy Coster, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Introductory Since 1992, the PEDI has been widely used in clinical practice and research. The new, revised PEDI (PEDI-CAT) has norms up to age 21, does not require an interview, and can be completed in less than 15 minutes. The features of the PEDICAT will be highlighted and administration will be demonstrated.

Expo Grand Opening and Reception
5:30 pm–9:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE
For details see page 11.

speCIAl eVenT
First-Timers’ Orientation 7:15 am–7:45 am CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Sponsored by GEICO For details see page 13.

egies to overcome those challenges. Specific findings from reviews will be presented along with implications for occupational therapy practice, education, and research.

speCIAl eVenT
International Breakfast 7:30 am–9:00 am CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 For details see page 13. 8:00 am–9:30 am SC 100 CC 101-102 (AOTA) Evidence-Based Literature Review on Occupational Therapy and Adults With Neurodegenerative Diseases (MS and ALS)
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Virgil Mathiowetz, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Chih-Huang Yu, MS, OTR/L (Taiwan), both of University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Marian Arbesman, PhD, OTR/L, ArbesIdeas, Inc., Williamsville, NY; Deborah Lieberman, MHSA, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Kendra Sheard, OTR/L, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Level: Intermediate This session will outline the process involved in the evidence-based literature review on occupational therapy and adults with neurodegenerative diseases (Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), including the development of the focused questions, search strategy, identified challenges faced, and strat-

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 101 CC 122 (AOTA) Doing the Right Thing: Ethical and Legal Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Deborah Yarett Slater, MS, OT/L, FAOTA; Jennifer Bogenrief, JD, both of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Intermediate Practitioners are often challenged to “do the right thing” from an ethical and/or legal perspective. Regulations and ethical principles for appropriate clinical decisions will be discussed with relevant case study analysis. Reporting options for taking action with professional and regulatory bodies will be identified.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 104 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 (SIS) EDSIS Faculty Subsection Annual Program: Using Team-Based Learning in Occupational Therapy Coursework
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Catana Brown, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ Level: Advanced This Short Course provides advanced occupational therapy faculty with the necessary tools to implement teambased learning (TBL) in their own classrooms. The philosophy, essential components, and strategies of TBL will be presented. Participants will experience a TBL exercise. The EDSIS Faculty Subsection Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 15 minutes of this session.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 107 CC 103-104 Evidence-Based Review of Early Childhood Screening Tools for Autism Spectrum Disorder Used in Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Children & Youth Cindee Quake-Rapp, PhD, OTR/L, Spalding University, Louisville, KY; Scott Tomchek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY Level: Introductory This presentation will explore evidence-based developmental and behavioral screening tools and surveillance methods that have sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value as a universal screen for preschool children. It will show validity in assessing young children at-risk for autism spectrum and other developmental disorders.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 102 CC 105-106 (AOTA) The IOTA Approved Provider Program and the Indiana OT Practice Act: Understanding the Regulations
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Christine Kroll, MS, OTR, Healthcare Therapy Services, Inc., Greenwood, IN; Thomas Fisher, PhD, OTR, CCM, FAOTA, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; Lori Breeden, MS, OTR; Jennifer Fogo, PhD, OTR, both of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory This course will help practitioners, students, and continuing education providers understand the expectations of Indiana licensure, as well as how to select the most relevant courses. We will review the Indiana Occupational Therapy Association Approved Provider Program (APP) that can help practitioners be sure that the courses they attend meet the continuing competency requirements, which includes continuing education.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 105 CC 107-108 Moving Toward EvidenceBased Practice: A Collaborative Approach To Treating Trauma and Substance Use in Adolescents
Content Focus: Children & Youth Elizabeth Carley, OTD, OTR/L; Luisa Lowe, LCSW, both of Occupational Therapy Training Program, Torrance, CA Level: Intermediate A community-based mental health agency has effectively shifted from an existing interdisciplinary model of service delivery to an evidence-based model for adolescents with histories of trauma and substance use. Implications for future collabora-

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 108 CC 120-121 Assistive Technology and Home Adaptation for Neurogenic Vision Impairment
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Albert Copolillo, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Contributing Author: Synneve Dahlin-Ivanoff, PhD, OT Level: Intermediate This session reviews use of assistive technology and home adaptation for people with neurogenic vision impairment. OT interventions typically used with people with acquired vision impairments, e.g., macular degeneration, are suggested for use with people with neurogenic vision impairments with emphasis on the additional challenges this population presents.

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / MOrnInG
8:00 am–9:30 am SC 109 CC 201-202 Occupational Therapy and HIV/AIDS Care: A Series of Case Studies
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Alexis Misko; David Nelson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Level: Intermediate Home-based case studies of three persons with HIV/AIDS will document the potential of occupational therapy. Needs met include energy management, medication adherence, pain management, coping skills, psychosocial health, community involvement, stress management, neuropathy management, and leisure.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 112 CC 203-204 Demystifying the Maze of Doctoral Education
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA; Mary Khetani, ScD, OTR; Mary Evenson, OTD, OTR/L, all of Boston University, Boston, MA; Pamela Roberts, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES, FAOTA, CPHQ, CedarsSinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Patricia Crist, PhD, OTR/L, PC, FAOTA, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Intermediate Understanding the maze of doctoral education can be overwhelming, yet finding the right match between professional goals and doctoral programs is important. This course enables participants to identify program options, assess interests and resources, and set goals for career advancement.

8:30 am–11:30 am WS 100 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 (SIS) EISSIS Annual Program: Providing Intervention in the Natural Environment
Content Focus: Children & Youth Leslie Jackson, MEd, OT, FAOTA, Chicago State University, Chicago, IL; Gloria Frolek Clark, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA, Private Practice, Adel, IA; Yvonne Swinth, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA; Jean Polichino, MS, OTR, FAOTA, Therapy Services and ECI Keep Pace, Harris County Department of Education, Houston, TX; Mary Muhlenhaupt, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; Meira Orentlicher, PhD, OTR/L, Touro College, New York, NY; Elizabeth Wall, MS, OTR/L, BCP, Aurora Public Schools, Aurora, CO Contributing Authors: Patricia Bowyer, EdD, OTR, FAOTA; Dottie Handley-Moore, MS, OTR/L Level: Advanced This session will provide strategies for OT interventions in natural environments. Case studies will apply approaches in multiple environments (i.e., home, variety of school environments, employment settings) with various clients (i.e., parents, teachers, students). The Early Intervention and School Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 15 minutes of this session.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 110 CC 123-124 The Second Look Program: Coordinating a Return to Rehabilitation for Persons with Spinal Cord Injury
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Piper Hansen, MS, OTR/L, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Contributing Author: Kimberly Eberhardt-Muir, MS, OTR/L Level: Intermediate With decreased time in acute inpatient rehab, individuals with spinal cord injury may miss needed training, and socialization. The Second Look Program increases the opportunity for individuals to return to rehab with the overall goals of decreasing knowledge gaps, improving independence, and providing additional resources.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 113 CC 205-206 Can We Talk? Using Health Literacy Techniques for Effective Communication and Patient Outcomes
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Joan Temple, MEd, OTR/L, University of Wisconsin—LaCrosse, LaCrosse, WI; Ann O’Sullivan, OTR/L, LSW, FAOTA, Southern Maine Agency on Aging, Scarborough, ME Level: Introductory For health self-management, we need to understand conditions, interventions, and strategies. Health literacy is the ability to comprehend and use this information, and effective teaching for clients and families is key. Learn strategies to enhance communication and learning, and to improve outcomes.

8:30 am–11:30 am WS 101 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 (AOTA) Arthritis Update: Best Practice for the Hand
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jeanine Beasley, EdD, OTR, CHT, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI Level: Advanced The purpose of this Workshop is to present the current state of the art for therapeutic management of the arthritic hand. The session will also include demonstrations of specific orthotic (splinting) techniques. This knowledge can assist the OT in promoting best practice. This session is supported by ASHT.

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 111 CC 125-126 Getting to the Heart of the Occupational Therapist Role for Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) Recipients in an Acute Care Environment
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kathleen Kramer, MS, OTR/L, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL Level: Introductory This presentation focuses on the science of the Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) and the affect VAD placement has on the recipient patient’s occupations. Emphasis is given to developing appropriate client-centered treatment for the patient. Sample goals will be presented and discussed as well as a review of recent literature on VAD recipients.

DRS, Indiana University Health, Bloomington, IN; Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Fran Carlin-Rogers, Carlin Rogers Consulting, Orlando, FL Contributing Authors: AARP and AAA Level: Advanced This CarFit Event Coordinator Training session builds upon the Technician Training and only applies for CarFit credit for persons who have already completed the CarFit Technician Training (at the Pre-Conference Seminar or previously in their community). CarFit is an educational program created by the American Society on Aging and developed in collaboration with AAA, AARP, and AOTA to build community conversations on person-to-vehicle fit and to promote education about driver safety and community mobility. The core of the program is the CarFit event, held in a variety of community settings and collaboratively staffed by a trained team of volunteers and health professionals. In order to ensure that occupational therapy is a consistent part of the program, CarFit-trained professionals are needed in every state. Those attending both the Technician Training and the Event Coordinator Training will be prepared to work with partner organizations to conduct technician trainings, and plan and host CarFit events in their community. No experience in driver rehabilitation is required. For more information on the CarFit program, go to www. Car-Fit.org. Educators: This year a sub-section will be added to share how CarFit can be integrated into curriculums to engage students in their communities and promote the use of CarFit in their future practice. Visit www.car-fit.org

8:00 am–9:30 am SC 114 CC 207 Assessment of the Outcomes of Cultural Immersion Experiences in Fieldwork Practicum
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Darlene Perez-Brown, PhD, OTR/L, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC Level: Intermediate This study analyzes perceived levels of cultural competence in Master of Science in Occupational Therapy students before and after participation in three different levels of cultural immersion during fieldwork experiences.

8:30 am–11:30 am WS 104 CC Sagamore Ballroom 6 Baby Boomers are From Mars, Gen X-ers are From Venus, and Millennials are From Saturn: Changing Orbital Conflict to Orbital Innovation
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Christine Wright, PhD, LOTR, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA Level: Intermediate Intergenerational conflict is happening across a multitude of professions including Occupational Therapy. This Workshop is designed to discuss conflicting generation sub-culture behavior and innovative solutions for creating environments where all generations can adapt.

8:30 am–11:30 am WS 102 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 (AOTA) CarFit Event Coordinator Training
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jennifer Radloff, OTR, CDRS, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN; Susan Touchinsky, OTR/L, CDRS; Wendy Starnes, OTR/L; Felicia Chew, MS, OTR/L, all of Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA; Rachel Norton, OTR,

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MOrnInG / ThursDAY, AprIl 26
8:30 am–11:30 am WS 105 CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Using Professional Resources and Tools To Facilitate Innovative Evidence-Based and Occupation-Based Evaluation and Treatment in Geriatric Settings
Content Focus: Productive Aging Estelle Strydom, OTR/L, CAPS; Annalia Briones, OTR/L; Christina Guida, OTR/L; Elaine Adams, OTR/L, all of Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA Contributing Author: Felicia Chew, MS, OTR Level: Introductory This Workshop aims to help OT professionals working in geriatric settings to consistently identify and provide innovative occupation-based interventions through use of practice resources, implementation of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, and use of evidencebased practice resources. Judy Grossman, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA, Ackerman Institute for the Family, New York, NY Level: Introductory Therapists can use a model of family resilience to understand family risks, resources, and beliefs, and help them to deal with the cumulative challenges they face when their child has special needs. Case examples and videotapes will help the participants think about recurring themes and innovative services to promote family-centered practice. Level: Intermediate AOTA has partnered with CARF, an accreditor of health and human services, since 1966. OTs should be articulate about frameworks to improve and deliver quality services. Come explore accreditation opportunities for your organization and for OTs to engage in standards development, focus groups, and surveying.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 117 CC 201-202 (AOTA) Successful Strategies and Pitfalls to Avoid in Grant Writing for Pilot Studies
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Susan Murphy, ScD, OTR, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Susan Lin, ScD, OTR/L, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Intermediate This presentation will provide guidance on the steps of writing a pilot grant proposal for different funding agencies. In this Short Course, we will highlight important writing strategies for a strong research proposal and common pitfalls of novice grant writers.

pOsTer sessIOn #1
9:30 am–11:30am CC 500 Ballroom Sponsored by EBS Healthcare For details see page 37. 10:00 am–11:30 am SC 115 CC 207 (AOTA) ASPIRE to Excellence®: Using the CARF Standards as a Quality Framework To Develop and Continually Improve Programs Across the Continuum
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Christine MacDonell, CARF International, Tucson, AZ

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 116 CC 101-102 (AOTA) Medicare Part B Policy Update
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Jennifer Hitchon, JD, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Contributing Author: Chuck Willmarth Level: Introductory Staff from AOTA’s Reimbursement and Regulatory Policy Department along with invited guests from Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services will explain the latest developments in Medicare Part B law and policy to help you understand the way your services are covered and reimbursed. Topics will include health care reform implementation and the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.

8:30 am–11:30 am WS 106 CC Sagamore Ballroom 5 Systemic Models To Promote Resilience in Families Who Have Children With Special Needs
Content Focus: Children & Youth

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 118 CC 107-108 (AOTA) Evidence-Based Literature Review on Occupational Therapy and Home Modifications
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Susan Stark, PhD, OTR/L; Marian Keglovits, both of Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; Marian Arbesman, PhD, OTR/L,

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CPG-5686

Visit this AOTA Bronze Sponsor at Booth 901

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

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ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / MOrnInG
ArbesIdeas, Inc., Williamsville, NY; Deborah Lieberman, MHSA, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Intermediate This session will present the findings of a systematic review of evidence for providing home modifications. The methods will be described in detail and findings will be summarized and presented. Implications of the findings for occupational therapy practice, education, and research will be discussed. FAOTA, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH; Cynthia Lau, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV Level: Intermediate A panel of researchers and practitioners will discuss opportunities and resources to support Occupational Therapy’s role in obesity prevention and intervention. Relevance to bullying, play, and recess promotion will be reviewed and specific action steps will be identified.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 123 CC 127-128 Exploring the Perceptions of Two OTs and Their Client, a Survivor of Domestic Violence, About Using Text Messaging in the Therapeutic Process
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Robin Underwood, PhD, OT/L; Chava Neiditch, both of Brenau University, Gainesville, GA Level: Introductory This study contributes to research about the use of technology in OT service delivery. The researchers hope to cause therapists to consider implementing new methods into their practices. Findings underscore the significance of technology as another facet of the therapeutic relationship.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 127 CC 103-104 Transitioning Youth on the Autism Spectrum: Evidence for the Changing Role of Occupational Therapy Practitioners
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lisa Crabtree, PhD, OTR/L; Janet DeLany, DEd, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Towson University, Towson, MD Level: Intermediate Society is under-prepared for transitioning youth on the autism spectrum into adulthood during the next 10 years. How to shift occupational therapy practitioners’ historical focus on sensory, visual perceptual, fine motor, and handwriting needs to engagement in adult occupations is essential.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 119 CC 122 (AOTA) Current Trends in Accreditation & Higher Education
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Susan Graves, both of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Intermediate The last year has seen significant changes in the regulatory requirements and market demands impacting academic programs. This course will provide an overview and analysis of changes in higher education policy and data trends that will potentially impact occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant education. In addition, the course will present the trend data collected on occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant educational programs and the implications for the education and practice communities.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 121 CC 120-121 Designing a Healthy Future: Occupational Therapy, Sustainability, and Ergonomics
Content Focus: Work & Industry Julie Dorsey, MS, OTR/L, CEAS, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY; Linda Miller, MeDes, OT, CCPE, CPE, EWI Works International Inc, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Intermediate Green ergonomics is defined as the incorporation of ergonomics into activities related to sustainability practices with the goal of improving health, wellbeing, and productivity of both individuals and systems. This is an area in which OTs are uniquely positioned to work, bringing a valuable role to the sustainability movement.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 125 CC 123-124 Put A Little PEP In Your Step: Effectiveness of an OccupationBased Planned EnergyExpenditure Principles Program for Women who are Morbidly Obese
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Letha Mosley, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Mysti Drinkwater, both of University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Level: Introductory Presentation of theoretical and practical aspects of Planned EnergyExpenditure Principles (PEP) including research on the effectiveness of Put A Little PEP in Your Step, an educational program designed to increase energy expenditure among women classified as morbidly obese through incorporation of PEP into daily routines and occupations.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 128 CC 125-126 Preschool Special Educators Perceptions of Occupational Therapists Roles and Services
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kerrie Ramsdell, MS, LOTR, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA Level: Introductory Based on the 2010 AOTA Workforce Study, school systems and early intervention are considered to be a primary work setting. However, there has been rapid change within special education and general education policy that has impacted service delivery. This study seeks to understand perceptions of preschool special educators on occupational therapists’ roles and services.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
10:00 am–11:30 am SC 120 CC 105-106 (AOTA) Occupational Therapy’s Role in Obesity Prevention: A National Priority
Content Focus: Children & Youth Yolanda Suarez-Balcazar, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Sandra Schefkind, MS, OTR/L, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Michael Pizzi, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA; Simone Gill, PhD, OTR/L, Boston University Sargent College, Boston, MA; Susan Orloff, OTR/L, Children’s Special Services, LLC, Atlanta, GA; Susan Bazyk, PhD, OTR/L,

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 122 CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 Concussed: Reconditioning the mTBI When Business is Booming!
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Erik Johnson, CPT, MS, OTR/L, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD; Robinette Amaker, PhD, OTR/L, CHT, FAOTA, Army Medical Department Center and School, San Antonio, TX Level: Introductory This session will discuss the development of OT mTBI reconditioning programs in combat, and identify specific treatment tools used to treat soldiers who have been exposed to blast forces resulting in mTBI/postconcussion syndrome. Discussion will also focus on barriers to restoration to include behavioral health issues and other associated injuries.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 126 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 Evidence and Occupation-Based Intervention in Community Corrections
Content Focus: Mental Health Sandra Rogers, PhD, OTR/L; John White, PhD, OTR/L, both of Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR; Brandon Johnson, MOT, Bridge to Independence Day Program, Hillsboro, OR Level: Intermediate This session presents a mixed method study that examined connections between occupational engagement, displacement, and role diversity in an intervention program for a community correction population. The occupation-based program that was developed to address the needs identified by the study will also be presented.

10:00 am–11:30 am SC 129 CC 203-204 Infusing Literacy and Wellness in an After-School Program for At-Risk Youth
Content Focus: Children & Youth Shelley Wallock, DrPH, OTR/L; Sheena Navidi; Kristen Bates; Katherine Balcerzak; Samantha McAteer; James Gillette, all of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA Level: Intermediate Occupational therapy has the potential to play an important role in after-school wellness programs. This course explores an innovative approach incorporating student-run occupational therapy groups in an urban, high-risk elementary and middle school community.

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10:00 am–11:30 am SC 130 CC 205-206 Looking Back as We Move Forward: Using the Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture Series to Connect Student Learning to the Foundations of Occupational Therapy Practice
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Kristin Winston, PhD, OTR/L, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Tammy Bickmore, MS, OTR/L, University of Southern Maine, Lewiston, ME Level: Introductory This course will examine strategies to introduce students to the profession of occupational therapy through the lens of the profession’s most celebrated educators, authors, and clinicians. Participants are encouraged to think innovatively as they consider the use of the Slagle Lectures for teaching foundational concepts.

professional Doctorate of occupational therapy

MOrnInG / ThursDAY, AprIl 26
12:30 pm–1:30 pm RP 102 CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 Assessing Cognition in Acute Care Setting: Seeking the Optimal Tools—Phase I
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Regula Robnett, PhD, OTR/L; Angela Sgrignuoli, MSOT; Taylor Hovey, MSOT; Julie Monteiro, MSOT, all of University of New England, Portland, ME; Jennifer Cote, OTR/L, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME Contributing Authors: Hilary Arsenault, MSOT; Kristel Anne Ayroso, MSOT Level: Intermediate This qualitative research project describes the results of five focus groups that explored the cognitive assessment process in acute care settings (N = 52). Themes include how therapists determine the patients’ level of cognition, issues and needs specific to the setting, and the clinical reasoning they employ during the assessment process. Content Focus: Mental Health Alyssa Evans, MOT, OTR/L; Mindy Miller, MOT, OTR/L; Randy McCombie, PhD, OTR/L, all of West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Level: Intermediate This study examined the incidence of substance abuse (alcohol and illicit drugs) by Occupational Therapy and Occupational Therapy Assistant students. Research found substantial alcohol use and modest drug use; the report focuses on differences between the two groups. Because OT is a health care profession, it must be cognizant of the degree of substance abuse within its ranks to maintain public trust.

Teresa May-Benson, ScD, OTR/L, The Spiral Foundation, Watertown, MA Contributing Author: Alison Teasdale Level: Intermediate This study examined the relationship of children’s maladaptive behaviors and emotional responses to praxis and motor skill performance. Attention, impulsivity, and activity level were related to praxis skills which were found to negatively impact participation in social skills and school performance skills.

Development of the Child’s Challenging Behavior Scale

Content Focus: Children & Youth Helen Bourke-Taylor, PhD, OTR, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia Contributing Authors: Mary Law, PhD; Linsey Howie, PhD Level: Intermediate The Child’s Challenging Behavior Scale (CCBS) is brief, psychometrically sound, and can assist profes• Enhance your career and become a leader in your profession sionals to identify mother-child 12:30 pm–1:30 pm dyads in need of additional support. • Apply principles of evidence-based practice as a basis for may use the RP 100 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 Occupational therapists CCBS to identify families and tailor clinical decision making Behavior, Emotion, and Praxis: interventions that promote healthy It’s Not All About Modulation • Gain advanced knowledge of occupational therapy practice family occupations. Content Focus: Children & Youth

Occupational Behaviors & Quality of Life: A Comparison Study of Individuals Who SelfIdentify as Adult Children of Alcoholics and Non-Adult Adult Children of Alcoholics
Content Focus: Mental Health Emily Vaught, MS; Peggy Prince Wittman, EdD, OT/L, FAOTA, both of Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY Level: Introductory This study was designed to research differences in overall quality of life and satisfaction with occupational behaviors between Adult Children of

professional through the study and application of occupational science literature and occupation-based intervention Doctorate of • Design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of innovative occupation-based programs in your chosen area of interest occupational DOCTORATE of OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROFESSIONAL therapy • 24/7 online experience, with just two short residencies, allows
you to study with convenience and flexibility • Develop skills in areas of professional advocacy, education, and business • Taught by clinical educators distinguished nationally and regionally in specific areas of expertise • Accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools

12:30 pm–1:30 pm RP 103 CC 201-202 Alcohol and Drug Abuse Among Occupational Therapy and Occupational Therapy Assistant Students

Bachelor’s Degree-to-otD option
Experienced occupational therapists who hold a bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy but do not hold a master’s degree have the option to bridge into Chatham’s OTD program

• Enhance your career and become a leader in your profession BACHELOR’S DEGREE-TO-OTD OPTION • Apply principles of evidence-based practice as a basis for Experienced occupational therapists who hold a bachelor’s degree clinical decision making in occupational therapy but do not hold a master’s degree have • Gain advanced knowledge of occupational therapy practice the option to bridge into Chatham’s OTD program through the study and application of occupational science Woodland Road . . . Pittsburgh, PA literature and occupation-based intervention 866-815-2050 . . . ccps@chatham.edu www.chatham.edu/ccps/ot Woodland Road . . . Pittsburgh, PA • Design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of innovative CPG-5687 866-815-2050 . . . ccps@chatham.edu occupation-based programs in your chosen area of interest Visit this AOTA Bronze Sponsor at Booth 25 AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO • 24/7 online experience, with just two short residencies, allows www.chatham.edu/ccps/ot you to study with convenience and flexibility

• Enhance your career and become a leader in your profession • Apply principles of evidence-based practice as a basis for clinical decision making • Gain advanced knowledge of occupational therapy practice through the study and application of occupational science literature and occupation-based intervention • Design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of innovative occupation-based programs in your chosen area of interest • 24/7 online experience, with just two short residencies, allows you to study with convenience and flexibility • Develop skills in areas of professional advocacy, education, and business • Taught by clinical educators distinguished nationally and regionally in specific areas of expertise • Accredited by Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools

25

ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / AfTernOOn
Alcoholics (ACOAs) and non-ACOAs, with results indicative of an existing difference. This can benefit in the development of effective intervention models to achieve life satisfaction through meaningful occupations. used accessibility information when asked to choose different models of equipment. for wheelchair assessments that can impact the driving task and vehicle access. It is essential that therapists consider how these areas impact one another. The session will also include demonstration of wheelchair and passenger securement equipment used in adapted vehicles.

12:30 pm–1:30 pm RP 104 CC 207 Safe Patient Handling and Movement Equipment as Assistive Devices for Use in OT Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Amy Darragh, PhD, OTR/L, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Contributing Author: Marc Campo, PhD, PT, OCS Level: Intermediate This session will provide preliminary information about the use of safe patient handling and movement devices in occupational therapy practice. The results of this qualitative study indicate that equipment, such as mechanical lift devices, can be used during therapy to facilitate patient recovery and protect occupational therapists from injury.

12:30 pm–2:00 pm SC 131 CC 122 (AOTA) Professional Presentations: Strategies for Success
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Denise Rotert, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Sioux Falls, SD; Maria Klamm, MBA, OTR/L, University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, SD Level: Introductory This Short Course provides practical strategies for delivering dynamic oral and poster presentations. Once your proposal has been accepted, the next step is to prepare a presentation that stands out from the rest, makes you feel successful, and shares your expertise with colleagues. Learn how to avoid common mistakes and a variety of helpful hints.

12:30 pm–2:00 pm SC 137 CC 125-126 Innovative and Evidence-Based Approaches to Functional Interventions for Children and Youth With Asperger Syndrome or High-Functioning Autism
Content Focus: Children & Youth M. Louise Dunn, ScD, OTR/L, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Lea Ann Lowery, MEd, OTR/L, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO Level: Intermediate Preparation for community living for children and youth with Asperger Syndrome or High-Functioning Autism is an important goal that needs more evidence. We will provide background research, and we will discuss measures and innovative evidencebased interventions that are critical to preparation for community living, especially daily living skills.

12:30 pm–2:00 pm SC 134 CC 123-124 Participation After Stroke: Wellness Centers for Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kathleen Parker, MS, OT, American Stroke Foundation, Mission, KS Level: Introductory The need for community-based programming for stroke survivors becomes more necessary as less time is spent in the rehab setting. This talk describes a unique “nonmedical” wellness program for stroke survivors that provides physical wellness programs, education, support, and community participation.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 107 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 (AOTA) OT Education Research Forum
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN; Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA; Debra Hanson, PhD, OTR/L, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Barb Hooper, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Janice Burke, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA Level: Introductory The current state of occupational therapy academic and fieldwork education research will be presented and situated in the context of trends in higher education. In keeping with the Centennial Vision, the panel members will engage participants in discussions on future directions of education research for the profession. The session will include a participatory dialogue on ways of achieving the visionary education research agenda and identifying the strategies and resources necessary to do so.

12:30 pm–1:30 pm RP 105 CC 203-204 Predicting Continuing Improvement in MCI Using the new Statistics Method: SPRE
Content Focus: Productive Aging Rosalie Miller, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Deborah Weissman-Miller, ScD; Mary Shotwell, PhD, OTR, all of Brenau University, Gainesville, GA Contributing Authors: Edita Stewart; Moira Chisvo; Denise Hutcherson; Morgan Catogni Smith Level: Advanced This research analyzes and predicts outcomes of treatment for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using a science-based and statistically innovative single subject design (SPRE). Using SPRE, practitioners and researchers can also predict efficacy for future treatments.

12:30 pm–2:00 pm SC 132 CC 120-121 (AOTA) OT Role in Falls Prevention
Content Focus: Productive Aging Elizabeth Head, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Contractor), Atlanta, GA; Elizabeth Peterson, PhD, OTR/L, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Carol Siebert, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, The Home Remedy, Chapel Hill, NC; Valeree Lecey, Greater Wisconsin Agency on Aging Resources, Brookfield, WI; Christina Metzler; Karen Smith, OT/L, CAPS, both of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Introductory Occupational therapy may be an underutilized resource in preventing falls. Attend this session to learn about occupational therapy’s role in the Centers for Disease Control’s recognized fall prevention programs, specifically Stepping On, a program developed by an occupational therapist.

12:30 pm–2:00 pm SC 135 CC 127-128 Using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure to Emphasize Occupation in Hand Therapy
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Lisa Deshaies, OTR/L, CHT; Michele Berro, MA, OTR/L, both of Rancho Los Amigos National Rehab Center, Long Beach, CA Level: Introductory Participants will be introduced to the use of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure as an evaluation, treatment, and outcome tool for clients receiving hand therapy. Case examples of clients with various diagnoses will be used to highlight key points.

Do Consumers With Disabilities Want Accessibility Labels on Products?: A Discrete Choice Modeling Experiment
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Rochelle Mendonca, PhD, OT, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; Roger Smith, PhD, OT, FAOTA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI Level: Introductory This paper reports on a discrete choice modeling experiment that investigated the type of information used most by people with disabilities as they made equipment decisions. Clients most significantly

12:30 pm–2:00 pm SC 133 CC 107-108 The Relationship Between Driving, Vehicle Modifications, and Seating/Mobility
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation C. Dan Allison, Jr., MS, OTR/L, ATP, CDRS, T.K. Martin Center at Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS Contributing Author: Wes L. Perry, MSBME, ATP, CDRS Level: Introductory This session will provide the participants with the strategies to consider

12:30 pm–2:00 pm SC 136 CC 109-110 Programs for At-Risk Youth: Partnerships That Provide Innovative Services and Demonstrate Effectiveness
Content Focus: Children & Youth Sandra Rogers, PhD, OTR/L; Jody Victoria, MOT/L, both of Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR Contributing Authors: Katie O’Day, MOT; Julie Ediger, MOT Level: Intermediate Two community programs that serve at-risk youth, developed as practicescholarship partnerships, will be highlighted as a way to identify mutually beneficial opportunities. We will present an adolescent activity card sort, intervention strategies and learning modules, and evidence for effectiveness.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 108 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 (AOTA) Arthritis Update: Best Practice for the Hand
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jeanine Beasley, EdD, OTR, CHT, Grand Valley State University, Rockford, MI

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

Visit us at Booth 1316

AfTernOOn / ThursDAY, AprIl 26
Level: Advanced The purpose of this Workshop is to present the current state of the art for therapeutic management of the arthritic hand. The Workshop will also include demonstrations of specific orthotic (splinting) techniques. This knowledge can assist the OT in promoting best practice. This session is supported by ASHT.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 112 CC 105-106 Occupational Therapy and Diabetes: Understanding our Role in Chronic Care Management
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Katie Jordan, OTD, OTR/L; Chantelle Rice, OTD, OTR/L; Camille Dieterle, OTD, OTR/L; Elizabeth Pyatak, PhD, OTR/L; Michelle Farmer, MA, OTR/L, all of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Shanpin Fanchiang, PhD, OTR/L, Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, Los Angeles, CA Level: Intermediate Healthy lifestyle factors can significantly improve the management and reduce the incidence of diabetes. As experts in task analysis, healthy habits and routines, and activities of daily living, occupational therapy practitioners are uniquely qualified to implement sustainable lifestyle changes to support diabetes prevention and management.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 115 CC Sagamore Ballroom 5 Self-Care With Flair!: A Practical Tool for Teaching SelfCare Skills to Children With Autism and Other Disabilities
Content Focus: Children & Youth Bhanu Raghavan, MS, OTR/L, Centerville City Schools, Centerville, OH; Virginia McDonald, OTR/L, CareerStaff Unlimited, Dayton, OH Contributing Author: Jane CaseSmith, EdD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA Level: Introductory Caregivers of children with autism express frustration when teaching self-care skills, and OTs are often consulted. Research shows children retain better when novelty is intertwined with new learning; for example, children memorize Mother Goose rhymes faster than text. SelfCare With Flair! is a novel tool that combines pictures and rhymes to teach basic self-care.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 109 CC 103-104 (SIS) GSIS Annual Program: Geriatric Obesity—Achieving Planned Energy Expenditure Through Occupation-Based Interventions and Assistive Technology for the Bariatric Client
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Shirley Blanchard, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; Letha Mosley, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Level: Intermediate Bariatrics is the medical study of causes, evaluation, and interventions for obese individuals. Practitioners need to understand the impact of obesity on elders. This presentation focuses on occupation-based interventions, planned energy expenditure, bariatric assistive technology, documentation, and application through case studies. The Gerontology Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the last 30 minutes of this session.

Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Sarah Burton, MS, OT, FAOTA, Prince George’s County Public Schools, Upper Marlboro, MD; Brenda George, MS, OTR/L, Consultant, Carroll, OH Level: Intermediate A panel including practitioners and AOTA staff from Ethics and Practice will explore actual school-based scenarios that members submitted to AOTA. These questions presented ethical challenges that impact daily practice. Resources and actions steps will be emphasized.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 139 CC 201-202 (AOTA) Health Reform 2012: What’s New? What’s Next?
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Tim Nanof, MSW, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Contributing Authors: Christina Metzler; Ralph Kohl; Chuck Willmarth Level: Intermediate Federal policy discussion about the current state of health reform with a focus on opportunities and challenges facing the profession of occupational therapy.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 113 CC Sagamore Ballroom 6 Turning a Lack of Evidence Into an Occupational Therapy Opportunity
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Naomi Abrams, OTD, OTR/L, CEAS, Worksite Health & Safety Consultants, Rockville, MD Level: Intermediate Office ergonomics research shows a lack of effective interventions, reproducible methods, and occupational therapy involvement. This Workshop will review the focus and methods of prior research and demonstrate how using occupation-based models can provide a more effective language for study.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 116 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 (SIS) AMSIS Private Practice Subsection Annual Program: Creating and Implementing a “SMART” Business Plan for a Private or Independent Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Tammy Richmond, MS, OTR/L, Ultimate Rehab, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; James Cino, OTR, Adaptive Home Therapy, Inc., Toms Rivers, NJ Level: Intermediate This interactive Workshop will teach practitioners how to write and implement a “SMART”(Sensible, Marketable, Actionable, Relevant, and Trustworthy) business plan for a private or independent practice with real-world basic business fundamental tools. Additional real scenarios across different practice settings will be presented. The Private Practice Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the last 20 minutes of this session.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 111 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 (SIS) HCHSIS Annual Program: Occupation at its Best! Capturing the Power of Enriched Environments in Home and Community
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jan Davis, MS, OTR/L, International Clinical Educators, Inc., Port Townsend, WA Level: Advanced Functional tasks using real-life objects give a multi-dimensional approach to treatment as they require simultaneous use of motor control, cognition, visual perception, sensation and motor planning. This interactive session will explore creative ideas in which OTs can best utilize occupation-based treatment in home/community settings. The Home and Community Health Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 30 minutes of this session.

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 140 CC 203-204 (AOTA) Evidence-Based Literature Review on Occupational Therapy and Driving and Community Mobility for Older Adults
Content Focus: Productive Aging Deborah Lieberman, MHSA, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Marian Arbesman, PhD, OTR/L, ArbesIdeas, Inc., Williamsville, NY; Anne Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Kathleen Golisz, OTD, OTR, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY; Michael Justiss, PhD, OTR, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; Wendy Stav, PhD, OTR/L, SCDCM, FAOTA, Towson University, Towson, MD Level: Intermediate This session will outline the process involved in the evidence-based literature review including the development of the focused questions, search strategy, challenges faced, and strategies to overcome those challenges. Specific findings will be presented along with implications for occupational therapy practice, education, and research.

12:30 pm–3:30 pm WS 114 CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 “There’s an App for That!”® Creating Apps for Your Clients and Students
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues DeLana Honaker, PhD, OTR, www. PracticeOrganizer.com, Amarillo, TX Level: Introductory This Workshop presents basic and intermediate information on considerations and the process for creating apps for clients and students, demonstrations of four apps (study guide/quiz, documentation forms, home exercise program with video clips, and social story) created by presenter, and resources to facilitate app development by participants.

pOsTer sessIOn #2
1:00 pm–3:00 pm CC 500 Ballroom Sponsored by EBS Healthcare For details see page 42. 2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 138 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 (AOTA) The Ethics of SchoolBased Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Deborah Yarett Slater, MS, OT/L, FAOTA; Sandra Schefkind, MS, OTR/L, both of American

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ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / AfTernOOn
2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 141 CC 207 Nutrition and Exercise for Wellness and Recovery (NEW-R): An Evidence-Based Weight Loss Program for People With Serious Mental Illness
Content Focus: Mental Health Catana Brown, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ; Cherie Bledsoe, Wyandot Center for Community Behavioral Health Care, Kansas City, KS Contributing Author: Jeannine Goetz, PhD, RD Level: Intermediate This Short Course trains occupational therapists to administer the NEW-R program. Adapted from the evidence-based RENEW program, the eight-week curriculum provides knowledge, skills and motivational strategies for people with serious mental illness to lose weight. NEW-R manuals will be provided.

2:30 pm–3:30 pm RP 106 CC 107-108 Patterns in Seating Equipment Evaluation/Provision and Patient Satisfaction: Evidence From the SCIRehab Project
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Lauren Heisler, MS, OTR/L, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY; Deepa Thimmaiah, MS, OTR, Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO Contributing Authors: Rebecca Ozelie, MHS, OTR/L, BCPR; Julie Gassaway, MS, RN; Kara L. Cantoni, OTR/L; Ginger J. Perritt, MS, OTR/L; Emily Ashpole, OTR/L; Teresa Foy, LOT Level: Introductory OTs play a critical role in determining appropriate wheeled mobility devices for patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Mat evaluations were used infrequently; therapists primarily used wheelchair fitting to determine seating systems. Patients were satisfied with the fit/function of their wheelchairs. Understanding long-term use and satisfaction will help optimize wheelchair decisions.

Level: Introductory Patient, clinician, and facility characteristics, in addition to the motor level and completeness of injury, may affect OT intervention selection for patients with spinal cord injury. This presentation describes associations of these variables with OT treatment choices.

establish content validity of a feeding scale for premature infants via a collaboration between an occupational therapy academic program and an occupational therapy clinical service.

2:30 pm–3:30 pm RP 107 CC 109-110 Virtual Reality Intervention To Engage Children With Cerebral Palsy During a Motor Control and Strengthening Program: A Case Study
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Nicole Goodson, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO Contributing Author: Jack Engsberg, PhD Level: Intermediate One of the limitations of traditional repetitive motor learning programs is the difficulty of keeping the participants motivated and engaged during the sessions. Interactive virtual reality videogames can be combined with a motor learning program in order to capture and sustain the participant’s attention while realizing functional goals.

2:30 pm–3:30 pm RP 109 CC 120-121 The Effects of Oral Motor Stimulation on Feeding Behaviors of Infants Born With Complex Congenital Heart Defects
Content Focus: Children & Youth Patricia Coker-Bolt, PhD, OTR/L; Courtney Jarrard, OTR/L, C/NDT; Francis Woodard Kline, NP; Paige Merrill, OTR/L, all of Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC Level: Intermediate This pilot study measured the effects of an oral motor stimulation program for infants born with complex congenital heart defects. Infants received oral motor treatment before and after cardiac surgery. A statistically significant difference was seen in the overall length of hospital stay between the treatment and experimental groups (p=0.04).

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 142 CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 Safety First, Safety Always: Mobility Considerations and Fall Prevention for Older Adults with Vision Loss
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Anne Riddering, OTR/L, CLVT, COMS, Henry Ford Health System Center for Vision Rehabilitation, Livonia, MI Level: Introductory Many older adults do not recognize the increased risks for a fall, including vision loss and co-morbid conditions. Occupational therapists can provide valuable information to clients by assessing risk, discussing prevention, and recommending modifications for the home and activities of daily living.

Adaptive Equipment: Prescription and Long-Term Use in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury—Evidence From an Innovative Practice-Based Evidence Design
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Rebecca Ozelie, MHS, OTR/L, BCPR, Rush University, Chicago, IL; Teresa Foy, OT, Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA Contributing Authors: Julie Gassaway, MS, RN; Lauren A. Heisler, MS, OTR/L; Kara L. Cantoni, OTR/L; Ginger J. Perritt, MS, OTR/L; Emily Ashpole, OTR/L Level: Introductory OTs provide adaptive equipment (AE) to persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) in an attempt to empower them to be more functional and independent after rehabilitation discharge. This presentation explores evidence demonstrating the receipt of AE, use after discharge, and differences in functional measures for patients with SCI that use AE.

Developing Home-Based Virtual Reality Therapy Interventions
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Janice Lin, OTD; Jack Engsberg, PhD; Caitlin Kelleher, PhD, all of Washington University, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory Two persons with stroke (>1.5 years) improved in movement, strength, motor control, function, and activities of daily living after six weeks of a motivating and engaging upper extremity virtual reality (VR) home intervention. Home VR could permit continued improvement in function, participation, and quality of life.

2:30 pm–3:30 pm RP 110 CC 122 Meaningful Activity Contributes to Meaning in Life: Results From a One-Year Longitudinal Design
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Aaron Eakman, PhD, OTR/L, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Level: Intermediate The purpose of this longitudinal study was to test how changes in meaningful activity for college students over a one-year timeframe relate to changes in life meaning. Results demonstrated increases in meaningful activity over one-year predicted greater levels of meaning in life.

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 143 CC 205-206 iPads and iTechnology: Is it More Engaging, Efficient, and Effective? A Rubric for Occupational Therapists
Content Focus: Children & Youth Dennis Cleary, OTD, OTR/L, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Contributing Author: Jennifer Cullen Level: Intermediate iPads and iTechnology are definitely engaging, but are they efficient and effective for Occupational Therapy practitioners? A rubric will be presented to help practitioners gauge which apps might be effective for their clients. Case studies will show the efficacy of iPads with preschoolers and high school students who have disabilities.

Beyond Injury Level: Evidence of Factors Influencing Occupational Therapy Interventions for Persons With Spinal Cord Injury
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Rebecca Ozelie, MHS, OTR/L, BCPR, Rush University, Chicago, IL Contributing Authors: Julie Gassaway, MS, RN; Teresa Foy, LOT; Lauren A. Heisler, MS, OTR/L; Kara L. Cantoni, OTR/L; Ginger J. Perritt, MS, OTR/L; Emily Ashpole, OTR/L

2:30 pm–3:30 pm RP 108 CC 123-124 Collaborative Partnerships: Use of the Delphi Technique as a Method to Establish Validity of a Feeding Scale for Premature Infants
Content Focus: Children & Youth Christy Nelson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Kendra Burkholder; Abby Nichols; Amanda Stoltz, all of University of Findlay, Findlay, OH Contributing Authors: Kara Ann Waitzman, OTR/L, CIMI; Sue Ludwig, OTR/L Level: Introductory This study reports the use of the Delphi Technique as a process to

The Health Promoting Activities Scale (HPAS): An Occupational Therapy-Specific Outcome Measure
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Helen Bourke-Taylor, PhD, MSOT, BApp ScOT, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia Contributing Authors: Mary Law, PhD; Linsey Howie, PhD Level: Intermediate The Health Promoting Activities Scale is a unique, brief, and psychometrically sound scale that provides professionals with an assessment tool that evaluates mothers of school-aged children’s participation in leisure occupations that are associated with health and wellbeing.

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

CPG-5763

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

31

ADVANCE YOUR CAREER AND GAIN A PROFESSIONAL EDGE THROUGH OUR INNOVATIVE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROGRAMS IN FORT LAUDERDALE AND TAMPA, FLORIDA
(1) Doctor of Occupational Therapy (Dr.OT) for practicing clinicians who wish to contribute to evidence-based practice and gain practice area expertise or leadership skills (2) Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in OT for aspiring researchers and scholars • Earn your doctorate without relocating: distance education format with short on-campus requirements. You will visit beautiful South Florida about 3 times per year to study with our distinguished faculty. • We are fully accredited by SACS.

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(1) Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) degree through our full time on-campus program in Fort Lauderdale (2) Doctor of OT (OTD) through the hybrid/weekend program in Tampa, FL. CONTACT... Dr. Max Ito, imax@nova.edu (for Ph.D. degree) Dr. Cathy Peirce, cpeirce@nova.edu (for Dr.OT degree) Dr. Rachelle Dorne, dorne@nova.edu (for MOT degree in Fort Lauderdale) Dr. Ricardo C. Carrasco, rc1265@nova.edu (for OTD degree in Tampa)

Notice of Accreditation/Nondiscrimination Nova Southeastern University admits students of any age, race, color, sexual orientation, pregnancy status, religion or creed, nondisqualifying disability, and national or ethnic origin. • Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia, 30033-4097; telephone number: 404-679-4501) to award associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees.
CPG-5820

32

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

Visit us at Booth 733

AfTernOOn/eVenInG / ThursDAY, AprIl 26
The Development of Care Pathways and Packages in Mental Health Based on the Model of Human Occupation Screening Tool
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Sun Lee, PhD, OTR/L; Renee Taylor, PhD, both of University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL Contributing Author: Gary Kielhofner, DrPH, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Intermediate Qualitatively distinct occupational profiles identified across the clusters of Payment-by-Result (PbR) system using the Model of Human Occupation will provide an important evidence base for thinking about the occupational needs of service users within the various PbR clusters and the corresponding services that might be offered.

sTuDenT OnlY sessIOn
2:30 pm–3:30 pm SC 144 CC 125-126 (AOTA) Realities and Myths of the COTA® Examination
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Marissa Gayle, MOT, OTR/L, National Board of Occupational Therapy, Gaithersburg, MD Level: Introductory What can you do to prepare for the National Board of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) certification examination? Everything is spelled out in one concise session, from the examination blueprint to examination preparation tools and tips. Learn realities and myths about how the COTA examination is constructed and administered, and hear tips on preparing for the exam. The session will include an overview of the format of the examination including sample multiple choice practice items.

