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Notes on Abstract Algebra

Daniel C. Bastos
dbastos@math.utoledo.edu
Jan 10, 2006
Abstract
These are my notes on abstract algebra; if you see something
wrong, let me know, please. If you found this document with the
help of search engines and you’re studying about algebra, I suggest
you look for a book on the subject.
1 Groups
Definition 1.1 (binary operation). A binary operation * on a set S
is a function of S S →S. That is, for each pair (a, b) ∈ S S, there
is a single element s ∈ S such that a ∗ b = s. This implies S closed
under *.
Definition 1.2 (group). A group G is a nonempty set with a binary
operation * satisfying: (i) * is associative, (ii) G has an identity e, (iii)
for each g ∈ G, there is a g
−1
such that gg
−1
= g
−1
g = e.
Exercise 1.1. Are the even positive integers closed under addition?
Yes. Proof. Because 2n + 2n = 4n is even and positive. Are they
closed under multiplication? Yes. Proof. Because 2n ∗ 2n = 4n
2
is
even and positive.
Exercise 1.2. For rectangles, there corresponds to each pair (length
measurement, width measurement), an area measurement. Still, com-
puting the areas is not, strictly speaking, a binary operation. Why?
Because area is something different than length.
1
Exercise 1.3. Are the odd positive integers closed under addition?
Yes. Proof. Because 2n+1+2n+1 = 4n+1 is odd and positive. Under
multiplication? Yes. Proof. Because (2n + 1)(2n + 1) = 4n
2
+ 4n + 1
is odd and positive.
Theorem 1.1. Let r be a nonzero integer. Let D be the set of all
divisors of r. The system of all fractions, in lowest terms, with the
property that their denominators is d
i
∈ D, is closed under addition.
Proof. Let 0 ,= r ∈ Z. Let D be the set of divisors of r. Let d
1
=
ar, d
2
= br. Then,
p
d
1
+
q
d
2
=
ap +bq
lcd(d
1
, d
2
)
,
where lcd(d
1
, d
2
) ∈ D and p, q ∈ Z.
Exercise 1.4. Show that the system of fractions having denominators
of 1, 2, or 4 when written in lowest terms is closed under addition.
Proof. By Theorem 