GenerAl sessIOn
Welcome Ceremony and Keynote Address 4:00 pm–5:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG Sponsored by Marsh Affinity Group Services For details see page 11.

speCIAl eVenT
Students Un-Conferenced 8:30 pm–10:30 pm JW White River Ballroom BCD Sponsored by RehabCare For details see page 13.

GenerAl sessIOn
Expo Grand Opening and Reception 5:30 pm–9:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE For details see page 11.

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

33

2012 Conference Corporate sponsors
AOTA Thanks Its Conference Corporate Sponsors!
Please join AOTA in specially recognizing and thanking these generous supporters of AOTA and the OT profession by stopping by their booths during your time in the Exhibit Hall.

platinum level
Conference Tote Bag

Booth 600

Welcome Ceremony

First Timers’ Orientation

Booth 624

Booth 227

Gold level
Conference Program Guide Presidential Address

Booth 533

Lanyards and Program Directors’ Breakfast

Booth 814

Annual Awards & Recognition Ceremony and Reception

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

To all Thank you for your generous support!

silver level
Transportation Zone SIS Network Reception

SIS Fun Run and Walk

Booth 124 Booth 524

Poster Sessions

Conference Tote Bag Stuffer

Expo Hall Pocket Guide

Booths 701, 705, and 813 Booth 807 Booth 609

Assembly of Student Delegates’ Meeting and Students Unconferenced

Program Directors’ Meeting & Textbook Expo

Booth 606 Booth 801 Booth 1415

Booth 907

Bronze level
ASAP Reception
Affiniscape Inc.

Food and Drink Station
Shepherd Center
Booth 901

Cyber Café
Boston University
Booth 633

Miami Valley Hospital University of Southern California
Booth 1032

Audio Visual
Mary Washington Healthcare Touro College

Casamba, Inc.

Tech Day
Quinnipiac University
Booth 626

Booth 1330

Chatham University
Booth 25

Touro University Nevada
AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO 35

CPG-5847

Visit us at Booth 635

poster sessions
Poster Sessions provide attendees with the opportunity to stay up-to-date on many new and interesting interventions, ideas, and programs; important advances in the profession; and latest research. View as many as you like during each 2-hour session and meet with authors for valuable interactions on the topics that interest you the most. Continuing education units are provided for Poster Sessions. Information sheets are provided onsite.

9:30 am–11:30 am CC 500 Ballroom

pOsTer sessIOn #1

Thursday, April 26
PO 1006 The Impact of Mild Stroke on Participation in Physical Fitness Activities
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Mary Hildebrand, OTD, OTR/L, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Megan Brewer, MSOT, OTR/L, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, IL; Timothy Wolf, OTD, OTR/L, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory

PO 1011 Occupational Therapy in the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jacqueline Hall, MS, OTR/L, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA Level: Introductory

Sponsored by EBS Healthcare PO 1000 Service Learning in Ukraine: Innovative Occupational Therapy Practice
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Donna Costa, DHS, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Contributing Author: Susan Meyers, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Intermediate

AsD spOTs
The Assembly of Student Delegates (ASD) invites you to view student-authored posters that are designated by an ASD Scholarship Projects by Occupational Therapy Students (SPOTS) logo. This initiative recognizes and encourages the scholarship of students to help achieve our Centennial Vision of being a science-driven and evidence-based profession.

PO 1001 Skills Program for Orphaned Children With Developmental Disabilities Living in Ukraine’s Institutions: Application of Evidence-Based Research
Content Focus: Children & Youth Emily Wallace, OTD, OTR/L, Helmer Global Initiatives, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory

PO 1007 Exploring Cultural Competency Among Rehabilitative Professionals: A Focus on Professional Advancement
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Jolene Grandmaison, Bay Path College, Longmeadow, MA Contributing Author: Karen Sladyk, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

PO 1012 Integrating Health Literacy Concepts Into Pediatric Settings: Innovative Tools for Occupation-Centered Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kris Pizur-Barnekow, PhD, OTR/L, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; Amy Darragh, PhD, OTR/L, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Lisa Schubert, MA, OTR/L, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN Level: Intermediate

PO 1002 Partnering With a NonGovernmental Organization: Using Innovative Strategies and Evidence To Guide a Volunteer Experience in Ethiopia
Content Focus: Children & Youth Joan Surfus, MS, OTR/L, Pediatric Therapy Network, Torrance, CA; Neeha Patel, OTD, OTR/L, Private Practice, Norman, OK Level: Introductory

PO 1008 Kitchen Gardens in Rural Rwanda: Enhancing Family Roles and Health Promotion
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Erika Seiver; Stephen Kern, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA Contributing Author: Janice Burke, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

PO 1013 The Role of OT in the Management of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome s/p BMT: A Case Study
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Lauren Bonacci, MOT, OTR/L, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Contributing Author: Claudine Campbell, OTR, CLT Level: Introductory

KeY TO COnTenT fOCus
Posters are color-coded in order to reflect the 8 broad practice categories and easily identify those that are most relevant to your practice. All posters are in numerical order. Academic & Fieldwork Education Children & Youth General & Professional Issues Health & Wellness Mental Health Productive Aging Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Work & Industry

PO 1003 Occupational Therapy in Africa: Understanding the Needs of Children, Caregivers, and Staff in Ethiopian Orphanages and Adoption Agency Transition Homes
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Brandi Buchanan, OTD, OTR/L, AT Still University, Mesa, AZ; Angie Fannon, OTD, OTR/L, Embrace International, Baltimore, MD; Jacklyn Kammerer, MS, OTR, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO Level: Introductory

PO 1009 Maximizing Stroke Survivors’ Occupational Performance Through Home Safety Assessment
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Celia Schulz, PhD, OTR, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX; Gayle Hersch, PhD, OTR, Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Contributing Authors: Jessica Foust, MOT, OTR; Alicia Wyatt, MOT, OTR; Kyler Godwin, DrPH; Salimah Virani, MOT, OTR; Sharon Ostwald, PhD, RN, FGSA Level: Intermediate

PO 1015 Midwestern Therapists’ Opinions of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Stephen Page, PhD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Leah Daniel, MOT, OTR/L; Whitney Howard, MOT, OTR/L; Danielle Braun, MOT, OTR/L, all of Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH Level: Introductory

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

PO 1004 The Use of Therapeutic Modes by Occupational Therapy Students
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Marjorie Scaffa, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Courtney Sasse, MAEdL, OTR/L, both of University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL Level: Introductory

PO 1010 Current Research Evidence on the use of Electrical Stimulation To Improve Grasping Abilities in Adults With Tetraplegia
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Irene Michel, Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Intermediate

PO 1016 Efficacy of Adhesive Taping as an Adjunct to Physical Rehabilitation To Influence Body Structure and Function in Persons With Stroke: A Systematic Review
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Namrata Grampurohit, MOTh, OTR/L; Sujata Pradhan, PhD, PT, both of University of Washington, Seattle, WA Level: Introductory

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / MOrnInG pOsTers
PO 1017 Effects of Forced Use Combined With Scheduled Home Exercise Program on Upper Extremity Functioning in Individuals With Hemiparesis
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Hae Yean Park, PhD, OT; Ji-Hyuk Park, both of Yonsei University, Wonju, Kanwon-do, Republic of Korea Level: Intermediate Shawn Phipps, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, Los Angeles, CA; Pamela Roberts, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES, OTR/L, FAOTA, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Angela Hegamin, PhD; Heidi Sato, PhD; Frank Gomez, PhD Level: Intermediate

PO 1022 Building an Inclusive Community Through Accessible Childcare
Content Focus: Children & Youth Tomi Johnson, LMP; Marge Luthman, MS, OTR/L, both of University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA Level: Introductory

Kathryn Loukas, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tynisha LaCroix; Laura McHarg; Amanda Perron, all of University of New England, Portland, ME Contributing Authors: Laurie Raymond, LCSW; Jerrold Edelberg, PhD Level: Intermediate

PO 1018 The Effect of Heart Transplantation on Participation Among Individuals With Severe Congestive Heart Failure
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Erin Foster, OTD, OTR/L; Sabrina Gornish, OTR/L; Allyson Zazulia, MD, all of Washington University, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory

PO 1020 The Effectiveness of Structured Handwriting Readiness Programs on Handwriting Related Skills in a Rural Head Start
Content Focus: Children & Youth Amy Goins; Leslie Wagner; Denise Donica, DHS, OTR/L, BCP, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Contributing Author: Brittni Winslow Level: Introductory

PO 1023 Integrating the Best Buddies Program Into Occupational Therapy Practice With Children and Youth With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kathryn Gillis; Kaitlyn Brems, both of University of New England, Portland, ME Contributing Author: Kathryn M. Loukas, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

PO 1025 Building Evidence in Transition Services: Exploring Educators’ Perceptions of Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Children & Youth Tina Mankey, EdD, OTR/L, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Level: Introductory

PO 1019 The Effect of Cerebral Palsy on Self-Care, Mobility, and Social Function
Content Focus: Children & Youth

PO 1021 The Effects of Therapeutic Horseback Riding on Sensory Processing Dysfunctions in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Content Focus: Children & Youth Brittany Gordon, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory

PO 1026 A Descriptive Analysis of the Sensory Processing Characteristics of Individuals With Fragile X Syndrome (FXS)
Content Focus: Children & Youth Clare Giuffrida, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Brynn Nealon; Mary Beth Aguire; Patricia Allen; Alicia Medina; Anne Schmidt; Lisa Katz, all of Rush University, Chicago, IL Contributing Authors: E. Berry Kravis, MD; K. Boudouris Level: Intermediate

PO 1024 Social Cognition and Occupational Participation of Young Adults With High Functioning Autism: A Mixed Method Study of a Social Skills Program
Content Focus: Children & Youth

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38 AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO Visit us at Booth 407

CPG-5760

MOrnInG pOsTers / ThursDAY, AprIl 26
PO 1027 Effectiveness of Psychosocial Occupational Therapy Preparation for School-Based Practice: A Mixed Methods Study
Content Focus: Children & Youth Sarah Nielsen, PhD, OTR/L, Trinity Health, Minot, ND Contributing Author: Sonia Zimmerman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Intermediate Terry Hayes, PhD, Cranberry Counseling PC, Marshfield, MA Level: Introductory

PO 1030 The Effectiveness of a Digital Metronome Program on Visual and Gross Motor Performance in a Single Case Design
Content Focus: Children & Youth Chaye Warburg, DPS, OTR/L, Pediatric Occupational Therapy Services, Englewood, NJ; Kristie Koenig, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, New York University, New York, NY Contributing Author: Aviva Goldwasser, MS, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 1032 The Second Chapter of SNAP: An Inter-Professional AcademicCommunity Partnership To Prevent Falls
Content Focus: Productive Aging Nancy MacRae, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA; Betsey Gray, MSW, LICSW, both of University of New England, Portland, ME Level: Intermediate

PO 1035 Barriers and Supports to Health Care Access for People With Disabilities
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Jade Holloway; Lisa Garrett, both of Washington University, St Louis, MO Contributing Authors: David Gray, PhD; Jessica Dashner, OTD, OTR/L; Meghan Gottlieb, MSW; Denise Dickerson; Susan Crumbaugh, OTD Level: Introductory

PO 1028 Effectiveness of a Combined Sensory and Cognitive Program on Self-Regulation in Elementary-Aged Children With Sensory Processing Disorders
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lynne Roberts, MS, OTR/L, New Hartford Central School, New Hartford, NY Contributing Authors: Bethany Truax, MS; Marybeth Russo, MS, LCSW-R Level: Intermediate

PO 1033 Occupational Therapy and Domestic Violence: Making Change, One Family at a Time
Content Focus: Mental Health Laura Seidel; Barbara Roth, both of Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Introductory

PO 1031 Comparison of CIMT vs. Bilateral Treatment for CVA Related Hemiplegia: Further Analysis of an RCT
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kate Hayner, EdD, OTR/L; Ginny Gibson, MS, OTR/L, CHT; Gordon Giles, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of Samuel Merritt University, San Francisco, CA Level: Intermediate

PO 1036 Community-Based Program: Becoming a Catalyst of Change for Homeless Youth With Occupation Engagement and Access
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Robyn Otty, OTD, OTR/L, Maryville University, Chesterfield, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 1034 Examining Sensory Processing Preferences in Individuals With Mental Health Disorders
Content Focus: Mental Health Linda Olson, PhD, OTR/L; Molly Bathje, MS, OTR/L; Matthew Clinger, all of Rush University, Chicago, IL Contributing Author: Aviva Blaustein Level: Intermediate

PO 1029 Weighted Belt Use To Reduce Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms
Content Focus: Children & Youth

PO 1037 Occupational Autonomy, Participation, and the Lived Experience of Women With Lichen Sclerosis
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Barbara Kornblau, JD, OT/L, FAOTA, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

39

ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / MOrnInG pOsTers
ALASKA • ARIZONA • CALIFORNIA • COLORADO NEBRASKA • NEVADA • WYOMING Contributing Authors: Hiba WehbeAlamah, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CTN-A; JoAnn Haderer, RN; Janetlynne Erickson, RN, CRNI Level: Intermediate

PO 1044 Welcome Back: Re-entering Occupational Therapy Practice After a Hiatus
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Catherine Haines, OTR/L, Schuyler Hospital, Montour Falls, NY; Corey McGee, MS, OTR/L, CHT, University of Minnesota-Rochester, Rochester, MN Level: Introductory

PO 1038 A Cultural Heritage Group Intervention in Long-Term Care: Evidence-Based Research
Content Focus: Productive Aging Gayle Hersch, PhD, OTR; Shirley Hutchinson, DrPH, RN; Harriett Davidson, MA, OTR; Christine Wilson, OTR; Teresa Maharaj, MSN, RN, all of Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Level: Intermediate

PO 1045 Ethical Issues in Occupational Therapy: A Survey of Practitioners
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Regina Doherty, OTD, OTR/L, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA; Ashley Dellinger; Megan Gately; Robert Pullo, all of Tufts University, Medford, MA Contributing Author: Stephanie Sullivan Level: Introductory

Sometimes the difference between “I can” and “I can’t” is simply you.
At Banner Health, we don’t take everyday activities for granted. We give you all the resources you need to be successful with your patients, career and life, and we strongly believe in making a difference in our employees’ lives so they can make a difference in the lives of others. We are committed to providing state-of-the-art facilities, leading-edge technology, an engaging environment and comprehensive benefits. At Banner Health, an awardwinning hospital system, we celebrate success and commemorate “I can.” We have Permanent, Travel and Registry occupational therapy opportunities across a wide variety of practice settings. Find out more about making a difference and joining our team. Call 1-866-377-5627, or visit:

PO 1039 The Effectiveness of Yoga Intervention on Mood and Stress Perception in Jail Inmates
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Barbara White, PhD, OTR/L; Margaret Schneider, MEd, Kripalu Certified, both of University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH; Danielle Oliveri, MS, OTR/L, Children’s Hospital of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA; Taylor White, MS, OTR/L, Pediatric Contracting Services, Inc., Berkeley, CA Level: Intermediate

PO 1041 Patient Education and Gerontic Occupational Therapy: Perceptions, Barriers, and Needs
Content Focus: Productive Aging Chiung-ju Liu, PhD, OTR; Sharon Pape, MS, OTR; Jennifer Ferrell; Kaley Johanningsmeier; Emily Turner, all of Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory

PO 1047 Core Science and Occupational Therapy: Practitioners Perspectives on Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Curriculum and Clinical Practice
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Katherine Schofield, MHS, OTR/L, CHT, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ Contributing Author: Kate DeCleene, OTD, OTR Level: Introductory

PO 1042 Effectiveness of the Living Skills Recovery Curriculum on Dual Diagnosis Clients
Content Focus: Mental Health Pat Precin, MS, OTR/L, LP, Touro College, New York, NY Level: Advanced

PO 1048 Integrating Web 2.0 Technologies and Bloom’s Affective Domain To Facilitate Attitudinal Opportunities of Occupational Therapy Students’ Related to Occupation
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Bryan Gee, OTD, OTR/L, BCP, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID Level: Introductory

www.BannerHealth.com/careers

PO 1043 The Well-Being of College Students With Disabilities: An Occupational Perspective
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Beth Ekelman, PhD, OTR/L, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH Contributing Authors: Susan Bazyk, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; John Bazyk, MOT, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 1049 Self-Perceptions of Experiences in Advanced and Specialty Practice Certification in Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Elizabeth Barstow, MS, OTRL, SCLV; Hilary Dollar; Lois Genter; Ashlei Jackson; Sarah Litchfield; Grace Ann Sooter, all of University of AlabamaBirmingham, Birmingham, AL Contributing Author: Maria Elena Louch, OT/L Level: Introductory

EOE/AA. We support a tobacco-free and drug-free workplace.
CPG-5829

Connect with Banner Health Careers:

40

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

MOrnInG pOsTers / ThursDAY, AprIl 26
PO 1050 Evidence of Blended-Learning Approaches for Utilizing an Innovative Anatomy Resource
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Lucinda Dale, EdD, OTR, CHT; Kate DeCleene, OTD, OTR, both of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory Contributing Authors: Monica Perez, MOT, OTR/L; Aubrie Stavig, MOT, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 1058 Client Adherence and Outcomes After Hand Occupational Therapy Home Education Program: A Retrospective Pilot Study
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Donna Breger Stanton, MA, OTR/L, CHT, FAOTA; Maelyn Legaspi, MOT; Bhupinder Kaur, MOT; Stiev Bobell, MOT; Sarah Reynolds, MOT; Rolando Lazaro, PhD, GCS; Nadine Raymond all of Samuel Merritt University, Oakland, CA Level: Introductory

Step into the Future with Confidence

PO 1051 A Study of Family Health in Second and Third Generation Survivors of the Holocaust
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Sharon Yaroslawitz, MS, OTR/L, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK Contributing Author: Elizabeth W. DeGrace, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

PO 1052 The HeRO Approach: An Innovative Occupation-Based Conceptual Model Bridging Theory and Practice
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Aimee Luebben, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN; Charlotte Royeen, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate

RWP 1014 Cognitive Deficits in Hospitalized Trauma Patients With a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jesse LoBreglio, MOT, OTR/L; Marisa Hart, MS, OTR/L, both of Good Shepherd Penn Partners, Philadelphia, PA Contributing Authors: Joe Adler, MS, PT; Tami Berdosh, OTR/L; Jennifer Dekerlegand, MPT; Jermaine Major, DPT, PT Level: Introductory

Post-Professional MS in Occupational Therapy

Allows the working clinician to: • Improve clinical reasoning and critical analysis skills • Strengthen academic foundations • Participate in research • Increase the ability to practice in varied clinical and administrative settings The OT program is known for its unique specialization areas of ergonomics and assistive technology.

PO 1053 Implementing an ExperientialBased Learning Assignment Highlighting Sensorimotor Concepts To Facilitate the Transition From Student to Practitioner
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Elizabeth Richardson, MS, OTR/L; Jeanne Wenos, PED, both of James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA Level: Intermediate

RWP 1040 The Effect of Wii®-Based Activities on Participation and Physical Fitness of Pre-Frail and Frail Older Adults
Content Focus: Productive Aging Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT; Pamela Hewitt, MS, OTR/L, CAPS; Nicole Frey, MOT; Amy Johnson, MOT; Brittany McQuide, MOT, all of Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT Level: Intermediate

PhD in Health Sciences

Interdisciplinary degree program designed to: • Develop future teaching and research faculty • Provide advanced study and research training in the human health sciences • Offer concentration and cross-disciplinary courses in areas such as disability and rehabilitation, diagnostic and biomedical sciences, human movement sciences, population health, and health administration/policy Be mentored by distinguished faculty, including five AOTA Fellows, two members of the AOTF Academy of Research, one RESNA Fellow and one Fellow of the American College of Rehabilitation Medicine.

PO 1055 Enhancing Professional Identity in Occupational Therapy: A Role for Electronic Portfolios
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Dennis Cleary, OTD, OTR/L, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Level: Introductory

RWP 1046 The Spiritual Practices of Occupational Therapists Worldwide and How These Practices Impact OT Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Anne Marie Hansen, EdD, OTR/L; Arienne Cauchie, both of Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Intermediate

More information:

PO 1057 Adaptive Strategies Used by Persons With Scleroderma To Perform Valued Occupations
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Janet Poole, PhD, OTR/L, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

http://www4.uwm.edu/chs ot-gradcoord@uwm.edu • (414)229-4713 UW-Milwaukee College of Health Sciences 2400 E. Hartford Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211

RWP 1054 Generational Differences: Impact of Millennials in Occupational Therapy Fieldwork Education
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education

CPG-5802

WHERE SCIENCE ENRICHES LIVES
AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO 41

ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / MOrnInG/AfTernOOn pOsTers
Cynthia Goodwin, OTD, OTR/L, The University of Findlay, Findlay, OH Contributing Authors: Amy Foster; Rachel Hubler Level: Introductory

1:00 pm–3:00 pm CC 500 Ballroom

pOsTer sessIOn #2

Sponsored by EBS Healthcare PO 2000 Information Needs Required to Deliver Evidence-Based Practice Among Occupational Therapists
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kate DeCleene, OTD, OTR; Alison Nichols, MOT, OTR, both of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Contributing Authors: Katie Benter, OTR; Elizabeth Castrale, OTR; Brittany Curts, OTR; Kathleen Gater, OTR; Steffanie Phillips, OTR Level: Introductory

RWP 1059 Motor Control of the Upper Extremity: Inherent Synergies Affecting Bilateral Movement
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Michael Lott; Martin Rice, PhD, OTR/L, both of The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Level: Intermediate

PO 2003 Personalized Transition Assistance for Young Adults With Disabilities and Their Families: A Venture in Private Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Debora Davidson, PhD, OTR/L, Bright Futures, Chesterfield, MO Contributing Author: Nikki Weiner Level: Introductory

PO 2006 Reading as an Occupation: The Role of Occupational Therapy in the Evaluation and Intervention of Children With Reading Difficulties
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lenin Grajo, EdM, OTR/L, OTRP, Texas Woman’s University, Dallas, TX Level: Intermediate

PO 2004 What Is the Main “IDEA?”: Staying in Front of “No Child Left Behind”
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jodi Kaseff, MEd, OTR/L, Prince George’s County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD Contributing Author: Sarah Burton, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

PO 2007 Family-Centered Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Locus of Control in Maternal Caregivers
Content Focus: Children & Youth Laura Kucsan; Carole Dennis, ScD, OTR/L, BCP, both of Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY Level: Introductory

PO 2001 Using Evidence-Based Design: Enhancing the Non-Human Environment
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Sandra Countee, PhD, OTR/L; Heather Comparetto; Sharon O’Brien; Aghaei Marjan; Laura Towney; Maria Cadavid, all of Dominican College, Orangeburg, NY Level: Introductory

PO 2005 Integrating Mental Health Practices Into Outpatient and School Pediatrics
Content Focus: Children & Youth Roberta Carrlson, OTR/L, Pediatric Therapy Clinic, Billings, MT; Alicia Bohrer, OTR/L, Peaks to Plains, Idaho Falls, ID Level: Introductory

PO 2008 Facilitating Parent-Child Bonding Through Infant Massage
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jennifer Nash, MOT, OTR/L, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA Level: Introductory

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42

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

Visit us at Booth 628

AfTernOOn pOsTers / ThursDAY, AprIl 26
PO 2009 Partnership for Health in Aging: Multidisciplinary Competencies in the Care of Older Adults
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Intermediate Shannon Casola; Robin Underwood, PhD, OT/L, both of Brenau University, Gainesville, GA Contributing Author: Ansley L. Smith Level: Introductory OTR/L; Janice Flegle, MA, OTR/L, BCP Level: Intermediate

PO 2010 Building Bridges to Stepping Stones: An Innovative Community-Based Occupational Therapy Program
Content Focus: Children & Youth Christine Raber, PhD, OTR/L; Barbara Warnock, MS, OTR/L; Mikel Stone, MOT, OTR/L, all of Shawnee State University, Xenia, OH Contributing Authors: Erica Parsley, MOT, OTR/L; Betty Dyer, MOT, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 2012 Using Embedded Interventions to Support School Readiness in the Transition to Preschool Program
Content Focus: Children & Youth Christine Myers, PhD, OTR/L, Eastern Kentucky University, Lexington, KY Contributing Authors: Dana Gaerke; Kristen Gerteisen; Lauren Jennings; Kristina McCloud; Amber O’Neal; Hannah Schmitz; Melissa Tabor; Kayla Valentine; Hannah Wathen Level: Intermediate

PO 2014 Survey of Assessment Tools taught in Entry-Level Master’s OT Programs Across the United States
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Jennifer Radloff, MHS, OTR, CDRS, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Contributing Authors: Chelsea Becht; Kiersten Hindahl; Brittany Miller; Crystal Stephens; Julie Van Der Wiele; Ashley Wilson Level: Introductory

PO 2017 Effects of the Fine Motor and Early Writing Pre-K Curriculum on the Fine Motor Skills of Preschool Children in the Head Start Population
Content Focus: Children & Youth Brittni Winslow; Denise Donica, DHS, OTR/L, BCP, both of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Contributing Author: Amy M. Goins Level: Introductory

PO 2018 Assessment Selection for Children and Youth: Is it Evidence-Based?
Content Focus: Children & Youth Carly Thom, MA, OTR, Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Contributing Authors: Patricia Bowyer, EdD, OTR, FAOTA; Katherine Moss, OTR; Kristina Stewart, OTR Level: Introductory

PO 2011 Special Education Staff Members’ Perceptions of the Factors That Affect StudentInterns’ Work Performance in a School-to-Work Transition Program: Implications for OT
Content Focus: Children & Youth

PO 2013 Pediatric Feeding Interventions: Keeping Data That Counts as Evidence
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kathleen Keller, MA, OTR/L, BCP; Holly Dixon, OTR/L, both of University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE Contributing Authors: Brooque Ellis, OTD, OTR/L; Carla Christenson,

PO 2016 How Do Mothers Play With Their Infants?: Examining Maternal Play Styles During CoOccupational Engagement
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kris Pizur-Barnekow, PhD, OTR/L, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; Kristin Kamp, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL Contributing Author: Marta Muusz, MS, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 2019 An ICF-CY Based Content Analysis of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales
Content Focus: Children & Youth

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We offer a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits package. For consideration, please visit our website at www.WakeHealth.edu or contact Lisa Moncus at lmoncus@wakehealth.edu with questions.
EOE/AA
CPG-5819

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

43

ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / AfTernOOn pOsTers
Wendy Coster, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Kara Gleason, both of Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Introductory Joseph Cipriani, EdD, OTR/L; Marisa Cooper; Nicole DiGiovanni; Alexandria Litchkofski; Andrea Nichols; Ashleigh Ramsey, all of Misericordia University, Dallas, PA Level: Introductory

PO 2020 The Effect of Tissue Specific Mobilization on Postural Alignment, Sleep, and Development in Infants With Congenital Muscular Torticollis: A Pilot Feasibility Study
Content Focus: Children & Youth Prisca Gruner; Jessie Brown; Jean Anne Zollars, PT; Gail Stockman; Patricia Burtner, OTR/L, all of University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM Level: Intermediate

PO 2025 Take Action: A SelfManagement Program for Breast Cancer Survivors
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Robin Newman, OTD, OTR/L, CLT, CDRS, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL Level: Intermediate

PO 2030 Improving Lives Through Caregiver Skill-Building: Two Case Stories of Adults With Intellectual Disability and Dementia Living in the Community
Content Focus: Productive Aging E. Adel Herge, OTD, OTR/L; Catherine Piersol, MS, OTR/L; Tracey Vause-Earland, MS, OTR/L, all of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 2035 From Clinician to Leader: Growing Your Own
Content Focus: Productive Aging Diane Durham, MS, OTR, Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA; Ellen Kolodner, MSS, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tara Stasik, MEd, both of Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 2021 Relationships Between Television in the Bedroom on the Occupations of Children and Families
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jennifer Crowder, MS, OTR, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK Contributing Authors: Beth DeGrace, PhD, OTR/L; Elizabeth Ramey; Andrea Sellmeyer; Sandy Richardson, MS, RD/LD; Sandra Arnold, PhD; Susan B. Sisson, PhD, CHES Level: Introductory

PO 2026 The Development and Implementation of a MovementBased Education Program for Veterans with Chronic Pain
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Julie Seltzer, OTD, OTR/L, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL Level: Introductory

PO 2031 Systematic Review of Evidence of the Value of Bariatric Surgery on Quality of Life
Content Focus: Mental Health Pat Precin, MS, OTR/L, LP, Touro College, New York, NY Contributing Authors: Candace Grosser, MS, OTR/L; Winnie O’Connell, MS, OTR/L Level: Advanced

PO 2037 Occupational Performance Beyond the Classroom: The Needs of Post-secondary Students With Disability
Content Focus: Children & Youth Consuelo Kreider, MHS, OTR/L; Roxanna Bendixen, PhD, OTR/L, both of University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Level: Introductory

PO 2038 Health Literacy and Cognition With Stroke Survivors
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Mylene Schriner, PhD, OTR/L; Robyn Dostal; Erin Brandenburg; Megan Curran; Amy Grosenheider; Krista Wever, all of Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO Level: Introductory

PO 2027 Use of Remediation Techniques in a Chronic Post-Stroke 71 year-old Community-Dwelling Client to Improve ADLs
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Denise Crowley, OTR/L, FOX Rehabilitation, Cherry Hill, NJ Level: Introductory

PO 2032 Domestic Violence: Identifying Intrapersonal Factors Enabling Abused Women To Initiate the Process of Leaving Their Abusers
Content Focus: Mental Health Corrie Trattner, EdD, OTR/L, Springfield College, Longmeadow, MA Contributing Author: Diane Lorenzo, EdD Level: Intermediate

PO 2022 The Tardieu Scale: A Critical Overview
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Grace Kim, MS, OTR/L; Terrence Hicks, MS, OTR/L, both of New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY Level: Introductory

PO 2040 Functioning of Women in Domestic Violence Shelters: The Impact on Mental Health
Content Focus: Mental Health Christine Helfrich, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Intermediate

PO 2028 The Meaning of Play for Siblings of Children With Disabilities
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mary Falzarano, PhD, OTR; Amanda Maddox; Lisa Budinic, all of Kean University, Union, NJ Contributing Author: Miri Krause Level: Intermediate

PO 2033 Perceived Contributions of Occupational Therapy in a Community Mental Health Setting
Content Focus: Mental Health Rosalie King, DHS, OTR/L, The University of Findlay, Findlay, OH Contributing Authors: Brittany Brownfield; Echo Gattshall; Sarah Heinfeld; Cara Kalb; Lynnette Koehler; Minda McKee; Jessica Wallen; Kyle Wright; Micaiah Zsigray Level: Intermediate

PO 2023 Comparing Results of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) to the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) in Treatment Plan Development
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation William Finley, MOT, OTR/L; Steve Van Lew, MS, OTR/L; Laura Carroll, all of NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY Contributing Author: Adrienne T. Dicembri, MPA, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 2041 The Effects of Brief Occupational Therapy for Older Adults Living in a Developing Country
Content Focus: Productive Aging Candace Beitman, EdD, OTR, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Contributing Author: Cary Eschenbach; Courtney Gray; Kate Lowry; Tiffany Penrod; Erin Peterson; Katie Pitchford Level: Intermediate

PO 2029 Current Trends in Occupational Therapy Services for Adults With Developmental Disabilities in Small Community Living Settings
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jennifer Anderson; Renee Watling, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA Contributing Author: Lucretia Berg, MS, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 2034 Fitness and Wellness for Persons With Disabilities
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Lynnda Emery, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY; Angela Scoggin, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX Level: Intermediate

PO 2024 Animal-Assisted Therapy for Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities: An EvidenceBased Practice Review With Implications for OT Practice
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation

PO 2042 Coping in the Lives of Women Who are Transitioning to and From Homelessness
Content Focus: Mental Health Terrance Anderson, University of Mary, Bismarck, ND Contributing Authors: Marcie A. Barth, OTR/L; Cassandra J. Broten, OTR/L; Cami J. Kleinknecht, OTR/L Level: Introductory

44

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

CPG-5745

Visit us at Booth 74

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

45

ThursDAY, AprIl 26 / AfTernOOn pOsTers
PO 2043 Training Occupational Therapists to Practice in Schools (TOPS)
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Leslie Roundtree, DHS, OTR/L; Regina Smith, DHS, OTR/L, both of Chicago State University, Chicago, IL Contributing Author: Joseph A. Balogun, PhD Level: Intermediate Contributing Authors: Chris Eidson, MS, OTR/L; Mary Rebekah Trucks, OTR/L, Stephanie C. DeLuca, PhD Level: Introductory Mary Hildebrand, OTD, OTR/L, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Helen Host, PhD; Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Eric Lenze, MD, all of Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 2048 Ensuring Quality Online Instruction in Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Nancy Doyle, OTD, OTR/L; Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA, both of Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Introductory

RWP 2002 Therapeutic Relationships and Older Adults: Implications for Health Service Delivery Across the Continuum of Care
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Shelley Williams, Queens University, Kingston, ON, Canada Contributing Author: Margo Paterson, PhD Level: Intermediate

PO 2056 Developing Evidence: The Evolution of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy as a Scientific Journal
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Elizabeth Crepeau, PhD, OT, FAOTA, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH; Linda Wilson, PhD, NZROT, Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin, New Zealand Level: Intermediate

PO 2044 OT Students: Meeting the Current Demands of OT Practice
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Lisa Knecht-Sabres, DHS, OTR/L; Mark Kovic, OTD, OTR/L; LaVonne St. Amand, MPH, OTR/L; Minetta Wallingford, MHS, OTR/L, all of Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL Level: Intermediate

PO 2049 Inter-Professional Education: Facilitating Core Competencies
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Anne Hull, MS, OT/L, University of St. Augustine, St. Augustine, FL Level: Intermediate

RWP 2015 The Effects of Early Rehabilitation Inclusive of Full Passive Range of Motion on Shoulder Joint Among Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy Population
Content Focus: Children & Youth Denise Justice, OTR/L; Lynnette Rasmussen, OTR/L, both of University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI Contributing Authors: Lynda Yang, MD, PhD; Virginia Nelson, MD; Kelly Vanderhave, MD; Michael DiPietro, MD; Kate Chang, MA Level: Intermediate

PO 2045 Institutional Collaboration in Entry-Level Education: A Model for Program Development
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Alfred Bracciano, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Brenda Coppard, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Helene Lohman, OTD, OTR/L; Lou Jensen, OTD, OTR/L, all of Creighton University, Omaha, NE Level: Intermediate

PO 2051 Constraint Induced Movement Therapy: How Much is it Used?
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Veronica Rowe, MS, OTR/L; Katie Banks, both of University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Level: Introductory

PO 2057 Developing Treatment Protocols Using the Interactive Metronome for Implementation With NC Project Re-Entry, Wounded Warrior Battalion
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kelly Ridenhour; Michelle Foley; Leonard Trujillo, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Contributing Author: Jamie Lynne Joyner Level: Introductory

PO 2046 Collaboration Between Academy and School-Based Practice: Adolescents With Autism Spectrum and Learning Disorders Experience College Through a Service Learning Program
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Jennifer Gardner, MS, OTR; Claire Mulry, MS, OTR, CAPS, both of Kean University, Union, NJ; Sandee Chalik, MS, OTR, The Newgrange School, Hamilton, NJ Level: Introductory

PO 2053 Effects of Occupational Therapy Intervention Using Infant Massage on the Stress Level of Mothers Living in a Homeless Shelter
Content Focus: Mental Health Winifred Schultz-Krohn, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA; Caitlin Kyse; Amy Pryle; Gaylene Simmons; Tracy Telder, all of San Jose State University, San Jose, CA Level: Intermediate

RWP 2039 The Evolution of Grip Strength: A Comparison of Past and Present Normative Data
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Kris Vacek, OTD, OTR/L; Ali Binder; Liz Brockmeyer; Shannon Hallgrimson; Samantha Houlihan; Ryan Lum, all of Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO Level: Introductory

PO 2058 Maximizing Quality of Life for Individuals Receiving Stem Cell Transplantation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Heather Kitching, OTD, OTR/L; Lyndsay Price, OTD, OTR/L; Stacey Morikawa, MA, OTR/L, all of Keck Hospital of USC, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Author: Kathleen Gross, MA, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 2054 Play and Playfulness of Hospitalized Children
Content Focus: Children & Youth Katherine Ryan, PhD, OTR/L, Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO Contributing Authors: Catherine Candler, PhD, OTR/L; Gayle Hersch, PhD, OTR; Glen Jennings, EdD Level: Intermediate

RWP 2052 Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Students Towards Persons With a Disability After Participation in an OccupationBased Community Program
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Catherine Acre, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jennifer Moore, PhD, OTR/L, both of University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Contributing Authors: Kristen Nutt; Maeve Andrews Level: Intermediate

PO 2059 Forces Older Adult Women With Arthritis Use To Open and/ or Operate Small Household Containers With and Without Wearing Wrist Orthoses
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Chase Majewski Courtney Schott; Julie Thomas, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Level: Introductory

PO 2047 Training Students in New Treatment Paradigms
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Regina Lutenbacher, MS, OTR/L, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

PO 2055 New Methods for Measuring and Ensuring Treatment Fidelity in a Rehabilitation Intervention Study
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation

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educational sessions
Presidential Address
11:15 am–12:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG
Sponsored by Signature Healthcare For details see page 11.

friday, April 27
8:00 am–9:00 am RP 201 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 Predicting Symptoms and Decreased Function Due to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome With Sonographic Imaging
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Shawn Roll, PhD, OTR/L, CWCE, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Kevin D. Evans, PhD, RT, (R)(M)(BD), RDMS, RVS, FSDMS; Jane Case-Smith, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Intermediate Anthropometry and occupational stressors are known contributory factors in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), but the relationship of these factors to physiology is not known. Grey-scale ultrasonography was used to measure morphologic changes in the median nerve and investigated the relationship of changes and risk factors to reported symptoms and functional deficits. pathologic changes and comparisons to normal physiology will be discussed as it relates to translation to prevention, intervention, and outcome measures for musculoskeletal rehabilitation.

Town Hall Meeting (SC 235)
2:00 pm–3:00 pm CC 103-104
For details see page 14.

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 202 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 Innovative Uses of Technology in Intervention Throughout the Lifespan (1 of 3)
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Tracy Jirikowic, PhD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Contributing Authors: Sally Westcott McCoy, PhD, PT; Robert Price, MSME; Brian Dellon, PhD; Lin-Ya Hsu, PT; Susan Astley, PhD; Beth Gendler, MSW Level: Intermediate Three pilot studies using gaming technology to improve motor function in children and adults will be presented. Interventions involve augmented reality to improve sensory adaptation during balance in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and biofeedback to improve functional hand use in children and adults with hemiplegia.

Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture
5:15 pm–6:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG
For details see page 11.

speCIAl eVenT
SIS Fitness Event-Bodybalance 6:45 am–7:30 am JW 101-102 For details see page 14.

Promoting Self-Regulated Learning To Promote Academic Achievement in Occupational Therapy Students: A Mixed Methods Study
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT; Keniel McLennon, MOT; Keren Fishbain, MOT, all of Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT Level: Advanced The benefits of adopting educational opportunities such as scholarly and service projects and collaborative assignments are better realized when students are more self-regulated. This paper describes the efficacy of a training program in making occupational therapy students become better learners by promoting selfregulated learning.

speCIAl eVenT
18th Annual AOTF Breakfast With a Scholar 7:30 am–9:00 am JW Grand Ballroom 2–4 For details see page 14. 8:00 am–9:00 am RP 200 CC 122 What Do Students Take Away From Participation in a Community-Based Research Project Related to Aging in Place?
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Claudia Oakes, PhD, University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT Level: Introductory This study assessed students’ perceptions about participation in an undergraduate research project related to older adults’ ability to age in place. Results suggest that students valued opportunities to learn about older adults more than they valued the opportunity to participate in a research project. Educational implications will be discussed.

A Clinical Trial of Comparative Effectiveness Evaluating an Intensive Lumbrical Splinting and Stretching Treatment on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms and Function
Content Focus: Work & Industry Nancy Baker, ScD, OTR/L, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Contributing Authors: Krissy K. Moehling, MPH; Elaine N. Rubinstein, PhD; Ronit Wollstein, MD; Norman P. Gustafson, MS, CHT, OTR/L; Mark Baratz, MD Level: Introductory We compared intensive lumbrical to non-intensive lumbrical four-week splinting/exercise regimes. The results suggest that a cock-up splint paired with lumbrical stretches may be the more effect conservative approach to increase function in carpal tunnel syndrome than other splint/ stretch combinations.

Innovative Uses of Technology in Intervention Throughout the Lifespan (2 of 3)
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Dianne Rios, ScD, OTR, University of Washington, Redmond, WA Contributing Authors: Torey Gilbertson, DPT, PCS; Anat Lubetzky-Vilnai, MS, PT; Robert Price, MS; Sally Westcott McCoy, PhD; PT; Chet Moritz, PhD Level: Intermediate

First Person Failure: Adaptation of Occupational Therapy Students Following Failure of a Level II Fieldwork Education Experience
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Nancy Krusen, PhD, OTR/L, Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR Level: Intermediate This grounded theory study described adaptive strategies of students who failed a Level II fieldwork experience. Data analysis revealed most students demonstrated mature adaptive behaviors for the occupational challenge of fieldwork. Results offer suggestions for professional development.

Innovative Uses of Technology in Intervention Throughout the Lifespan (3 of 3)
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Elena Donoso Brown, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Contributing Authors: Dianne Rios, ScD, OTR/L; Torey Gilbertson, DPT, PT; Karli Gutman; Robert Price, MSME; Chet Moritz, PhD; Brian Otis, PhD; Sarah Westcott McCoy, PhD, PT Level: Intermediate

Visualization of Changes in the Median Nerve in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Shawn Roll, PhD, OTR/L, CWCE, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Kevin D. Evans, PhD, RT, (R)(M)(BD), RDMS, RVS, FSDMS; Miriam Freimer, MD; Carolyn M. Sommerich, PhD Level: Intermediate Gaining an understanding of the morphology involved in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) can improve interventions provided by practicing OTs. Images of median nerve

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 203 CC 105-106 Shoulder Kinematics During Overground Manual Wheelchair Propulsion in Individuals With Tetraplegia
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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Kerri Morgan, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Contributing Authors: Jack Engsberg, PhD; Christina Stephens, OTD; Anna Goins, MSOT Level: Intermediate The purpose of this study was to examine shoulder movement during manual wheelchair overground propulsion in individuals with tetraplegia. Results from the study include: 1. shoulder movement difference between different speeds; and 2. shoulder movement difference between the left and right side, indicating asymmetry during propulsion. chair over the ground at different speeds, which will aid occupational therapists in determining optimal wheelchair positioning and training for individuals with tetraplegia.

Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Contextually Relevant Sensory Processing Intervention for Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mary Kientz, MS, OTR, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Galloway, NJ Contributing Author: Winnie Dunn, PhD, OTR,FAOTA Level: Advanced This session discusses the findings from a study addressing the effectiveness of sensory processing interventions embedded into daily routines and natural environments of adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). All participants demonstrated significant improvement and satisfaction in participation in everyday activities.

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 204 CC 207 National Survey of Sensory Features in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire (3.0)
Content Focus: Children & Youth Karla Ausderau, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Contributing Authors: John Sideris, PhD; Lauren M. Little, MA, OTR/L; Grace T. Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Intermediate Sensory features are prevalent in autism and may interfere with daily occupations. We analyzed the factor structure and psychometrics of the SEQ (3.0), a new tool measuring sensory features in children with autism ages 2-12 years. Four sensory response patterns were validated and these may inform further research and practice with this population.

A grounded theory approach was used to explore the complex interactions between mothers attempting to promote health in their families and the surrounding context. The results can directly inform decisions impacting the development of effective occupation and family-based intervention programs for overweight children and their families.

Head and Trunk Kinematics During Overground Manual Wheelchair Propulsion in Individuals With Tetraplegia
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Marie Julien, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Contributing Authors: Kerri Morgan, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP; Christina Stephens, OTD, OTR/L; Jack Engsberg, PhD Level: Introductory The purpose of this study was to examine the movement of the head and trunk in persons with tetraplegia while propelling their wheel-

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 205 CC 107-108 The Efficacy of Occupational Therapy Using Sensory Integration Principles for Children With Autism
Content Focus: Children & Youth Roseann Schaaf, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; Joanne Hunt, OTR/L; Patricia Faller, OTR/L; NJ; Elke van Hooydonk, OTR/L, all of Children’s Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, NJ Contributing Authors: Carol Just, OTD; Teal Benevides, MS, OTR/L; Donna Kelly, MS, OTR/L Level: Intermediate The findings from three cases from a randomized control trial of occupational therapy using sensory integration principles for children with autism are presented.

Understanding How Environmentally-Induced Challenges Influence a Mother’s Ability To Orchestrate Healthy Habits and Routines in her Family
Content Focus: Children & Youth Laura Schmelzer, MOT, OTR/L, The University of Findlay, Findlay, OH Level: Intermediate

finalaota 2010 confad:Layout 1 11/01/2010 13:43 Page 1

(Black plate)

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Misericordia University’s OT department is recognized as an educational leader in the occupational therapy professional community. We offer degree and certificate programs to fit your busy schedule. POST-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS • Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctorate MASTER’S DEGREES • Post-Professional for OTs POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATES • Post-Professional Pediatrics • Geriatric Care Management ENTRY-LEVEL MASTER’S DEGREES • OT Weekend Program for COTAs and BS degree holders • Five-year BS to MS program

Move ahead in your career by attending class part-time – weekends and online. For more information, visit us at misericordia.edu/ot, or e-mail Grace S. Fisher, Ed.D., OTR/L at gfisher@misericordia.edu You may also call us at 570-674-8015, toll free at 1-866-262-6363.

Dallas, Pennsylvania Founded by the Sisters of Mercy
CPG-5766

48

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

Visit us at Booth 319

MOrnInG / frIDAY, AprIl 27
8:00 am–9:00 am RP 206 CC 201-202 Authenticating an Assessment for Mothers of Children With Autism
Content Focus: Children & Youth William Rider, MS, OT; Robin Snyder, MS, OT; Elizabeth Lewis, MS, OT; Grace Fisher, EdD, all of Misericordia University, Dallas, PA Level: Introductory The instrument we developed to measure the impact of autism on families is the Assessment for Mothers of Children with Autism (AMCA). Therapists working with children with autism may utilize the AMCA to become more aware of situational challenges faced by mothers and to help mothers and their families identify needed support and resources. Contributing Authors: Michael Carlson, PhD; Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jeanne Jackson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Intermediate This mixed methods research study explored, through semi-structured interviews, how older adults perceived the interconnections between indicators of health and wellbeing and healthy activity, active coping, social support, perceived control, stress, and positive-reinterpretationbased coping.

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 208 CC 203-204 Sensory Characteristics, Symptomatology, and Functioning of Young People At Risk for Psychosis
Content Focus: Mental Health Diane Parham, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Donna Downing, MS, OTR/L, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH; William Cook, PhD, Robert Wood Johnson National Program Office, Portland, ME Contributing Authors: Jennifer Innis, MA, OTR/L; Alexa Allen; Laura Carlisle; Kimberly Warner Level: Introductory This study of youth at risk for psychosis showed that Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP) scores were significantly different from norms, and were differentially related to psychotic symptoms and functioning. Assessment of sensory characteristics of at-risk youth may be helpful in planning occupational therapy services for this population.

Executive Function as a Predictor of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) in CommunityDwelling Older Adults
Content Focus: Productive Aging Areum Han, MS, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Level: Introductory The measures of inhibition were the best predictors of ability to perform Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and might serve as a detector of initial functional decline among older adults. This study will inform occupational therapists about which component of executive function they should target in treatment processes among older adults.

Elizabeth Lannigan, PhD, OTR/L; Rachel Lebovits; Sheri Roth; Josef Shasha, all of Touro College, New York, NY Contributing Authors: Bracha Firestone; David Margolis, OTR; Susan Morcos; Elana Ungar, OTR; Aliza Zuker, OTR Level: Intermediate This paper will describe clients with severe mental illness and their participation in supported employment vocational programs. Occupational therapists will understand how the occupation of work for these individuals is perceived as they re-engage in competitive employment.

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 207 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 Older Adults’ Perceptions of Relationships Among Psychosocial Constructs and Key Indicators of Health and Well-Being
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jeanine Blanchard, PhD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 209 CC 205-206 Implementing and Maintaining Evidence-Based Practice: Recommendations for Success
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Patricia Scott, PhD, OT, FAOTA; Britteny Godar, MS, OTR; James Kinder, MS, OTR; Sara Miller, MS, OTR, all of Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Contributing Author: Jackson Gall, MS, OTR Level: Introductory Therapists value the use of evidence in their practice, yet studies have

Perceptions of Individuals With Severe Mental Illness Regarding Supported Employment: A Qualitative Study
Content Focus: Mental Health

All That Jazz!
After my stroke, some said I’d never play an instrument again. But, my team at HealthSouth kept me in tempo and upbeat.
If you’re looking to make a bigger impact in peoples’ lives, join our ensemble. At HealthSouth, every patient is assigned a personalized team of specialists that work in concert to help him or her achieve their full potential. This collaborative approach to rehabilitation distinguishes our care, and it’s one of the many reasons our patients return to full strength in less than average times. You can apply your talents in a more personal way while working with your colleagues to take rehabilitative care to the next level. At HealthSouth, you’ll bring your patients closer to independence as you set the tone on a great new career. And the impact you make will be music to your ears.

©2012:HealthSouth Corporation:481439-03

better outcomes at work ™
www.healthsouth.jobs
CPG-5808

Visit us at Booth 1231

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

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shown this value must be shared throughout the organization to assure implementation. This research studied the preferences of therapists and administrative personnel when working to turn their facility into a best practice center in evidencebased practice.

Evidence-Based Practice for Falls Prevention (3 of 3)
Content Focus: Productive Aging Natalie Leland, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Sharon Elliott, DHS, OTR/L, BCG, GCG, FAOTA, Therapeutic Life Center, Greenville, NC; Susan Murphy, ScD, OTR/L, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Contributing Author: Lisa O’Malley, PhD Level: Introductory This presentation will highlight the results of a scoping review which summarizes the current evidence on occupational therapy fall prevention interventions within the context of the 2010 International Fall Prevention Guidelines. The session identifies gaps in the literature in order to inform future research needs.

Use of Standardized Assessments in Occupational Therapy in the United States
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Bridgett Piernik-Yoder, PhD, OTR; Alison Beck, PhD, OTR, both of University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX Level: Introductory A national survey of 794 OTs was conducted to investigate the use of standardized measures. Findings include differences in use of measures by practice setting and factors influencing the selection of measures. An improved understanding of assessment in OT practice has implications for practice, education, and measurement development.

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 210 CC 123-124 Evidence-Based Practice for Falls Prevention (1 of 3)
CPG-5682

8:00 am–9:00 am SC 230 CC 109-110 (AOTA) Exploring Opportunities To Integrate Inter-Professional Education in Occupational Therapy Curriculum
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Maralynne Mitcham, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Introductory There is growing recognition in the practice community of the positive outcomes resulting from interprofessional collaborative practice. Occupational therapy educational programs need graduate practitioners prepared to work in an interprofessional collaborative model. Interprofessional education occurs when “two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care” (CAIPE, 2002).

Visit us at Booth 1206

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Content Focus: Productive Aging Elizabeth Peterson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL Contributing Authors: Gary Kielhofner, DrPH, OTR/L, FAOTA; Kerstin Tham, PhD, OT reg.; Lena von Koch, PhD, RPT Level: Introductory This phenomenological study explored the lived experience of falls self-efficacy (FSE) among six people with multiple sclerosis. One main theme (managing fall risk as a means of supporting activity) and six subthemes emerged through data analysis. The findings suggest new approaches to FSE assessment and highlight the value of occupationbased fall prevention efforts.

Evidence-Based Practice for Falls Prevention (2 of 3)
Content Focus: Productive Aging Leonard Trujillo, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jane Painter, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Caroline Berry, MS, OTR/L, Nash Rehabilitation, Rocky Mount, NC Level: Introductory This phenomenological study explored and described the lived experiences of community-dwelling seniors living in eastern North Carolina regarding what falls and fear of falling meant to them, and how each entity influenced self-efficacy, functional performance, and degree of engagement in occupations.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
8:00 am–11:00 am WS 200 CC 500 Ballroom (AOTA) Perspectives on Cognition, Cognitive Rehabilitation, and Occupational Performance (1): Models and Applications
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Gordon Giles, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Samuel Merritt University, San Francisco, CA; Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; Mary Jane Youngstrom, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO; Helene Polatajko,

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Visit us at Booth 802
CPG-5761

50

Visit us at Booth 802 AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

MOrnInG / frIDAY, AprIl 27
PhD, OT Reg. (Ont.), OT(C), FCAOT, FCAHS, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Joan Toglia, PhD, OTR/L, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY; Mary Corcoran, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, George Washington University, Washington, DC; Tina Champagne, OTD, OTR/L, Institute for Dynamic Living, Springfield, MA Level: Advanced Cognition Workshop (1) provides a “big picture” view of the status of cognitive rehabilitation, and models of occupational therapy for cognition and application across diagnoses. The new AOTA “Statement” on cognition will be introduced. Major contributors to occupational therapy theory and practice in this area will present their approaches. OTR/L, AdaptABLE for LIFE LLC, Seattle, WA Level: Intermediate Home and environmental modifications interventions vary due to funding, practice acts, conditions of participation, and covered services. The role and scope of service in skilled nursing facilities, outpatient, home health, and private practice, as well as required documentation and reimbursement, will be examined.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 204 CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 Unilateral Neglect: Putting Evidence Into Practice
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Deirdre Cooke, PhD, BOccThy(Hons), OTR, Mater Private Hospital, Brisbane, Australia Level: Introductory This Workshop will provide practical examples of the application of research evidence in the treatment of unilateral neglect following stroke. Ongoing measurement of clinical outcomes and development of insight into neglect behavior is demonstrated through a longitudinal series of video interviews.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 201 CC 101-102 Power and Leadership: Propelling Occupational Therapy Beyond 2017
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Brent Braveman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Level: Advanced This Workshop will introduce participants to evidence on power in the professional arena. Participants will explore their personal values and experiences with exercising power through small group work and peer storytelling and analysis and establish personal goals for increasing professional power as well as strategies for achieving them.

Be
D.P.S.

the future

Depar tment of occupati onal t herapy

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 205 CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Technology Advances in Treatment for Adults With Neurogenic Dysphagia Enhances Patient Participation and Outcomes
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Marcia Cox, MHS, OTR/L, SCFES, Kettering Medical Center, Dayton, OH Level: Intermediate Technology of videofluoroscopy swallowing study (VSS), functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) VitalStim®, and surface electromyography (sEMG) for evaluation and intervention of swallowing management is presented with client application.

Clinical Doctorate in Occupational Therapy |
• focus on advanced clinical mastery, clinical outcomes research, and evidencebased practice. • faculty clinical specializations in autism, neonatology, neuroscience, pediatrics, and upper quadrant. • New career paths in private practice, prevention and intervention, public policy, teaching, and consulting.
New York UNiversitY is aN affirmative actioN/eqUal opportUNitY iNstitUtioN.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 202 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 Connect the Dots: Occupational Therapy’s Role in Chronic Disease Self-Management
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Carol Siebert, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, The Home Remedy, Chapel Hill, NC Level: Intermediate Occupations and routines are a critical part of chronic disease self-management. Learn about self management and the key relationship between daily activities and managing chronic conditions. Take away tools and strategies for integrating self management into OT in a variety of practice settings.

• full- and part-time study options. • courses offered year-round; we welcome nondegree students in individual courses. • close mentoring and small classes in one of the nation’s top-ranked ot departments. • Also: post-professional m.a., Dual m.a./D.p.s., ph.D.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 203 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 The Marriage of Traditional and Private Practice Occupational Therapy in Home Modifications: Is it Such an Odd Couple?
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Marnie Renda, MEd, OTR/L, CAPS, ECHM, Destination Home LLC, Cincinnati, OH; Jennifer DeRosa,

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 206 CC 120-121 Innovations in the Educational Arena: Educational, Behavioral, and Sensory-Based Methodologies to Help ALL Children Excel
Content Focus: Children & Youth Carolyn Murray-Slutsky, MS, OTR; Betty Paris, MEd, both of STAR Services, Hollywood, FL; Mary Murray, EdD, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH; Pamela Hudson Baker, EdD, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA Level: Intermediate

Be the future. Be NYU steinhardt. www.steinhardt.nyu.edu/2012-dps or call 212 998 5825.

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe CPG-5764 & expO

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This interactive session, presented by a team of specialists, will address common behavioral and classroom challenges encountered. We will concentrate on specific sensory, behavioral, and educational interventions and collaboration strategies to strengthen OT’s role as a team member and leader. OT/L, FAOTA; Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS, both of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Essie Wagner, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC Level: Introductory Evidence supports the OT role and ethical responsibility to make driving and community mobility recommendations related to client safety and risk. This session will examine the evidence that correlates conditionrelated impairment with safety risk and its impact on OT practice.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 207 CC Sagamore Ballroom 6 Early Intervention Services for Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Content Focus: Children & Youth Shelley Mulligan, PhD, OTR/L, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH; Alexa TrolleyHanson, MS, OTR/L, Easter Seals, Manchester, NH Level: Intermediate Participants will gain an understanding of evidence-based intervention practices for children 12-36 months of age with autism spectrum disorders, and will learn how to integrate multiple approaches to provide comprehensive, family-centered programs, and for delivering effective play-based sessions.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
9:30 am–11:00 am SC 202 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Productive Aging
Content Focus: Productive Aging Sharon Elliott, DHS, OTR/L, BCG, GCG, FAOTA, Therapeutic Life Center, Greenville, NC; Natalie Leland, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory This presentation will introduce the Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Productive Aging of community-dwelling older adults. Presenters will summarize evidence supporting best practice; review the occupational therapy process from screening through evaluation, intervention, reevaluation, and outcomes; and discuss implications for practice, education, and research.

CPG-5699

Visit us at Booth 1132

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 200 CC 103-104 (AOTA) Occupational Therapists Implementing Response to Intervention (RtI) in Preschool and School Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Gloria Frolek Clark, PhD, OTR, BCP, FAOTA, Private Practice, Adel, IA; Jean Polichino, MS, OTR, FAOTA, Harris County Department of Education, Houston, TX; Judith Schoonover, MEd, OTR/L, ATP, Loudoun County Public Schools, Ashburn, VA Level: Intermediate OTs working in schools collaborate with teachers to develop strategies for student success. This presentation will discuss the core concepts and key elements of Response to Intervention (RtI) and Early Intervening Services (EIS). Case studies will demonstrate occupational therapy’s role in implementing RtI in preschool and school settings.

Online Post-Professional Master of Science in Occupational Therapy
Ready to invest in your future? Complete your degree through this part time, evidence-based graduate program led by awardwinning, internationally known faculty. • A flexible 4-semester program for working therapists • The latest web-based distance education technologies • A state-of-the-art library • Cohort model for personal and academic support • Small classes with intensive faculty mentoring • Fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges • No GRE required
Pamela Richardson, phd, otr/l, faota Post Professional Program Coordinator Pamela.Richardson@sjsu.edu www.sjsu.edu/occupationaltherapy/ot_online
CPG-5712

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 204 CC 105-106 (AOTA) Medicare Part A Policy Update
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Jennifer Bogenrief, JD, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Contributing Author: Chuck Willmarth Level: Introductory Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently made changes to Medicare coverage and payment policies in Part A settings including skilled nursing facilities (SNF), inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRF), hospice and home health. Learn more about these changes and how they impact occupational therapy, as well as other CMS initiatives to watch for such as quality reporting and value-based purchasing. CMS officials have been invited to present.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 201 CC 207 (AOTA) Ethics and Evidence: Addressing Driving Risk With OT clients in Schools, in Clinics, and in the Community
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Miriam Monahan, MS, CDRS, OTR/L, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Deborah Yarett Slater, MS,

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9:30 am–11:00 am SC 205 CC 107-108 Communications and Publishing in Occupational Therapy: An Insider’s Guide to Traditional and Social Media
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Chris Davis; Laura Collins; Samuel Gonzales, all of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Contributing Author: Beth Ledford Level: Introductory AOTA staff will present numerous avenues for spreading the word about occupational therapy for various audiences, including: 1. Getting published in both professional and community print media; 2. Leveraging blogs and social media; and 3. Profiting from the new business models of print and digital works.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 208 CC 123-124 Occupational Therapy in the Critical Care Setting: How Evidence Impacts Care With an ICU Adult Early Mobilization Program
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Vi Nguyen, MOT, OTR/L, RRT, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX Contributing Authors: S. Egbert Pravinkumar, MD, FRCP, EDI; Mary Lou Warren, MSN, RN, CNS-CC; Shari Frankel, MBA, PT; Stacey Ryan, DPT, PT; Laura Withers, MBA, RRT; Quan Nguyen, RRT Level: Intermediate Collaboration between the OT practitioner and the multidisciplinary team is essential in optimizing care for patients who are critically ill. This presentation highlights the contribution of OT within a multidisciplinary team in optimizing patient care achieved through the development and implementation of an ICU Adult Early Mobilization Program.

Northwestern Illinois Association A Regional Special Education Cooperative SCHOOL-BASED OT’s Northwestern Illinois Association (NIA)
• NIA, a regional special education cooperative, has school-based jobs for full and part-time OT’s in various northwestern Illinois communities including the Rockford, Dundee, and Aurora area. • Therapists work on teams to assist students with special needs who reside in our member districts, providing interventions that support education. • Staff enjoy the benefits of a school calendar, mentoring, continuing education, health and pension plans and competitive salaries. • Qualified candidates will be eligible for Illinois licensure, and have a strong desire to work with teams and students in a school atmosphere. • New graduate applicants are welcome. COME JOIN OUR TEAM! Contact: Mary Kolinski, MS, OTR/L (630) 402-2002, fax resumes to (630) 513-1980 or email to mkolinski@thenia.org. EOE
CPG-5714

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 206 CC 122 Develop Professional Behavior Through Peer Coaching
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Sophie Rydin, PhD, OTR; Stephanie Chin; Tina Luong, all of University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX Contributing Author: Dallas Nelson Level: Introductory This course demonstrates the benefits and use of peer coaching techniques in facilitating OT students’ professional behavior development and goal attainment. It provides OT educators with innovative tools in furthering their students’ success in Level II fieldwork settings by achieving their professional development goals.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 209 CC 201-202 Therapy Missions: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved Through Innovative Strategies
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Carol Doehler, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, New England Institute of Technology, East Greenwich, RI; Paula Kramer, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA Level: Introductory Occupational Therapy has an opportunity to expand its presence throughout the world by providing unique training and teaching to those non-professionals caring for people with disabilities. This session will provide participants a first-hand opportunity to fully engage in the innovative international practice of Therapy Missions, Inc.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 207 CC 127-128 Occupational Therapists in the Field of Hand Transplantation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Marie Pace, MHS, OTR/L, CHT; Kimberly Maguire, MS, OTR/L, CHT, both of Centers for Rehab Services, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Advanced OTs who specialize in hand therapy can provide the care that is required for patients receiving hand transplants. Learning what has already been written on rehabilitation following hand transplantation and understanding the unique facets of transplantation will prepare a therapist to succeed with this growing patient population.

Doctorate of Science in Occupational Science
Individualize your educational and research experiences. Choose between the Science of Human Occupation and Practice in Occupation tracks. Apply knowledge gained through the advanced study of occupational science and social justice to promote the health and participation of society. Select between part-time and full-time enrollment options. Located near Baltimore, MD, a great place to learn and live! http://grad.towson.edu/program/doctoral/osc-scd/
CPG-5083

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 210 CC 203-204 Transforming the Use of Secondary Data Sources Into Occupational Therapy Evidence
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Pamela Roberts, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES, FAOTA, CPHQ, CedarsSinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; Shawn Phipps, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory Secondary data sources are being used more frequently in research.

Visit us at Booth 18 AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

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Dr. Anne Fisher
2nd Annual Lyla M. Spelbring Endowed Lecture
in Occupational Therapy on September 22, 2012 at
will be giving the

This session will focus on developing a practical plan for accessing available data and transforming it into evidence that informs occupational therapy practice. Examples will illustrate how to utilize multiple secondary data sources from adult and pediatric rehabilitation.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 214 CC 205-206 From Diagnosis to Dinnertime: A Tale of 3 Children—Learning To Recognize, Evaluate, and Treat Children With Feeding and Swallowing Difficulties
Content Focus: Children & Youth Judy Hopkins, OTR/L, SWC, CLE; Lichelle Fernando, OTR/L, SWC; Kimberly Carter, OTR/L, SWC, all of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory This course will reveal the “big picture” of pediatric feeding and swallowing from beginning to end. It will provide a tool-kit of knowledge to enable OTs to confidently address complex feeding disorders and provide consistent intervention across the continuum of care.

Eastern Michigan University

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 211 CC Sagamore Ballroom 2 Ethics as a Foundation for Addressing Student Professional Behavior
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Amanda Kessler, MS, OTR/L; Diana Davis, MA, OTR/L, both of West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Level: Intermediate Ethics is not just about significant issues like discrimination or illegal actions; rather it is a concept that belongs in everyday practice. This Short Course will present a methodology for utilization of the OT Code of Ethics as a framework for teaching and developing professional behaviors.

Contact Dr. Valerie Howells at vhowells@emich.edu for event information Eastern Michigan University Occupational Therapy emich.edu/hs/OTindex.html
CPG-5818

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 212 CC Sagamore Ballroom 5 Fall Stop ... Move Strong: A Successful CommunityBased Fall Prevention and Strengthening Program for Older Adults
Content Focus: Productive Aging Julie Kardachi, MA, OTR/L, Touro College, New York, NY Level: Intermediate Falls rates and consequences among older adults are a serious public health issue. This session, developed for OT practitioners who work with older adults and are interested in wellness and prevention, addresses community-based fall prevention and reports on an evidence-based program in operation in community centers in New York for the past 8 years.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 215 CC 125-126 School Assessment of Motor and Process Skills: Clarifying Occupational Therapy’s Role in Schools
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lou Ann Griswold, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of New Hampshire, Lee, NH; Brett Berg, OTR, AMPS Project International, Fort Collins, CO Level: Introductory The School Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) provides a standardized tool focusing on schoolwork tasks, based on observation of a student as s/he engages in schoolwork in the regular classroom. We will demonstrate administration of the School AMPS and use results to plan classroom-based intervention.

Practice Your Passion
With a Central Florida Healthcare Leader
At Orlando Health, you can develop the career that is right for your individual goals. We are seeking Occupational Therapists of all levels to join our team. Full-time, part-time or pool positions are available. Our 1,780-bed, 7-hospital system/Level One Trauma Center offers a full continuum of comprehensive healthcare in such areas as lymphedema, cardiology, trauma, brain and spinal cord injury, orthopedics, oncology, pediatrics, burn care, neuroscience, women’s health, critical care and home health. In addition, our CARF-accredited Rehabilitation Institute is home to the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center and our Spinal Center; both are proud to have Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Program designations by the state of Florida. To qualify for a position at one of our hospitals, you must be a graduate of an approved program in Occupational Therapy with a Florida OT licensure and current BLS. To learn more about Orlando Health and our family of facilities, visit our website at orlandohealth.com/jobs-ot or call 321-841-8625 for additional information. EOE/Tobacco-Free Workplace

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 213 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 Sleep: A Key Essential to Living Life to its Fullest
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Tony Gentry, PhD, OTR/L, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA; Jeff Loveland, OTD, OTR/L, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA Level: Introductory Sleep disorders are prevalent in people of all ages in the United States and can lead to health problems that can complicate occupational therapy assessment and intervention. This Short Course aims to provide information for practitioners to enhance their understanding in working with an increasingly fatigued population.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 216 CC 109-110 How Important is the Restraint?: Answering Questions About Pediatric CIMT, Motor Control, and Motor Learning
Content Focus: Children & Youth Patricia Coker-Bolt, PhD, OTR/L, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; Jane O’Brien, PhD, OTR/L, University of New England, Biddeford, ME Level: Introductory Principles of contemporary motor control support the use of personally meaningful activities for motor skill acquisition; successful pediatric CIMT programs engage children in rich, meaningful, motor opportunities. The course will clarify the importance of the restraint in pediatric CIMT and discuss the features of successful CIMT programs.

CPG-5767

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GenerAl sessIOn
Presidential Address 11:15 am–12:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG For detials see page 11. Identification of Unmet Needs for Environmental Supports in Housing and Communities of Georgia’s Seniors
Content Focus: Productive Aging Hsiangyu Yang, OTD, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Contributing Authors: Traci Swartz, OTD, OTR/L; Jon Sanford, MArch Level: Introductory This study’s aim was to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the environmental needs of Georgia’s seniors to age in place. More specifically, this study identified and prioritized home and community barriers in and across urban, suburban, and rural areas. Implications to OT practice will be discussed.

sIs rOunDTABle DIsCussIOns
Special Interest Section (SIS) Roundtable Discussions 12:30 pm–1:30 pm CC Exhibit Hall DE For details see page 56.

pOsTer sessIOn #3
12:30 pm–2:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE Sponsored by EBS Healthcare For details see page 63.

speCIAl eVenT
Town Hall Meeting (SC 235) 2:00 pm–3:00 pm CC 103-104 For details see page 14. 2:00 pm–3:00 pm RP 214 CC 109-110 How Older Adults Make Decisions Regarding Smart Technology: An Ethnographic Approach
Content Focus: Productive Aging Rick Davenport, PhD, OTR/L, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL Contributing Author: William C. Mann, PhD, OTR Level: Introductory In-depth individual interviews with 11 older adults aged 65 and older with mobility impairments provided insight into how older adults perceived smart technology. Future designers could use this decision model to create appropriately matched technological devices to promote independence of aging baby boomers with mobility impairments.

2:00 pm–3:00 pm RP 215 CC 122 Parents’ Perceptions of a Strengths-Based Coaching Intervention
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lauren Foster; Lisa Mische-Lawson, PhD, CRTS; Winnie Dunn, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Jane Cox, MSOT, all of University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS Contributing Author: Dory Sabata, OTD, OTR/L, SCEM Level: Intermediate This study examined parent perceptions of a strengths-based intervention that targeted family daily routines and resources. Preliminary findings indicate that strengthsbased coaching practices help parents analyze and plan for challenging activities. Future research should examine how to maintain fidelity among coaches.

CPG-5801

Visit us at Booth 408

2:00 pm–3:00 pm RP 216 CC 107-108 Measuring Community Receptivity Using the Community Health Environment Checklists
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jessica Dashner, OTD, OTR/L, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO Contributing Authors: Susan Crumbaugh, OTD, OTR/L; Jaclyn Tarloff, MSOT, OTR/L; Lisa Garrett; Meghan Gottlieb, MSW; Holly Hollingsworth, PhD; David B Gray, PhD Level: Intermediate The Community Health Environment Checklists are objective measurement tools designed to assess the accessibility of the environment in terms of physical and social elements. Three versions of the checklists have been created to address the needs of individuals with mobility and sensory impairments.
CPG-5697

The Effect of Illustrations on Learning About Assistive Devices for Older Adults: A Pilot Study
Content Focus: Productive Aging Chiung-ju Liu, PhD, OTR; Sharon Pape, MS, OTR; Kimberly Bayston; Michelle Hahn; Leeann Harney; Betsy Powers, all of Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory Gerontic occupational therapy practice includes teaching older adults how to use assistive devices properly. This study provides empirical evidence of using illustrated print materials to enhance patient education.

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Special Interest Section (SIS) Roundtable Discussions

12:30 pm–1:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls DE Important Notice! SIS Roundtable Discussion tickets are free and are included with Conference registration but must be picked up in advance at the Information Booth in the Registration Area from 12:00 pm–4:00 pm on Thursday and 7:30 am–11:30 am on Friday. AMSIS
The Manager’s Role in Creating an Ethical Therapy Culture
Jane Yousey, OTR/L, SAVA Consulting, LLC, Atlanta, GA In today’s environment of reduced reimbursement, and controlled resource utilization, managing and promoting a strict ethical practice environment is critical for all occupational therapy management professions. This roundtable will focus on Jing and other available freeware and ways to adapt them to fit the unique learning needs of occupational therapy students.

MHSIS

Taking a Closer Look— Reimbursement in CommunityBased Mental Health
Christina Metzler, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD In order to meet the goals of the Centennial Vision, AOTA has made substantial efforts at the federal level to get OT recognized as a mental/ behavioral health profession. This session will be a facilitated discussion about reimbursement concerns and strategies in community-based settings.

PDSIS Driving/Driver Rehabilitation Network

EISSIS

Cognitive Assessments to Predict Older Driver On Road Abilities
Matt Abisamra, OTR/L, CDRS, Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA Occupational therapy practitioners have a vital role in driving rehabilitation for the older adult. This round table discussion will focus on understanding and discussing various cognitive assessments and their ability to predict driving ability on the road.

The Role of OT in Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS)
Dottie Handley-More, MS, OTR/L, Highline Public Schools, Burien, WA Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) teams implement behavioral practices to support social competence. This roundtable discussion will focus on the unique role that OTs have on PBIS teams as well as strategies for getting involved with PBIS teams.

AMSIS Private Practice Subsection

Expanding Client Services in Private Practice Settings Through Technology
Tammy Richmond, MS, OTR/L, Ultimate Rehab, LLC, Los Angeles, CA Participants will discuss the opportunities to expand care and delivery models through technology such as cell phones, web based software, and home monitoring devices.

PDSIS

SISIS

GSIS

Sexuality and Aging
Nancy MacRae, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of New England, Portland, ME Sexuality is an occupational area that changes dynamically with aging. Strategies to appropriately handle the changing expression of sexuality as one ages, and the potential kinds of older adult sexual behaviors a practitioner may encounter, will be discussed in this roundtable.

Evaluating Neuromotor Function and Documenting Outcomes in an Adult Outpatient Setting
Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT Objective assessments and outcomes are important indicators of occupational therapy effectiveness. In an adult outpatient setting, occupational therapy practitioners must demonstrate evidence-based interventions and ongoing measurable progress towards target outcomes in order to receive reimbursement and ensure continuation of services for the client. However, given the fast-paced nature of the setting along with resource constraints and pressures of productivity, occupational therapy practitioners do not always utilize evidence-based evaluation procedures. Consequently, clients are prematurely discharged without ongoing care and/or clinics do not receive payment for skilled care provided by the therapists. This roundtable is designed to provide a forum to explore and discuss the applicability of assessments that are evidence-based yet “quick-and-easy” to use.

Sensory Modulation and the Mental Health Connection: Anxiety, Depression, and ADHD
Beth Pfeiffer, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA This roundtable will be a small group discussion regarding the clinical relationships between sensory modulation and mental health issues, including anxiety, depression, and ADHD.

DDSIS

Sexuality—What is OT’s Role Working With Individuals With Developmental Disabilities and Their Families?
Mariana D’Amico, EdD, OTR/L, BCP, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA This roundtable session will focus on the role of occupational therapy in working with individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to address sexual behaviors and social participation. A secondary focus will be ways occupational therapists can assist individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to address concerns related to sexuality and personal health. Participants engaging in this discussion session should come away with practical ways and resources to address concerns and issues surrounding sexual behaviors, personal health, and client self-protection and safety that can be used in their practice.

TSIS

A Facilitated Discussion of Key Telehealth Policy Documents and Their Utilization in Practice
Jana Cason, DHS, OTR/L, Spalding University, Louisville, KY Telehealth is a service delivery model that has the potential to improve access to occupational therapy services, particularly in underserved areas. This roundtable will foster discussion around key policy documents, their utilization in practice, and ways occupational therapy practitioners can become involved in telehealth policy development at the state and federal level.

HCHSIS

Marketing OT to a Hospice Agency
Stephanie Sahanow, OTR/L, ATP, Swedish Visiting Nurse Services, Seattle, WA New opportunities are continually facing OT practitioners, but they need to be prepared to act. Come discuss how OTs can market to hospice agencies and understand what will be expected from them.

HCHSIS Home Modification Network Subsection
Great Apps for Home Modifications
Marnie Renda, MEd, OTR/L, CAPS, ECHM, Destination Home, Cincinnati, OH Cool apps can make working in home modifications easier and more productive. Come discuss some apps that OT practitioners are using and the role they play in home modifications.

WISIS

Infusing Ergonomics Into the Green School Movement
Julie Dorsey, MS, OTR/L, CEAS, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY School environments designed for sustainability, known as green schools, are associated with improved student learning outcomes and benefit society as a whole. This discussion will focus on the occupational therapist’s role in the green school movement through its ergonomic impact on student and employee health, well-being, and productivity.

PDSIS Hand Subsection

EDSIS

Applying Outcome Measures and Hand Therapy
Carole Dodge, OT, CHT, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor, MI Participants in this interactive roundtable will have the opportunity to discuss client outcome measures that can be applied to hand rehabilitation and how they can be used to demonstrate improvement in pain management and activities of daily living. The discussion will include methods to utilize this data to improve client satisfaction and reimbursement.

Utilization of Jing and Other Freeware To Engage Students
Robyn Otty, OTD, MEd, OTR/L, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO With increased student comfort with and reliance on technology, it is important to utilize teaching tools that are in alignment with their learning.

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Challenges in Conducting a Community-Based Lifestyle Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial Among a Disadvantaged Population
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Elizabeth Pyatak, PhD, OTR/L; Erna Imperatore Blanche, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jesus Diaz, OTD, OTR/L, all of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Susan Garber, OTR/L; Jeanine Blanchard, PhD, OTR/L; Lucia Florindez, MA; Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Intermediate Research on effective interventions to improve health in disadvantaged groups is much needed. However, the chronic stressors they face in daily life create barriers to research participation. We will discuss the challenges of conducting a clinical trial among a disadvantaged group, and we will make recommendations for researchers conducting similar studies. This presentation will give a short overview of the up-to-date literature and the data collected from hand therapists in the United States, Canada, and Israel concerning conservative assessments and treatment protocols for Trigger Finger. Planned future research aimed at enhancing evidence-based practice using this data will be presented.

Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists Invitation to Attend: 36th Annual Conference & Exhibits

ADED

Evidence-Based Static Progressive Splinting: A Literature Review
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Deborah Schwartz, OTD, OTR/L, CHT, Orfit Industries America, Jericho, NY Level: Intermediate Therapists will gain understanding of the current levels of evidence supporting static progressive splinting of the upper extremity, including systematic reviews, high quality clinical trials, retrospective case series and expert opinion papers.

Making a Difference
July 27-31, 2012 Kansas City, MO ADED is the only professional organization solely devoted to meeting the professional needs of those professionals working the field of driver rehabilitation. www.aded.net

Influence of a CommunityBased Exercise Program on Fitness, Endurance, and Strength of Mobility Device Users
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Susan Tucker, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Melissa Lyles Smith, MSOT, OTR/L, Paraquad, Inc., St. Louis, MO Contributing Authors: Jessica Dashner, OTD, OTR/L; Kerri Morgan, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP; David Gray, PhD Level: Introductory Community exercise interventions carried out by trained occupational therapists (OTs) can improve the strength and endurance of mobility device users. This research shows that effective community exercise programs can be carried out by OTs and provides support for the role of OTs in this setting.

2:00 pm–3:00 pm RP 218 CC 105-106 Evidence for Occupational Therapy Interventions for Autism
Content Focus: Children & Youth Roseann Schaaf, PhD, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; Kathleen Stumpf, MS, OTR/L, Menasha Joint School District, Menasha, WI; Jennifer Perhac, MS, OTR/L, Hillsborough Township Public School, Hillsborough, NJ Contributing Authors: Donna Oberst, OTR/L; Erin Forde, OTR/L; Paula Costello, OTR/L; Carol Just, OTD Level: Intermediate The efficacy of OT interventions for students with autism will be discussed, including Videomodeling and Smart Board to improve handwriting skills, and Sensory Stories and “How does your Engine Run?” to improve self regulation.

CPG-5698

Visit us at Booth 114

2:00 pm–3:00 pm RP 217 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 Assessment and Treatment of Trigger Finger: Toward Evidence-Based Practice
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Danit Langer, MSc, OT, Hadassah and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel; Shai Luria, MD, Hadassah Medical Organization, Jerusalem, Israel; Noomi Katz, PhD, OTR; Asnat Bar-Haim Erez, PhD, OT, both of Ono Academic College, Kiryat-Ono, Israel Level: Intermediate

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 217 CC Sagamore Ballroom 5 (AOTA) Advocacy 101: Federal Legislative Round-Up
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Tim Nanof, MSW; Ralph Kohl, both of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Contributing Author: Christina Metzler Level: Intermediate This session is a federal policy update to educate AOTA members about the important work AOTA is doing on Capitol Hill and to empower and motivate grassroots activists for the profession of occupational therapy.
CPG-5885

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2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 218 CC 127-128 Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: Evidence-Based Strategies for Assessment, Remediation, and Prevention
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kathryn Levit, PhD, OTR/L, Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA Level: Intermediate Hemiplegic shoulder pain has devastating effects on recovery of function, participation, and quality of life poststroke. This Short Course reviews current literature on hemiplegic shoulder pain, and describes how to use research evidence to assess, remediate, and prevent hemiplegic shoulder pain in acute, rehab, and long-term care settings.

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 222 CC 203–204 Bringing Innovation and Evidence to Occupational Therapy Disaster Work
Content Focus: Mental Health Theresa Smith, PhD, OTR/L, CLVT; S. Maggie Reitz, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Towson University, Towson, MD; Marjorie Scaffa, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL Level: Introductory People affected by a disaster experience acute stress reactions to personal losses and environmental changes. Occupational therapy practitioners need to understand how participation in occupation can help individuals, families, and communities mitigate these reactions and restore routines and roles.

sTuDenT OnlY sessIOn
2:00 pm–3:00 pm SC 234 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 (AOTA) Perspectives on Fieldwork: Toolbox for Student Success
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Rebecca Barton, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN; Donna Heinle, OT, OTD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Paula Paul, MS, OTR, Metropolitan School District of Pike Township; Danette Lerner, MOT, OTR, American Village; Rachel Boehrer, BS, OTS, Indiana University; Ashley Dresslar, Brown Mackie College, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory The purpose of this session is to familiarize students with the expectations and responsibilities required for occupational therapy fieldwork experiences. Student and fieldwork educator perspectives will be shared on different fieldwork requirements, supervision models, and strategies for success.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
2:00 pm–5:00 pm WS 208 CC 500 Ballroom (AOTA) Perspectives on Cognition, Cognitive Rehabilitation, and Occupational Performance (2): Strategies and Skills
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Gordon Giles, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Samuel Merritt University, Oakland, CA; Izel Obermeyer, OTR/L, Westchester Institute for Human Development, Valhalla, NY; Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, Columbia University, New York, NY; Timothy Wolf, OTD, OTR/L, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; Andrea Mastrogiovanni, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; Barbara Nadeau, MA, OTR/L, CBIST; Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT, both of Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT; Mary Radomski, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; M. Tracy Morrison, OTD, OTR/L, both of Sister Kenny Research Center, Minneapolis, MN; Tony Gentry, PhD, OTR/L, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Level: Advanced Cognition Workshop (2) consists of short presentations by researchers and clinicians focused on cognitive rehabilitation (in its broadest sense) across diagnoses. Presentations will address the application of the models described in the morning session. The goal is to augment clinicians’ available assessment and intervention techniques.

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 220 CC 201-202 Innovation in Education of OT Students & Delivery of OT Services Within an Underserved Rural Community
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Elizabeth Richardson, MS, OTR/L; Amy Yun, OTD, OTR/L; Heather Kennell, OTR/L; Corrine Taylor, all of James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA Contributing Author: Cynthia Colvin Level: Intermediate Access to OT services can be limited within a small rural community. Learn how one university created opportunities to meet a community’s needs and address the requirements of an OT education program while coordinating with existing community agencies.

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 223 CC 205-206 Supporting Students With Sensory Discrimination Disorders in the School Setting
Content Focus: Children & Youth Sharon Ray, ScD, OTR/L, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY; Jan Hollenbeck, OTD, OTR/L; June Bunch, MS, OTR/L, both of Partnership for Advancement of School Service Providers, Inc., Watertown, MA Level: Intermediate Students with sensory discrimination disorder (SDD) often encounter participation difficulties in school. This course will describe the challenges faced by students with SDD in school and will present a format for using strategies to enable successful participation across school environments.

2:00 pm–3:00 pm SC 235 CC 103-104 (AOTA) Town Hall Meeting: Centennial Vision Progress and Issues Facing the Profession
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel, PhD, OT, BCMH, FAOTA; Fred Somers, all of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Introductory In the spirit of traditional American town hall meetings, this informal and interactive meeting is an opportunity to discuss professional issues of concern to you and ask questions of AOTA leaders. The forum will feature the AOTA President Florence Clark, Vice President Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel, and Executive Director Fred Somers, and will include discussion of key issues facing the profession and the Association’s progress in addressing important Centennial Vision priorities. Bring your questions, concerns, ideas and opinions!

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 221 CC 207 Promoting Your Profession: How To Sell AOTA’s Message of Science, Innovation, and Evidence Through TV, Radio, Newspapers, and Magazines
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Noah Gurock, WWOR-TV, Secaucus, NJ Level: Introductory This presentation will teach OTs and OT students how to contact the Media, how to pitch their story, what type of information news reporters and editors need, and how to make it easy for reporters and editors to prepare their stories in a way that will show Occupational Therapy in the best light possible.

2:00 pm–3:30 pm SC 224 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 Using Telecommunication To Support Rural School-Based Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Rebecca Nicholson; Laine Bassham, MOT; Amy Chapman, MOT; Debra Fricker, MOT, all of University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Contributing Authors: Lisa MischeLawson, PhD, CRT; Dory Sabata, OTD, OTR/L Level: Introductory This Short Course will illustrate how technology provides support to the therapists in a rural school basedpractice. Participants will learn strategies for using technology such as videoconferencing and internet resources in key areas of practice such as evaluation, interventions, and communication.

2:00 pm–5:00 pm WS 209 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Role in Early Identification
Content Focus: Children & Youth Donna Downing, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH; Sandra Schefkind, MS, OTR/L; Tim Nanof, MSW, both of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Lesly Wilson, PhD, OTR/L, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Sharon McCloskey, Constellation Health Services, Norwalk CT; Kris Pizur-Barnekow, PhD, OTR/L, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; Barbara Hanft, MA, OTR, FAOTA, Consultant, Silver Spring, MD Level: Intermediate A panel of researchers, educators, and practitioners discuss the importance of pre-referral screening and early identification in various environments (RtI in schools) and populations (autism, psychosis). The panel reviews tools and advocacy as well.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
2012 AOTF Research Colloquium 2:00 pm–5:00 pm JW Grand Ballroom 2–4 For details see page 14.

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2:00 pm–5:00 pm WS 210 CC 101-102 (SIS) EDSIS Annual Program: Handling Change in a Changing Education and Practice Environment
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Judith Parker Kent, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA; Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Ricardo Carrasco, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Nova Southeastern University, Tampa, FL; Heather Panczykowski, DHSc, OTR/L, Jamestown Community College, Jamestown, NY Level: Intermediate The EDSIS Business meeting will be followed by a panel presentation that focuses on the impact of public policies, regulations, economic factors and shifts in health care on occupational therapy education. AOTA representatives along with practicing academics will discuss ways to adjust to change and use it to the profession’s advantage. The Education Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the last 20 minutes of this session.

2:00 pm–5:00 pm WS 211 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 Older Adults and Vision Loss: What You Need to Know
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jennifer Kaldenberg, MSA, OTR/L, SCLV, FAOTA, New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA; Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Introductory All occupational therapy practitioners working with older adults, no matter what practice setting, need to understand implications of vision loss on occupational performance and use evidence-based interventions to support engagement in occupations. This interactive Workshop will provide strategies to apply in your current practice setting.

University, St. Louis, MO; Doris Pierce, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY; Christine Peters, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Pollie Price, PhD, OTR, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Level: Intermediate The purpose of this presentation is to extend the AOTA’s Centennial Vision to the year 2050. To project a vision of occupational therapy in 2050, presentation content includes drivers of change distilled from the work of futurists, from the field’s historical patterns of response to change, and from expected shifts in everyday occupations.

Case studies will be examined and discussed to illustrate how models of practice, theories, and research can guide innovative home modification practice, including the planning, selection, recommendation, and evaluation of interventions to suit specific needs of each client in his or her unique home environment.

2:00 pm–5:00 pm WS 215 CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 Playful Occupational Therapy Intervention for Children and Adolescents With Autism: Innovative, Creative, and Evidence-Based Strategies for Success
Content Focus: Children & Youth Susan Spitzer, PhD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Heather MillerKuhaneck, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA; Elissa Longo, OTD, OTR/L, both of Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT Level: Intermediate Case examples and discussion highlight the importance of play as an intervention to meet the occupational needs of children and adolescents with autism. Strategies will be illustrated for implementing creative, playful occupational therapy with critical attention to challenging practice dilemmas.

2:00 pm–5:00 pm WS 212 CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Drivers of Change for Occupational Therapy: Innovations in the Profession in 2050
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Aimee Luebben, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN; Charlotte Royeen, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Saint Louis

2:00 pm–5:00 pm WS 214 CC 120-121 Home Modifications: Advancing Innovative Practice and Exploring Creative Possibilities
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Elizabeth Ainsworth, MOT, Private Practice, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Desleigh de Jonge, MPH, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia Level: Intermediate

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CPG-5855

Visit us at Booth 1309

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

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pOsTer sessIOn #4
3:00 pm–5:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE Sponsored by EBS Healthcare For details see page 66. 3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 225 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 (SIS) EDSIS Fieldwork Subsection Annual Program: The Fieldwork Experience Assessment Tool (FEAT)— Bridging Fieldwork Educator and Student Communication
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Patricia Stutz-Tanenbaum, MS, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Camille Sauerwald, EdM, OTR, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Galloway, NJ Level: Intermediate The Lived Experience of Being a Clinical Educator model describes the development of fieldwork educator competency. This presentation bridges the clinical educator model with the Fieldwork Education Assessment Tool (FEAT) to address challenging fieldwork dilemmas and to design interventions for successful outcomes. The Education Fieldwork Subsection Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 15 minutes of this session. a NY State Senator whose legislative efforts reflect the values and expertise of a powerful public servant occupational therapist; an occupational therapy researcher whose collaborative efforts with engineers will highlight future roles for occupational therapy in the application of digital modeling of people with severe movement limitations; and a clinical specialist whose efforts at creating organizational change embedding the Centennial Vision in daily practice is building strategies and tools embodying a new Centennial Culture. Attendees will have the opportunity to interact with the panel and each other to identify individual and organizational opportunities, strategies and tools which contribute to a “powerful, widely-recognized, science-driven and evidence-based profession with a globally-connected and diverse workforce, meeting society’s occupational needs.” Level: Introductory This session will provide an in-depth look at the role of Occupational Therapy in providing “Veteran centric” and evidence-based rehabilitation to facilitate the reintegration of injured service members and Veterans back into society and their subsequent reengagement in occupation. Contributing Author: Anna Janoura, MA, SpEd Level: Introductory Participants of this course will explore the impact of aberrant primary reflexes secondary to incomplete inhibition during the first year/s of life and their impact on occupations and the development of the sensory system and postural reflexes. How CNS immaturity can be used as the starting point for a remedial integration program will be discussed.

3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 229 CC 103-104 Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy in Stroke: Principles and Application in Your Clinic
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Stephen Page, PhD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Peter Levine, PTA, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Level: Introductory Modified constraint-induced therapy (mCIT) is a reimbursable, outpatient protocol developed by this team. Randomized controlled studies show that mCIT is efficacious in all phases post stroke. In this seminar, we will discuss mCIT principles, components, and clinical application.

3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 233 CC 125-126 The Role of OT in Palliative Care: Lessons Learned From the Geriatric Education Utilizing a Palliative Care Framework (GEPaC) Project
Content Focus: Productive Aging Mary Corcoran, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Beverly Lunsford, PhD, RN, both of George Washington University, Washington, DC Contributing Authors: Jacqueline Barnett, PA; Narimah Jamshed, MD; Phillip Blatt, PT; Paul Tscudi; Laurie Posey; Cheryl Arenella, MD Level: Introductory In 2009, HRSA funded George Washington University to provide Geriatric Education Utilizing a Palliative Care Framework (GEPaC). The purpose of this presentation is to present the six online GEPaC modules, and to discuss strategies for enhancing occupational therapy’s role in palliative and end-of-life care.

3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 227 CC 122 (AOTA) Putting Evidence Into Practice: Join AOTA’s Evidence Exchange
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Deborah Lieberman, MHSA, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT; Marian Arbesman, PhD, OTR/L, ArbesIdeas, Inc., Williamsville, NY Level: Intermediate AOTA’s Evidence Exchange is a central repository of Critically Appraised Papers (CAPs) and Topics (CATs), and related resources. Becoming an evidence-based profession is an important component of AOTA’s Centennial Vision. This session will help participants work toward this goal and will cover the self-study training module to become a CAP Reviewer, the process for submitting CAPs and reviewing CAP submissions, and the strategies for using CAPs in practice.

3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 231 CC 123-124 Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: EvidenceBased Approaches for Complex Children
Content Focus: Children & Youth Tracy Jirikowic, PhD, OTR/L, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Diana Steffen-Steer, OT/L, University of Alaska-Anchorage, Anchorage, AK; Joy Doll, OTD, Creighton University, Omaha, NE Level: Intermediate Emerging evidence-based practices for individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) that are relevant to occupational therapy practitioners will be reviewed. Content encompasses the critical role of occupational therapy practitioners in FASD diagnosis, assessment, and intervention, and prevention of alcohol-exposed births.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 226 CC 107-108 (AOTA) Beyond 2017: A Toolkit for Advancing the Centennial Vision in High Definition
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel, PhD, OT, BCMH, FAOTA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; Timothy Kennedy, MS, OTR/L, 58th District-New York State Senate, Buffalo, NY; Gerry Conti, PhD, OTRL, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Robert Ferguson, OTR/L, University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI Level: Introductory The Centennial Vision serves as an inspiring plan for the profession as it ends its first century. Building capacity in High Definition beyond 2017 will be the focus of this session. Grassroots efforts in having a strong voice in public policy and legislation, inter-professional research using technology to solve everyday life challenges, and building a Centennial Culture across all practitioners and organizations will provide concrete and inspiring models that can be replicated across the country. This interactive session will begin with presentations by the panelists:

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 203 CC 109-110 (AOTA) AOTA’s Mental Health Initiatives: Reclaiming Our Role
Content Focus: Mental Health Tim Nanof, MSW; Chuck Willmarth; Laurel Cargill Radley, MS, OTR/L, all of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Contributing Author: Christina Metzler Level: Introductory Policy discussion of AOTA’s work to expand opportunities at the state and federal level for occupational therapy practitioners in mental health settings.

3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 228 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 Occupational Therapy’s Role in the Rehabilitation of Service Members and Veterans Within the Veterans Affairs Health Care System
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Deborah Voydetich, OTR/L, SCLV; Nancy Hildreth, OTR/L, both of Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN; Julie Seltzer, OTD, OTR/L, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL; Valerie Rounkles, OTR, Audie Murphy Veterans Health Care Administration, San Antonio, TX

3:30 pm–5:00 pm SC 232 CC 105-106 Before Sensory, Neuro! A Look at Neuro-Motor Immaturity and its Impact on Development, Occupations, and Treatment Using a Reflex Inhibition Program
Content Focus: Children & Youth Steven Dubin, MA, OTR/L, Performance Diagnostics and Solutions, LLC, Passaic, NJ; Paul Stadler, MS, OTR/L, Private Practice, Staten Island, NY

4:00 pm–4:30 pm PA 200 CC 127-128 (AOTA) How to Submit a Conference Proposal for the AOTA Annual Conference & Expo
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Frank Gainer, MHS, OTR/L, FAOTA; Fern Carbonell, both of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD

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Level: Introductory Each year, over 1,100 proposal submissions are received for AOTA’s Annual Conference & Expo. Approximately 750 are accepted for the final Conference Program. Learn what information is needed to ensure that your submission is complete and will more likely receive a positive review. This session is tailored to first-time submitters.

4:00 pm–4:30 pm PA 203 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 The Assistance to Participate Scale (APS) for Children With Disabilities: A Scale for Occupational Therapists
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Helen Bourke-Taylor, PhD, OTR, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia Contributing Authors: Mary Law, PhD, Linsey Howie, PhD Level: Intermediate Designed by occupational therapists, the Assistance to Participate Scale (APS) is a short psychometrically sound tool that measures the human assistance needed by school-aged children with disabilities to play and recreate at home and in the community.

4:00 pm–4:30 pm PA 201 CC Sagamore Ballroom 2 Managing Body Weight by Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Approach to Understanding Beliefs, Choices, and Actions
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Brian Dudgeon, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, University of Washington-Seattle, Seattle, WA Contributing Authors: Suparna Rajan, PhD; Barry Goldstein, MD Level: Intermediate Twenty veterans with spinal cord injury described experiences with weight and weight management and impacts on health, functioning, and other lifestyle routines. An individualized approach was often taken and most were challenged with attention to diet, activity level, and dedicated exercise programs.

Ayana Horton, MBA, OTR, Brunel University, London, United Kingdom Contributing Authors: David Holman, PhD; Gail Hebson, PhD Level: Intermediate The aim of this research was to build a conceptual model of emotion regulation development within the therapeutic relationship using semi-structured interviews with 20 occupational therapists and 20 clients who have received occupational therapy services. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.

City, UT; Steve Taff, PhD, OTR/L, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate This study explored how educators address occupation to prepare students to implement professionspecific science, innovation and evidence in changing health care contexts. Key challenges and strategies related to keeping the occupational core of the profession visible to students are described.

4:00 pm–4:30 pm PA 205 CC 203-204 Determining How the Construct of Occupation Is Addressed in Curricula: A Pilot Study
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Barb Hooper, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Sheama Krishnagiri, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA; Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA; Maralynne Mitcham, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; Pollie Prince, PhD, OTR/L, University of Utah, Salt Lake

4:00 pm–4:30 pm PA 206 CC 207 Participation and Quality of Life in Children With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Content Focus: Children & Youth Roxanna Bendixen, PhD, OTR/L, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Contributing Authors: Claudia Senesac, PhD, PT; Krista Vandenborne, PhD, PT Level: Introductory Boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy report low physical and social engagement, as well as low quality of life compared to healthy peers. The ability to engage in diverse and socially based activities may be extremely important for children who are limited by physical or motor difficulties

4:00 pm–4:30 pm PA 204 CC 201-202 A Model of Emotion Regulation Development: How Do Therapists and Clients Experience and Use Emotion Regulation When Building Therapeutic Relationships?
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues

CPG-5868

Visit us at Booth 1333

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

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frIDAY, AprIl 27 / AfTernOOn/eVenInG

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4:00 pm–4:30 pm PA 207 CC 205-206 Opportunities for Occupational Therapy in the Management of Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: Testing-Tailored Activity Pacing
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Susan Murphy, ScD, OTR/L, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Level: Introductory This study provides preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of tailored activity pacing for fatigue reduction in people with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Although this study is being replicated in a large randomized controlled trial, this work provides a model for how occupational therapy can be examined for management of rheumatic disease.

GenerAl sessIOn
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Director of Occupational Therapy School of Allied Health Sciences Florida A&M University
Full-time, 12 month, tenure-track position, salary, rank, and tenure status commensurate with experience. Florida A&M University is a state institution located in Tallahassee, Florida. Florida A&M University has 13,000 students. The School of Allied Health Sciences is one of thirteen colleges and schools of the University. The Division of Occupational Therapy (OT) is one of five baccalaureate programs in the School. Applicant must possess: (1) an earned doctorate degree or currently engaged in doctoral education; (2) 5 years of clinical experience in Occupational Therapy; (3) licensure or licensure eligible status in Occupational Therapy in the State of Florida; (4) a record of teaching excellence, curriculum development & research productivity; (5) ability to secure external funding; (6) effective, interpersonal, communication & management skills along with evidence of leadership and; (7) evidence of professional involvement. Please submit a completed Florida A&M University application and letter of interest with current vita to: Ms. Carrie Gavin Director of Equal Opportunity Programs 674 Gamble Street Tallahassee, FL 23207
CPG-5836 CPG-5913

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnferenCe & expO

poster sessions
Poster Sessions provide attendees with the opportunity to stay up-to-date on many new and interesting interventions, ideas, and programs; important advances in the profession; and latest research. View as many as you like during each 2-hour session and meet with authors for valuable interactions on the topics that interest you the most. Continuing education units are provided for Poster Sessions. Information sheets are provided onsite.

12:30 pm–2:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE

pOsTer sessIOn #3

friday, April 27
Colleen McDermott, MSOT; Victoria Anziano, MSOT; Heather MillerKuhaneck, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT Level: Introductory Stephania Acord-Vira, MOT/L, CBIS, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Contributing Author: Brian Weller Level: Introductory

Sponsored by EBS Healthcare PO 3000 Creating a System Process Model: Evidence and Innovation as a Continuum
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Sandra Countee, PhD, OTR/L; Jan Garbarini, MA, OTR/L; Margaret Boyd, MPH, OTR/L; Kristina Vilonen, MA, OTR/L; Pamela McFall, MA, OTR/L, all of Dominican College, Orangeburg, NY Level: Intermediate

PO 3006 Optimal Living With Multiple Sclerosis: A Lifestyle Redesign® Group Intervention
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Ashley Uyeshiro, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Karen McNulty, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory

PO 3012 A Comparison of Drivers’ Braking Responses Across Ages
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Danielle Brown; Anne Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Kristen Davis; Cyrus Ridenour, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory

AsD spOTs
The Assembly of Student Delegates (ASD) invites you to view student-authored posters that are designated by an ASD Scholarship Projects by Occupational Therapy Students (SPOTS) logo. This initiative recognizes and encourages the scholarship of students to help achieve our Centennial Vision of being a science-driven and evidence-based profession.

PO 3001 OT and RCT: Why the Evidence is Not Piling Up
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kathlyn Reed, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Texas Woman’s University (Retired), Houston, TX Level: Intermediate

PO 3008 The Future of Upper Extremity Prosthetics Using Targeted Muscle Reinnervation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Caitlyn Townsend, University of New England, Portland, ME Contributing Author: Janine Loguidice, OTR/L, David Sandmire, MD Level: Intermediate

PO 3013 Clinically Important Differences on the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer in Minimally to Moderately Impaired, Chronic Stroke
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Stephen Page, PhD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; George Fulk, PhD, PT, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY; Pierce Boyne, DPT, The University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Level: Intermediate

PO 3002 Academic Innovation: Developing Core Competencies for Inter-Professional Collaborative Practice Through Participation in an Online Learning Community
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Wendy Hildenbrand, MPH, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jackie Nowak, MS, ARNP, both of University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Level: Introductory

PO 3009 Infusing Occupation-Based Interventions Into Hand Rehabilitation in Occupational Therapy Practice
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Vanessa de Leon; Russell Thompson; Lisa Mazur; Danila Cepa, DHS, OTR/L, all of Governors State University, University Park, IL Level: Introductory

KeY TO COnTenT fOCus
Posters are color-coded in order to reflect the 8 broad practice categories and easily identify those that are most relevant to your practice. All posters are in numerical order. Academic & Fieldwork Education Children & Youth General & Professional Issues Health & Wellness Mental Health Productive Aging Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Work & Industry

PO 3014 Does a Structured Handwriting Readiness Program Have a Carry-Over Effect for Fine Motor Skills of Preschool Children the Year Following Intervention?
Content Focus: Children & Youth Whitney Lear; Anna Call; Denise Donica, DHS, OTR/L, BCP, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory

PO 3003 The Electronic Medical Record: A Therapy Perspective
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Carol Clerico, OT/L, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA Level: Introductory

PO 3010 Exploration of Innovative Technology for Upper Extremity Intervention After Acquired Brain Injury
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Elena Donoso Brown, MS, OTR/L, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Contributing Authors: Dianne Rios, ScD, OTR/L, Torey Gilbertson, DPT, PT; Karli Gutman; Robert Price, MSME; Brian Otis, PhD; Sarah Westcott McCoy, PhD, PT; Chet Moritz, PhD Level: Introductory

PO 3015 Coping Strategies of Parents with Visual Impairments Who Have Young Children
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Ramona Guthrie, MPA, OTR/L, Touro College, New York, NY Contributing Authors: Meira Orentlicher, PhD, OTR/L; Daniella Cohen; Ita Kogan; Tovah Reichman; Blima Weill; Leora Berger; Lisa Friedman; Simha Levy; Rebecca Wolf; Sharice Harewood; Maya Kominer; Kayli Young Level: Introductory

PO 3004 Generational Competence in Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Sonia Kay, PhD, OTR/L, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL Level: Intermediate

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

PO 3005 Professional Involvement in Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues

PO 3011 Return to Work Success for an Individual With Severe Brain Injury and Global Aphasia
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation

PO 3017 Brain Injury and Life Satisfaction
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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Peter Giroux, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS Contributing Authors: Charles Crenshaw, MOTR/L; Tiffany Elmore, MOTR/L; Jessica Jackson, MOTR/L; Ashley Pretti, MOTR/L; Katy Anne Spradlin, MOTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 3024 Increasing the Need for Occupational Therapy on an Adult Psychiatric Unit Using the Sensory Processing Model
Content Focus: Mental Health Doris Obler, MSW, OTR, Long Island University-Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY; Suzanne White, MS, OTR/L, SUNY-Downstate, Brooklyn, NY; Emily Greenfield, EdD, OTR/L, Columbia University, New York, NY; Renee Ortega, MS, COTA/L, R-DMT; Valerie Brusylivska; Yana Krimer; Karina Kolodiy, all of Long Island University-Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY Level: Introductory

PO 3029 Effectiveness of the Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi Program® for Community-Dwelling Older Adults Living in a Continual Care Facility
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jane Painter, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Robin Groth, MS, OTR/L; Courtney King, MS, OTR/L, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory

PO 3036 Innovative Interdisciplinary Collaboration Among Occupational Therapy, Healthcare, and Education College Students Working With Special Olympics Young Athlete Program
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mary Falzarano, PhD, OTR; Laurie Knis-Matthews, PhD, OT; Penina Kroll, all of Kean University, Union, NJ Level: Intermediate

PO 3019 To Buy or Not To Buy Technological Toys
Content Focus: Children & Youth Socorro Banda; Shirley Wells, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA, both of The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX Level: Introductory

PO 3030 Engagement and Barriers to Healthy Activities in Elder South Asian Immigrants
Content Focus: Productive Aging Erin Fuller; Lesley Ruda, both of San Jose State University, San Jose, CA Contributing Authors: Chris Kreutzer; Sheama Krishnagiri, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

PO 3020 The Missing Links in Interventions for Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy
Content Focus: Children & Youth Heather Roberts; Patricia Bowyer, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Contributing Author: Renee Taylor, PhD Level: Introductory

PO 3025 Supporting Transition to American Life: Occupational Therapy and the Refugee Resettlement Experience
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Sheetal Kapadia; Erika Seiver; Stephen Kern, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA Level: Introductory

PO 3037 Applying Neurofeedback and Hemoencephalography To Improve Cognition in Children and Adolescents
Content Focus: Children & Youth Guy McCormack, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Samuel Merritt University, Oakland, CA Level: Intermediate

PO 3031 Recovery in Mental Health: Innovation and Practice in Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Mental Health Caitlin Synovec, MSOT, OTR/L, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD Level: Introductory

PO 3021 Bringing the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework to Life: The Student Occupational History E-Scrapbook Project
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Rachelle Dorne, EdD, OTR/L, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL Contributing Authors: Caitlin Belvin; Alyssa Borowski; Christina Denslow; Jamie Duva; Erin Holland; Heather Humphrey; Jenna Rusche Level: Introductory

PO 3026 Implementing I.M. Brainy Curriculum: An Approach To Preventing Brain Injuries With Preschool Children
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Tina Mankey, EdD, OTR/L; Jennifer Moore, PhD, OTR/L, both of University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Level: Introductory

PO 3038 How To Use the Everyday Activities, Routines, and Materials of the Family in Early Intervention
Content Focus: Children & Youth Ellen Pope, MS, OTR/L, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Level: Intermediate

PO 3032 Behavioral Health Competence of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists
Content Focus: Mental Health Paul Arthur, COTA; Kate DeCleene, OTD, OTR, both of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory

PO 3027 Support for Mental Health Practice: Trends, Challenges, and Opportunities
Content Focus: Mental Health Linda Olson, PhD, OTR/L; Meghan Crisp, MS, OTR/L, both of Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; Lisa Tekell, OTD, OTR/L, OTD, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN Contributing Authors: Erin Austria; Courtney Buron; Heather Fite; Andrew Rader; Jenna Robbins; Porshia Parker Level: Intermediate

PO 3039 What Occupational Therapy Practitioners Need to Know About Bullying Prevention in Schools
Content Focus: Children & Youth Iris Leigh, OTR/L, CAGS, Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Introductory

PO 3022 Decision-Making Preferences Predict Clinical Performance With Graduate Occupational Therapy Students: A Preliminary Study
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Tamera Humbert, DEd, OTR/L, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA Contributing Author: Jean E. Pretz, PhD Level: Advanced

PO 3033 Voices of Elders in Long-Term Care: Cultural and Personal Perspectives
Content Focus: Productive Aging Gayle Hersch, PhD, OTR, Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Contributing Authors: Shirley Hutchinson, DrPH, RN; Harriett Davidson, MA, OTR; Beth MastelSmith, PhD, RN; Adeline Chu, PhD, RN Level: Introductory

PO 3040 Social Opportunities for Connections With Kids (SOCKS)
Content Focus: Children & Youth Claudia Hilton, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Cheryl Klohr, MSOT, OTR/L, both of Washington University, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 3023 Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: OT is the Missing Link
Content Focus: Mental Health Dorothy Frederick, MS, OTR/L, Center for Human Development, Northampton, MA Contributing Author: Tina Champagne, OTD, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 3028 The Science of Bucket Drumming: An Innovative Evidence-Based Occupation
Content Focus: Mental Health Emily Raphael, EdD, OTR; Anna Shteyler, MSOT; Michael Silva, MSOT, all of Columbia University, New York, NY Level: Introductory

PO 3035 “Launch!” A School Team Works Collaboratively To Provide Transition Services on a College Campus
Content Focus: Children & Youth Asha Asher, MA, OTR/L, FAOTA; Martha Reisenberg; Jennifer Buelsing, MS, CCC-SLP; Todd Strasser, CWSC; Julie Louis, COTA/L, all of Sycamore Community Schools, Cincinnati, OH Level: Intermediate

PO 3041 The Outsiders: Supporting Families During Early Childhood Transitions
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mara Podvey, PhD, OTR, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ Level: Intermediate

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PO 3042 Healthy Camping: A Primary Prevention Wellness Program for Youth
Content Focus: Children & Youth Pamela Toto, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, BCG; Sam Boardman; Maggie Corcoran; Kourtney Heichel; Kate Schramm; Rachael Simon, all of University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 3048 Disparities in Unmet Need for Therapy Services Among Hispanic Children With Special Health Care Needs
Content Focus: Children & Youth Rebecca Swanke, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Contributing Author: Ruth E. Benedict, DrPH, OTR Level: Introductory

PO 3054 Innovative Roles for Occupational Therapy in Foster Care
Content Focus: Mental Health Pat Precin, MS, OTR/L, LP, Touro College, New York, NY Contributing Authors: Jennifer Timque; Alison Walsh Level: Intermediate

RWP 3015 The Effects of Dorsal Wrist and Hand Splinting on Patients With Hemiplegia: Preliminary Findings From a Randomized, Controlled Trial
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Christine Griffin, MS, OTR/L, BCPR; Sharon Flinn, PhD, OTR/L, CHT, CVE; Lisa Juckett, MOT, OTR/L, all of The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Level: Intermediate

PO 3043 Daily Life on the Spectrum: A Website Promoting Self-Care Independence for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Content Focus: Children & Youth Marisa Prior; Marge Luthman, MS, OTR/L, both of University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA Level: Introductory

PO 3049 Effect of Occupational Therapy Play Groups on Preschool Children Living in a Homeless Shelter
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jodee Steiner; Crystal Smith; Rachael Krugman; Brenna Weeks, all of San Jose State University, San Jose, CA Contributing Author: Winifred Schultz-Krohn, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, SWC, FAOTA Level: Intermediate

PO 3055 Innovative Treatment: Evidence of the Occupational Therapist’s Role in Bladder Management With the Spinal Cord Injury Population
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Emily Ashpole, DOT, OTR/L; Ginger Perritt, MS, OTR/L, both of Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA Contributing Authors: Teresa Foy, LOT; Julie Gassaway, MS, RN; Debbie Backus, PhD, PT; Kara Cantoni, OTR/L Level: Introductory

RWP 3016 Intensity of Meaning Upon the Efficiency of a Reach Movement in Healthy Adults Using Positively and Negatively Associated Objects
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Emily Fahrer; Kareisha Sackaloo; Martin Rice, PhD, OTR/L, all of The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Level: Intermediate

PO 3044 The Effects of Text Messaging on Adolescents and Young Adults
Content Focus: Children & Youth Marcy Racicot; Nicole Chase; Lori Vaughn, OTD, OTR/L, all of Bay Path College, Longmeadow, MA Level: Introductory

PO 3051 Experiences With a Service Dog of an Adolescent With Spinal Muscular Atrophy
Content Focus: Children & Youth Sarah Onsager; Kari Tanta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA Contributing Author: Lucretia Berg, MS, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 3045 Implications of a Unique Occupational Therapy Approach With a Pediatric Pain Rehabilitation Client: A Case Study
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jennifer Herold, OTD, OTR/L, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH Contributing Author: Melanie Criss, MOT, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 3056 Power Versus Manual: The Science Behind Wheelchair Intervention for Individuals With Low-Level Tetraplegia— Evidence From the SCIRehab Study
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Lauren Heisler, MS, OTR/L, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY; Deepa Thimmaiah, MS, OTR, Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO Contributing Authors: Rebecca Ozelie, MHS, OTR/L, BCPR; Julie Gassaway, MS, RN; Kara L. Cantoni, OTR/L; Ginger J. Perritt, MS, OTR/L; Emily Ashpole, OTR/L; Teresa Foy, LOT Level: Introductory

RWP 3034 Older Women’s Perceptions of Physical Activity in Their Daily Occupational Routine: A Qualitative Study
Content Focus: Productive Aging Judith Malek-Ismail, MEd, OTR/L, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Contributing Author: Candace Beitman, EdD, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 3052 The Mirror Neuron System: Evidence for Neural Theories of Sensory Integration and Implications for Neural and Physical Rehabilitation Across the Lifespan
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Sook-Lei Liew, MA, OTR/L; Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, PhD, both of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Kathleen Garrison, MS; Tong Sheng; Carolee Winstein, PhD, PT, FAPTA Level: Introductory

RWP 3047 Children With and Without Disabilities (Ages 0- 21): What Variables are Associated With the Extent of Responsibility Shift From Parent to Child?
Content Focus: Children & Youth Ying-Chia Kao, MA, OTR, Boston University, Boston, MA Contributing Authors: Wendy J. Coster, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Gael Orsmond, PhD; Ellen S. Cohn, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Stephen M. Haley, PhD; Jessica Kramer, PhD, OTR/L; Pengsheng Ni, MD; Helene M. Dumas, MS, PT; Maria A. FragalaPinkham, DPT; Tian Feng, MS; Richard Moed, MBA Level: Introductory

PO 3046 Teacher Perceptions of Handwriting Without Tears Program Implementation: Evidence To Support Collaboration
Content Focus: Children & Youth Colleen Schneck, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY; Sharon Brandenburger-Shasby, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Retired Educator, Henrico, VA Contributing Authors: Lacey Brewer; Anthony Femia; Carly Hamm; Brittany Horn; Justin King; Misty Mason; Jennifer Williams Level: Intermediate

PO 3057 Detection of Early Motor Skill and Muscle Pattern Differences in Female and Male Low and High Risk Infants
Content Focus: Children & Youth Patricia Coker-Bolt; Noelle Moreau, PhD, PT; Jessica Perkel; Dorothea Jenkins, MD, all of Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC Level: Intermediate

PO 3053 The Impact of a Stress Management Intervention on Burnout Levels for CommunityBased Direct Support Staff as Measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory
Content Focus: Work & Industry Terrance Anderson, OTD, OTR/L, University of Mary, Bismarck, ND Contributing Authors: Sasha Fischer; Tanner Pryor; Sarah Rebenitsch; Desiree Richter; Luke Schlichenmayer Level: Introductory

PO 3058 Maximizing Occupational Therapy Services: Educate Stakeholders on Mobility for Medically-At-Risk Older Adults
Content Focus: Productive Aging Anne M. Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Contributing Author: Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS Level: Intermediate

RWP 3050 Social Competence and Time Usage Amongst Adolescents
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kevin Bielanski, MEd, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; Kaitie Tamura, Creighton University, Omaha, NE Level: Introductory

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3:00 pm-5:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE

pOsTer sessIOn #4

Sponsored by EBS Healthcare PO 4000 Using Driving Simulator for Occupational Therapy Practice
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Erin Strong; Courtney Smith; Anne Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory

PO 4005 Occupational Therapy for Patient Following Facial Transplant Surgery: A Case Study
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Angela Broadnax, MOT, OTR/L, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH Contributing Authors: Maria Siemionow, MD; Vernon Lin, MD; Pamela L. Dixon, MOT, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 4010 Connecting the Dots: Creating a Successful Transition into an Acute Care Fieldwork Setting
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Stephanie Stegman, MOT, OTR/L, Barnes Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO; Robyn Otty, OTD, OTR/L, Maryville University, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory

PO 4018 Sustainable Living and Occupational Justice
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Carole Dennis, ScD, OT; Amie Engel Germain, MOTR/L, both of Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY; Julie Nastasi, OTD, OTR/L, SCLV, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA Level: Introductory

PO 4001 The Collective Efficacy of Mexican-American Families Living With Dialysis
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Albert Gonzales; Shirley Wells, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA, both of The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX Level: Introductory

PO 4006 Impacts on Function for Those With Multiple Sclerosis Who Remain Active in the Community
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Rebecca Salyards, MS, OT, Keuka College, Keuka Park, NY Contributing Author: Onda Bennett, PhD, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 4012 Cross-Border Contributions to Obesity Research and Interventions: A North American Review of Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Simone Gill, PhD, OTR/L, Boston University, Boston, MA Contributing Author: Mary Forhan, PhD, OT Reg (Ont) Level: Introductory

PO 4019 A Comprehensive OT Program To Improve Posture and Performance of Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults With Osteoporosis and/or Back Pain
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jaime Carver, OTR/L; Aili FilippiJohns, OT/L, both of Hillcrest Health and Rehabilitation, Bellevue, NE Level: Intermediate

PO 4002 Introduction to The NeuroRecovery Network and Intensive Treatment for Spinal Cord Injury
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Carrie Shogren, OTR/L, Courage Center, Minneapolis, MN; Julie Heerdink, MS, OTR/L, Frazier Rehab, Louisville, KY Contributing Author: Jennifer Schwartz, MS, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 4007 Innovative Applications of OT Tools: OT Assessment Battery for Ventricular Assist Device Patient Selection
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Phuong Nguyen, MA, OTR/L; Whitney Pike, OTR/L, CLT, both of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Katie Jordan, OTD, OTR/L; Kathy Gross, MA, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 4013 Health Through HOrTiculture: A Natural Innovation
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Amy Wagenfeld, PhD, OTR/L, CAPS, Studio Sprout, Juniper, FL Level: Intermediate

PO 4020 Occupational Effects of Internet Usage for Geriatric People
Content Focus: Productive Aging Katie McKeon; Rose Heacock; Leah Koontz; Lindsey Kleindienst; Ingrid Provident, EdD, OTR/L, all of Chatham University, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Introductory

PO 4014 Evidence for the Use of Visual Imagery in Asperger’s Syndrome
Content Focus: Mental Health Pat Precin, MS, OTR/L, LP, Touro College, New York, NY Contributing Authors: Michele Floria, MS, OTR/L; Simi Thomas, MS, OTR/L; January Magno, MS, OTR/L; Diana Chang, MS, OTR/L; Charles Jean-Paul, MS, OTR/L Level: Advanced

PO 4021 Learning With Colleagues Wearing Pajamas
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Susan Burwash, MSc(OT), OT(C); Anita Hamilton, MOccThy, OT(C), both of University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA Contributing Authors: Merrolee Penman, MA; Sarah Bodell, MSc; Angela Hook, MSc Level: Introductory

PO 4003 Low-Tech Solutions for a High-Tech World: Integration of Assistive Technology in Inpatient Rehabilitation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Sara Benham, MS, OTR/L, ATP, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory

PO 4008 Evidence for a Client-Centered Modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy Program
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Vanessa Jewell, MS, OTR/L; Jessica Mayer; Carrie Einck, all of University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI Level: Introductory

PO 4015 Building Essential Life Skills for Success in Teen Parents
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Janelle Kurtenbach, OTD, OTR/L, Occupational Therapy Training Program, Torrance, CA Contributing Author: Crystalie Dairo, COTA/L Level: Introductory

PO 4022 Barriers to Occupational Performance Among Homeless and Food Insecure Individuals
Content Focus: Mental Health Dorothy Porcello; Jeanenne Dallas; Catina O’Leary, PhD, all of Washington University, St Louis, MO Level: Introductory

PO 4004 Preparing For Practice in the Ever-Changing Health Care Environment Through Service Learning Innovations
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Dory Sabata, OTD, OTR/L, SCEM; Julia Icenogle; Megan Griffin; Maggie Strode; Erin Schneweis, all of University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Level: Introductory

PO 4009 Experience of Vietnamese Immigrants Adapting to Life in the United States and the Impact on Seeking Employment
Content Focus: Work & Industry Bich-Ngan Nguyen; Dung (Aaron) Huynh, MS; Stephanie T. Tran, MS; Jimmy P. Vo, MS; Sheama Krishnagiri, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA all from San Jose State University, San Jose, CA Level: Introductory

PO 4016 Healthy Choices for Me: A Research Project Turned Community-Based Intervention
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Cynthia Lau, PhD, OTR/L, BCP; Shelley Bolor; Ashley Brown; Marybeth Hamrick; Jasmine Jia; Melissa Martin; Devan Stevens, all of Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV Level: Introductory

PO 4023 Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning in Occupational Therapy Education: Translating Evidence on Innovative Teaching Strategies
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Letha Mosley, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Veronica Rowe, MS, OTR/L;

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Tina Mankey, EdD, OTR/L, all of University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Level: Intermediate

PO 4024 Complementary and Alternative Treatment Approaches in OT
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Randy McCombie, PhD, OTR/L; Rose Miller, MOT, OTR/L, both of West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Level: Intermediate

PO 4031 Project-Based Learning: Curriculum Innovation for Health Promotion, Wellness, and Prevention for Individuals, Groups, Organizations, and Populations
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Rebecca Barton, DHS, OTR; Julie Bednarski, MHS, OTR; Lori Breeden, MS, OTR, all of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Intermediate

PO 4036 Evaluation of Fieldwork Performance: A Critical Tool for Program Evaluation
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Michael Roberts, MS, OTR/L, Tufts University, Medford, MA; Lisa Tekell, OTD, OTR/L, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN Level: Intermediate

Contributing Authors: Brittany Behrendt; Andrea Dykes; Brandon Johnson; Teri Maloney; Jenny Ray; Dominic Toscano Level: Introductory

PO 4042 Utilizing The Center for the Developing Child To Promote EBP Occupational Therapy in Early Childhood
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kerrie Ramsdell, MS, LOTR; Jill Thomas; Meredith Sanders; Brooke Stewart; Kristen Davis, all of Louisiana State University Health Science Center, New Orleans, LA Level: Introductory

PO 4026 Evidence-Based Research and the Patent Process Made Easy
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kurt Hubbard, OTD, OTR/L; Sue Guerrette, OTD-S, OTR/L, both of University of St. Augustine, St. Augustine, FL Level: Introductory

PO 4032 An Evidence-Based Practice Review of Intervention Strategies Used for Children With Feeding Difficulties
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lalit Shah, EdD, OTR/L; Kathleen Kane; Jesse Karger, all of Misericordia University, Dallas, PA Level: Introductory

PO 4037 Learning Developmental Assessment Through the Use of Expert and Self-Scaffolding Strategies
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Judy Ericksen, PhD, OTR/L, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 4043 Occupational Balance: Supporting Parents of Children With Disabilities
Content Focus: Children & Youth Katrina Jeffries; Christina Kail, both of Chatham University, Pittsburgh, PA Contributing Authors: Joyce Salls, OTD, OTR/L; Chelsea Mummert; Nicole Budinsky Level: Introductory

PO 4028 Recruiting, Developing, and Portraying a Diverse Workforce: Embracing the Centennial Vision
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kerri Golden, EdD, OTR/L, Saint Francis University, Loretto, PA Contributing Authors: Kenneth J. Staub, MS, CCC-SLP; Brittany Busse; Brooke Fulcher; Jamie Fieldhouse; Kathleen Kachmar; Heather McDaniel; Leslie Sunder Level: Introductory

PO 4033 Beyond Immediacy: Integrating Information Literacy With Historical Research To Teach Lessons Learned From the 20th Century to Millennial Students
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Rita Fleming-Castaldy, PhD, OTL, FAOTA, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 4038 Describing the Occurrence and Influence of Mentoring for Occupational Therapy Faculty who are on the Tenure Track or Eligible for Reappointment
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Mary Falzarano, PhD, OTR, Kean University, Union, NJ Level: Intermediate

PO 4044 Consciousness Expanding: New Perspectives on Autism
Content Focus: Children & Youth Michelle Colletti, OTR/L, Water’s Edge Healing Occupational Therapy Practice, Astoria, NY Level: Introductory

PO 4029 Awareness of Domestic Violence by Occupational Therapy Practitioners
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Amanda Kessler, MS, OTR/L; Julie Memel, MOT; Lyndsay Neal; Meghan Hardin, all of West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Level: Introductory

PO 4034 Occupational Therapy Intervention To Foster PreVocational Skills in Mothers Living in a Homeless Shelter
Content Focus: Work & Industry Winifred Schultz-Krohn, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA; Diana Chien; Amy Deavours; Jessica Rankin-Gee; Sheela Roy, all of San Jose State University, San Jose, CA Level: Intermediate

PO 4039 An Exploration Into the Lived Experiences of Adults With Cerebral Palsy Practicing Yoga
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Renee Nahum, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA Contributing Authors: Michael Bitting; Amy Mak; Tina Tom Level: Introductory

PO 4045 A Comparison of Two Assistive Technology Outcome Measures for the Public School Setting
Content Focus: Children & Youth Anne Watson, PhD, OTR/L, Arlington Public Schools, Arlington, VA; Roger Smith, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI Level: Intermediate

PO 4040 A Self-Esteem OT Program for Adolescents After Burn Injuries
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kathryn Miller, MOT; Karla Beck, MOT; Jan Stube, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND Level: Introductory

PO 4030 Centennial Culture: Embedding the Centennial Vision Into Everyday Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Robert Ferguson, OTR/L, University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI Contributing Authors: Douglas Rakoski, MA, OTR/L, ATP; Erin Muston-Firsch, MS, OTRL; Christine Wallis, PT Level: Introductory

PO 4035 Community Connections: A Pilot Program To Provide Non-Traditional Fieldwork Opportunities
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Florence Hannes, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA; Mildred Melchionne, COTA, both of SUNY Orange Community College, Middletown, NY; Donna Frazier, OTR/L, ELANT Health Care System, Fishkill, NY Level: Introductory

PO 4046 CATT Center Use in Elementary Schools To Close the Gap Between General and Special Education
Content Focus: Children & Youth Denise Donica, DHS, OTR/L, BCP, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory

PO 4041 Evaluation of an AnimalAssisted Learning Program Involving At-Risk Youth and Shelter Dogs in an Educational Setting
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lucinda Dale, EdD, OTR, CHT, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN

PO 4047 Planting Seeds for InterProfessional Team Participation: A Journey for Occupational Therapy Students
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education

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Karen Pardue, MS, RN, CNE, ANEF; Caryn Cartledge; Kathryn Loukas, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Laura Costin; Audrey Grass; Tynisha LaCroix, all of University of New England, Portland, ME Level: Intermediate

PO 4050 The Validity and Effectiveness of the Interactive Metronome as a Treatment Modality With PostCVA Clients
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Leonard Trujillo, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Intermediate

Level: Intermediate

PO 4053 The Exploration of Spirituality on the Transition of Older Adults Into a Long-Term Care Facility
Content Focus: Productive Aging Gayle Hersch, PhD, OTR; Anila Jose, both of Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Level: Introductory

RWP 4010 Recovery Following Complex Medical Procedures: Evidence of the Need for OT Services PostAcute Care
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Patricia Scott, PhD, OT, FAOTA; Fatoumata Bah; Stacie Bordner; Emily Ehlers; Amanda Linck; Julie Widbin, RN; Emily Winslow, MS, OTR, all of Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Level: Intermediate

PO 4048 Sensory Processing Patterns of Children With Autism and Reduced Visual Convergence
Content Focus: Children & Youth Sandee Dunbar, DPA, OTR/L, FAOTA; Natalie Gonzalez, MOT; Nicole Quint, DrOT, OTR/L, all of Nova Southeastern University, Davie, FL Contributing Authors: Ariela Neuman, PhD, OTR/L; Sharanie Smith, MOT; Jennifer Jacobs, MOT Level: Intermediate

PO 4051 Enhancing Instrument Precision for Improved Measurement of Clinical Trials Outcomes
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Trudy Mallinson, PhD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Mike Carlson, PhD; Florence Clark, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Abbey Marterella, PhD, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 4054 Environmental Factors Affecting Participation of Children and Youth With and Without Disabilities
Content Focus: Children & Youth Wei-Chang Chen; Neal Drew; Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, all of Tufts University, Medford, MA Level: Introductory

RWP 4011 From Hero to Homeless: An Examination of the Challenges and Barriers That War Veterans Experience During Community Reintegration
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Anne Marie Hansen; Eileen Johnson; Kelli Clark, all of Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Introductory

PO 4049 The Science of Teaching: Does It Impact Wellness Programming?
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kate DeCleene, OTD, OTR; Julie Bednarski, MHS, OTR; Lori Breeden, MS, OTR; Angelia Ridgway, PhD; Deborah Sachs, MS; Donna Stephenson, MS, all of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory

PO 4052 Environmental Barriers That Affect Participation of Children and Youth With Acquired Brain Injuries
Content Focus: Children & Youth Wei-Chang Chen; Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, both of Tufts University, Medford, MA

PO 4059 Occupational Therapists’ Attitudes Toward Working With Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia Disorders in Skilled Nursing Facilities
Content Focus: Productive Aging Candace Beitman, EdD, OTR; William Staples, DHSc, PT, GCS, all of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Contributing Authors: Shikina Bays, OT; Julie Greenbaum, OT; Jacob Hromas, OT; Kristy Peterson, OT; Tabitha Smith, OT Level: Intermediate

RWP 4025 Safe Housing Creates a Foundation for Adaptive Occupational Performance
Content Focus: Mental Health Jaime Muñoz, PhD, FAOTA; Alexandria Natal, both of Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Contributing Author: Miranda Gruber, OTR/L Level: Introductory

SAVE THE DATE

NOVEMBER IS FOR STUDENTS ONLY!

PO 4060 The Science Behind Preparing Students for the National Examination
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Jennifer Radloff, MHS, OTR; Kate DeCleene, OTD, OTR, both of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory

RWP 4050 An Investigation of OccupationBased Practice in Upper Extremity Intervention
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Amy Ma; Barbara White, PhD, OTR/L; Elizabeth Stewart, all of University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH Level: Intermediate

RWP 4054 Teachers’ Awareness and Perceptions of the Sensory Diet
Content Focus: Children & Youth Victoria Nackley, MS, OTR/L; Rochelle Battle; Shana Mathers; Lauren Micho; Gabriella Lynch; Chelsea Beehm, all of Utica College, Utica, NY Level: Introductory

2012 AOTA/National Student Conclave
November 9–10, 2012 | Columbus, Ohio
Students—join us in Columbus this November for the AOTA/NBCOT National Student Conclave. Don’t miss exclusive opportunities to speak with leaders and experts in the field, meet with job recruiters, and learn important information about the NBCOT exam!
®

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educational sessions
Plenary Session
11:15 am–12:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG
For details see page 11.

saturday, April 28
ers with recommendations on factors that influence the measurement of hemi-inattention in functional activities.

Should We Strength Train or Just Skill Train Post-Stroke?
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Lorie Richards, PhD, OTR/L, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Contributing Authors: Sandra Davis, PT; Tara Patterson, PhD; Amit Sethi, PhD, OTR; Stephen Nadeau, MD Level: Introductory Weakness after stroke limits engagement in occupation. We compared motor function gains after CIMT and resistance exercises vs. CIMT alone. Both groups increased upper extremity function with no significant differences between groups, suggesting no advantage of adding progressive resistance exercises to intensive task practice after stroke.

Using Video Diaries To Understand Friendships From the Perspective of an Adolescent With an Autism Spectrum Disorder
Content Focus: Children & Youth Ellen Cohn, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Gael Orsmond, PhD, both of Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Intermediate Using a strengths-based approach, this study examines the personal and contextual factors that support friendships for an adolescent girl with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Findings offer innovative ways to include clients’ perspectives in the development of theoretical understandings of social relationships among adolescents with an ASD.

AOTA’s 92nd Annual Business Meeting
12:15 pm–1:15 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG
For details see page 12.

Annual Awards & Recognition Ceremony
5:30 pm–6:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG
Sponsored by Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For details see page 12

SIS Fun Run & Walk 6:45 am–7:30 am Participants will meet in front of the JW Marriott at the corner of West and Washington Streets. Sponsored by Image Sport For details see page 15. 8:00 am–9:00 am RP 300 CC 105-106 Impact of Fear of Pain on Functional Status Outcomes Among People With Shoulder Impairments
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Bhagwant Sindhu, PhD, OTR, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI Contributing Authors: Leigh A. Lehman, PhD, OTR; Sergey Tarima, PhD; Mark Bishop, PhD, PT; Dennis Hart, PhD, PT; Mikesh Shivakoti, MS; Matthew Klein; Ying-chih Wang, PhD, OTR/L Level: Intermediate The study’s purpose was to determine the influence of fear related cognitions on recovery of functional status during rehabilitation for people with shoulder impairments. Data demonstrates elevated fear mediates poor functional status outcome among 2 of 8 disease categories (soft tissue injuries and osteopathies).

speCIAl eVenT

Using the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand and Upper Limb Functional Index To Measure Clinical Change
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Lucinda Dale, EdD, OTR, CHT, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Contributing Authors: Crystal L. Cummings, OTR; Timothy M. Hirons, OTR; Erin L. McLain, OTR; Sara-Ruth Riggs, OTR; Amy D. Spencer Level: Introductory Using patient-rated outcome measures (PRO) to quantify clinical change gives clinicians a method to measure client perception of improvement. Two PRO, the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH), and Upper Limb Functional Index (ULFI), are responsive tools to measure clinical change for upper extremity musculoskeletal conditions.

Balance Confidence: A Primary Predictor of Activity and Participation After Stroke
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Arlene A. Schmid, PhD, OTR; Kristine Miller, PT; Tracy Dierks, PhD; Marieke Van Puymbroeck, PhD, all from Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory This study assessed the relationship between mobility variables to determine which most greatly impacts activity and participation after stroke. Data shows balance confidence to be the only mobility variable to be an independent predictor of activity and participation. OTs have a role in management of balance confidence, as it is a psychosocial factor.

Case Studies on the Feasibility of Exergaming To Enhance Physical Activity in Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Content Focus: Children & Youth Amanda Foran, MS, OTR/L; Sharon Cermak, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory This presentation reports on the ability of youth with autism spectrum disorder to learn to use exergames, how much assistance is required, levels of enjoyment/motivation, and the physiological effects of exergame play. For youth who are primarily sedentary, exergaming may increase physical activity and assist in weight management.

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 301 CC 120-121 Functional Measures of Hemi-Inattention
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Elena Donoso Brown, MS, OTR/L, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Contributing Authors: Janet M. Powell, PhD, OTR/L; Beth Wise, OTR/L; Deborah Kartin, PhD, PT; Sarah Westcott McCoy, PhD, PT Level: Introductory Only a handful of measures are available to assess hemi-inattention (or unilateral neglect) in functional activities. From the results of an initial feasibility study, this session will provide clinicians and research-

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 302 CC 125-126 Participation in Recreational Activities in School Age Children With High Functioning Autism and Their Peers
Content Focus: Children & Youth Marie-Christine Potvin, PhD, OTR/L, ATP, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT Contributing Authors: Laurie Snider, PhD, OTR; Patricia Prelock, PhD, SLP; Eva Kehayia, PhD; Sharon Wood-Dauphinee, PhD, PT Level: Introductory This cross-sectional study examined the recreational participation and health-related quality of life in school-aged children with High Functioning Autism. Findings will inform therapists’ and teachers’ decision making in the design of relevant intervention programs for these children.

8:00 am–9:00 am RP 303 CC 127-128 Impact of Home Modifications Provided by Rebuilding Together Hartford
Content Focus: Productive Aging Claudia Oakes, PhD, University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT Level: Introductory Results of an outcome study that assessed homeowners’ satisfaction with, use of, and perceptions of safety related to home modifications will be presented. Issues related to conducting outcomes research related to home modification will be discussed.

How Does the Community Support Aging in Place?
Content Focus: Productive Aging Claudia Oakes, PhD, University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT Level: Introductory The results of a qualitative study aimed at understanding how older women perceive community support for their ability to age in place will be presented.

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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8:00 am–9:00 am RP 304 CC 103-104 Telling Us What They Think: Those Who Matter Speak About Optimal Dementia Care
Content Focus: Productive Aging Regula Robnett, PhD, OTR/L, University of New England, Portland, ME; Bridget Moore, MS, OTR/L, Sedgewood Commons, Falmouth, ME Contributing Author: Jill E. Sawyer, MS, OTR/L Level: Introductory This qualitative research project, conducted in a dementia care facility, involved focus groups with staff members, family and friends, and residents with dementia. Results demonstrated differences of opinion about optimal care, specifically related to activities, time, and the context of care.

sTuDenT OnlY sessIOn
8:00 am–9:00 am SC 358 CC Sagamore Ballroom 5 (AOTA) Panel of New Practitioners
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Emily L. Vaught, MS, OTR/L, Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters, Virginia Beach, VA; Jaclyn Tarloff, MS, OTR/L, BarnesJewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO; Shaji Varughese, MOT, OTR/L, Brooks Rehabilitation Hospital, Jacksonville, FL; Kim Mahoney, COTA, Gentiva Home Care, Silver Spring, MD; Felicia Chew, MS, OTR/L, Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA; Michael T. Berthelette, MSM, OT/L, Progressus Therapy, LLC, Tampa, FL Level: Introductory Hear from a panel of new practitioners who will share their insights in successfully making the transition from student to new practitioner. Both OTA and OT new practitioners in a variety of practice settings will be represented. Be prepared to ask your questions so you too can successfully make the transition.

Debra Hanson, PhD, OTR, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Camille Sauerwald, EdM, OTR, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Galloway, NJ; Maralynne Mitcham, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jerry Burik, MHS, OTR/L, both of Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; Patricia Stutz-Tanenbaum, MS, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Jeanette Koski, MS OTR/L, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Level: Intermediate Participants will be informed regarding accreditation changes/updates and will have the opportunity to network with one another regarding resources to support the Academic & Fieldwork Coordinator (AFWC) role. Highlights of recent research on the AFWC role will be presented.

gathered at the Spring 2012 NHTSA/ AOTA Experts Meeting. There will be an opportunity for questions and dialogue.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
8:00 am–11:00 am WS 303 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 (AOTA) OT Role in CDC’s “Learn the Signs. Act Early.” Campaign
Content Focus: Children & Youth Sandra Schefkind, MS, OTR/L, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Cheryl Rhodes, MS, LMFT, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA; Lesly Wilson, PhD, OTR/L, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Kris Pizur-Barnekow, PhD, OTR/L, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Level: Intermediate This session focuses on the role of OT in early identification of signs of autism and highlights the partnership with Centers for Disease Control, American Physical Therapy Association, and American SpeechLanguage-Hearing Association to develop research, resources, and strategies to support families and achieve earlier diagnosis, leading towards better outcomes.

Caregiving Styles: A Typology of Cognitive and Behavioral Processes Associated With Caring for a Family Member With Dementia
Content Focus: Productive Aging Mary Corcoran, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, George Washington University, Washington, DC Level: Introductory This grounded theory study describes a typology of caregiving styles relevant to 97 family members of an individual with Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders. Caregiving style is a culturally-based pattern in thinking and action. The goal of this study was to characterize the relationship between caregiver intentions and care strategies, and to guide future OT research and practice.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 300 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 (SIS) PDSIS Annual Program: Occupational Therapy and Oncology—From Acute Care to Palliative Care and Survivorship
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Vi Nguyen, MOT, OTR, RRT, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Robin Newman, OTD, OTR/L, CLT, CDRS, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Lauren Bonacci, MOT, OTR/L; Claudine Campbell, MOT, OTR/L, both of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Contributing Author: Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, BCPR, CHT Level: Intermediate Cancer requires complex medical intervention and therapies. Treatment focuses on eradication. Many patients, however, also experience a significant decrease in quality of life/ function. This Workshop explores the vital role OT has in helping individuals maintain meaningful engagement in occupations, wherever they are in treatment/recovery. The Physical Disabilities Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 20 minutes of this session.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 302 CC 122 (AOTA) Older Driver Initiative Update: Explore the Latest Research, Education, and Resources for Generalists and Specialists Addressing Driving and Community Mobility
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Mary Jo McGuire, MS, OTR/L, OTPP, FAOTA, The Rehabilitation and HealthCenter, Akron, OH; Felicia Chew, MS, OTR/L, Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA; Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Ann Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Essie Wagner, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC Level: Introductory We are a car-dependent nation, and clients with medical impairments want (and need) to drive! All occupational therapy programs need to identify their role for addressing driving and community mobility through screening, evaluation, intervention, and/or referral. The number of senior drivers deserving our service will increase dramatically, but transportation is not isolated to geriatric practice settings. We have a duty to include the IADL of safe transportation in most practice settings. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) will underscore the demographic trends and societal need for growth in effective occupational therapy intervention and referral to experts. Genesis Rehab Services will describe the Champion’s Project and its impact on generalist practice. Researchers will present current evidence and the link to practice. We will announce the consensus recommendations for occupational therapy practice

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 304 CC 201-202 Using the Short Child Occupational Profile (SCOPE) To Measure Occupational Therapy Outcomes When Working With Children/Youth
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jane O’Brien, PhD, OTR/L, University of New England, Portland, ME; Patricia Bowyer, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, Texas Women’s University, Houston, TX; Renee Taylor, PhD, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL Contributing Authors: Caryn Birstler, MS, OTR/L; Molly Walrath, MS, OTR/L; Jeremy O’Dell; Caroline Phinney Level: Introductory The speakers use case studies to illustrate how using an occupationbased tool, such as the Short Child Occupational Profile (SCOPE), helps practitioners understand and use concepts of the Model of Human Occupation in pediatric practice to enhance intervention and to measure outcomes.

Using Art as a Restorative Occupation With Persons With Dementia: The Impact on Passivity
Content Focus: Productive Aging Ashlyn Cunningham; Samantha Buch; Brogan Canciamille; Andrea Evans; Jessica Lange; Rebecca Nehrt; Abby Schmidt; Hannah Schremp; Laura Schwartz, all of Maryville University, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory This study investigated whether participation in an arts-based intervention impacted the activity level and prevalence of passive behaviors in people with dementia residing in a nursing home. Results of this study indicate a decrease in passive behaviors of the participants after the arts-based intervention sessions.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 301 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 (AOTA) Academic Fieldwork Coordinators Forum
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 305 CC 123-124 (SIS) DDSIS Annual Program: Harnessing Strengths— Your Secret Weapon for Transforming the Effectiveness of Your Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth

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Winnie Dunn, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Angela Blackwell, MS, OTR; Jane Cox, MS, OTR/L; Ellen Pope, MS, OTR/L; Dory Sabata, OTD, OTR/L, SCEM; Lauren Foster, MOT, all of University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS; Kristie Koenig, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, New York University, New York, NY Level: Intermediate This workshop identifies strengths in the OT process. This rich resource goes untapped as OTs solve problems identified in assessment. Interdisciplinary evidence points to effective methods for harnessing strengths, generating both proximal and longterm effectiveness for participation and quality of life. The Developmental Disabilities Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 20 minutes of this session. identify performance skills, and learn measurement and documentation components specific to animalassisted therapy.

sIs BuZZ sessIOn
8:30 am–9:30 am For details see page 72. 9:30 am–11:00 am SC 300 CC 107-108 (AOTA) Using Social Media Resources Effectively, Efficiently, and Ethically
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Cheryl Morris, MSOT, OTR/L, Hagerstown, MD; Karen Dobyns, MOT, OTR/L, Encinitas Union School District, La Jolla, CA; Christopher Alterio, DrOT, OTR, ABC Therapeutics, East Amherst, NY; Anita Hamilton, MOT, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Erik Johnson, CPT, MS, OTR/L, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD Level: Introductory It’s easier than you think to find and benefit from a new world of online OT resources. Learn how to access this world with ease and efficiency. Discuss real-life applications and ethical considerations relevant to Web 2.0 tools with our panel of bloggers and social media experts.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 302 CC 103-104 How To Prevent Shoulder Pain in Stroke Survivors: Examining the Science and Evidence To Determine Best Treatment Strategies
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jan Davis, MS, OTR/L, International Clinical Educators, Inc., Port Townsend, WA Level: Intermediate Patients who are managed correctly can avoid many of the painful syndromes that frequently occur following a stroke. This session provides clear and effective treatment strategies in the prevention of shoulder pain, based on current evidence, and demonstrated with patient videos and practice labs.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 305 CC Sagamore Ballroom 5 Work: The Missing Area of Occupation in OT Practice— How To Address Work Performance With our Clients
Content Focus: Work & Industry Vicki Kaskutas, OTD, OT/L; Mary Seaton, MHS, OTR/L; Debbie Turley, OTR/L; Susan Tucker, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP, all of Washington University, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory OT practitioners will learn how to assess work performance and design intervention programs to help adolescent and adult clients in a wide-range of settings achieve their employment goals. Legislation for this area of practice, methods to analyze the client’s job demands, and OT’s role in facilitating return to work with the employer will be discussed.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 306 CC Sagamore Ballroom 2 Infusing Positive Psychology Across Occupational Therapy Practice Areas
Content Focus: Mental Health Marjorie Scaffa, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Courtney Sasse, MAEdl, OTR/L, both of University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL Level: Intermediate Participants will be introduced to concepts and principles of positive psychology and how these can be applied to OT practice in a variety of settings. A number of intervention techniques will be experienced firsthand that could be implemented to enhance the wellbeing of recipients of OT services.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 303 CC 105-106 (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Adults With Serious Mental Illness
Content Focus: Mental Health Catana Brown, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ Level: Intermediate This session will provide an overview of the Practice Guidelines for Adults with Serious Mental Illness including a summary of the evidence that supports best practice. The OT process from screening through evaluation, intervention, reevaluation and outcomes will be reviewed. Implications for practice, education, and research will be discussed.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 306 CC 125-126 An Innovated Approach To Prioritize Patients in an Acute Care Setting
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Susy Krimker, MS, OT/L; Joseph Domanico, DOT, OTR/L, both of Jeanes Hospital, Philadelphia, PA Level: Introductory In the changing health care environment it is important to maximize therapist time and efficiency. Based on this, this OT Department developed a Needs Assessment Scale to prioritize patients in an acute care hospital. This presentation will introduce that Scale and participants will have the opportunity to discuss modifications for their own setting.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
9:30 am–11:00 am SC 301 CC 109-110 (AOTA) Paths to Leadership
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Debi Hinerfeld, OTR/L, The Atlanta Speech School, Atlanta, GA; Andrew Persch, MS, OTR/L, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel, PhD, OT, BCMH, FAOTA, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; Juleen Rodakowski, OTD, OTR/L, Oronoco, MN; Midge Hobbs, MA, OTR/L, New England Sinai Hospital, Stoughton, MA; Nadine Kwebetchou, MS, OTR/L, MedPro, Palo Alto, CA; Jaclyn Tarloff, MS, OTR/L, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate Development of AOTA members as leaders is critical to the achievement of the Centennial Vision. Outcomes of the Emerging Leaders Development Program, including personal stories, program data, and professional plans will be shared. Participants will identify opportunities for the development of personal leadership skills.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 307 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 Animal-Assisted Therapy: A Conceptual Framework for Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Melissa Winkle, OTR/L, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Liberty Jackson, MOTR/L, Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR; Lori Andersen, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL; Staci Copses, MS,OTR/L, Essential Therapy Services & Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA; Andrea Cottos, MS, OTR/L, Kiddo’s Clubhouse, Alpharetta, GA; Allison Macurak, MS, OTR/L, Redmond Regional Medical Center, Rome, GA Level: Introductory This presentation will increase participant aptitude by addressing professional issues concerning the practitioner-client-animal triad. Participants will apply OT frames of reference to evidence-based research,

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 304 CC 127-128 Innovative Processes for Curriculum Redesign: One Program’s Journey
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Jan Garbarini, MA, OTR/L; Margaret Boyd, MPH, OTR/L; Sandra Countee, PhD, OTR/L; Pamela McFall, MA, OTR/L; Kristina Vilonen, MA, OTR/L, all of Dominican College, Orangeburg, NY Level: Intermediate This presentation describes a program’s journey through the curriculum redesign processes guided by the Kawa Model. This culturallysensitive Model directs students’ inquiry toward a collective and broad perspective. The Model’s view of life’s interconnectivity in context with the society has relevance for programs and practice.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 307 CC Sagamore Ballroom 6 You Must Get Out of the Car Sometime: Community Mobility Beyond Driving—Opportunities for Innovation and Best Practice in All Practice Settings
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jeffrey Crabtree, OTD, FAOTA; Christina Mushi-Brunt, PhD, both of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory This Short Course explores community mobility beyond driving. In the course, presenters will provide a foundation for advancing occupational therapy practice through community mobility services that include in-hospital assessment, intervention, and discharge planning community-based services.

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SIS Buzz Sessions
The Special Interest Sections (SIS)s have selected a topic of current interest to their practice area for a brief presentation and a facilitated discussion. The focus of these sessions will be to provide lots of opportunity for active participation by attendees with questions, answers and discussions to promote interactive learning amongst colleagues. 8:30 am–9:30 am
Administration & Management (AMSIS) CC 207 Budget Friendly Marketing Success
Facilitator: Jane Yousey, OTR/L, ACC In today’s challenging business economy, private practice and small business owners depend on affordable, effective marketing strategies. This BUZZ session will introduce participants to creative marketing strategies with opportunities to share best practice marketing ideas.

10:00 am–11:00 am
Developmental Disabilities (DDSIS) CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 Innovative Practices for Social Inclusion in Community Activities
Facilitator: Roger Ideishi, JD, OT, FAOTA This interactive session will describe innovative practices to promote community participation at airports, theaters, and museums with an emphasis on developing resources to support a socially-inclusive practice. Group discussion will facilitate problem solving and action planning for the future.

Home & Community Health (HCHSIS) CC 207 The Documentation Game— How Are You Documenting Home Health Occupational Therapy To Meet the New Guidelines From Medicare and Using the OT Practice Framework?
Facilitator: Donna Flowers, OTR, Amedisys Home Health Care, Dallas, TX This interactive session will clearly define new Medicare documentation requirements, facilitate discussion on how to incorporate the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework into documentation, allow OT practitioners to share successful documentation tips, and ensure attendees understand what is required to meet the new Medicare requirements.

Sensory Integration (SISIS) CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 Beyond the Sensory Diet— Strategies To Promote Community and Home Participation for Children
Facilitator: Stacey Szklut, MS, OTR/L A facilitated discussion among participants of advanced intervention strategies on sensory processing issues, with focus on assisting practitioners in developing effective treatment plans and strategies that will encourage a child’s successful participation at home and in the community.

Education (EDSIS) CC 101-102 Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Occupational Therapy
Facilitator: Mark Johnston, PhD Participants will learn tools and strategies for improving student engagement in and learning of evidence-based practice methods. After a brief overview presentation, participants will discuss and share learning objectives, content, effective strategies, resources, assignments, and teaching modules.

Gerontoloy (GSIS) CC 205-206 Uncovering Sleep Disturbances in Elders
Facilitator: Meryl Marger Picard, MSW, OTR This brainstorming session “uncovers” the topic of sleep in elders. We will share information and discuss changes in sleep that affects older adults, as well as screening options, assessment and referral, practical interventions, awareness of key drug interactions, and the impact of environment on sleep dysfunction.

Mental Health (MHSIS) CC 101-102 Fieldwork, Practice and Reimbursement Patterns in Mental Health OT Practice
Facilitator: Tina Champagne, OTD, OTR/L, Occupational therapy began with a specific role in mental health practice. Recent pilot studies have been conducted to explore mental health fieldwork, education, practice, and reimbursement patterns. This session will review study results to inform and facilitate discussion on the implications for future growth in mental health occupational therapy.

Work & Industry (WISIS) CC 205-206 Occupational Therapy and Ergonomics—Exploring What OTs in All Practice Areas Need To Know and the Pathway Towards Becoming an Ergonomics Expert
Facilitator: Denise Finch, OTD, OTR/L, CHT, CCM Ergonomics continues to be an area of growth for occupational therapy. OTs skilled in ergonomics can positively impact consumers in a variety of environments and practice settings. However, there is a need to further identify learning opportunities and pathways to help guide OTs towards advanced expertise in ergonomics. This interactive session will explore the scope of the field of ergonomics and discuss the available opportunities for OTs to advance their ergonomic knowledge and gain recognition for their expertise. Current continuing education opportunities and ergonomic certification resources will be provided for review and discussion.

Early Intervention & School (EISSIS) CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Managing and Surviving the Workday—Caseload Versus Workload Models of Service Delivery
Facilitator: Laurette Olson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA An overview of caseload vs. workload approach for an effective professional practice in schools will be provided. The majority of the session will be an interactive discussion in which OTs will explore how to manage current practice demands within a caseload vs. workload model of service provision.

Physical Disabilities (PDSIS) CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Measuring and Managing Productivity in Acute Care Settings
Facilitator: Brent Braveman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA This buzz session will explore productivity in acute medical settings. Participants will discuss and share strategies to establish targets for provision of billable and non-billable services. Approaches to measuring productivity, identifying potential root causes for lowered productivity, and general approaches to improving efficiency will be explored.

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9:30 am–11:00 am SC 308 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 Practicalities and Perks of Establishing a Family-Centered Private Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth DeLana Honaker, PhD, OTR, www. PracticeOrganizer.com, Amarillo, TX; Stacy Rosello, MA, OTR/L, Embrace the Child, LTD, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Introductory This course addresses the practicalities of starting a private practice and specifically delves into the practicalities of family-centered services. Strategies to deal with building practice will be presented as will strategies to facilitate the familychild-therapist relationship, creating or re-engaging in family occupations and interventions.

TeCh DAY I
9:30 am–11:00 am CC 500 Ballroom Sponsored by Touro University Nevada; Quinnipiac University For details see page 73.

sIs BuZZ sessIOns
10:00 am–11:00 am For details see page 72.

GenerAl sessIOn
Plenary Session 11:15 am–12:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG For details see page 11.

pOsTer sessIOn #5
10:00 am–12:00 noon CC Exhibit Halls BCDE Sponsored by EBS Healthcare For details see page 81.

TECH DAY I

9:30 am–11:00 am
TD 300 An Overview of Telehealth and Telehealth Technologies Within Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Jana Cason, DHS, OTR/L, Spalding University, Louisville, KY; Kim Hartmann, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT; Tammy Richmond, MS, OTR/L, Ultimate Rehab, LLC, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory This presentation will provide an overview of telehealth and its application in occupational therapy. Participants will examine telehealth technologies including videoconferencing devices and home monitoring systems. Telehealth research and barriers to clinical use (reimbursement, infrastructure, licensure portability) will be discussed.

CC 500 Ballroom
Level: Introductory The goal of computer therapy is to provide exceptional therapy services to all clients, regardless of their mobility status. Computer-based therapy offers innovative tools to improve strength, coordination, and cognition. Participants will have the opportunity for hands-on interaction and demonstration with a mobile computer-therapy cart.

TD 305 Magnets and Switches
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mary Hager, MA, OTR/L, FAOTA, Kanawha County Schools, Cross Lanes, WV Level: Introductory This presentation will demonstrate how low-tech devices can help our students be an integral part of the classroom. Innovative ideas for combining science experiments with switch activation will be explored.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 309 CC 120-121 Quick Tips®: A Data Recording System To Develop SensoryBased Strategies and Measure Effectiveness Following use of the Sensory Processing Measures
Content Focus: Children & Youth Diana Henry, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, Henry OT Services, Inc., Glendale, AZ Contributing Author: David Herzberg, PhD Level: Intermediate Case studies using Quick Tips® (a color-coded navigation tool based on items from the Sensory Processing Measures) highlight an innovative approach, guiding teams to generate sensory-based strategies and leading to evidence-based progress monitoring via a data recording system.

TD 303 Interfacing Electronic Aides for Daily Living (EADL) With Power Wheelchair Electronics To Access Devices Via Various Drive Control Systems
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Robin Tacker, MS, OTR/L, ATP, ATECH Services, Concord, NH; John Doherty, OTR/L, ATP, Pride Mobility, Exeter, PA Level: Intermediate Enabling clients with disabilities who use power wheelchairs for mobility to access assistive technology promotes independence and supports occupational performance. This presentation provides participants hands-on experience in interfacing wheelchair electronics with various assistive technologies.

TD 306 Innovative Web 2.0 Tools: Application to Rehabilitation Practice
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Julie Gahimer, PT, HSD; Elizabeth Kiggins, both of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory With the explosion of online tools, practitioners have an opportunity to use Web 2.0 resources to engage clients. Practitioners can transform their practice into more authentic and collaborative experiences. This course will describe how practitioners can enhance their practice with Web 2.0 applications.

TD 301 Simple Every Day Assistive Technologies for the Office Worker
Content Focus: Work & Industry Leonard Trujillo, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Intermediate Assistive technologies strategies and accommodations for the office worker can often be implemented without significant cost to the employer, while producing successful outcomes for the challenged worker. Software and hardware devices will be reviewed in conjunction with possible intervention strategies.

9:30 am–11:00 am SC 310 CC 203-204 Qi Gong as a Complementary Approach to Occupational Therapy: A Case Study Demonstrating Innovative Practice in the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Kurt Hubbard, OTR/L; Philippe Bourgoing, OTD, OTR/L, both of University of St. Augustine, St. Augustine, FL Level: Intermediate This case study demonstrated that Qi Gong may be a relevant technique for the treatment and evaluation in individuals diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Incorporating Qi Gong exercises may be an innovative approach to promote evidencebased practice among occupational therapists.

TD 304 Sensory Processing Parent/ Family Education: Reusable Learning Object Prototypes
Content Focus: Children & Youth Bryan Gee, OTD, OTR/L, BCP, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID Level: Introductory This session will provide occupational therapy educators and practitioners with an overview of reusable learning objects (RLOs) and will provide exposure to sensory processingbased prototypes of family/caregiver education-based RLOs delivered in a stand alone, electronic format using the Internet, Microsoft Power Point, Articulate, and Adobe Flash.

TD 307 Lifelong Driver: Technology to Prolong Driving Among Older Adults
Content Focus: General & Professional Wendy B. Stav, PhD, OTR/L, SCDCM, FAOTA, Towson University, Towson, MD Level: Introduction Lifelong Driver is an innovative training program designed to help older adults improve driving skills and extend safe mobility. This evidence-based program uses simulated driving exercises to improve skills known to be problematic for older drivers. This session will allow attendees to experience the program and understand the benefits for older clients.

TD 302 Mobile Computer Therapy Carts: Exploring Client Roles, Maximizing Goals
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Douglas Rakoski, MA, OTR/L, ATP; Amanda Carr, OTR/L, ATP, both of University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI

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TECH DAY II
1:30 pm–3:00 pm
TD 310 Integrating “Clicker” Technology Into Clinical Health Science Programs
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Kate DeCleene, OTD, OTR; Jennifer Radloff, MHS, OTR; Linda Biggers, PT, MHS, CLT, all of University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Level: Introductory Classroom Response Systems (CRS) are technological tools that can be used to measure student learning and faculty effectiveness. This session provides samples and demonstrations applying CRS to measure achievement of classroom objectives applied to accreditation and results collected from surveying students’ perceptions will be available.

GenerAl sessIOn CC 500 Ballroom
TD 313 Incremental Universal Design - Making Progress Toward Accessibility and Universal Design in Measurable Steps
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Aura Hirschman, MS, CRC, CDMS; Roger Smith, PhD, OT, FAOTA, RESNA Fellow, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI Contributing Author: Denis K. Anson, MS, OT Level: Intermediate “Incremental Universal Design” acknowledges that achieving campus accessibility is a progression from providing individualized accommodations to designing to meet the accessibility needs of all people. A tool is demonstrated for measuring universal design progress in a learning environment.

TD 316 Beyond YouTube: Innovative Strategies for Selecting Online Video to Create Case Studies and Other Powerful Learning Activities
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Jan Davis, MS, OTR/L, International Clinical Educators, Inc., Port Townsend, WA Level: Intermediate Tired of looking on YouTube for videos to use in your classroom? Learn how to find dynamic content-relevant videos in online learning repositories and engage your students with exciting new technology that can be also be used with smartphones and iPads.

AOTA’s 92nd Annual Business Meeting 12:15 pm–1:15 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG For details see page 12.

pOsTer sessIOn #6
12:30 pm–2:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE Sponsored by EBS Healthcare For details see page 84.

TeCh DAY II
1:30 pm–3:00 pm CC 500 Ballroom Sponsored by Touro University Nevada; Quinnipiac University For details see page 74. 1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 311 CC 101-102 (AOTA) Everyday Ethics: Moral Distress--Cultural, Ethical and Spiritual Issues in the Workplace
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Lea Brandt, OTD, OTR/L, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO; Barbara Hemphill, DMin, OTR, FAOTA, FMOTA, Kalamazoo, MI Level: Intermediate This case-based session addresses clinical issues causing moral distress in practitioners. Productivity, reimbursement-driven ethical challenges, professional boundaries related to religious/spiritual values and cultural differences and their impact on practice will be discussed through a highly interactive dialogue with participants.

TD 311 Diagnostic Ultrasonography: A Clinical Tool for Occupational Therapists
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Shawn Roll, PhD, OTR/L, CWCE, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Intermediate Technology to visualize morphology/ entrapments can assist remediation/ prevention of injury. Participants will be oriented to upper extremity anatomy via a demonstration of hand-carried diagnostic ultrasonography. Hands-on scanning will be provided and participants will discuss the innovative use of this technology to improve efficacy and to document outcomes.

TD 314 Therapals.com: An Extraordinary Network for Exceptional Children
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mollie Verdier, COTA/L, Ohio Occupational Therapy Association, Sidney, OH Level: Introductory Therapals.com is an online social community and therapeutic activity center. Users search for friends, resources, and video-based activities. It is a communication hub and a bridge to reach and teach clients who are unable to receive traditional interventions due to health issues, geographical barriers, economics, or social emotional disorders.

TD 317 High-Fidelity Patient Simulation: A Tool for Developing Critical Reasoning
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Chi-Kwan Shea, PhD, OTR/L; Robyn Wu, OTD, OTR/L, BCP, both of Samuel Merritt University, Oakland, CA Level: Intermediate High fidelity simulations (HFS) are utilized in medical education to train physicians and nurses to acquire critical clinical skills; however, its use in OT education is not well documented. This short session introduces HFS as an effective education tool used by an OT program in augmenting students’ learning and acquisition of critical reasoning skills.

TD 312 Exploring Second Life®: A Second World for Clients and Clinicians To Explore
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Frankie Chan, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Contributing Author: Anita Hamilton, MScOT, OT(C) Level: Introductory Second Life® users who access information, engage with others with similar experiences and join support groups report an improved sense of well-being and empowerment. During this presentation audience members will be shown how to access and use Second Life® as a tool for occupational therapy.

TD 315 Combining High and Low Technologies to Create Effective Social Stories
Content Focus: Children & Youth Judy Hopkins, OTR/L, SWC, CLE; Briana Hamill Pollard, OTR/L, OTD, CIMI; Kristine Tanita, MA, OTR/L, SWC, all of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory Social stories are an effective tool to educate and prepare children for occupational engagement. This course will discuss how the use of low and high tech interventions can complement each other in order to prepare children to engage in undesirable occupations.

TD 318 Expanding the Classroom Experience via SKYPE
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Karen Ann Cameron, OTD, OTR/L, Alvernia College, Reading, PA; Erik Johnson, CPT, MS, OTR/L, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD Level: Introductory Technologically-wired Millenial students are expecting active integration of technology within the academic experience. This presentation will demonstrate how faculty members can easily integrate Skype into the learning environment and will provide examples of how learning experiences that transcend time and distance without expense can be created.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 312 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 (AOTA) Medicare Home Health Policy and Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Ralph Kohl, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Karen Vance, OTR, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO; Carol Siebert, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, The Home Remedy, Chapel Hill, NC Level: Intermediate This session will focus on AOTA’s efforts to make occupational therapy a full initiating service in Medicare home health, covering the background and history of the issue. The session will also focus on regulatory activities and current occupational therapy practice in Medicare home health and how AOTA’s efforts would impact the profession.

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1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 313 CC 107-108 (AOTA) Funding Opportunities at the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR): Getting to Know the Programs
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Pimjai Sudsawad, ScD, OT, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), Washington, DC; Susan Lin, ScD, OTR/L, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Intermediate During this session, an overview will be provided on NIDRR’s mission, organizational structure, strategic focuses, and the research areas of interest. NIDRR’s funding programs and mechanisms, and its application preparation process will also be discussed. In addition, a previously published priority, notice inviting application, and application package will be reviewed and important information highlighted and discussed. conference themes and international collaborations. This course will elaborate on the hazards and triumphs of electronic record implementation at two large academic medical centers. The speakers will attempt to prepare you for electronic documentation by offering pre and post implementation strategies to make the execution of your computerized documentation program go as smoothly as possible.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 316 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 (SIS) AMSIS Annual Program: Preserving Occupational Therapy Services in an Accountable Care Organization (ACO)
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Christine Kroll, MS, OTR/L, Healthcare Therapy Services, Inc., Greenwood, IN; Sharon Kurfuerst, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Center for Rehabilitation at Wilmington Hospital, Wilmington, DE Level: Intermediate Discuss the salient components of the ACO initiative, as well as identify potential roles and new ways of practicing as presenters demonstrate OT’s contributions to health promotion, maintaining wellness, reducing disability, and promoting independence. The Administration and Management Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the last 20 minutes of this session.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 322 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 Meeting Society’s Needs in Emergency Preparedness: An Evidence-Based Program for Safely Handling Persons With Disabilities in a Disaster
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Pamela Kasyan-Itzkowitz, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale FL; Barbara Kornblau, JD, OTR/L, FAOTA, DAAPM, ABDA, CCM, CDMS, University of MichiganFlint, Flint, MI Level: Intermediate This hands-on Short Course features OT’s role in a grant-funded training program for emergency shelter workers. Attendees participate in evidence-based safe handling under crisis conditions using found items, and learn tips to teach first responders to meet the needs of persons with disabilities.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 319 CC 203-204 Race, Ethnicity, and Health Disparities: Occupational Therapy’s Role in the EverChanging Health Care Environment
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Carly Thom, MA, OTR, Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Level: Introductory Occupational therapy’s responsibility in reducing health disparities is often overlooked. This session provides insight on disparities and how they affect occupational therapy intervention. This knowledge is vital to providing client-centered care.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 314 CC 103-104 (AOTA) State Legislative and Regulatory Forum: Trends, Scope of Practice, Autism, and Health Care Reform
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Marcy Buckner, JD, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Introductory State regulation of occupational therapy, health care reform, states’ mandates of autism coverage--state legislatures are debating these issues. How will it affect you and the profession? Come learn about the trends in state legislation and regulatory policy and how you can be an effective advocate.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 323 CC Sagamore Ballroom 4 From Origin to Insertion: Army Occupational Therapy’s “Muscle” in Behavioral Health
Content Focus: Mental Health Carol Haertlein Sells, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Milwaukee, WI; Laura Suttinger, MS, OTR, Fort Therapy and Sport Center, Fort Atkinson, WI; Florie Gonzales, Jr., MJR DSc, OTR/L, CHT, US Army-Academy of Health Sciences, Fort Sam Houston, TX Level: Introductory Occupational Therapy roots in the military have evolved into diverse applications with emphases on behavioral health in the deployed environment and complex poly-trauma in military medical settings. Army OTs will share experiences as soldiers and health care providers along the spectrum of deployment, focusing on mental health.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 317 CC 122 (SIS) WISIS Annual Program: OTs Advancing the Field of Ergonomics
Content Focus: Work & Industry Naomi Abrams, OTD, OTR/L, CEAS, Worksite Health and Safety Consultants, Rockville, MD; Holly Ehrenfried, OTR/L, CHT, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, PA Level: Advanced OTs are not engineers--and we don’t want to be. What OT brings to work and industry goes beyond measuring angles and recommending handle shapes. This session will discuss Occupational Therapists’ unique skill set in this amorphous field and our roles that take us well beyond the confines of “work and industry.” The Work and Industry Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 15 minutes of this session.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 320 CC Sagamore Ballroom 6 Using Client Strengths to Build Resilience and Enhance Occupational Performance
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Courtney Sasse, MAEdL, OTR/L; Marjorie Scaffa, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL Level: Introductory Integrating client strengths into OT evaluation and intervention can improve outcomes. Attention to strengths is precursory to building resilience. This session presents practitioners with strategies to elicit positive strengths-based changes that encourage engagement in meaningful occupations.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 315 CC 109-110 (AOTA) World Federation of Occupational Therapists: Update on Activities and Collaborations
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Susan Coppola, MS, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, University of North CarolinaChapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Anne Jenkins, EDM, OTR/L, WinstonSalem State University, WinstonSalem, NC Level: Intermediate Advancement of science, innovation, and evidence in OT is now international in scope. We will present information developed for the World Federation of OT Council Meeting in Taiwan in March 2012, relevant to

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 321 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 Assistive Technology and Home Modifications: A Perfect Match
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Debra Young, MEd, OTR/L, SCEM, ATP, CAPS, EmpowerAbility®, LLC, Newark, DE; Marnie Renda, MEd OTR/L, CAPS, ECHM, Destination Home LLC, Cincinnati, OH Level: Intermediate Practitioners have an expanding role helping elders and persons with disabilities live at home. Through the combination of assistive technology (AT) and environmental modifications, the occupational needs of our client are met. This course includes a review of design principles, AT, and funding.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 324 CC 120-121 Using Innovative Handwriting Readiness Programs in PreSchool Settings: Exploring the Programs and the Evidence
Content Focus: Children & Youth Denise Donica, DHS, OTR/L, BCP; Brittni Mattocks; Amy Goins; Leslie Wagner, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory The explanation of two structured handwriting readiness programs (Handwriting Without Tears Get Set For School and the Fine Motor and Early Writing Pre-K Curriculum) will be discussed and the benefits these programs bring to the Head Start Pre-K setting. A detailed ac-

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 318 CC Sagamore Ballroom 2 Hazards, Pitfalls, and the Occasional Triumph: Implementing an EMR in a Large Teaching Hospital
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Carol Clerico, OT/L, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA; Norma Greenberg, OTR/L, CPHQ, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Palo Alto, CA Level: Intermediate

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count of the implementation and execution of each program will be presented.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 325 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 Pinch by Pinch Part II: Moving Beyond Pinch and Grasp-Developing Executive Function in RtI Groups and Using Technology for Collaboration
Content Focus: Children & Youth Michelle Brown, MOT, OTR/L, BCP, Worcester Public Schools, Worcester, MA; Susan Guertin, OTR/L, RYT, Tantasqua Regional School District, Sturbridge, MA Level: Introductory RtI is an emerging role for OT. This hands-on session will use mindful awareness practices, vision strategies and cognitive shift to develop Executive Function skills in the K-4 classroom. Presenters will demonstrate data forms to monitor progress and participation, and the use of classroom web site or Trackstar to enhance collaboration with home and school.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 329 CC 127-128 Uses of Technology To Empower Clients and Promote Independence by Increasing Participation in the Overall Rehabilitation Program
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Lynn Gitlow, PhD, OTR/L, ATP, TEC, Winterport, ME; Douglas Rakoski, MA, OTR/L, ATP, Amanda Carr, OTR/L, ATP, both of University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI Level: Introductory In this session participants will learn how technology can be used to increase occupational performance during treatment sessions, during goal obtainment, to enhance meaningful activities. Case studies and occupational analysis will be used to provide participants with hands on learning. Outcomes for program development will be discussed.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 331 CC 125-126 Neuroplasticity in the Clinic: Utilizing Evidence To Maximize Participation in Occupation for Individuals With Stroke
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Christine Griffin, MS, OTR/L, BCPR, The Ohio State University Medical Center-Dodd Hall, Columbus, OH Level: Intermediate Utilizing neuroplasticity is supported through evidence to increase function in individuals with stroke. Discussion will include application of neuroplasticity techniques such as repetitive practice, functional NMES, bilateral training, constraint induced movement therapy, and mental practice.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm TA 300 CC 205-206 (AOTA) Talk About: The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Debbie Amini, EdD, OTR/L, CHT, C/NDT, Cape Fear Community College, Wilmington, NC; Donna Colaianni, PhD, OTR/L, CHT, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; Pei-Fen Chang, PhD, OTR/L, Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX; Lisa Mahaffey, MS, OTR/L, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL; Michael Urban, MS, OTR/L, MBA, CWCE, CEAS, VA Healthcare System, West Haven, CT Level: Intermediate The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process is in the preliminary stages of the 5-year review process. As an integral part of that process, the Commission on Practice (COP) is seeking feedback and suggestions that will be used to inform possible updates and revisions to the third edition. This 90-minute Talk About session will provide an opportunity for exchange of ideas with members of the COP and conference attendees in an open forum format.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 326 CC 105-106 The Power of Play and Playfulness
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jennifer Nash, MOT, OTR/L, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Level: Introductory Given the development significance of play, pediatric OTs need a working knowledge of play from a family-centered perspective. Supporting parent/ caregiver-child interactions directly impact the quality of children’s play and how they acquire skills through play.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 330 CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Occupation-Based Practice in the Acute Care Setting: Oxymoron or Opportunity?
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Cathy Dolhi, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jodi Schreiber, MS, OTR/L, both of Chatham University, Pittsburgh, PA; Denise Chisholm, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburg, PA Level: Introductory Acute care practitioners are challenged to use an occupation-based approach. This session offers evidence and strategies that will help practitioners provide occupationbased evaluation and intervention that will enhance patient outcomes and contribute to distinguishing the role of occupational therapy in acute care.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 332 CC 201-202 Developing an Interdisciplinary Student-Run Free Clinic at an Urban University
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Nancy Vandewiele Milligan, PhD, OTR/L; Gerry Conti, PhD, OTR/L; Susan Talley, DPT, PT; Martha Schiller, DPT, PT, all of Wayne State University, Ann Arbor, MI Level: Intermediate This presentation will describe the development of an inter-professional student-run free clinic at an urban university. Faculty from the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Wayne State University will discuss and share their experiences in the collaborative process of developing the Diabetes Education Wellness (DEW) Clinic

TeCh DAY III
3:30 pm–5:00 pm CC 500 Ballroom Sponsored by Touro University Nevada; Quinnipiac University For details see page 77. 3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 334 CC 122 (AOTA) OTA Forum: Empowering the OTA/OT Partnership for Optimal Service Delivery and Appropriate Client Reimbursement Outcomes in a Time of Reform
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Teri Black, COTA, ROH, Aegis, Madison, WI; Michele Luther-Krug, COTA/L, SCADCM, CDRS, ROH, Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA; Mary Ellen East, MS, COTA/L, ROH, Baker College, East Pointe, MI; Mashelle Painter, COTA/L, Northwest Regional Education District, Hillsboro, OR; Marcy Buckner, JD; Jennifer Hitchon, JD; Jennifer Bogenrief, JD, all of American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD Level: Intermediate The 2012 OTA Forum will address current issues related to healthcare reimbursement and the role of the

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 327 CC 123-124 Autism: It’s a Brain Thing!
Content Focus: Children & Youth Gretchen Reeves, PhD, OT/L, FAOTA, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI Level: Intermediate This Short Course is an overview of central nervous system anomalies in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) impacting performance and behavior in social, emotional, cognitive, sensory and motor domains. Variations in brain cell structure and function in many regions of the brain in ASD are described.

1:45 pm–3:15 pm SC 333 CC 207 Creating Evidence-Based Practitioners: Incorporating Evidence-Based Practice Into an Occupational Therapy Assistant Curriculum
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Patti Calk, OTD, MEd, LOTR; Carolyn Murphy, OTD, LOTR, both of University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA Contributing Author: Elysa Roberts, PhD, OTR/L Level: Intermediate The purpose of this session is to describe instructional methods and explore active teaching strategies used in educating occupational therapy assistant students to apply evidence-based practice to clinical practice through Level I fieldwork experiences and problem-based learning.

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OTA/OT partnership in meeting consumer needs through a better understanding of guidelines for practice and reimbursement.

TECH DAY III
3:30 pm-5:00 pm
TD 320 Infusing Website Development Into Academics and Fieldwork Coordination
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education David Merlo, MS, COTA, CPRP, Erie Community College, Clarence Center, NY Level: Intermediate With easy-to-use website development technology, anyone with even limited computer competence can create a website within minutes. Learn how one educator/fieldwork coordinator applies no/low cost website development technology to service-learning, community intervention, and fieldwork educator support and communication.

CC 500 Ballroom
TD 323 eReaders: Features That Support Cognitive, Sensory, and Physical Dysfunction
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Tricia Peters, OTR, ATP, Region 4 Education Service Center, Houston, TX Contributing Author: Hindie Becker Dershowitz, MEd Level: Intermediate Discover eReader features that support clients with cognitive, sensory, and physical dysfunction. View many eReader options including off-themarket devices, iPad, and computer eReader software. Learn about features including annotations, text-to-speech, speaking dictionaries, and alternative access. Supports for the blind are not discussed.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 335 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 (AOTA) School based transitions: Research to Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Karen Summers; Doris Pierce, both of Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY; Linda Rudd, Peoria Unified School District, Peoria, AZ; Sandra Schefkind, MS, OTR/L, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Heather Jackson-Pena, MOT, OTR/L, ETS, New View, Rockville, MD Level: Intermediate Panel of researchers and practitioners will discuss preliminary findings from a participatory action research study and its impact to school based practice. Tools and actions steps to support local school practitioners are reviewed.

TD 326 Access for All: Easy to HighTech Environmental Aids to Daily Living
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Mary Sagtetter; Tom Nikola, Environmental Control Specialist, AbleNet, Roseville, MN Level: Introductory The Access for All session will illustrate the spectrum and functionality of environmental aids to daily living solutions available in today’s market. Session attendees will learn how the right environmental control unit can deliver independence and interaction at any skill level.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 336 CC 201-202 (AOTA) Doing, Being, and Becoming a Scientist
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Susan Lin, ScD, OTR/L, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Kenneth Ottenbacher, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Timothy Reistetter, PhD, OTR, both of University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX; Stacey Reynolds, PhD, OTR/L, College of Public Health and Health Professions, Gainesville, FL; Mary Ellen Stoykov, PhD, OTR/L, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; Timothy Wolf, OTD, OTR/L, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate To achieve the Centennial Vision, we need to increase the research capacity in occupational therapy and recruit more scientists. This session highlights the work of OT K12 scholars using a 5/5 format (5 slides in 5 minutes) to demonstrate the wide range of research being conducted by promising scientists, followed by a discussion period.

TD 321 Enhancing Student Participation (for no money) Through the Use of Personal/ Mobile Devices in School: A Win-Win Solution
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jan Hollenbeck, OTD, OTR/L, Medford Public Schools, Medford, MA Level: Intermediate The use of smartphones, laptops, and tablets is pervasive. Discover how, through the use of free and readily available apps and tools in conjunction with personal/mobile devices, students can achieve a costfree method of access, engagement, and independence for successful school participation.

TD 324 PDAs and Tablets as Cognitive-Behavioral Assistive Technologies
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Tony Gentry, PhD, OTR/L, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Level: Introductory Display will include iPads, Android tablets, iPod Touch and other devices loaded with applications appropriate for cognitive-behavioral OT, with discussion of assessment/treatment strategies. App catalog provided.

TD 327 Tots on Bots: Comparison of Two Controls for a Robotic Infant Mobility Device
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Carole Dennis, ScD, OT; Sharon Stansfield, PhD; Hélène Larin, PhD, PT; Jill Cater-Cyker; Molly Osterhoudt; Monica Puglisi; Rachel Smith, all of Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY Level: Introductory Goal-directed movements of infants on a mobile robot were compared using two different control systems: a reversed joystick and a balance board (controlled by infant leaning). Results will provide new information about infant capability that should help therapists make decisions about powered mobility for very young children with disabilities.

TD 322 Low Tech Works: Adaptive Projects for the Community
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jayne Shepherd, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Level: Introductory Occupational therapy students learn how to use low tech adaptations when they develop adaptive projects for community stakeholders. Examples of the process for developing, designing, and evaluating the effectiveness of sample adaptive projects for individual clients, schools, hospitals, and long-term care facilities will be presented.

TD 325 Occupational Therapy and the Wii®ssential Guide to Emerging Technology
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Erik Johnson, CPT, MS, OTR/L, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD Level: Introductory This session will explore application of emerging technology for patients across the lifespan to include uses of the Nintendo Wii, Xbox 360, iPads and smartphones, the Biometrics E-Link System, and virtual reality. Presenters will identify how Army OTs are using these technologies to treat wounded soldiers in upper extremity ortho, mTBI, and Behavioral Health.

TD 328 Facilitating Recovery After Stroke: Traditional Methods Meet Technologically Innovative Interventions
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Douglas Rakoski, MA, OTR/L, ATP; Robert Ferguson, OTR/L; Amanda Carr, OTR/L, ATP, all of University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI Level: Introductory Computer-based therapy offers innovative tools to improve strength, coordination, and cognition. Utilization of a novel computer therapy lab for neuromuscular facilitation and re-education techniques can enhance occupation-based treatment. Participants will learn how to grade and document computer tasks in terms of functional outcomes.

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sTuDenT OnlY sessIOn
3:45 pm–4:45 pm SC 337 Sagamore Ballroom 4 (AOTA) Realities and Myths of the OTR® Examination
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Lisa Johnson, MS, OTR/L, National Board of Occupational Therapy, Gaithersburg, MD Level: Introductory What can you do to prepare for the NBCOT certification examination? Everything is spelled out in one concise session, from the examination blueprint to examination preparation tools and tips. Learn realities and myths about how the OTR examination is constructed and administered. The session will include an overview of the format of the examination illustrated with practice items.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 340 CC 101-102 Innovation in Mental Health Fieldwork: Linking Research, Education, and Practice
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Roseanna Tufano, LMFT, OTR/L; Barbara Nadeau, MA, OTR/L, CBIST, both of Quinnipiac University, North Haven, CT; Sean Getty, MS, OTR/L, Central Nassau Guidance & Counseling Services, Nassau, NY Level: Introductory AOTA promotes mental health practice as an emerging area for future professional development. This course describes an innovative, Level II fieldwork experience that takes place in a community mental health setting and allows students to effectively integrate educational, research, and practice skills that will meet the needs of the 21st century.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 343 CC 123-124 Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI), Stigma, and the Military Service Member: Using Patient Education To Increase Self-Efficacy in the mTBI/ Occupational Therapy Setting
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Bronwyn Pughe, MA; Susan Powell, OTR/L, ATP, both of Traumatic Brain Injury Program, Tacoma, WA Level: Introductory The OT advances his/her roles as educator and builder of self-efficacy in the care of a military member and family after mTBI. Complicating these roles are stigma linked with invisible wounds, within the military culture and without. OTs learn the cultural construction of stigma as a barrier to care and its reduction to improve outcomes for mTBI clients.

Learned helplessness is a form of depression that affects our patients/ caregivers. It should be a major focus of the evaluation. The session begins with an introduction to learned helplessness. Afterwards, we will discuss case examples outlining evidenced-based assessment tools and treatment planning under the outpatient homecare model.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 347 CC 125-126 Quality of Life in Families With Transition Age Young Adults on the Autism Spectrum
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Barbara Demchick, MS, OTR/L; Karen Eskow, PhD, OTR/L, both of Towson University, Towson, MD Level: Intermediate This course examines family quality of life (FQoL)in families with young adult children with autism spectrum disorder and looks at how roles and occupations of family members are influenced by having an adult child with autism. Occupational balance, occupational engagement, and occupational justice are discussed, as is the role of occupational therapy in examining FQoL.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 338 CC 120-121 OT’s Unique Place In an Inclusive Setting for Children With Autism: The ASD Nest Program
Content Focus: Children & Youth Christene Maas, MA, OTR/L; Dora Sarkodie, MS, OTR/L, both of NYC Department of Education, Brooklyn, NY; Kristie Koenig, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, New York University, New York, NY Contributing Author: Dorothy Siegel, MPH Level: Intermediate The ASD Nest Program is an inclusive public elementary school program that provides a therapeutic environment using a trans-disciplinary team of therapists and educators. Sensory strategies embedded in the classroom are a key part of the program. A model to address sensory processing and self-regulation needs in the inclusive class will be presented.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 341 CC 107-108 Research Enhancing Student Education, Program Development, and Clinical Practice: Sexuality as an Overlooked ADL in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Marissa Dastice, MOT, OTR/L; Emily Simpson, MS, OTR/L, both of Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL Level: Introductory This course describes the evolution of a program to address sexuality in practice, and also demonstrates the link between student participation in research and program development as it results in commitment to evidence-based practice. This research resulted in a juried presentation and development of a program that meets a vital need in practice.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 344 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 The Science of Treating Individuals in Chronic Pain
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Cynthia Hayden, DHEd, OTR/L, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY Level: Introductory This presentation will identify types of chronic pain, common symptoms, and the risk factors associated with this condition. The brain’s response to pain, typical medications, and OT treatment will be reviewed.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 348 CC Sagamore Ballroom 3 Vision and Falls: Screening and Intervention Strategies for Nursing Home Residents
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jennifer Kaldenberg, MSA, OTR/L, SCLV, FAOTA, New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA; Natalie Leland, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory This session will highlight the prevalence of vision impairment among nursing home residents and will discuss the current evidence-based practice approaches for addressing falls and vision impairment among this population to promote occupational performance and address fall risk.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 345 CC 109-110 Research? Yes You Can!
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Amber Ward, MS, OTR/L, BCPR, ATP, Carolinas Health Care, Charlotte, NC Level: Introductory This session will focus on how to complete research with even a single patient, and will use lecture and discussion to show therapists how they can incorporate small research designs into daily practice and build confidence in their ability to do so. Encouraging more therapists to perform research will continue to advance the field of OT.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 339 CC 207 Introduction to Infant Mental Health
Content Focus: Children & Youth Jennifer Nash, MOT, OTR/L, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Contributing Author: Tracy Jirikowic, PhD, OTR/L Level: Introductory Bonding with children with disabilities is challenging. Given the developmental significance of parent-child attachment, pediatric OTs working with young children with disabilities and their families need a working knowledge of attachment and ways to facilitate parent-infant bonds.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 342 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 Assessing Safety and Accessibility in Communities and Getting Changes Made
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Mary Ellen Daniel, MSA, OTR/L, CLVT, CAPS; Lori Adamek, OTR/L, CLVT, both of Henry Ford Health System, Livonia, MI Level: Introductory When public settings do not accommodate persons with vision loss, it places them at a higher risk for social isolation, falls, injuries, depression and dependence. Learn how to perform an environmental assessment, make recommendations, and educate decision makers and staff on strategies for enhancing safety and participation in community settings.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 349 CC 127-128 Brief Cognitive Screening Tools for the Everyday Practitioner
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Pamela Story, OTD, OTR/L, CPAM, Long Ridge of Stamford, Stamford, CT Level: Introductory Cognition impacts every client’s engagement in their daily lives. Evidence-based cognitive screening tools are a time- and cost-efficient method to address this vital client factor. This session introduces

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 346 CC 105-106 Treating Learned Helplessness: “Thinking Outside the Front Door”--An Outpatient Homecare Perspective
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation James Cino, OTR, Adaptive Home Therapy, Inc., Toms River, NJ Level: Introductory

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several brief cognitive screening tools for critical analysis and utility to everyday practice.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 350 CC Sagamore Ballroom 1 Evidence for Creativity in Occupational Therapy Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Tina Fletcher, OTR, EdD; Mary Baxter, PhD, OT, both of Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Level: Intermediate Creativity is a rapidly expanding research area. New understandings from neuroscience and behavioral studies offer evidence-based strategies for enhancing occupational therapists’ creativity in the workplace. Creative occupational therapists experience less burnout, more successful problem solving, and improved patient outcomes.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 353 CC Sagamore Ballroom 7 Can you Hear and Understand Me Now?: The Use of Technology To Enhance Interpreter Services in Therapy
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kari Tanta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Melinda Glass, OTR/L, both of Valley Medical Center, Renton, WA Level: Intermediate This technology-driven, evidencebased session will showcase identified best practices and evidencemodels of interpreter services for the 1 in 5 patients/families with limited English proficiency (LEP) currently in the United States health care system.

Kathleen Weissberg, EnduraCare Therapy Management, Inc., Milford, DE Level: Introductory OT plays a key role in developing facility programs to meet state survey requirements and resident need. This session demonstrates a 4-step process to establish programs in long-term care. Participants are offered strategies to prioritize programs, identify facility needs, communicate with nursing, identify appropriate residents and gauge success of programs.

share brief examples of its application within OT practice settings along with current research. Barriers towards utilization and considerations associated with licensure, reimbursement, and standards of care will be discussed.

GenerAl sessIOn
Annual Awards & Recognitions Ceremony 5:30 pm–6:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls FG Sponsored by Visiting Nurse Service of New York For details see page 12.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 357 CC 205-206 Telehealth Applications Across Occupational Therapy Practice Areas
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Jana Cason, DHS, OTR/L, Spalding University, Louisville, KY; Kim Hartmann, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT; Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA; Tammy Richmond, MS, OTR/L, Ultimate Rehab, LLC, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory This presentation will highlight clinical applications of telehealth in occupational therapy. Panelists will

GenerAl sessIOn
Annual Awards & Recognitions Reception 6:45 pm–7:45 pm JW White River Ballroom B-D For details see page 15.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 351 CC Sagamore Ballroom 2 Innovation in Organizational Leadership
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Heather Kitching, OTD, OTR/L, Keck Hospital of USC, Los Angeles, CA; Patricia Nagaishi, PhD, OTR/L, Pasadena Unified School District, Pasadena, CA; Shawn Phipps, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, Los Angeles, CA; Lora Woo, OTD, OTR/L, Los Angeles County California Childrens’ Services, El Monte, CA Contributing Author: Karen Polastri Level: Introductory Innovative and evidence-based leadership in our state and local professional organizations will be a critical component in achieving the Centennial Vision 2017. Outcome data on new leader recruitment, leadership development, and project completion will be reviewed.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 354 CC 103-104 Addressing Visual Impairments Within Acute Care: The Impact of Occupational Therapy Within the Neurologic Population
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jamie Slentz, MOT, OTR/L, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD Level: Introductory It is vital for occupational therapists to assess vision to promote engagement in meaningful occupations. The focus of this course will be on neuro-based visual deficits. Visual screens, assessments, and interventions applicable for the use in an acute care setting with an emphasis on visual field cuts and visual inattention will be presented.

speCIAl eVenT
AOTPAC Night: KaraOTe Idol IV 7:30 pm–10:30 pm JW White River Ballroom E For details see page 16.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 355 CC 203-204 How To Solve Ethical Issues in Current Occupational Therapy Practice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Roxie Black, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Southern Maine, Lewiston, ME Level: Intermediate OT practitioners may experience ethical conflict due to changing healthcare policies and often feel unprepared to deal with it. An examination of the AOTA Code of Ethics and the application of a systematic approach to ethical analysis in this session will assist participants in learning how to problem-solve actual and simulated ethical issues.

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 352 CC Sagamore Ballroom 6 Envisioning a Next Chapter for Health Care Reform: The Single Payer Model
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Michelle Farmer, OTD, OTR/L; Amanda Foran, MS, OTR/L; Alann Salvador, OTD, OTR/L, all of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Introductory With the recent enactment of national health care reform, the United States took a first step toward better quality care for all. This presentation reviews these changes and their relationship to OT practice, and proposes the single payer model as one promising direction for further reform.

AOTA Board Certification
n n n n Gerontology Mental Health Pediatrics Physical Rehabilitation

AOTA Specialty Certification
n Driving and Community Mobility n Environmental Modification n Feeding, Eating, and Swallowing n Low Vision

3:45 pm–5:15 pm SC 356 CC Sagamore Ballroom 5 The Rehabilitation Process: Program Development Strategies for Long-Term Care
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues

www.aota.org/certification
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poster sessions
Poster Sessions provide attendees with the opportunity to stay up-to-date on many new and interesting interventions, ideas, and programs; important advances in the profession; and latest research. View as many as you like during each 2-hour session and meet with authors for valuable interactions on the topics that interest you the most. Continuing education units are provided for Poster Sessions. Information sheets are provided onsite.

10:00 am–12:00 noon CC Exhibit Halls BCDE

pOsTer sessIOn #5

saturday, April 28
PO 5006 The Meaning Is in the Making: The Theory and Practice of Culinary Therapy
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Bruce Ellerin, MD, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS; Ann Burkhardt, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 5013 Motor Recovery: Making Thoughts a Reality— A Literature Review
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Caitlyn Krzywiecki; Rebecca Brand; Kaitlin McQuinn; Jodi Schreiber, MS, OTR/L, all of Chatham University, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Intermediate

Sponsored by EBS Healthcare PO 5000 Dancing and the Well Elderly
Content Focus: Health & Wellness O. Jayne Bowman, PhD, OT; Jennifer Weinheimer, both of Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX Level: Intermediate

PO 5001 Running as Occupation
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Steven Eyler, MS, OTR/L, Fletcher Allen Health Care, Milton, VT Level: Intermediate

PO 5007 Sensory-Based Workplace Accommodations for Adults With Schizophrenia
Content Focus: Mental Health Deborah Waltermire, MHS, OTR/L; Timothy Katzaman; Kelly O’Brien; Megan Salazar, all of Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 5014 Neurodevelopmental Therapy and Contraversive Pushing
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kavitha Padmanabhan, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX Level: Introductory

AsD spOTs
The Assembly of Student Delegates (ASD) invites you to view student-authored posters that are designated by an ASD Scholarship Projects by Occupational Therapy Students (SPOTS) logo. This initiative recognizes and encourages the scholarship of students to help achieve our Centennial Vision of being a science-driven and evidence-based profession.

PO 5002 HomeFit: OT Collaborating With AARP for Educating Older Adults To Be Able To Stay in Their Own Homes as Long as They Choose
Content Focus: Productive Aging Debra Lindstrom-Hazel, PhD, OTR/L, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI; Karen Kafantaris, AARP Michigan, Lansing, MI Level: Intermediate

PO 5008 Healthy Habits: An Occupational Therapy App (H2OT)—Addressing Minority Health Disparities via Innovative CommunityBased Experiential Learning Opportunities
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Aimee Luebben, EdD, OTR, FAOTA; Andrew Watson; Kasie Bennett, all of University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN; Pilar Tirado, MS, Juan Diego Latino Center, Evansville, IN Level: Intermediate

PO 5015 Beyond Self-Care: Exploring Occupational Engagement and Narrative Employment To Promote Psychosocial and Emotional Well-Being in Patients With Extended Hospitalizations
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Barbara Leung, MA, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Author: Heather Kitching, OTD, OTR/L Level: Introductory

KeY TO COnTenT fOCus
Posters are color-coded in order to reflect the 8 broad practice categories and easily identify those that are most relevant to your practice. All posters are in numerical order. Academic & Fieldwork Education Children & Youth General & Professional Issues Health & Wellness Mental Health Productive Aging Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Work & Industry

PO 5003 Assessing Fall Risk in the Home: Where are the Effective Assessments?
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jeanine Stancanelli, OTD, OTR/L, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY Level: Intermediate

PO 5004 Generation to Generation: Exploring Meanings Attributed to Mementos Created by Jewish Elders
Content Focus: Productive Aging Tina Fletcher, EdD, OTR, Texas Woman’s University, Denton, TX Level: Introductory

PO 5009 Stress Less, Live Well: An Evidence-Based Stress Management Program for Older Adults
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Paula Carey, OTD, OTR/L, Utica College, Utica, NY Level: Intermediate

PO 5016 Measurement of Restaurant Accessibility by People With Disabilities: Preliminary Validity of a Restaurant Universal Design Assessment
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Amy Erfurth, OT; Roger Smith, PhD, OT, FAOTA, RESNA Fellow, both of R2D2 Center, Milwaukee, WI Level: Introductory

PO 5005 The Effects of Part A Versus Part B Reimbursement on Occupational Therapy Delivery in the Home
Content Focus: Productive Aging Patricia Cheney, MBA, OTR/L, BCG; Marvin Lawson, MS, OTR/L, both of Fox Rehabilitation, Cherry Hill, NJ Level: Intermediate

PO 5012 The Use of Kinesio-Tape To Reduce Edema and Contusions to the Upper Extremity PostShoulder Hemi-Arthroplasty in the Acute Care Setting: A Single Subject Data Analysis
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation William Finley, MOT, OTR/L; Christopher Venezia, MOT, OTR/L, both of NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY Contributing Authors: Adrienne T. Dicembri, MPA, OTR/L; Steve Van Lew, MS, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 5017 Developing an OccupationBased Ergonomic Evaluation
Content Focus: Work & Industry Naomi Abrams, OTD, OTR/L, CEAS, Worksite Health & Safety Consultants, Rockville, MD Level: Intermediate

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

PO 5020 Co-Occupation Between Adults With Intellectual Disabilities in a Day Program
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Wanda Mahoney, PhD, OTR/L; Jordan Warlick; Suzanna Raykher;

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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Kelly Lynch, all of Chicago State University, Chicago, IL Contributing Author: Thelma Segbawu Level: Introductory

PO 5021 Innovations in Teaching: Collaboration Between Universities To Integrate Multiple Sources of Evidence for Best Practice
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Susan Coppola, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA; Allison Darwin, MS, OTR/L, both of University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA Contributing Authors: Jennifer Kaldenberg, OTR/L, MSA, SCLV, FAOTA; Sharon Moore, MS, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 5025 Use of a Competency System To Foster Evidence-Based Practice and Staff Development: An Example in Stroke Rehabilitation
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Gina Holecek, MPH, OTR/L; Sarah Blanton, DPT, PT, NCS; Melissa Tober, OTR/L, all of Emory University, Atlanta, GA Contributing Authors: Megan Hite, OTR/L; Sara Ivey Zeforeno, OTR/L; Mary Seitz Woods, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 5032 Qualitative Research and Implications for Practice When Working With Individuals With an ASD and Their Families
Content Focus: Children & Youth George Tomlin, PhD, OTR/L; Marge Luthman, MS, OTR/L; Yvonne Swinth, PhD, OTR/L, all of University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA Contributing Author: Wibke Stolte, MS, OT Level: Intermediate

Jeanne Eichler, MOT, OTR/L; Alicia Karpel; Monica Jefferson; Megan Cooper, all of Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 5038 Evidence-Based Literature Review of Interventions for Preschool Children With or At Risk for Behavioral or Psychosocial Problems
Content Focus: Children & Youth Debra Rybski, MS, OTR, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 5026 Innovative Occupational Therapy Interventions During Disaster
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Pat Precin, MS, OTR/L, LP, Touro College, New York, NY Level: Intermediate

PO 5033 The Relationship of Pencil Grasp Patterns on College Students’ Handwriting Speed and Legibility
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lalit Shah, EdD, OTR/L; Linda Andrejko; Beth Gladson, all of Misericordia University, Dallas, PA Level: Introductory

PO 5039 Development of the Life Participation for Parents (LPP)
Content Focus: Children & Youth Patricia Fingerhut, OTR, League City, TX Level: Introductory

PO 5022 A Comparison Between SpiderTech™ Prefabricated Kits and Kinesiology Tape in the Management of Neck Pain
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Rachel Diamant, PhD, OTR/L, BCP; Melissa Clark, CHT, both of A.T. Still University, Chandler, AZ Contributing Authors: Christina Griffin, PhD, FAOTA; Stephanie Black; Jesse Dialessi; Maureen Gilloon; Foli James; Amanda Leach; Jennifer Lindeman; Andrew Martina; Kenlynne Ralph; Rose Tin Level: Introductory

PO 5027 Relationships Between Sensory Processing and Parenting Stress: Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
Content Focus: Children & Youth Tracy Jirikowic, PhD, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Contributing Author: Heather Carmichael Olson, PhD Level: Intermediate

PO 5034 Using a Feeding Profile for Complex Pediatric Feeding Disorders
Content Focus: Children & Youth Diane Fleetwood, OTR/L, SCFES, Stepping Stones Pediatric Therapy, Goldsboro, NC; Jodi Petry, OTR/L, BCP, SCFES, Duke University Health System, Durham, NC Level: Intermediate

PO 5040 Fostering Money Management Skills in Teenagers Living in a Homeless Shelter
Content Focus: Children & Youth Winifred Schultz-Krohn, PhD, OTR/L, BCP, FAOTA; Kim Arzillo; Elizabeth Gray; Marisa Harrison; Andrea Wallraven, all of San Jose State University, San Jose, CA Level: Intermediate

PO 5023 Reliability of the Seven Task Cognitive Performance Test: Measuring Cognitive-Functional Capacity in Persons With Dementia-Related Disease
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Patricia Schaber, PhD, OTR/L; Colette Brogan; Emily Stallings, all of University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Contributing Author: Fouzia Ali Level: Introductory

PO 5028 Published Studies on OT Interventions and Procedures
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kathlyn Reed, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Texas Woman’s University-Retired, Houston, TX Level: Intermediate

PO 5035 Effects on Handwriting Readiness Skills of Preschoolers With Pre-Writing Deficits Who Receive Whole Class and Small Group PreWriting Instructions
Content Focus: Children & Youth Carol Lust, EdD, OTR/L, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Contributing Author: Melissa D. Maxwell, MSOT, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 5041 Sensory Modulation Disorder: A “Stand Alone” Diagnosis
Content Focus: Children & Youth Shelly Lane, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Level: Intermediate

PO 5031 The Relationship Between Pre-Pulse Inhibition, a Sensory Gating Measure, and Behavioral Measures of Sensory Processing in Individuals With Fragile X Syndrome
Content Focus: Children & Youth Clare Giuffrida, OTR/L, PhD, FAOTA; Brynn Nealon; Mary Beth Aguire; Patricia Allen; Lisa Katz; Alicia Medina; Anne Schmidt, all of Rush University, Chicago, IL Contributing Authors: E. Berry Kravis, PhD, MD; H. Kavanaugh, MS, OTR/L; V. Kluss, MS, OTR/L; J. Korber, MS, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 5042 Facilitating Evidence-Based Practice in Pediatric and Rehabilitation Settings
Content Focus: Children & Youth Rebecca Nicholson, OTD, OTR/L; Kelli Reiling, OTR/L, both of University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS Contributing Authors: Lisa MischeLawson, PhD; Jane Cox, MS, OTR Level: Intermediate

PO 5036 Getting Going: Providing Powered Mobility to Infants With Disabilities
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Carole Dennis, ScD, OTR/L, BCP; Sharon Stansfield, PhD; Hélène Larin, PhD, PT; Cheri Berger; Kaitlyn Burger; Taylor Carlotti; Lauren Cresser; Jessica Hauberg, all of Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY Level: Introductory

PO 5024 Elaboration on Occupational Justice: Haitian Women With Acquired Disabilities Provide Perspectives About Disability and Occupational Injustice
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Tamera Humbert, DEd, OTR/L, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA; Janelle Sullivan, OTD, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 5037 Creating Innovative Groups is Within Your Reach! From Teen Connection to Your own Inspiration—You Can Do It Too!
Content Focus: Children & Youth

PO 5043 Using Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Data as Evidence to the Efficacy of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Children and Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Content Focus: Children & Youth Teresa Fair-Field, OTR/L, Private Practice, Redmond, WA; Mindy Miles, MA, BCBA, Private Practice, Bremerton, WA Level: Introductory

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PO 5044 High School Students’ Transition to Young Adulthood: Evidence, Resources, and Tools To Support Occupational Therapy Leadership in Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Heather Jackson-Pena, MOT, OTR/L, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA Contributing Author: Susan TothCohen, PhD, OTR/L Level: Advanced

PO 5049 Fieldwork Educators’ Perceptions and Expectations of Professional Behaviors in Level II Fieldwork Students
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Lynne Clarke, OTD, OTR/L; Melodie Christman; Tara Korus, all of The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD Contributing Author: Nicole Bylander, MS, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 5054 A Place for All: The Impact of Universal Design on the Quality of Life of Individuals Living in Fully Accessible Communities and Homes
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Karen Barney, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Rachel Dratnol, both of Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO Level: Introductory

RWP 5018 Community Participation of Individuals With Mobility and Sensory Impairments
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jessica Dashner, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Contributing Authors: David B. Gray, PhD; Holly Hollingsworth, PhD; Denise Dickerson; Lisa Garrett; Meghan Gottlieb, MSW Level: Intermediate

PO 5045 Faculty Beliefs, Perceptions and Attitudes Related to Integrating Spirituality Into American Occupational Therapy Core Curricula: A Pilot Study
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Paige Johns, OTD, OTR/L, Creighton University, Omaha, NE Level: Intermediate

PO 5050 Conceptual Model for Understanding the Phenomena of MOT Student Active Participation in the Classroom
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Cynthia Carr, MS, OTR/L; Divya Sood, OTD, OTR/L, both of Governors State University, University Park, IL Level: Introductory

PO 5055 Development of Young Children With Sickle Cell Disease
Content Focus: Children & Youth Catherine Hoyt, OTD, OTR/L, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Contributing Author: Allison King, MD Level: Introductory

RWP 5019 Exploring the Efficacy of a New Intervention Paradigm: A Phase II Randomized Trial of Cognitive Strategy Training in Sub-Acute Stroke
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Timothy Wolf, OTD, OTR/L; Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Sara McEwen, PhD, PT, St John’s Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; Helene Polatajko, PhD, OT Reg. (Ont.), OT(C), FCAOT, FCAHS, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Level: Intermediate

PO 5046 The Occupational Therapy Student Professionalism Scale (OTS P.S.): Opening the Dialogue Between Fieldwork Educators and Students
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Dianne Simons, PhD, OTR/L; Jayne Shepherd, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Level: Intermediate

PO 5051 Meeting the Fieldwork Challenge: Developing a Model of Support for Fieldwork Educators
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Diane Durham, MS, OTR; Wendy Starnes, MA, OTR/L; Estelle Strydom, OTR/L, CAPS, all of Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA Contributing Author: Catherine Colucci, MA, OTR Level: Intermediate

PO 5056 Retention of Motor Changes in Chronic Stroke Survivors Who Were Administered Mental Practice
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Stephen Page, PhD, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Colleen Murray, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN; Valerie Hill, MS, OTR/L, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH Level: Introductory

PO 5047 What Do Students Within Allied Health Professions “Know” About Occupational Therapy?
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Francine Seruya, PhD, OTR/L, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT Contributing Authors: Arielle Abbato; Laura Colon; Jessica McGrath; Amanda Towne; Melissa Weber Level: Introductory

PO 5057 Adult Sensory Sensitivities: Daily Occupations and Coping Strategies
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Abbie Stern; Jesse Cates; Kelly Laurendi; Suzanne Rappaport; Ashley Rider, all of Tufts University, Medford, MA Contributing Author: Jane Koomar, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

RWP 5029 Measuring the Efficacy of the “Learn to Move, Move to Learn” Program on Improving Sensory Processing and Occupational Performance in Preschoolers: A Pilot Study
Content Focus: Children & Youth Katherine Ryan, PhD, OTR/L; Heather Ebert; Cassandra Laas, CHES; Jessica Palmer; Claire Pierce; Casey Sumner, all of Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO; Jenny Clark, OTR/L, BCP, Jenny’s Kids Inc., Lawrence, KS Level: Intermediate

PO 5052 Handwriting Instruction: A Survey of Elementary Teachers and Education Professors
Content Focus: Children & Youth Denise Donica, DHS, OTR/L, BCP, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Contributing Authors: Michelle Larson, OTR; Abbey Zinn, OTR Level: Introductory

RWP 5030 Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy Project
Content Focus: Children & Youth Angela Shierk, MOT, OTR, Texas Woman’s University, Denton, TX Contributing Authors: Sally Schultz, PhD, OTR, LPC; Marybeth Ezaki, MD; Amy Lake, OTR, CHT Level: Intermediate

PO 5048 An Analysis of Clinical Practice and the use of OccupationBased Treatment
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Karen Howell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Cindy Mathena, PhD, OTR/L; Tammy LeSage, OTR, CHT, all of University of St. Augustine, St. Augustine, FL Level: Intermediate

PO 5053 Depression, Apathy, and Anhedonia in Parkinson’s Disease: An Occupational Therapy Meta-Analysis
Content Focus: Mental Health Jiyi Yin, MS; David Nelson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Level: Intermediate

RWP 5011 Creating Opportunities for Dialogue: Using Photovoice in the Design of Healing and Natural Spaces in a Hospital Setting
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Jim Sinclair; Erin Moran; Valerie Howells, PhD, OTR/L, all of Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI Contributing Author: Thomas Zelnik, MD Level: Introductory

RWP 5036 Safe Patient Handling Issues With Bed Repositioning use Slide Sheets: A Comparative Study
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Lindsay Bartnik, CTRS; Martin Rice, PhD, OTR/L, both of The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Level: Intermediate

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12:30 pm-2:30 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE

pOsTer sessIOn #6

PO 6005 Describing and Measuring Adherence to the Functional Group Model: A Pilot Study
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Leslie Inenaga; Sapna Bansil; Megan Wall, all of Tufts University, Medford, MA Contributing Author: Sharan L. Schwartzberg, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA Level: Introductory

Sponsored by EBS Healthcare PO 6000 Developing Community Exercise Programs for People With Disabilities
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Carla Walker, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP; Melissa Lyles Smith, MSOT, OTR/L, both of Paraquad, Inc., St. Louis, MO; Susan Tucker, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP, Washington University, St. Louis, MO Contributing Authors: David Gray, PhD; Jessica Dashner, OTD, OTR/L; Kerri Morgan, MSOT, OTR/L, ATP Level: Introductory

PO 6011 The Elder’s Right to Sight Collaborative: Overcoming Barriers To Address Visual Impairment
Content Focus: Productive Aging Jennifer Kaldenberg, New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA Contributing Author: Y.K. Gary Chu, OD, FAAO Level: Intermediate

PO 6016 Sense of Coherence, Attachment and Activity Participation of Individuals Who are on Probation for Drug Use: Implications to Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Mental Health Essential Yeh, MS, OT; Su Lien Wen, both of Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Chinyu Wu, PhD, OT/L, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC Contributing Author: Lien Wen Su, MD Level: Intermediate

PO 6006 Using Infant Massage for Mother-Infant Social Participation
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Jennifer Pitonyak, MS, OTR/L, SCFES, CIMI, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 6012 Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS): A Practice-Based Outcome Questionnaire
Content Focus: Mental Health Suzanne White, MS, OTR/L, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY; Diane Tewfik, Paladia Inc., Bronx, NY Contributing Authors: Elyssa Yablow, OTR; Aliza Vishniavsky, OTR; Morgan Kalberer, OTR; Shira Goldberg, OTR; Nicole Ciezar, OTR; Suzanne White, OTR Level: Advanced

PO 6001 How We Developed and Implemented an EvidenceBased Treatment Standard for Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Task Specific Training
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Kristin Brewster, OTR/L, Fletcher Allen, Burlington, VT Contributing Authors: Suzanne Lawrence, PT; Gretchen Daly, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 6007 Lifestyle Redesign® for Headaches
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Ashley Uyeshiro, OTD, OTR/L; Susan McNulty, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Author: Soma SahaiSrivastava, MD Level: Introductory

PO 6018 Service Learning and Hippotherapy: A Unique Educational Combination of Passions That Develops Critical Reflection and Analysis of Occupation
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Kathryn Splinter-Watkins, MOT, OTR/L, HPCS, FAOTA, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY Level: Introductory

PO 6002 Missing: Client-Centered, Occupation-Based Hand Therapy
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Brian Connors, MOTR/L, United States Army, San Antonio, TX Level: Introductory

PO 6008 Adolescent Substance Abuse: The Role of Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Mental Health Kori LeBlanc, MOT, OTR/L, Choice Therapy, Bemidji, MN; Cassandra Leach, MOT, OTR/L, Interactive Children’s Therapy Services, Newnan, GA; Sonia Zimmerman, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND Level: Introductory

PO 6013 Applying Occupational Therapy to a Recovery-Based Treatment Model: A Renaissance in Psychosocial Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Mental Health Sean Getty, MS, OTR/L, Oakdale, NY Level: Introductory

PO 6019 The Effects of Gaming on Young Adult Males Social Interaction
Content Focus: Mental Health Ruth Cano, The University of TexasPan American, Edinburg, TX Level: Introductory

PO 6014 Challenges of Conducting Longitudinal Community Based Interventions With the Homeless Population: Strategies for Successful Research Outcomes
Content Focus: Mental Health Christine Helfrich, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Andrea Halverson, MS, OTR/L; Chih-Ying Li, MS, OTR, all of Boston University, Boston, MA Level: Intermediate

PO 6020 Using End of Year Cumulative Examinations in Program Assessment: An Innovative Approach for Promoting Student Success.
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Leslie Roundtree, DHS, OTR/L; Sarah Austin, PhD, OTR/L, both of Chicago State University, Chicago, IL Level: Intermediate

PO 6003 Patient Empowerment: Ensuring OT Best Practice Through Providing Effective Patient Education
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Lesley Addison, OTD, OTR/L, Children’s Hospital, New Orleans, LA Level: Introductory

PO 6009 The Aggregate Fieldwork Model: Innovations in Mental Health
Content Focus: Mental Health Pat Precin, MS, OTR/L, LP, Touro College, New York, NY Level: Advanced

PO 6004 A Top-Down Approach To Defining Professionalism: Evidence That it is More Than Professional Dress & Punctuality
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Samia Rafeedie, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Intermediate

PO 6010 Aging in Place: The Development of an Innovative Holistic Community-Based Program for Older Adults
Content Focus: Productive Aging Tara Beitzel, DrOT, OTR/L, The University of Findlay, Findlay, OH Level: Introductory

PO 6015 Health Disparities by Gender and Ethnicity in Older Adults With Urinary Incontinence
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Trudy Mallinson, PhD, OTR/L, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Contributing Authors: Colleen Fitzgerald, MD; Cynthia E. Neville, DPT, PT, WCS, BCB-PMD; Larry Manheim, PhD Level: Intermediate

PO 6021 Improving Professional Communication in Written Work: Recommendations, Innovative Learning Activities, and Scoring Rubrics
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Aimee Luebben, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN; Whitney Case, MS, OTR, Bluegrass Rehab Center, Owensboro, KY Level: Intermediate

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AfTernOOn pOsTers / sATurDAY, AprIl 28
PO 6022 Implementation of Innovative Off-The-Shelf Games in Adult Rehabilitation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Grace Kim, MS, OTR/L; Ruchi Patel, MS, OTR/L; Terrence Hicks, MS, OTR/L, all of New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY Level: Introductory

PO 6029 Measuring the Efficacy of an Adolescent CIMT Summer Camp for Improving Upper Extremity Function and Occupational Performance: A Longitudinal Study
Content Focus: Children & Youth Katherine Ryan; Leslie Bray, OT; Caitlin Eldridge, OT; Laura Roeder, OT; Chelsea Grueninger, OT; Jill Hughes, OT, all of Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO; Petra Crosby, MOT, OTR/L; Cathie DeVries, OTR/L, both of Rehabilitation Institute of Kansas City, Kansas City, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 6035 OT/OTA Academic Fieldwork Coordinator Role and Personal Reward
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Patricia Stutz-Tanenbaum, MS, OTR, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Debra Hanson, PhD, OTR, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Jeanette Koski, MS, OTR/L, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Level: Intermediate

PO 6042 Factors to Consider in Developing Electronic Documentation for Outpatient Occupational Therapy and Acute Care Settings
Content Focus: Work & Industry Christopher Dunbar, MS, OTR/L, CHT; Lalit Shah, EdD, OTR/L, both of Misericordia University, Dallas, PA Level: Introductory

PO 6023 India: A Perspective of Occupational Therapy’s History and Promotion Through an Experiential Learning Opportunity
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Katharine Grant; Claire Kelly; Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA, all of Boston University, Boston, MA Contributing Authors: Harjas Chilana; Genevieve Cyrs; Valerie Yip Level: Introductory

PO 6030 Pool Pals: Fun Through Occupation!
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lynne Roberts, MS, OTR/L, New Hartford Central School, New Hartford, NY Level: Intermediate

PO 6036 Understanding the Role of Arousal and Self-Regulation in Enhancing Activity Participation for Children Diagnosed With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Content Focus: Children & Youth Katherine Dimitropoulou, PhD, OTR/L; Panagiotis Rekoutis, PhD, OTR/L, both of Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY Level: Intermediate

PO 6043 Sensory Responsiveness Related to Age in Siblings Concordant and Discordant for Autism Spectrum Disorders
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Claudia Hilton, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Alison Babb, MSOT, OTR/L, Therapy Relief, Chesterfield, MO Contributing Authors: Erin Eitzmann, OTD, OTR/L; Yi Zhang, MS; John Constantino, MD Level: Introductory

PO 6024 Specialty Level II Fieldwork in Low Vision Rehabilitation
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Julie Nastasi, OTD, OTR/L, SCLV, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA Level: Intermediate

PO 6031 How Today’s Reality Created Positive Change in Two Rural School Boards
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mary Culshaw, MSc, OTR, OT Reg AB/SK, The Great Beyond Therapy Pediatric Services Ltd., Sedgewick, AB, Canada Level: Introductory

PO 6037 Quality of Life in Boys With Barth Syndrome: Comparison of Child Self-Report and Parent Proxy-Report
Content Focus: Children & Youth Yoonjeong Lim, MS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Contributing Authors: Roxanna Bendixen, PhD, OTR/L; Consuelo Kreider, MHS, OTR/L; Stacey Reynolds, PhD, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 6044 Functional Outcomes of Inpatient Occupational Therapy Intervention With Burn Survivors
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Rebecca Buttiglieri, OTR/L; Julia Broyer, OTR/L, both of Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA Contributing Authors: Courtney Fellows, MS, OTR/L; Samantha Geary, MS, OTR/L; Carol Jenkins, COTA/L; Mindy Titus-de Souza, OTR/L; Marissa Zona, MS, OTR/L; John Lowry, DO; Jeffrey Schneider, MD Level: Introductory

PO 6025 Efficacy of Occupational Therapy Pediatric Health Promotion Programs
Content Focus: Children & Youth Ariel Sanders; Sarah Maust; Jesse Bender; Julie Phillips, all of Chatham University, Pittsburgh, PA Level: Introductory

PO 6032 Bring Handwriting Back to the Classroom
Content Focus: Children & Youth Marnie Danielson, MHS, OTR/L, The TV Teacher, LLC, Dallas, TX Level: Intermediate

PO 6026 Protecting Children in Daycare Centers From Lead Exposures in Toys
Content Focus: Children & Youth Martha Sanders, PhD, OTR/L, CPE, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT Contributing Authors: Ashley Chacon-Baker; Julie Stolz Level: Introductory

PO 6033 The Potential Role of Occupational Therapy in the Foster Care System
Content Focus: Children & Youth Mark Kovic, OTD, OTR/L, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL Level: Introductory

PO 6038 Parent Needs and Strategies for Promoting Participation of School-Age Children With and Without Disabilities
Content Focus: Children & Youth Gary Bedell, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Jacqueline Bresnahan; Abigail Hamilton; Shawna Hollebone, MPH; Hajnalka Lakatos; Laura Memole, all of Tufts University, Medford, MA Level: Introductory

PO 6045 Heart Rate as a Physiologic Response to Scenarios on the Driving Simulator
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kristen Davis; Anne Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Danielle Brown; Cyrus Ridenour, all of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC Level: Introductory

PO 6028 Safely Home: The Occupational Therapist’s Role in Providing Travel Recommendations for Low Birth Weight and Premature Infants
Content Focus: Children & Youth Laura Novak, MS, OTR; Janell Yonkman, MS,OTR, both of National Center for Safe Transportation of Children with Special Health Care Needs, Indianapolis, IN Level: Intermediate

PO 6034 Development and Validation of Child Mealtime Participation Checklist
Content Focus: Children & Youth Elizabeth Wanka, MOT, OTR/L; Divya Sood, OTD, OTR/L, both of Governors State University, University Park, IL Level: Intermediate

PO 6041 Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Melbourne Low Vision ADL Index
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Albert Copolillo, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA Contributing Authors: Cindy Creef, MS, OTR/L; Ava Hostetler, MS, OTR/L; Adam Parsons, MS, OTR/L; Hansung Ryu, MS, OTR/L Level: Intermediate

PO 6046 Cognitive Strategies of Women Post-Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Treatment: A Case Study Approach
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Laura Festa; Julia Hostetter, both of Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA

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Contributing Author: Ann Marie Potter, MA, OTR/L Level: Introductory Contributing Authors: Tim Uhl, PhD, ATC, PT; Christine Myers, PhD, OTR/L Level: Intermediate Dye, OTR; Richelle Moore, OTR; Lisa Racine, OTR, all of Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Level: Intermediate all of Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI Contributing Authors: Andrea Gossett Zakrajsek, OTD, OTRL; Elizabeth Schuster, PhD Level: Introductory

PO 6047 Unique Adaptations for the Acute Care Oncology Patient
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Kelly McFarlane, MS, OTR/L; Stacey Mislavsky, MS, OTR/L, both of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY Level: Intermediate

PO 6051 Maximizing Social Participation: A Core Word Strategy for Working Augmentative Communication Into Everyday Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Kimberly Thompson, MS, OTR/L, Prentke Romich Company, Wooster, OH; Cindy Halloran, OTR/L, Center for AAC and Autism, Wooster, OH Contributing Author: David Kay, MEd, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 6054 Formation of Solutions for Rheumatic Condition-related Work Barriers by Occupational and Physical Therapists
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Nancy Baker, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Contributing Authors: Julie Keysor, PhD; Saralynn Allaire, PhD Level: Introductory

RWP 6027 Skills Retraining Using the Holistic Habit Retraining Model: A Program for Family Members of Persons With ABI
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Anita Hamilton, MOccThy OT(C); Richard Tang; Matthew Fong, all of University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Contributing Author: Lily Ma, aSZ MScOT OT(C) Level: Intermediate

PO 6048 Sexuality After Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Amy Torrence, MSOT; Sara Fischer, MSOT; Bryley Stevens, MSOT; Chelsea Thomas, MSOT, all of University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN Level: Introductory

PO 6052 Methods for Increasing and Measuring Occupational Therapy Intensity in the Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Setting
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Mary Hildebrand, OTD, OTR/L, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; Helen Host, PhD, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Linsey Kraus, MOT, OTR/L, Barnes Jewish Extended Care, St. Louis, MO Contributing Authors: Ellen Binder, MD; Eric Lenze, MD Level: Intermediate

PO 6055 Community Interaction Experiences of Families of Children With Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Content Focus: Children & Youth Preethy Samuel, PhD, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI Contributing Authors: Karen L. Hobden, PhD; Barbara W. LeRoy, PhD Level: Introductory

RWP 6039 Assessment of Correctness of Home Exercise Program With Children and Adolescents With Brachial Plexus Palsy
Content Focus: Children & Youth Lynnette Rasmussen, OTR/L; Denise Justice, OTR/L, both of University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI Contributing Authors: Kathleen M. Murphy; Lynda Yang, MD, PhD; Virginia Nelson, MD; Kate Chang, MA Level: Intermediate

PO 6049 Static and Dynamic Sitting Balance in the Neurologically Impaired: A Single Subject Data Analysis Using the Nada Chair
Content Focus: Children & Youth William Finley, MOT, OTR/L, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY Contributing Authors: Adrienne T. Dicembri, MPA, OTR/L; Steve Van Lew, MS, OTR/L Level: Introductory

PO 6056 Assessing the Contribution of Assistive Technology on Reading and Writing Goals
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Robert Cunningham, MS, OT/L, ATP; Anne Akright; Laci Forsythe; Lacey Gebke; Katie Hinton; Jennifer Melson; Sajel Patel-Hernandez; Nicole Sitton; Jessica Stuart, all of Maryville University, St. Louis, MO Level: Intermediate

PO 6050 Long-Finger Abduction Displacement (LAD) Test Utilization Post-Operatively In Subcutaneous Ulnar Nerve Transposition: A Case Study
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Ryan Morgan, MS, OTR/L, Kentucky Hand & Physical Therapy, Lexington, KY

PO 6053 Yoga-Based Rehabilitation Intervention Improves Quality of Life, Activity, and Participation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Arlene Schmid, PhD, OTR, Indiana University/Roudebush VAMC, Indianapolis, IN; Marieke Van Puymbroeck, PhD; Peter Altenburger, PhD; Tracy Dierks, PhD; Kristine Miller, PT; Nancy Schalk, ChYT; Erin DeBaun; Teresa Damush, PhD; Linda Williams, MD; Stephanie Chagdes, OTR; Lauren

RWP 6040 A Two-Phased Study of Transitions of Youth At Risk in Nontraditional Education Programs
Content Focus: Children & Youth Amy Marshall, MS, OTR/L, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY Contributing Authors: Doris Pierce, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Elaine Fehringer, MA, OTR/L; Norman Powell, EdD; Ronnie Nolan, EdD Level: Intermediate

RWP 6017 Coming Home: Exploring and Supporting Transitions of Older Adults from Hospital to Home
Content Focus: Productive Aging Deirdre Guenther; Kimberly Lorenz; Angela Natschke; Abigail Zukausky,

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MOrnInG / sunDAY, AprIl 29

educational sessions
COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
8:00 am–11:00 am WS 400 CC 101-102 (AOTA) Emerging Area of Occupational Therapy Practice: OT Interventions Across the Treatment Continuum for Women With Breast Cancer
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Jennifer Hughes, OTR, MOT, MediServe, Chandler, AZ; Sara Cohen, OTR/L, CLT-LANA, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Kathleen Lyons, ScD, OTR/L, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH; Lauro Munoz, MOT, OTR, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Elizabeth DeIuliis, OTD, OTR/L, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA Contributing Author: Claudine Campbell, MOT, OTR/L, CLT Level: Advanced Women diagnosed with breast cancer are susceptible to physical, psychological, cognitive and social complications that negatively impact occupational performance and quality of life. OT’s unique role across the continuum of care and emerging practice areas will be identified by an expert panel. to rehabilitation outcomes, and identifies evidence-based training practices. Participants use an assessment developed to measure cultural awareness, knowledge and skills. The session uses lecture, discussion, and break-out training groups.

sunday, April 29
8:00 am–11:00 am WS 404 CC Wabash Ballroom 2 The Importance of Occupational Therapy Involvement in the Intensive Care Unit
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Cheryl Esbrook, OTR/L, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL Level: Intermediate This course will discuss the negative complications survivors of critical illness often face as well as the implications for occupational therapists. Scheirton, PhD, all of Creighton University, Omaha, NE Level: Intermediate This session reports the outcomes of a series of research projects on practice errors in OT practice, paying particular attention to specific error prevention/reduction strategies. Implications to professional education and current occupational therapy practice will be highlighted via the DVD and learning module generated from the projects.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 402 CC Wabash Ballroom 1 (SIS) SISIS and MHSIS Annual Programs: Assessment and Intervention Strategies for Adults With Sensory Processing Disorders
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Teresa May-Benson, ScD, OTR/L, The Spiral Foundation, Watertown, MA; Tina Champagne, OTD, OTR/L, Institute for Dynamic Living, Springfield, MA; Moya Kinnealey, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Temple University, Emeritus, Philadelphia, PA; Erna Imperatore Blanche, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Jane Koomar, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, OTA Watertown, Watertown, MA Level: Advanced Practical information and research on cutting-edge assessment and intervention strategies for identifying and treating adult populations with sensory processing disorders (SPD) will be presented by leading experts in sensory integration and mental health. Special emphasis will be on adults with mental health concerns and SPD. The Sensory Integration Special Interest Section Business Meeting and the Mental Health Special Interest Section Business Meeting will take place during the first 30 minutes of this session.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 405 CC Wabash Ballroom 3 Motor Control Evidence for Occupation
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Gerry Conti, PhD OTRL, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI Level: Introductory This Workshop will provide basic research information in balance, mobility and reach, grasp and manipulation as well as application to assessment and intervention appropriate for many treatment settings. Information will culminate in a set of guiding principles for motor rehabilitation.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 409 CC 123-124 Innovations in Autism: Enhancing Participation and Social Skill Development Through Performing Arts Programming
Content Focus: Children & Youth Michael Pizzi, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA; Sheila Clonan, PhD, Colgate University, Hamilton, NC Level: Introductory This session will highlight the development, implementation and evaluation of innovative performing arts programming for children with disabilities. Innovative ways to promote occupational justice and inclusive communities while enhancing social development and participation will also be presented.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 401 CC 107-108 (AOTA) Practice Models, Educational Practices, and Best Evidence for Culturally Responsive Caring
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Jaime Muñoz, PhD, FAOTA, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA; Yolanda Suarez-Balcazar, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, Saint Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN; LaVonne Fox, PhD, OTR/L, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Meenakshi Iyer, PhD, OTR/L, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Rivka Molinsky, OTR/L, Touro College, New York, NY Level: Intermediate This session critiques models of cultural competence, discusses evidence connecting cultural competence

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 406 CC 103-104 Occupational Therapy in Primary Care—An Emerging Practice Area
Content Focus: Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation Katie Jordan, OTD, OTR/L; Camille Dieterle, OTD, OTR/L; Brian Prestwich, MD; Michelle Farmer, MA, OTR/L, all of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA Level: Intermediate The Affordable Care Act initiated aggressive efforts to improve access to primary care through Patient Centered Medical Homes and Accountable Care Organizations. New healthcare models create opportunities for OT practitioners to discover, innovate, and generate evidence to lead the way in prevention and chronic disease management in primary care.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 410 CC 122 Understanding Medical Issues Associated With Premature Birth: Foundations and Evidence for Safe Occupational Therapy Practice
Content Focus: Children & Youth Christy Nelson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Findlay, Findlay, OH Level: Intermediate This session will provide an in-depth study of the medical conditions frequently seen in premature babies including common medical procedures, interpretation of medical tests, pharmacological interventions, and the potential impact of those conditions/interventions on developmental abilities and future human occupation.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 403 CC 201-202 The Resilient Occupational Therapy Practitioner: Tools for Professional Self-Care
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Donna Costa, DHS, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Level: Intermediate The occupational therapy profession is full of rewards, but not without stress. Concepts of compassion fatigue and burnout and the mechanisms by which they develop are important for the therapist to understand. Helping our clients live life to the fullest requires practitioners to develop a plan for professional self-care.

KeY TO ABBreVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Room Section(s) Center

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 408 CC 127-128 Client Safety: What Can We Do To Reduce or Prevent Practice Errors in OT Practice?
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Keli Mu, PhD, OTR/L; Helene Lohman, OTD, OTR/L; Linda

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 411 CC 125-126 The Art and Science of Home Modifications: Innovative Strategies for Student Learning
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Noralyn Pickens, PhD, OT/L, Texas Woman’s University, Dallas, TX; Carla Chase, EdD, OTR/L, CAPS,

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

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sunDAY, AprIl 29 / MOrnInG
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI; Sharon Glover, OTR/L, Genesis Rehab Services, Kennett Square, PA; Anne Morris, EdD, OTR/L, SCEM, FAOTA, CAPS, Howard University, Washington, DC; Tracy Van Oss, DHSc, OTR/L, SCEM, CAPS, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT Level: Intermediate This session provides innovative strategies for teaching occupational therapy students the home modification process to include evaluation, intervention, and outcome measures. Learning activities will be presented with objectives, strategies for implementation with students, and assessment of learning. function. This session will provide an overview of the OT’s role in the treatment of incontinence, along with treatment applications, practical strategies for immediate clinical use, and resources for further training/ certification in this area of practice. Occupational therapy services are delivered in increasingly complex and ever-changing environments. Workshop participants will analyze case studies from practice, research and education to promote ethical reflection and behavior. Mechanisms to prevent unethical behavior and strategies to resolve ethical dilemmas will be shared.

COnferenCe hIGhlIGhT
8:00 am–11:00 am WS 416 CC 205-206 (AOTF) Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Content Focus: Academic & Fieldwork Education Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA; John White, PhD, OTR/L, Pacific University, Hillsboro, OR; Anne James, PhD, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA Level: Intermediate The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) program will continue its focus on ways to foster collaborative research that provides evidence for best practices in education. Dr. Andrea Bilics, Dr. John White, and Dr. Anne James will be facilitators for this important session, which will consist of short presentations, discussion/working groups, and an open forum.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 414 CC 105-106 Promoting Ethics in the Ever-Changing Environments of Practice, Science, and Innovation
Content Focus: General & Professional Issues Janie Scott, MA, OT/L, FAOTA; S. Maggie Reitz, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Towson University, Towson, MD; Elizabeth Larson, PhD, OTR, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; Susanne Roley, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; Linda Gabriel, PhD, OTR/L, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; Susan Haiman, MPS, OTR/L, FAOTA, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA; Jeff Snodgrass, PhD, OTR, Milligan College, Milligan College, TN; Tammy Richmond, MS, OTR/L, Ultimate Rehab, LLC, Los Angeles, CA Level: Intermediate

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 415 CC 203-204 Using Occupations to Maintain or Improve Cognitive Function in Older Adults
Content Focus: Mental Health Franklin Stein, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Occupational Therapy International, Madison, WI; Guy McCormack, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Samuel Merritt University, Oakland, CA Level: Introductory This session will describe the growing evidence that cognitive function can be maintained or improved when occupational therapists engage clients in functional occupations. The evidence is based on studies on neuroplasticity and aging. Specific strategies and techniques will be demonstrated.

8:00 am–11:00 am WS 412 CC 109-110 Occupational Therapy for the Treatment of Incontinence & Pelvic Floor Disorders
Content Focus: Health & Wellness Brenda Neumann, OTR, BCB-PMD, ProHealth Care, Mukwonago, WI; Tiffany Lee, MA, OTR, BCB-PMD, Central Texas Medical Center, San Marcos, TX Level: Introductory More than 50 million Americans are affected by loss of bladder and bowel

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Welcome to the AOTA 2012 Expo!
Expo Grand Opening and Welcome Reception
Thursday, April 26, 5:30 pm–9:00 pm CC Exhibit Halls BCDE Immediately following the Welcome Ceremony, you will enjoy an OT party of great food, great friends, and great finds in the exhibit booths filling the aisles. Be sure to check out the hundreds of exhibitors ready to offer you products, services, employment opportunities, and so much more!

2012 Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars
Earn .75 Contact Hours (.75 NBCOT PDUs) There are two areas in the Exhibit Hall for Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars, Booth 939 and Booth 1339. Please note the exact location of the seminar you are interested in and arrive early as these seminars are available to all Conference registrants on a first-come, first-seated basis. See pages 92–93 for full descriptions.

AOTA Central: Marketplace & Member Resource Center
Open Throughout all Expo hours n AOTA Central combines the Marketplace and Member Resource Center as the hub in the Exhibit Hall. It is your central source of member value and top-quality AOTA products at special Conference-only pricing, up to 20% off almost everything! n AOTA Press Bookstore—new releases, classic mustreads, bestsellers, and essential resources from AOTA Press, and carefully selected books from other publishers. n AOTA Interactive CE Center—previews and demonstrations of new and forthcoming Self-Paced Clinical Courses, Online Courses, and CEonCD™s. n Educator Corner—high-quality and popular textbooks to take home and review for adoption in the classroom. n OT Month Kiosk—products, tools, and resources to help you demonstrate your pride in occupational therapy and to help you promote your profession to the public. n Author Signing Tables—areas where you can talk to the authors of some of your favorite AOTA Press books and take home autographed copies. n Member Ribbons—our special way each year to highlight and honor AOTA’s dedicated members. n Membership Representatives—available throughout Conference to answer questions, offer updates on AOTA programs and activities, and provide important member information. n Special Interest Section (SIS) Kiosk—the place to learn more about the 11 SIS communities and 4 subsections. n Board and Specialty Certification Kiosk—an excellent opportunity to meet Board Certified and Specialty Certified leaders and staff and discuss the application process and value of certification. n CyberCafé E-mail Access—stay in touch with your family and employer, and write a blog on OT Connections about your Conference experience. n Daily prize drawings to show our gratitude and…
THE EXPO & MORE

Expo Hours
Thursday, April 26 5:30 pm–9:00 pm (unopposed hours*) Friday, April 27 11:00 am–5:30 pm (unopposed hours* are 12:00 pm–2:00 pm) Saturday, April 28 9:30 am–2:30 pm (unopposed hours* are 11:45 am–1:45 pm)

Expo Passes
One-day Expo passes are available at a discounted price to people who are not registered for Conference. Passes are sold onsite only during registration hours (see page 7). Thursday, April 26 $50 per person (includes Welcome Ceremony/Keynote Address and Expo Grand Opening Reception). Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28 $30 per person per day

Expo Hall Pocket Guide
Sponsored by Maddak, Inc. You received a concise, easy-to-carry Expo Pocket Guide in your tote bag at registration. The Guide lists all of the exhibitors, educational sessions, networking opportunities, and AOTA resources in the Exhibit Hall. It includes: n Exhibitor listing by name with booth numbers, descriptions, and contact information. n Exhibitor listing by category such as Activities of Daily Life, Assistive/Adaptive Equipment, Education, Employment/ Recruitment, Rehabilitation Health Care Products/Equipment, Sensory Integration, and many others. n Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars listing with date, time, location, and descriptions. n Exhibit Hall floor plan to help you find exhibitors, products, services, job recruiters. n AOTA Marketplace and Member Resource Center activities, including author signings, membership information, Cyber-Café, and more.

Grand Prize Raffle Drawing!
Saturday, April 28 at 1:00 pm—You must be present to win!

*Expo unopposed hours are those in which no concurrent educational sessions are held.

The Right Tools at the Right Time

At Zaner-Bloser we clearly understand the role occupational therapists have in supporting outcomes in the educational environment. In addition to our complete classroom curriculum for handwriting, Zaner-Bloser Handwriting, we offer two affordable kits with manipulatives and developmentally appropriate teaching tools that occupational therapists love: • Fine Motor Skills Development Kit • On the Road to Writing and Reading PreKindergarten Kit

Benbow Scissors

Zaner-Bloser Handwriting Apps

Wikki Stix®

Digital Resources for Handwriting

Visit us in booth 1415 to discover the right tools for you!

www.zaner-bloser.com • 800.421.3018
ADH0024
CPG-5716

Visit this AOTA Silver Sponsor at Booth 1415
ADH0024_aota_ad_final.indd 1 1/5/12 1:19 PM

Indiana Convention Center Halls B–E
Entrance

Expo Hall Floorplan

Poster Sessions

AOTA Member Resource Center and Marketplace
Snack Concession

Transportation Zone

Exhibitor Sponsored Seminars 1339 939

Exhibitor Sponsored Seminars

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AOTA 2012 Expo Exhibitors
Company Name Booth Number
AOTA Older Driver Initiative ...116 Ardor Health Solutions..935 & 46 ArjoHuntleigh .........................110 Army Medical Recruiting......1109 Aureus Medical Group ..........1104 Avante Group, Inc. ................1232 Avenue Innovations, Inc .........117 Battle Creek Equipment Co.....104 Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation .....................417 BigKeys ......................................12 Bioness Inc. ...........................1117 Blue Sky Designs, Inc. ............835 Blue Sky Therapy ..................1041 Bodysense Midwest/ Bodewell ............................1218 Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College ...633 Brighter Futures For Beautiful Minds .................................1525 Brightlines Paper ......................57 Broda Seating ........................1324 Brooks Rehabilitation ...........1401 BrOT Movement ....................1332 BTE Technologies Inc. ..........1004 Callirobics ..................................70 Calmoseptine, Inc. ..................108 CareerStaff Unlimited ...........1003 Carefoam Inc. ........................1430 CareOne ...................................912 Cariant Health Partners........1219 CASAMBA, Inc. ......................1330 Centra Health ............................56 Century Staffing Solutions .......64 CHAMP Camp..........................233 Chatham University ..................25 Chewy Tubes ............................815 Children’s Care Hospital & School....................................30 Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center ....61 Chrysler Automobility Program ..............................125 Cincinnati Children’s Hospital ...4 Cirrus Medical Staffing ...........433 Classroom Seating Solutions, LLC ..........................................6 Cleveland Clinic ....................1239 ClinicSource Software ............802 Cobb Pediatric Therapy Services ...............................833 3E Love, LLC ...........................133 A.T. Still University....................16 AARP Driver Safety Program..124 Abilitations ..............................401 Academic Therapy Publications Assessments ......................1206 Academy of Lymphatic Studies.................................628 Accelerated Care Plus .............206 Accelerated Rehab Centers ...1315 AccuMed Technology Solutions .............................800 Achieve Beyond (a division of Bilinguals Inc) ....................430 Achievement Products ............407 ACLS and LACLS Committee and Allen Cognitive Network ......14 Active Innovations ..................503 ACVREP .....................................15 Adaptivation Inc ........................51 Adaptive Driving Alliance (ADA) ...................................210 Adaptive Therapy Devices .........38 ADED .......................................114 ADEPT Driver ..........................230 Adjuris Therapy .........................49 Advance Media-MarketingMerchandise ......................1429 Advance My Baby, Inc. ..........1407 Advanced Keyboard Technologies .....................1006 Advanced Medical Personnel Services .............................1226 Advanced Therapy Products, Inc.......................................225 AEGIS Therapies .....................634 Agility Health, Inc. ................1239 Aiutante Inc. ..............................53 Alejandro Duran ........................71 AMBUCS/Amtryke .................1301 American Foundation for the Blind ......................................74 American Printing House for the Blind ......................1316 American Society of Hand Therapists ..........................1311 AMPS Project International, Inc.....................................1304 Amramp .................................1435 Anchorage School District .......75

College Internship Program...534 Columbia Medical Mfg. ...........209 CompHealth ..........................1230 Comprehensive Rehab ..............43 Concept Rehab Inc ....................52 Concorde Career Colleges ......426 Concordia University Wisconsin ..............................10 Createable Learning Concepts ............................1331 Creative Health Solutions ....1312 Creform Corp. .......................1043 Cross Country Education .......130 Cross Country TravCorps........911 Cumberland Therapy Services ...............................834 Dementia Care Specialists ......317 Department of Veterans Affairs (HRRO) ................................516 Discover Student Loans ............59 DriveSafety, Inc. ......................219 Dycem ......................................735 Dysphagia-Diet ........................427 Eastern Kentucky University......1 EBS Healthcare .......................807 EBSCO Publishing ..................526 Elsevier ....................................806 Envision Conference .................26 ERGOGENESIS.......................232 Evergreen Healthcare ...........1411 Experia USA .............................201 F. A. Davis Company................507 Facilitate Rehab Products.....1405 Fairbanks North Star Borough School District ..................1424 Five Star Rehab & Wellness ...903 FlagHouse................................708 Ford Mobility Motoring ..........128 Fox Rehabilitation...................814 Freedom Innovations Inc. ......305 Fulton County Schools .............58 Fun and Function .................1100 G.R.I.P. Solutions ..................1107 GEICO ......................................227 Genesis Rehab Services ..........600 Givmohr Corporation ...............13 GM Mobility .............................117 Got-Autism, LLC .......................68 Governors State University.......41 Grampa’s Garden Inc ................42 Graston Technique ..................213 Greenlight Staffing Services, Inc..........................................60

Greystone Healthcare Management .....................1414 Hallmark Rehabilitation .......1228 Hand Therapy Certification Commission ......................1313 HandiThings, LLC ...................324 Handwriting Without Tears Inc......................................1201 HCR ManorCare ....................1131 Healthcare Staffing Innovations, LLC ..............1334 Healthcare Therapy Services, Inc........................................306 HealtheCareers ......................1317 HealthPRO Rehabiliation .......511 HealthSouth Corporation.....1231 Hi-Dow International Group Inc......................................1235 Hocoma, Inc. .........................1200 Hoggan Health Industries ......235 Home Heart Beats, LLC........1215 iCanSit .....................................316 idapt LLP ...................................62 ImageSport ..............................524 Indiana Occupational Therapy Association ............................54 Indiana University Health.........32 Innovative Senior Care .........1132 Interactive Metronome, Inc....415 Interfysio................................1214 International Clinical Educators, Inc........................................632 IOS Press .................................435 It’s Never 2 Late.......................202 Jackson Therapy Partners.......734 Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center ..................1439 Johns Hopkins Medicine.......1437 Jovipak Corporation ................335 JUMP-IN.......................................2 Kadlec Medical Center ..........1310 Kare Partners ..........................109 Kaye Products, Inc. ...............1326 Kennedy Krieger Institute......328 Kinesio USA .............................900 Kinsman Enterprises, Inc.....1400 Klose Training & Consulting, LLC..................913 Landscape Structures .............113 Lee Memorial Health System .326 Legacy Healthcare Services ......40 Liberty Hardware ..................1300 Life Care Centers of America ...416 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins/ Wolters Kluwer Health .....1110

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Loma Linda University..............44 Los Angeles Unified School District...................................24 Maddak Inc. .............................701 Maddak Awards........................705 Marianjoy Hospital ....................35 Marsh U.S. Consumer .............624 Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital .................................34 Massaging Insoles .................1210 Mat Su Borough School District ......................47 Mayo Clinic ..............................425 McKie Splints, LLC ...................20 MD Anderson Cancer Center ................................1333 MDI Group...............................333 Med Travelers, an AMN Healthcare Company ........1106 Medi USA ...............................1238 Mediscan Staffing Services ...1112 Merritt Manufacturing, Inc. ...331 Misericordia University ...........319 Mobility Works ........................215 Mountain Land Rehabilitation .....................832 Multicultural Diversity and Inclusion (MDI) Networking Groups ............333 Myomo .....................................103 NASCO ...................................1425 National AgrAbility Project...1404 National Rehabilitation Hospital ...............................419 Navajo County Schools ...........107 NBCOT, Inc. ...........................1125 Newman Adaptive........................8 NHC Rehabilitation.................915 NIAMS......................................330 North Coast Medical, Inc.........................1010 & 1011 Norton School of Lymphatic Therapy................................208 Nova Southeastern University ............................733 Novant Health ...........................29 Occupational Therapy Toolkit ..17 OccuPro ...................................501 OJOT/WMU Occupational Therapy................................635 One Leg UP ..................................5 ONR, Inc-Orthopaedic & Neurological Rehabilitation ..........933 Optelec US, Inc......................1314 Orfit Industries America .........810

OTJobLink.org.........................132 OT Practice Photo Booth ........132 OTvest, LLC ...........................1524 Pathways Awareness..................66 Patterson Medical....................601 Pearson Assessments ..............711 PediaStaff, Inc. ........................325 Pediatric Therapy Network .......23 Perceptual Testing, Inc. ..........217 PESI .......................................1213 Pocket Nurse .........................1426 PointScribe ............................1409 Practice Perfect EMR + Management Software........414 Precious Ideas ...........................55 Procare Therapy ....................1319 Progressus Therapy, Inc. ......1101 Proxtalker.com ........................530 Push International ....................73 Quinnipiac University .............626 Raintree Systems, Inc ...........1217 RCM Health Care Services....1225 Real OT Solutions ...................914 Re-Design, LLC .......................200 Reflectx Staffing Services .....1234 Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association ..........45 Rehab Management ................804 RehabCare ...............................801 Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago................................514 Reliant Rehabilitation .............932 Renown Health........................101 Restorative Care of America, Inc......................................1134 Restorative Therapies, Inc. .....315 Resurrection Health Care– Provena Health .....................65 Rifton Equipment .................1209 Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions ..............413 Rush University Medical Center ................................1129 S & S Worldwide .....................707 Saebo........................................525 Salem State University..............39 San Diego CVB ......................1433 San Juan College .......................50 Sante Pediatric Services .........431 Select Rehabilitation Inc. .....1114 Select Therapies ....................1434 Sensamart..............................1412 Shepherd Center .....................901 Shower Buddy, LLC ..............1143

Shumsky Therapeutic Pillows .................................532 Signature HealthCARE, LLC ...533 Silipos ......................................303 Silver Ring Splint Company ...714 Silverchair Learning Systems ...............................204 SLACK Incorporated ...............606 SmartKnit Kids, a brand of Knit-Rite, Inc. ...................1408 Soft Anatomy ...............................3 Soliant Health .........................424 Sommerfly ...................................9 Southpaw Enterprises, Inc. ....515 Spenco Medical .....................1338 St. Catherine University .......1035 St. David’s Healthcare System ...............................1309 St. Joseph Health System .......102 Staffing Options & Solutions ....408 Sunbelt Staffing ....................1308 SunDance Rehabilitation Corp. ..................................1005 Sunrise Medical .......................432 Supplemental Health Care ...1139 Sutter Health East Bay .............67 Systems Technology, Inc ........131 Teachers’ Treasures .................233 Tenura/Maddak .......................813 TFH USA Ltd .........................1039 The Delta Companies ............1335 The Futures HealthCore .........301 The Gideons International .......72 The Handwriting Clinic ............33 The Pencil Grip .....................1325 The ROHO Group..................1432 The TV Teacher........................512 The University of Arizona Medical Center ......................36 The Valley Health System .....1142 Thera-Band & Biofreeze/Performance Health Product .......312 Theracare of New York, Inc. ..1138 Therapeutic Dimensions, Inc./ dba RangeMaster Shoulder Therapy..................................19 Therapeutic Systems.................28 Therapro, Inc...........................400 Therapy Management Corp. ...410 Therapy Source .....................1410 Therapy Staff LLC ...................535 TherapyEd ...............................907 TheraStaff LLC ........................100 Thinking Moves.....................1033

Thomas Jefferson University ...309 Time Timer LLC ....................1327 Tiny Tots Therapy Inc ...............27 Tobii ATI.................................1233 Today in OT ...........................1216 Torbot Group, Inc. ..................318 Tourette Syndrome Association, Inc......................................1113 Towson University .....................18 TriHealth....................................69 U.S. Army Civilian Medical Corps .................................1212 UAB Department of Occupational Therapy ..........11 UCLA Health System ..............529 University of Florida Dept. of OT ....................................116 University of Illinois at Chicago................................732 University of Indianapolis .....1000 University of Kentucky/ AgrAbility Project .................63 University of Michigan Medical Center ....................................37 University of Southern California...........................1032 University of St. Augustine ...1224 University of Utah....................528 University of WisconsinMadison ...................................7 Uplift Technologies Inc .........1115 US Navy Recruiting ...............1416 Vibra Healthcare .....................105 Virginia Commonwealth University ..............................21 VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies .....................1431 Vital Links................................518 WABA Fun, LLC ....................1340 Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Program in Occupational Therapy ......1001 Wee Blossom ...........................332 Weighted Wearables ................429 Western Psychological Services ...............................609 Wikki Stix Co...........................934 Wiley - Blackwell .......................31 Words+ ....................................905 Worldwide Ortho, LLC..............22 WR Medical Electronics Co. ...207 Zaner-Bloser Publishing .......1415 List as of 3/19/12

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Exhibitor-sponsored seminars
There are two areas in the Exhibit Hall for Exhibitor-Sponsored Seminars, Booth 939 and Booth 1339. Please note the exact location of the seminar you are interested in and arrive early as these seminars are available to all Conference registrants on a first-come, first-served basis. Earn .75 Contact Hour (.75 NBCOT PDU/.075 CEU) for attending these seminars.

Seminars taking place in Booth 939
FrIdAy, AprIl 27 12:00 pm–12:45 pm sATurdAy, AprIl 28 10:00 am–10:45 am

Playing The Way to School Readiness: Multisensory Learning Boosts Pre-K Development
Sponsored by Handwriting WIthout Tears Hands-on activities build children’s fine and gross motor skills, but also help young brains master the social and academic skills they need to get set for school. Learn fun, playful strategies to teach early math, writing, and reading to preschoolers in your classroom or practice. 1:00 pm–1:45 pm

The Impact of Therapeutic Listening on Sensory Processing and Motor Control: An Evidence Based Review
Sponsored by Vital Links This presentation will provide an overview of Therapeutic Listening and its use in clinical practice including home, school, and clinical settings. Speakers will review basic elements necessary to develop an individualized Therapeutic Listening protocol as well as current evidence available regarding Therapeutic Listening with various client populations. 12:00 pm–12:45 pm

Helping You Help Your Clients with Dysphagia!
Sponsored by Dysphagia Diet Division of Med-Diet, Inc. We specialize in Dysphagia! Learn about the many supplies available to assure safe swallowing and minimize aspiration. Discover new easy-to-follow videos (English & Spanish) that demonstrate simple food preparation and presentation techniques of the National Dysphagia Diet. Experience the range of texture modified products and adaptive equipment. Leave with new resources. 2:00 pm–2:45 pm

Occupational Therapy Toolkit
Sponsored by Maddak, Inc. 63 evidence-based treatment guides for physical disabilities and geriatrics intended to simplify treatment planning, generate new treatment ideas and increase utilization of OT Services. Each guide is complete with functional limitations, interventions and patient handouts. The guides are helpful for treating patients with less familiar diagnoses and ensure consistent treatment planning for multi-therapist settings.

Make Handwriting Fun: A Multi-Sensory Approach to Writing Using Video Modeling
Sponsored by The TV Teacher, LLC Learn why video modeling is making breakthroughs for children with Autism, DS, and ADD. Review scientific research behind video modeling. Learn best practices of our programs that foster prewriting, and writing letters & numbers. Discuss implementation and applications to RtI and AOTA official statements for easy integration into therapy practices.
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Seminars taking place in Booth 1339
FrIdAy, AprIl 27 12:00 pm–12:45 pm

DLOTCA and DLOTCA-G
Sponsored by Maddak, Inc. Series of cognitive tests that enable a therapist to evaluate clients with neurological deficits in order to obtain a detailed cognitive profile and enable intervention planning for management and maintenance. DLOTCA builds off the research of the original LOTCA and incorporates a dynamic component providing the ability to measure learning potential and recognize thinking strategies through the use of mediation. 1:00 pm–1:45 pm

The ABC’s of “Sit Up and Pay Attention:” Changing Alignment and Base of Support for a More Dynamic Center of Mass To Improve Posture, Function, and Attention
Sponsored by Casual Living Worldwide, Inc. Session on why your current chair fails you and an overview of posture/movement system development from birth. Includes a demonstration of how the “I Can...Sit” promotes correct Alignment, a dynamic Base of support with a mobile Center of mass that activates postural motor units and increases proprioceptive activation, thus improving attention, productivity, and reducing back pain. 2:00 pm–2:45 pm

Cognition, Occupation, and Participation Across the Life Span: Neuroscience, Neurorehabilitation, and Models of Intervention in Occupational Therapy
Edited by Noomi Katz, PhD, OTR Foreword by Beatriz Colon Abreu, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA The translation of cognitive neuroscience into occupational therapy practice is a required competence that helps practitioners understand human performance and provides best practice in the profession. This comprehensive new edition represents a significant advancement in the knowledge translation of cognition and its theoretical and practical application to occupational therapy practice with children and adults. Chapters, written by leaders in an international field, focus on cognition that is essential to everyday life. A must-read book for occupational therapy professionals and students to consider cognitive intervention strategies as critical to promote occupation-based, client-centered care and everyday participation in a fuller life!

Assistive Technology for Handwriting: Successful, Interactive Instruction for All
Co-Presenters: Diane Wheeler and Pat O’Neill, Zaner-Bloser National Literacy Consultants

Sponsored by Zaner-Bloser, The Language Arts and Reading Company Whether it is designated in the IEP or not, everyone is more engaged in learning when material is presented in a fun, interactive way. At this seminar you will learn how to initiate handwriting instruction with auditory (music, too), visual, and kinesthetic strategies working from gross to fine motor skills using interactive whiteboard technology. An added bonus is that the process provides opportunities for shoulder stabilization as well as wrist extension development. Come have fun with us and be prepared to “get your wiggle on!”

Order #1173B AOTA Members: $89 Nonmembers: $126

BK-267

To order, call 877-404-AOTA, or visit http://store.aota.org/view/?SKU=1173B
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Indiana Convention Center
Level 1

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Level 2

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JW Marriott Indianapolis
Level 3

Level 2

White River Conference Level

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2012 Call for papers reviewers
AOTA thanks the following reviewers for their time and effort reviewing more than 650 submissions for the 2012 Annual Conference & Expo.
Dan Allison Robinette Amaker Debbie Amini Lori Andersen Rebecca Argabrite-Grove Elizabeth Barstow Carolyn Baum Mary Baxter Jeryl Benson Wanda Berg Andrea Bilics Kay Blose Stefanie Bodison Jessica Bolduc Abby Brayton Barbara Brockevelt Susan Cahill Karen Ann Cameron Cynthia Campbell Carrie Carlson Jennifer Carton-Wade Jane Case Smith Roxanne Castaneda Danila Cepa Carla Chase Lynn Chatfield Beth Chiariello Denise Chisholm Joseph Cipriani Malachy Clancy Ellen Cohn Amy Collins Leora Comis Donna Costa Jane Cox Michelle Cullen Lea Curcio Elin Schold Davis Martha Davis Kimberly Davis Kate DeCleene Elizabeth DeIuliis Joan Delahunt Janet DeLany Beth Deverix Anne Dickerson Denise Donica Nancy Doyle M. Louise Dunn Kathryn Eberhardt
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Rhonda Edwards Erin Eitzmann Melanie Ellexson Sharon Elliott Jack Engsberg Judy Ericksen Robert Ferguson Emilie Ferranti Thomas Fisher Kathleen Foley Erin Foster Lauren Foster Jennifer Friesema Diane Gaffney Frank Gainer Susan Garber Jamie Geraci Lesley Geyer Lynn Gitlow Coralie Glantz Cynthia Grapczynski Mary Greer Christina Griffin Yvette Hachtel Dorothy Handley-More Debra Hanson Ellen Harrington-Kane Neil Harvison Mary Hendricks E. Adel Herge Susan Hermes Sarah Hertfelder Debi Hinerfeld Nancy Hollins Delana Honaker Julie Honan Beverly Horowitz Jean Hsieh Tia Hughes Michelle Hunter Roger Ideishi Meenakshi Iyer Heather Jackson-Pena Anne James Anne Jenkins Gavin Jenkins Vanessa Jewell Paige Johns Andre Johnson Robin Jones

Ricky Joseph Katherine Judge Jennifer Kaldenberg Kathleen Kannenberg Vicki Kaskutas Pamalyn Kearney Stephen Kern Amanda Kessler Mary Kientz Christyna Kiesel Riqiea Kitchens Mark Kovic Emily Kringle Sheama Krishnagiri Christine Kroll Sharon Kufuerst Penny Kyler Shelly Lane Elizabeth Lannigan Mara Levine Kathryn Levit Deborah Lieberman Susan Lin Jesse LoBreglio Sheila Longpre’ Arlene Lorch Kathryn Loukas Gloria Lucker Kathleen Lyons Cathy Lysack Vivian Madison Wanda Mahoney Michelle Malone Teresa May-Benson Sharon McCloskey Randy McCombie Ann Mcdonald Susan McDuff Tina McNulty Thomas Mernar Bernadette Mineo Gail Miyahira Sheri Montgomery Cheryl Morris Mary Muhlenhaupt Lauro Munoz Susan Murphy Erin Muston-Firsch Marsha Neville-Smith Rebecca Nicholson Izel Obermeyer Linda Olson Meira Orentlicher Robyn Otty Kavitha Padmanabhan Jane Painter L. Diane Parham Judith Parker Suzanne Perea

Andrew Persch Christine Peters Gabrielle Petruccelli Mary Phillips Stoykov Noralyn Pickens Derek Piggott Mara Podvey Janet Poole Emily Pugh Beth Pyatak Ketki Raina Ellen Rainville Douglas Rakoski Chelsea Randall Yvonne Randall Timothy Reistetter Stacey Reynolds Linda Riccio Martin Rice Pamela Roberts Regula Robnett Penny Rogers Joan Rogers Susan Rogowski Shawn Roll Becky Russell Amy Russell-Yun Michelle Savrann Sandra Schefkind Mylene Schriner Winifred Schultz-Krohn Emily Schulz Francine Seruya Loretta Sherwood Deborah Yarett Slater Karen Smith Diane Smith Theresa Smith Divya Sood Jeanine Stancanelli Dee Stanfield Leah Stein Regena Stevens-Ratchford Virginia (Ginny) Stoffel Pamela Story Yvonne Swinth Melissa Tilton Pamela Toto Catherine Trombly Latham Tracy Van Oss Laura Vogtle Kimberly Walker Don Walkovich Renee Watling Carla Wilhite Timothy Wolf Jo Anne Wright

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnFErEnCE & ExpO

2013 CALL FOR PAPERS
AOTA 93rd Annual Conference & Expo • San Diego, CA • April 25–28, 2013
PROPOSAL DEADLINE: JUNE 29, 2012
AOTA invites you to share your practice innovations, research, and experiences by submitting a proposal to present at the 93rd Annual Conference & Expo in San Diego, California, April 25-28, 2013. Proposals can be submitted at any time from May 14 until midnight June 19, 2012. Log on to the AOTA Web site at www.aota.org and click on “Call for Papers.” Complete instructions are available online. The theme for 2013 is, From Heartfelt Leadership to Compassionate Care. You are encouraged to submit proposals that include these concepts within the practice of occupational therapy. For each proposal submitted, you will be asked to choose from one of the following session types: Institute (full day), Workshop (3 hours), Short Course (90 minutes), Research Platform (90 minutes or 60 minutes), Research Paper (30 minutes), Tech Day lab session, or a Poster Session. You will also be prompted to identify a primary and secondary content focus, selecting from a menu of options that reflect an array of subject matter and categories. These content focus selections are used to categorize sessions in the Conference program and to assist the proposal reviewers in selecting topics relating to their expertise. Please make your selections carefully. Proposals will be peer reviewed from June 27 to August 8, 2012 and final selections will be made in early fall. This peer review is based solely on the content and quality of the written proposal (i.e., the title, content focus, learning objectives, abstract and synopsis, references, and completeness of the submission). Neither names nor affiliations are provided to the reviewers. All submissions are given equal opportunity, and names of both submitters and reviewers remain anonymous. Written notification of proposal acceptance or non acceptance will be sent in early October 2012. Note: For first time submitters, please be sure to review “How to Submit a Proposal” on the AOTA Web site at www.aota.org.

Your involvement determines the outstanding professional development opportunities that AOTA continues to deliver. Please accept this invitation to submit your proposal for the premier educational opportunity of the year—the AOTA 93rd Annual Conference & Expo!
If you have any questions or concerns or require assistance, please e-mail conference@aota.org or call 800-SAY-AOTA, ext. 2830 (members) or 301-652-6611, ext. 2830 (nonmembers or local callers), and AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnFErEnCE & ExpO we will be pleased to assist you.

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2012 Meetings schedule
All official and commission meetings of the Association are open for audit by the membership, except when deliberations of a confidential nature are occurring. TuEsdAy, AprIl 24 7:30 am–5:00 pm
Program Directors Education Council Meeting
JW White River Ballroom F Sponsored by Fox Rehabilitation, Slack Incorporated, Therapy Ed, Zaner-Bloser

FrIdAy, AprIl 27 12:00 pm–2:00 pm
MDI Network Leadership Meeting
JW Rooms 101–102

sATurdAy, AprIl 28 7:00 am–5:30 pm
ACOTE Meeting
JW Rooms 103–104

KEy TO ABBrEVIATIOns
CC: Indiana Convention Center JW: JW Marriott Indianapolis
Convention Center Room Section(s)

3:30 pm–3:45 pm
(SIS) EDSIS Fieldwork Subsection Annual Program
(SC 225) CC Wabash Ballroom 2

8:00 am–8:20 am
(SIS) PDSIS Annual Program
(WS 300) CC Wabash Ballroom 2

CC 105AB See floorplans on pages 94–96.

8:00 am–8:20 am
(SIS) DDSIS Annual Program
(WS 305) CC 123–124

4:40 pm–5:00 pm 1:30 pm–5:00 pm
RA Task Groups
JW Room 201–205

(SIS) EDSIS Annual Program (WS 210) CC 101–102

12:15 pm–1:15 pm
AOTA’s 92nd Annual Business Meeting
CC Exhibit Halls FG

7:00 pm–9:00 pm
Association of Asian/Pacific Occupational Therapists in America
JW White River Ballroom A

9:00 am–3:00 pm
Assembly of Student Delegates Steering Committee Meeting
JW 103

6:30 pm–9:30 pm
Doctoral Network Reception and Annual Meeting
JW White River Ballroom HIJ

1:45 pm–2:00 pm
(SIS) WISIS Annual Program
(SC 317) CC 122

7:00 pm–9:00 pm THursdAy, AprIl 26 7:00 am–3:30 pm
2012 Representative Assembly Meeting
JW White River Ballroom E

3:30 pm–6:00 pm
Assembly of Student Delegates Meeting
JW Grand Ballroom 1–2 Sponsored by RehabCare

Black Occupational Therapy Caucus
JW White River Ballroom BC

2:55–3:15 pm
(SIS) AMSIS Annual Program
(SC 316) CC Sagamore Ballroom 1

7:00 pm–9:00 pm
The Network for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Concerns in OT
JW White River Ballroom D

6:30 pm–9:30 pm
National VA OT Meeting
JW 309–310

7:30 am–8:30 am WEdnEsdAy, AprIl 25 7:00 am–5:30 pm
Assembly of Student Delegates
JW Grand Ballroom 1–2

AJOT Editorial Board Meeting
JW White River Ballroom AB

7:00 pm–9:00 pm
IOTA Member Appreciation Celebration
JW White River Ballroom G-I

7:00 pm–9:00 pm
The Network for Native American Practitioners
JW Room 105

8:00 am–8:15 am
(SIS) EDSIS Faculty Subsection Annual Program
(SC104) CC Sagamore Ballroom 1

7:30 am–12:00 pm
Program Directors Education Council
JW White River Ballroom F Sponsored by Fox Rehabilitation, Slack Incorporated, Therapy Ed, Zaner-Bloser

7:00 pm–9:00 pm
Network of Practitioners with Disabilities (ICW)
JW White River Ballroom H

sundAy, AprIl 29 8:00 am–8:30 am
(SIS) Joint SISIS and MHSIS Annual Program
(WS 402) CC Wabash Ballroom 1

8:30 am–8:45 am
(SIS) EISSIS Annual Program
(WS 100) CC Wabash Ballroom 1

12:30 pm–1:00 pm
(SIS) HCHSIS Annual Program
(WS 111) CC Wabash Ballroom 2

7:00 pm–10:30 pm
Shabat Services/Glatt Kosher Shabat Dinner organized by OJOTC
JW Rooms 101–102

7:00 am–4:30 pm
ACOTE Meeting
JW Rooms 103–104

3:00 pm–3:30 pm 8:00 am–5:00 pm
ASAP Meeting
JW White River Ballroom AB Sponsored by Affiniscape, Inc.

(SIS) Gerontology Annual Program
(WS 109) CC 103–104

7:00 pm–9:00 pm
Terapia Occupacional para Diversidad, Oportunidad y Solidaridad (TODOS)
JW White River Ballroom I

3:10 pm–3:30 pm
(SIS) AMSIS Private Practice Subsection Annual Program
(WS 116) CC Sagamore Ballroom 7

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presenters Index
A Abisamra, Matt ..................56 Abrams, Naomi......29, 75, 81 Acord-Vira, Stephania .......63 Acre, Catherine..................46 Adamek, Lori .....................78 Adams, Elaine ....................23 Addison, Lesley ..................84 Aguire, Mary Beth .......38, 82 Ainsworth, Elizabeth.........59 Akright, Anne ....................86 Allen, Patricia ..............38, 82 Allison, Jr., C. Dan .............26 Altenburger, Peter .............86 Alterio, Christopher ..........71 Amaker, Robinette .. 12, 17, 24 Amini, Debbie ....................76 Andersen, Lori ...................71 Anderson, Jennifer ............44 Anderson, Terrance .....44, 65 Andrejko, Linda .................82 Anziano, Victoria ...............63 Arbesman, Marian ......21, 23, 29, 60 Arthur, Paul .......................64 Arzillo, Kim .......................82 Asher, Asha ........................64 Ashpole, Emily ............30, 65 Ausderau, Karla .................48 Austin, Sarah .....................84 Avery, Charlene .................17 Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa ................65 B Babb, Alison .......................85 Bah, Fatoumata .................68 Baker, Nancy..........19, 47, 86 Baker, Pamela Hudson......51 Balcerzak, Katherine.........24 Banda, Socorro ..................64 Banks, Katie.......................46 Bansil, Sapna .....................84 Barney, Karen ....................83 Barstow, Elizabeth ......19, 40 Bartnik, Lindsay ................83 Barton, Rebecca ..........58, 67 Bassham, Laine .................58 Bates, Kristen ....................24 Bathje, Molly .....................39 Battle, Rochelle .................68 Baum, Carolyn .....14, 46, 50, 77, 83 Baxter, Mary.......................79 Bayston, Kimberly.............55 Bazyk, Susan .....................24 Beasley, Jeanine...........22, 26 Beck, Alison .......................50 Beck, Karla ........................67 Beckley, Margaret..............19 Bedell, Gary .................68, 85 Bednarski, Julie ...........67, 68 Beehm, Chelsea .................68 Beitman, Candace .......44, 68 Beitzel, Tara .......................84 Bender, Jesse .....................85 Bendixen, Roxanna ..........44, 61, 85 Benham, Sara ....................66 Bennett, Kasie ...................81 Bent, Margaret ..................78 Berg, Brett .........................54 Berger, Cheri .....................82 Berger, Sue ......22, 43, 69, 82 Berg-Weger, Marla ............17 Berro, Michele ...................26 Berry, Caroline ..................50 Berthelette, Michael..........70 Bickmore, Tammy .............25 Bielanski, Kevin ................65 Biggers, Linda ...................74 Bilics, Andrea.........26, 61, 88 Binder, Ali ..........................46 Black, Roxie .......................79 Black, Teri ..........................76 Blackwell, Angela ..............71 Blanchard, Jeanine............49 Blanchard, Shirley ............29 Blanche, Erna Imperatore ......57, 87 Blanton, Sarah ..................82 Bledsoe, Cherie..................30 Boardman, Sam.................65 Bobell, Stiev.......................41 Boehrer, Rachel .................58 Bogenrief, Jennifer...........21, 52, 76 Bohrer, Alicia .....................42 Bolor, Shelley ....................66 Bonacci, Lauren ..........37, 70 Bondoc, Salvador .......41, 47, 56, 58, 60 Bordner, Stacie ..................68 Borrero, Hector .................19 Bourgoing, Philippe ..........73 Bourke-Taylor, Helen .25, 30, 61 Bowman, O. Jayne .............81 Bowyer, Patricia...........64, 70 Boyd, Margaret ............63, 71 Boyne, Pierce .....................63 Bracciano, Alfred .........17, 46 Brand, Rebecca ..................81 Brandenburg, Erin ............44 Brandenburger-Shasby, Sharon ............................65 Brandt, Lea ........................74 Brasseur, Cecily .................17 Braun, Danielle .................37 Braveman, Brent .........51, 72 Bray, Leslie ........................85 Breeden, Lori.........21, 67, 68 Brems, Kaitlyn ..................38 Bresnahan, Jacqueline ......85 Brewer, Megan...................37 Brewster, Kristin ...............84 Briones, Annalia ................23 Broadnax, Angela ..............66 Brockmeyer, Liz ................46 Brogan, Colette .................82 Brooks, Johnell..................17 Brown, Ashley....................66 Brown, Catana .......21, 30, 71 Brown, Danielle...........63, 85 Brown, Elena Donoso .....47, 63, 69 Brown, Jessie ...............44, 60 Brown, Michelle ................76 Broyer, Julia.......................85 Brusylivska, Valerie ...........64 Buch, Samantha................70 Buchanan, Brandi .............37 Buckner, Marcy ...........75, 76 Budinic, Lisa......................44 Buelsing, Jennifer .............64 Bunch, June ......................58 Burger, Kaitlyn ..................82 Burik, Jerry........................70 Burke, Anne.......................17 Burke, Janice .....................26 Burkhardt, Ann .................81 Burkholder, Kendra ..........30 Burtner, Patricia................44 Burton, Sarah ....................29 Burwash, Susan.................66 Buttiglieri, Rebecca...........85 C Cadavid, Maria ...................42 Calhoun, Alison .................82 Calk, Patti ..........................76 Call, Anna ..........................63 Cameron, Karen Ann ........74 Campbell, Claudine ...........70 Canciamille, Brogan .........70 Cannon, Nancy ..................17 Cano, Ruth.........................84 Cara, Elizabeth ..................17 Carbonell, Fern .................60 Carey, Paula .......................81 Carley, Elizabeth .........17, 21 Carlin-Rogers, Fran ..........22 Carlotti, Taylor ..................82 Carr, Amanda .........73, 76, 77 Carr, Cynthia .....................83 Carrasco, Ricardo ..............59 Carrlson, Roberta ..............42 Carroll, Laura ....................44 Carter, Kimberly................54 Cartledge, Caryn................68 Carver, Jaime .....................66 Case, Whitney ....................84 Casola, Shannon ...............43 Cason, Jana ............56, 73, 79 Cater-Cyker, Jill .................77 Cates, Jesse ........................83 Cauchie, Arienne ...............41 Cepa, Danila.......................63 Cermak, Sharon ................69 Chagdes, Stephanie ...........86 Chalik, Sandee...................46 Champagne, Tina... 51, 72, 87 Chan, Frankie ....................74 Chandler, Barbara .............19 Chang, Pei-Fen ..................76 Chapman, Amy ..................58 Chase, Carla .......................87 Chase, Nicole .....................65 Chen, Wei-Chang ..............68 Cheney, Patricia ................81 Chew, Felicia .... 17, 19, 22, 70 Chien, Diana ......................67 Chin, Stephanie.................53 Chisholm, Denise ..............76 Christman, Melodie...........83 Cino, James .................29, 78 Cipriani, Joseph.................44 Clark, Florence ......11, 14, 58 Clark, Gloria Frolek ...19, 22, 52 Clark, Jenny .......................83 Clark, Kelli.........................68 Clark, Melissa ....................82 Clarke, Lynne ....................83 Classen, Sherrilene ...........17 Cleary, Dennis .............30, 41 Clerico, Carol...............63, 75 Clinger, Matthew ...............39 Clonan, Sheila ...................87 Cohen, Sara .......................87 Cohn, Ellen........................69 Coker-Bolt, Patricia....30, 54, 65 Colaianni, Donna ..............76 Colletti, Michelle ...............67 Collins, Laura ....................53 Comparetto, Heather ........42 Connors, Brian ..................84 Conti, Gerry ...........60, 76, 87 Cook, William ....................49 Cooke, Deirdre ..................51 Cooper, Marisa ...................44 Cooper, Megan...................82 Copolillo, Albert ..........21, 85 Coppard, Brenda .........17, 46 Coppola, Susan ............75, 82 Copses, Staci......................71 Corcoran, Maggie ..............65 Corcoran, Mary......51, 60, 70 Costa, Donna ...............37, 87 Coster, Wendy..............21, 43 Costin, Laura .....................68 Cote, Jennifer ....................25 Cottos, Andrea ...................71 Countee, Sandra....42, 63, 71 Cox, Jane ......................55, 71 Cox, Marcia ..................19, 51 Crabtree, Jeffrey ................71 Crabtree, Lisa ....................24 Crepeau, Elizabeth ............46 Cresser, Lauren .................82 Crisp, Meghan ...................64 Crist, Patricia.....................22 Crosby, Petra .....................85 Crowder, Jennifer ..............44 Crowley, Denise .................44 Culshaw, Mary ...................85 Cunningham, Ashlyn ........70 Cunningham, Robert ........86 Curran, Megan ..................44 D Dale, Lucinda ........41, 67, 69 Dallas, Jeanenne ................66 D’Amico, Mariana..............56 Damush, Teresa .................86 Daniel, Leah.......................37 Daniel, Mary Ellen ............78 Danielson, Marnie .............85 Darragh, Amy ..............26, 37 Dashner, Jessica...........55, 83 Dastice, Marissa.................78 Davenport, Rick.................55 Davidson, Debora ..............42 Davidson, Harriett.............40 Davis, Chris .......................53 Davis, Diana .......................54 Davis, Elin Schold ......17, 19, 22, 52, 70 Davis, Jan ...............29, 71, 74 Davis, Kristen ........63, 67, 85 de Jonge, Desleigh ............59 de Leon, Vanessa ...............63 Deavours, Amy ..................67 DeBaun, Erin.....................86 DeCleene, Kate .....41, 42, 64, 68, 74 DeIuliis, Elizabeth.............87 DeLany, Janet ....................24 Dellinger, Ashley ...............40 Demchick, Barbara ...........78 Dennis, Carole ... 42, 66, 77, 82 DeRosa, Jennifer..........19, 51 Deshaies, Lisa ....................26 DeVries, Cathie ..................85 Diamant, Rachel................82 Diaz, Jesus .........................57 Dickerson, Anne ...17, 29, 39, 63, 65, 66, 70, 85 Dierks, Tracy................69, 86 Dieterle, Camille .........29, 87 DiGiovanni, Nicole ............44 Dimitropoulou, Katherine........................85 Dixon, Holly.......................43 Dobyns, Karen ...................71 Dodge, Carole ....................56 Doehler, Carol .............19, 53 Doherty, John ....................73 Doherty, Regina.................40 Dolhi, Cathy.......................76 Doll, Joy .............................60 Dollar, Hilary .....................40 Domanico, Joseph .............71 Donica, Denise ...........38, 43, 63, 67, 75, 83 Dorne, Rachelle .................64 Dorsey, Julie ................24, 56 Dostal, Robyn ....................44 Downing, Donna .........49, 58 Doyle, Nancy......................46 Dratnol, Rachel .................83 Dresslar, Ashley .................58 Drew, Neal .........................68 Drinkwater, Mysti ..............24 Dubin, Steven ....................60

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnFErEnCE & ExpO

101

Dudgeon, Brian .................61 Dunbar, Christopher .........85 Dunbar, Sandee .................68 Dunn, M. Louise................26 Dunn, Winnie ..............55, 71 Duran, Gerri ......................19 Durham, Diane............44, 83 Dye, Lauren .......................86 E Eakman, Aaron..................30 East, Mary Ellen ................76 Ebert, Heather...................83 Ehlers, Emily.....................68 Ehrenfried, Holly ..............75 Eichler, Jeanne ..................82 Einck, Carrie .....................66 Ekelman, Beth...................40 Eldridge, Caitlin ................85 Ellerin, Bruce ....................81 Elliott, Sharon.............50, 52 Emery, Lynnda ..................44 Engsberg, Jack ..................30 Erez, Asnat Bar-Haim .......57 Erfurth, Amy .....................81 Ericksen, Judy ...................67 Esbrook, Cheryl.................87 Eskow, Karen.....................78 Evans, Alyssa .....................25 Evans, Andrea ....................70 Evenson, Mary ...................22 Eyler, Steven ......................81 F Fahrer, Emily.....................65 Fair-Field, Teresa ...............82 Faller, Patricia ...................48 Falzarano, Mary.....44, 64, 67 Fanchiang, Shanpin ..........29 Fannon, Angie ...................37 Farmer, Michelle ...29, 79, 87 Ferguson, Robert .......21, 60, 67, 77 Fernando, Lichelle ............54 Ferrell, Jennifer.................40 Festa, Laura .......................85 Filippi-Johns, Aili ..............66 Finch, Denise ....................72 Fingerhut, Patricia............82 Finley, William ......44, 81, 86 Fischer, Sara ......................86 Fishbain, Keren .................47 Fisher, Grace .....................49 Fisher, Thomas ..................21 Fleetwood, Diane...............82 Fleming-Castaldy, Rita......67 Fletcher, Tina...............79, 81 Flinn, Sharon ....................65 Flowers, Donna .................72 Fogo, Jennifer....................21 Fong, Matthew ..................86 Foran, Amanda ............69, 79 Forsythe, Laci ....................86 Foster, Erin ........................38 Foster, Lauren .............55, 71 Fox, LaVonne .....................87 Foy, Teresa ...................30, 65 Frazier, Donna ...................67

Frederick, Dorothy............64 Frey, Nicole........................41 Fricker, Debra....................58 Fulk, George ......................63 Fuller, Erin ........................64 Furphy, Kimberly ..............17 G Gabriel, Linda ....................88 Gahimer, Julie ...................73 Gainer, Frank.....................60 Garbarini, Jan ..............63, 71 Gardner, Jennifer ..............46 Gately, Megan ....................40 Gayle, Marissa....................33 Gebke, Lacey......................86 Gee, Bryan ...................40, 73 Genter, Lois .......................40 Gentry, Tony ....17, 54, 58, 77 George, Brenda..................29 Geraci, Jamie .....................19 Germain, Amie Engel .......66 Getty, Sean...................78, 84 Gibson, Ginny....................39 Giles, Gordon ........39, 50, 58 Gill, Simone.................24, 66 Gillen, Glen .......................58 Gillette, James ...................24 Gillis, Kathryn ...................38 Giroux, Peter .....................64 Gitlow, Lynn ......................76 Giuffrida, Clare ............38, 82 Gladson, Beth ....................82 Glass, Melinda ...................79 Gleason, Kara ....................44 Glennon, Tara ....................19 Glover, Sharon...................88 Godar, Britteny ..................49 Goins, Amy ..................38, 75 Golden, Kerri.....................67 Golisz, Kathleen ................29 Gonzales, Albert ................66 Gonzales, Samuel..............53 Gonzales, Jr., Florie...........75 Gonzalez, Natalie ..............68 Goodson, Nicole ................30 Goodwin, Cynthia .............41 Gordon, Brittany ...............38 Gornish, Sabrina ...............38 Grajo, Lenin.......................42 Grampurohit, Namrata .....37 Grandmaison, Jolene ........37 Grant, Katharine ...............85 Grass, Audrey ....................68 Graves, Susan ....................24 Gray, Betsey .......................39 Gray, Elizabeth ..................82 Greenberg, Norma ............75 Greenfield, Emily ..............64 Griffin, Christine .........65, 76 Griffin, Megan ...................66 Griswold, Lou Ann ............54 Grosenheider, Amy............44 Grossman, Judy .................23 Groth, Robin......................64 Grueninger, Chelsea .........85 Gruner, Prisca ...................44 Guenther, Deirdre .............86

Guerrette, Sue ...................67 Guertin, Susan ..................76 Guida, Christina ................23 Gupta, Jyothi .........19, 26, 87 Gurock, Noah ....................58 Guthrie, Ramona...............63 H Hager, Mary .......................73 Hahn, Michelle ..................55 Haiman, Susan ..................88 Haines, Catherine .............40 Hall, Jacqueline .................37 Hallgrimson, Shannon .....46 Halloran, Cindy .................86 Halverson, Andrea .............84 Hamilton, Abigail ..............85 Hamilton, Anita.....66, 71, 86 Hamilton, Toby Ballou ......17 Hamrick, Marybeth ...........66 Han, Areum .......................49 Handley-More, Dottie .......56 Hanft, Barbara ...................58 Hannes, Florence ..............67 Hansen, Anne Marie....41, 68 Hansen, Piper ....................22 Hanson, Debra.......26, 70, 85 Hardin, Meghan ................67 Harney, Leeann .................55 Harrison, Marisa................82 Hart, Marisa .......................41 Hartmann, Kim ...........73, 79 Harvison, Neil.............19, 24, 26, 50, 59 Hauberg, Jessica ................82 Hayden, Cynthia................78 Hayes, Terry .......................39 Hayner, Kate ......................39 Heacock, Rose ...................66 Head, Elizabeth .................26 Heerdink, Julie ..................66 Heichel, Kourtney .............65 Heinle, Donna ...................58 Heisler, Lauren ............30, 65 Helfrich, Christine ......44, 84 Hemphill, Barbara.............74 Henry, Diana......................73 Herge, E. Adel....................44 Herold, Jennifer ................65 Hersch, Gayle ... 37, 40, 64, 68 Hewitt, Pamela ..................41 Hicks, Terrence ...........44, 85 Hildebrand, Mary ... 37, 46, 86 Hildenbrand, Wendy .........63 Hildreth, Nancy .................60 Hill, Valerie ........................83 Hilton, Claudia ............64, 85 Hinerfeld, Debi ..................71 Hinton, Katie.....................86 Hirschman, Aura ...............74 Hitchon, Jennifer ........23, 76 Hobbs, Midge.....................71 Holecek, Gina ....................82 Hollebone, Shawna ...........85 Hollenbeck, Jan ...........58, 77 Holloway, Jade ...................39 Honaker, DeLana.........29, 73 Hooper, Barb ...............26, 61

Hopkins, Judy ..............54, 74 Horton, Ayana ...................61 Host, Helen..................46, 86 Hostetter, Julia ..................85 Houlihan, Samantha.........46 Hovey, Taylor .....................25 Howard, Whitney ..............37 Howell, Karen....................83 Howells, Valerie .................83 Hoyt, Catherine .................83 Hubbard, Kurt .............67, 73 Hughes, Jennifer ...............87 Hughes, Jill........................85 Hughes, Tia........................19 Hull, Anne .........................46 Humbert, Tamera........64, 82 Hunt, Joanne .....................48 Hutchinson, Shirley..........40 Hutchison-Maravilla, Kelley ..............................17 Huynh, Dung (Aaron) .......66 I Icenogle, Julia ...................66 Ideishi, Roger ....................72 Inenaga, Leslie ..................84 Iyer, Meenakshi .................87 J Jackson, Ashlei ..................40 Jackson, Leslie...................22 Jackson, Liberty ................71 Jackson-Pena, Heather .....................77, 83 Jacobs, Karen .............24, 46, 66, 79, 85 James, Anne.......................88 Janke, Tom.........................17 Janson, J. Robin ................17 Jarrard, Courtney ..............30 Jedlicka, Janet ...................19 Jefferson, Monica ..............82 Jeffries, Katrina .................67 Jenkins, Anne ....................75 Jenkins, Dorothea .............65 Jensen, Lou........................46 Jewell, Vanessa ..................66 Jia, Jasmine .......................66 Jirikowic, Tracy .....47, 60, 82 Johanningsmeier, Kaley....40 Johns, Paige .......................83 Johnson, Amy ....................41 Johnson, Brandon .............24 Johnson, Eileen .................68 Johnson, Erik ... 24, 71, 74, 77 Johnson, Tomi ...................38 Johnston, Brenda ..............19 Johnston, Mark..................72 Jordan, Katie ...............29, 87 Jose, Anila ..........................68 Juckett, Lisa.......................65 Julien, Marie ......................48 Justice, Denise.............46, 86 Justiss, Michael .................29 K Kafantaris, Karen ..............81 Kail, Christina ...................67

Kaldenberg, Jennifer ........59, 78, 84 Kammerer, Jacklyn ...........37 Kamp, Kristin ....................43 Kane, Kathleen ..................67 Kao, Ying-Chia ..................65 Kapadia, Sheetal ................64 Kardachi, Julie ..................54 Karger, Jesse ......................67 Karpel, Alicia .....................82 Kaseff, Jodi.........................42 Kaskutas, Vicki ..................71 Kasyan-Itzkowitz, Pamela ............................75 Katz, Lisa .....................38, 82 Katz, Noomi ......................57 Katzaman, Timothy ..........81 Kaur, Bhupinder................41 Kay, Sonia ..........................63 Keglovits, Marian ..............23 Kelleher, Caitlin ................30 Keller, Kathleen.................43 Kelly, Claire .......................85 Kennedy, Timothy .............60 Kennell, Heather ...............58 Kent, Judith Parker...........59 Kern, Stephen .............37, 64 Kessler, Amanda ..........54, 67 Khetani, Mary ....................22 Kientz, Mary ......................48 Kiggins, Elizabeth .............73 Kim, Grace...................44, 85 Kinder, James ....................49 King, Courtney ..................64 King, Rosalie .....................44 Kinnealey, Moya ................87 Kitching, Heather .......46, 79 Klamm, Maria....................26 Kleindienst, Lindsey .........66 Kline, Francis Woodard ....30 Klohr, Cheryl .....................64 Knecht-Sabres, Lisa ..........46 Knis-Matthews, Laurie......64 Koenig, Kristie ......39, 71, 78 Koger, Lauren....................21 Kohl, Ralph..................57, 74 Kolodiy, Karina..................64 Kolodner, Ellen .................44 Koomar, Jane .....................87 Koontz, Leah .....................66 Kornblau, Barbara.......39, 75 Korus, Tara ........................83 Koski, Jeanette ............70, 85 Kovic, Mark .................46, 85 Kramer, Kathleen ..............22 Kramer, Paula....................53 Kraus, Linsey.....................86 Kreider, Consuelo..............44 Krimer, Yana......................64 Krimker, Susy....................71 Krishnagiri, Sheama ....61, 66 Kroll, Christine ...........21, 75 Kroll, Penina .....................64 Krugman, Rachael ............65 Krusen, Nancy ...................47 Krzywiecki, Caitlyn ...........81 Kucsan, Laura ...................42 Kurfuerst, Sharon .............75

102

AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnFErEnCE & ExpO

Kurtenbach, Janelle ..........66 Kwebetchou, Nadine .........71 Kyse, Caitlin ......................46 L Laas, Cassandra .................83 LaCroix, Tynisha..........38, 68 Lakatos, Hajnalka..............85 Lambert, William ..............17 Lane, Shelly .......................82 Lange, Jessica ....................71 Langer, Danit .....................57 Lannigan, Elizabeth ..........49 Lantieri, Linda...................17 Larin, Hélène...............77, 82 Larson, Elizabeth ..............88 Lau, Cynthia ................24, 66 Laurendi, Kelly ..................83 Lawson, Marvin .................81 Leach, Cassandra...............84 Lear, Whitney ....................63 LeBlanc, Kori ....................84 Lebovits, Rachel ................49 Lecey, Valeree ....................26 Lee, Sun .............................33 Lee, Tiffany ........................88 Legaspi, Maelyn .................41 Leigh, Iris ..........................64 Leland, Natalie ...........19, 51, 52, 78 Lenze, Eric.........................46 Lerner, Danette .................58 LeSage, Tammy .................83 Leung, Barbara ..................81 Levine, Peter......................60 Levit, Kathryn ...................58 Lewis, Elizabeth ................49 Li, Chih-Ying .....................84 Lieberman, Deborah ........21, 24, 29, 61 Liew, Sook-Lei ...................65 Lim, Yoonjeong .................85 Lin, Janice .........................30 Lin, Susan..............23, 75, 77 Linck, Amanda ..................68 Lindstrom-Hazel, Debra ...81 Litchfield, Sarah ................40 Litchkofski, Alexandria .....44 Liu, Chiung-ju.............40, 55 LoBreglio, Jesse.................41 Lohman, Helene..........46, 87 London, Susan ..................17 Longo, Elissa .....................59 Lorenz, Kimberly ..............86 Lott, Michael .....................42 Louch, Maria Elena ...........19 Louis, Julie ........................64 Loukas, Kathryn..........38, 68 Loveland, Jeff .....................54 Lowe, Luisa........................21 Lowery, Lea Ann ................26 Luebben, Aimee..........41, 59, 81, 84 Lum, Ryan .........................46 Lunsford, Beverly ..............60 Luong, Tina .......................53 Luria, Shai .........................57 Lust, Carol .........................82

Lutenbacher, Regina .........46 Luther-Krug, Michele .......76 Luthman, Marge .... 38, 65, 82 Lynch, Gabriella ................68 Lynch, Kelly.......................82 Lyons, Kathleen.................87 M Ma, Amy .............................68 Maas, Christene .................78 MacDonell, Christine ........23 MacRae, Anne ....................17 MacRae, Nancy ............39, 56 Macurak, Allison................71 Maddox, Amanda ...............44 Maguire, Kimberly ............53 Mahaffey, Lisa ....................76 Maharaj, Teresa .................40 Mahoney, Kim ...................70 Mahoney, Wanda ...............81 Majewski, Chase ................46 Malek-Ismail, Judith .........65 Mallinson, Trudy .........68, 84 Mangone, Christine...........19 Mankey, Tina..........38, 64, 67 Marjan, Aghaei ..................42 Marshall, Amy....................86 Martin, Melissa ..................66 Mastrogiovanni, Andrea ....58 Mastrogiovanni, Dina........17 Mathena, Cindy .................83 Mathers, Shana..................68 Mathiowetz, Virgil .............21 Matsuda, Sandy .................17 Mattocks, Brittni ...............75 Maust, Sarah......................85 May-Benson, Teresa ....25, 87 Mayer, Jessica ....................66 Mazur, Lisa ........................63 McAteer, Samantha ...........24 McBride, Mischelle............46 McCloskey, Sharon............58 McCombie, Randy .......25, 67 McCormack, Guy.........64, 88 McDermott, Colleen..........63 McDonald, Virginia ...........29 McEwen, Sara ....................83 McFall, Pamela ............63, 71 McFarlane, Kelly ...............86 McGee, Corey ....................40 McGuire, Mary Jo .. 17, 19, 70 McHarg, Laura ..................38 McKeon, Katie ...................66 McLennon, Keniel .............47 McNulty, Karen .................63 McNulty, Susan .................84 McPhee, Scott....................17 McQuide, Brittany .............41 McQuinn, Kaitlin ..............81 Medina, Alicia ..............38, 82 Medow, Tricia.....................17 Melchionne, Mildred .........67 Melson, Jennifer ................86 Memel, Julie ......................67 Memole, Laura ..................85 Mendonca, Rochelle ..........26 Merlo, David ......................77 Merrill, Paige .....................30

Metzler, Christina........26, 56 Meuser, Thomas ................17 Michel, Irene .....................37 Micho, Lauren ...................68 Miles, Mindy ......................82 Miller, Kathryn ..................67 Miller, Kristine ............69, 86 Miller, Linda ......................24 Miller, Mindy .....................25 Miller, Rosalie ....................26 Miller, Rose ........................67 Miller, Sara ........................49 Miller-Kuhaneck, Heather .....................59, 63 Milligan, Nancy Vandewiele ....76, 88 Mische-Lawson, Lisa .........55 Misko, Alexis ......................22 Mislavsky, Stacey ...............86 Mitcham, Maralynne ........50, 61, 70 Molinsky, Rivka .................87 Monahan, Miriam........17, 52 Monteiro, Julie ..................25 Moore, Bridget ..................70 Moore, Jennifer ...........46, 64 Moore, Richelle .................86 Moran, Erin .......................83 Moreau, Noelle ..................65 Morgan, Kerri ....................48 Morgan, Ryan ....................86 Morikawa, Stacey ..............46 Morris, Anne ......................88 Morris, Cheryl ...................71 Morrison, M. Tracy ............58 Mosley, Letha.........24, 29, 66 Mu, Keli .......................17, 87 Muhlenhaupt, Mary ..........22 Mulligan, Shelley ..............52 Mulry, Claire ......................46 Munoz, Lauro ....................87 Muñoz, Jaime ..............68, 87 Murphy, Carolyn ...............76 Murphy, Susan ......23, 50, 62 Murray, Colleen .................83 Murray, Mary .....................51 Murray-Slutsky, Carolyn...51 Mushi-Brunt, Christina ....71 Myers, Christine ................43 N Nackley, Victoria................68 Nadeau, Barbara ..........58, 78 Nagaishi, Patricia ..............79 Nahum, Renee ...................67 Nanof, Tim .......29, 57, 58, 60 Nash, Jennifer........42, 76, 78 Nastasi, Julie................66, 85 Natal, Alexandria ...............68 Natschke, Angela ...............86 Navidi, Sheena...................24 Neal, Lyndsay.....................67 Nealon, Brynn .............38, 82 Nehrt, Rebecca ..................70 Neiditch, Chava .................24 Nelson, Christy ............30, 87 Nelson, David ..............22, 83 Neumann, Brenda .............88

Newman, Robin ...........44, 70 Nguyen, Bich-Ngan...........66 Nguyen, Phuong ...............66 Nguyen, Vi ...................53, 70 Nichols, Abby.....................30 Nichols, Alison ..................42 Nichols, Andrea .................44 Nicholson, Rebecca .....58, 82 Nielsen, Sarah ...................39 Nikola, Tom .......................77 Nordin, Karen....................17 Norton, Rachel ............19, 22 Novak, Laura .....................85 Nowak, Jackie ....................63 O O’Brien, Jane ...............54, 70 O’Brien, Kelly ....................81 O’Brien, Sharon ................42 O’Leary, Catina ..................66 O’Sullivan, Ann .................22 Oakes, Claudia .............47, 69 Obermeyer, Izel .................58 Obler, Doris........................64 Oliveri, Danielle ................40 Olson, Laurette..................72 Olson, Linda ................39, 64 Onsager, Sarah ..................65 Orentlicher, Meira .............22 Orloff, Susan......................24 Orsmond, Gael ..................69 Ortega, Renee ....................64 Osterhoudt, Molly .............77 Ottenbacher, Kenneth.......77 Otty, Robyn ............39, 56, 66 Ozelie, Rebecca..................30 P Pace, Marie ........................53 Padmanabhan, Kavitha .....81 Page, Stephen .............37, 60, 63, 83 Painter, Jane ................50, 64 Painter, Mashelle ...............76 Palmer, Jessica...................83 Panczykowski, Heather.....59 Pape, Sharon ...............40, 55 Pardue, Karen....................68 Parham, Diane...................49 Paris, Betty ........................51 Park, Hae Yean ..................38 Park, Ji-Hyuk.....................38 Parker, Kathleen................26 Patel, Neeha .......................37 Patel, Ruchi .......................85 Patel-Hernandez, Sajel .....86 Paul, Paula .........................58 Pennington, Robert...........19 Perez-Brown, Darlene.......22 Perhac, Jennifer ................57 Perkel, Jessica....................65 Perritt, Ginger .............30, 65 Perron, Amanda ................38 Persch, Andrew..................71 Peters, Christine................59 Peters, Tricia ......................77 Peterson, Elizabeth .....26, 50 Petry, Jodi ..........................82

Pfeiffer, Beth ......................56 Phillips, Julie .....................85 Phipps, Shawn .......38, 53, 79 Picard, Meryl Marger ........72 Pickens, Noralyn ...............87 Pierce, Claire .....................83 Pierce, Doris ................59, 77 Piernik-Yoder, Bridgett .....50 Piersol, Catherine..............44 Pike, Whitney ....................66 Pitonyak, Jennifer .............84 Pizur-Barnekow, Kris .......37, 43, 58, 70 Pizzi, Michael ........19, 24, 87 Podvey, Mara......................64 Polatajko, Helene ........50, 83 Polichino, Jean ............22, 52 Pollard, Briana Hamill ......74 Poole, Janet .......................41 Pope, Ellen...................64, 71 Porcello, Dorothy ..............66 Potvin, Marie-Christine ....69 Poutre, Bette .....................17 Powell, Susan ....................78 Powers, Betsy ....................55 Pradhan, Sujata .................37 Precin, Pat ......40, 44, 65, 66, 82, 84 Prestwich, Brian ................87 Price, Lyndsay....................46 Price, Pollie .......................59 Prior, Marisa ......................65 Provident, Ingrid ...............66 Pryle, Amy .........................46 Pughe, Bronwyn................78 Puglisi, Monica ..................77 Pullo, Robert .....................40 Pyatak, Elizabeth.........29, 57 Q Quake-Rapp, Cindee..........21 Quint, Nicole .....................68 R Raber, Christine.................43 Racicot, Marcy ...................65 Racine, Lisa .......................86 Radley, Laurel Cargill........60 Radloff, Jennifer ...19, 22, 43, 68, 74 Radomski, Mary.................58 Rafeedie, Samia .................84 Raghavan, Bhanu ..............29 Rakoski, Douglas ...73, 76, 77 Ramsdell, Kerrie..........24, 67 Ramsey, Ashleigh ..............44 Rankin-Gee, Jessica...........67 Raphael, Emily ..................64 Rappaport, Suzanne ..........83 Rasmussen, Lynnette ...46, 86 Ray, Sharon .......................58 Raykher, Suzanna..............81 Reed, Kathlyn ..............63, 82 Reeves, Gretchen...............76 Reiling, Kelli......................82 Reisenberg, Martha ...........64 Reistetter, Timothy ...........77 Reitz, S. Maggie...........58, 88

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Rekoutis, Panagiotis .........85 Renda, Marnie .. 19, 51, 56, 75 Reynolds, Sarah.................41 Reynolds, Stacey................77 Rhodes, Cheryl ..................70 Rice, Chantelle ..................29 Rice, Martin ...........42, 65, 83 Richards, Lorie ..................69 Richardson, Elizabeth ..41, 58 Richmond, Tammy.....29, 56, 73, 79, 88 Riddering, Anne ................30 Ridenhour, Kelly ...............46 Ridenour, Cyrus ..........63, 85 Rider, Ashley ......................83 Rider, William....................49 Ridgway, Angelia ...............68 Rietz, Kristi .......................17 Rios, Dianne ......................47 Roberts, Heather ...............64 Roberts, Lynne ............39, 85 Roberts, Michael................67 Roberts, Pamela ....22, 38, 53 Robinson, Marla ................19 Robnett, Regula...........25, 70 Rodakowski, Juleen ...........71 Roeder, Laura ....................85 Rogers, Sandra ............24, 26 Roley, Susanne ..................88 Roll, Shawn .................47, 74 Roscetti, Sally ....................17 Rosello, Stacy ....................73 Rotert, Denise....................26 Roth, Barbara ....................39 Roth, Sheri ........................49 Roundtree, Leslie ........46, 84 Rounkles, Valerie...............60 Rowe, Veronica ............46, 66 Roy, Sheela ........................67 Royeen, Charlotte .......41, 59 Ruda, Lesley.......................64 Rudd, Linda .......................77 Russell-Yun, Amy ..............58 Ryan, Katherine ....46, 83, 85 Rybski, Debra ....................82 Rydin, Sophie ....................53 S St. Amand, LaVonne .........46 Sabata, Dory ................66, 71 Sachs, Deborah..................68 Sackaloo, Kareisha ............65 Sagstetter, Mary.................77 Sahanow, Stephanie ..........56 Salazar, Megan...................81 Salvador, Alann..................79 Salyards, Rebecca ..............66 Samuel, Preethy ................86 Sanders, Ariel ....................85 Sanders, Martha ................85 Sanders, Meredith .............67 Sarkodie, Dora...................78 Sasse, Courtney .....37, 71, 75 Sauerwald, Camille .....60, 70 Scaffa, Marjorie ..........37, 58, 71, 75 Schaaf, Roseann ..........48, 57 Schaber, Patricia ...............82

Schalk, Nancy ....................86 Schefkind, Sandra ......24, 29, 58, 70, 77 Scheirton, Linda................87 Schiller, Martha .................76 Schmelzer, Laura ..............48 Schmid, Arlene ............69, 86 Schmidt, Abby ...................70 Schmidt, Anne.............38, 82 Schneck, Colleen...............65 Schneider, Margaret..........40 Schneweis, Erin ................66 Schofield, Katherine .........40 Schoonover, Judith ...........52 Schott, Courtney ...............46 Schramm, Kate .................65 Schreiber, Jodi .............76, 81 Schremp, Hannah .............70 Schriner, Mylene ...............44 Schubert, Lisa ...................37 Schultz-Krohn, Winifred ........17, 46, 67, 82 Schulz, Celia......................37 Schwartz, Deborah............57 Schwartz, Laura ................70 Scoggin, Angela.................44 Scott, Janie ........................88 Scott, Patricia ........17, 49, 68 Seaton, Mary......................71 Seidel, Laura......................39 Seiver, Erika ................37, 64 Sells, Carol Haertlein ........75 Seltzer, Julie ................44, 60 Seruya, Francine ...............83 Sgrignuoli, Angela ............25 Shah, Lalit .............67, 82, 85 Shasha, Josef .....................49 Shea, Chi-Kwan.................74 Sheard, Kendra..................21 Shepherd, Jayne ..........77, 83 Shierk, Angela ...................83 Shogren, Carrie .................66 Shotwell, Mary ..................26 Shteyler, Anna ...................64 Siebert, Carol.........26, 51, 74 Silva, Michael ....................64 Simmons, Gaylene ............46 Simon, Rachael .................65 Simons, Dianne .................83 Simpson, Emily .................78 Sinclair, Jim.......................83 Sindhu, Bhagwant ............69 Sitton, Nicole.....................86 Slater, Deborah Yarett......21, 29, 52 Slentz, Jamie .....................79 Smith, Courtney ...............66 Smith, Crystal ...................65 Smith, Karen .....................26 Smith, Melissa Lyles .........88 Smith, Rachel ....................77 Smith, Regina....................46 Smith, Roger ...26, 67, 74, 81 Smith, Theresa ..................58 Snodgrass, Jeff...................88 Snyder, Robin ....................49 Somers, Fred ...............14, 58 Sood, Divya ..................83, 85

Sooter, Grace Ann .............40 Spitzer, Susan....................59 Splinter-Watkins, Kathryn...........................84 Stadler, Paul ......................60 Stallings, Emily .................82 Stancanelli, Jeanine ..........81 Stansfield, Sharon .......77, 82 Stanton, Donna Breger .....41 Staples, William ................68 Stark, Susan ......................23 Starnes, Wendy......19, 22, 83 Stasik, Tara ........................44 Stav, Wendy .................29, 73 Steffen-Steer, Diana ..........60 Stegman, Stephanie ..........66 Stein, Franklin ..................88 Steiner, Jodee ....................65 Stephenson, Donna...........68 Stern, Abbie .......................83 Stern, Erica .......................17 Stevens, Bryley ..................86 Stevens, Devan ..................66 Stevens, Melissa ................17 Stewart, Brooke.................67 Stewart, Elizabeth .............68 Stockman, Gail ..................44 Stoffel, Virginia (Ginny)...14, 15, 58, 60, 71 Stoltz, Amanda ..................30 Stone, Mikel.......................43 Story, Pamela ....................78 Stoykov, Mary Ellen ..........77 Strasser, Todd ....................64 Strode, Maggie ..................66 Strong, Erin.......................66 Strydom, Estelle ..........23, 83 Stuart, Jessica....................86 Stube, Jan ..........................67 Stumpf, Kathleen ..............57 Stutz-Tanenbaum, Patricia................60, 70, 85 Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda .....................24, 87 Sudsawad, Pimjai ..............75 Sullivan, Janelle ................82 Summers, Karen ...............77 Sumner, Casey...................83 Surfus, Joan .......................37 Suttinger, Laura ................75 Swanke, Rebecca ...............65 Swinth, Yvonne ...........22, 82 Synovec, Caitlin ................64 Szklut, Stacey ....................72 T Tacker, Robin .....................73 Taff, Steve ..........................61 Talley, Susan ......................76 Tamura, Kaitie ...................65 Tang, Richard ....................86 Tanita, Kristine..................74 Tanta, Kari ...................65, 79 Tarloff, Jaclyn ..............70, 71 Taylor, Corrine...................58 Taylor, Renee .........17, 33, 70 Tekell, Lisa ...................64, 67 Telder, Tracy.......................46

Temple, Joan......................22 Tewfik, Diane .....................84 Thimmaiah, Deepa ......30, 65 Thom, Carly.................43, 75 Thomas, Chelsea ...............86 Thomas, Jill .......................67 Thomas, Julie ..............46, 67 Thompson, Kimberly ........86 Thompson, Russell............63 Tirado, Pilar .......................81 Tober, Melissa ....................82 Toglia, Joan ..................14, 51 Tomchek, Scott ...........19, 21 Tomlin, George..................82 Torrence, Amy ...................86 Toto, Pamela ......................65 Touchinsky, Susan ......19, 22 Towney, Laura ...................42 Townsend, Caitlyn .............63 Tran, Stephanie .................66 Trattner, Corrie..................44 Trolley-Hanson, Alexa .......52 Trujillo, Leonard ........46, 50, 68, 73 Tucker, Susan ........57, 71, 84 Tufano, Roseanna ..............78 Tunningley, Joan ...............19 Turley, Debbie....................71 Turner, Emily ....................40 U Underwood, Robin.......24, 43 Urban, Michael ..................76 Uyeshiro, Ashley ..........63, 84 V van Hooydonk, Elke ..........48 Van Lew, Steve...................44 Van Oss, Tracy .............19, 88 Van Puymbroeck, Marieke .....................69, 86 Vacek, Kris .........................46 Vance, Karen......................74 Varughese, Shaji................70 Vaughn, Lori ......................65 Vaught, Emily..............25, 70 Vause-Earland, Tracey.......44 Venezia, Christopher.........81 Verdier, Mollie ...................74 Victoria, Jody .....................26 Vilonen, Kristina .........63, 71 Vo, Jimmy ..........................66 Voydetich, Deborah ...........60 W Wagenfeld, Amy.................66 Wagner, Essie ..............52, 70 Wagner, Leslie .............38, 75 Walker, Carla ...............57, 84 Wall, Elizabeth ..................22 Wall, Megan .......................84 Wallace, Emily ...................37 Wallingford, Minetta .........46 Wallock, Shelley ................24 Wallraven, Andrea .............82 Waltermire, Deborah ........81 Wanka, Elizabeth ..............85 Warburg, Chaye.................39

Ward, Amber......................78 Warlick, Jordan .................81 Warnock, Barbara..............43 Warren, Jocelyn.................19 Watling, Renee ..................44 Watson, Andrew ................81 Watson, Anne.....................67 Weeks, Brenna...................65 Weinheimer, Jennifer ........81 Weissberg, Kathleen .........79 Weissman-Miller, Deborah ..........................26 Wells, Shirley...............64, 66 Wen, Su Lien .....................84 Wenos, Jeanne ...................41 Wever, Krista .....................44 White, Barbara ............40, 68 White, John ...........17, 24, 88 White, Suzanne ...........64, 84 White, Suzanne .................84 White, Taylor .....................40 Widbin, Julie......................68 Williams, Linda .................86 Williams, Shelley.........42, 46 Willmarth, Chuck .............60 Wilson, Christine ..............40 Wilson, Lesly ...............58, 70 Wilson, Linda ....................46 Winkle, Melissa..................71 Winslow, Brittni ................43 Winslow, Emily..................68 Winston, Kristin ................25 Wittman, Peggy Prince .....25 Wolf, Timothy .............37, 58, 77, 83 Woo, Lora ..........................79 Wright, Christine ..............22 Wu, Chinyu........................84 Wu, Robyn .........................74 Y Yang, Hsiangyu .................55 Yaroslawitz, Sharon ..........41 Yeh, Essential ....................84 Yin, Jiyi ..............................83 Yonkman, Janell ................85 Young, Debra .....................75 Youngstrom, Mary Jane ....50 Yousey, Jane .................56, 72 Yu, Chih-Huang ..........21, 84 Z Zimmerman, Sonia ...........84 Zollars, Jean Anne .............44 Zukausky, Abigail ..............86

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AOTA’s 2012 AnnuAl COnFErEnCE & ExpO

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Putting Learning into Practice
This worksheet is designed to help capture the “aha” moments of Annual Conference so you can incorporate them into your practice.

Great idea

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save The dates! AOTA 2012 specialty Conferences
Advanced Practice in Traumatic Injuries & PTSD: Lessons for Military, VA, & Civilian Practitioners
September 7–8, 2012 San Antonio, Texas More information forthcoming at www.aota.org/conference

STROKE
November 30–December 1, 2012 Baltimore, Maryland More information forthcoming at www.aota.org/conference

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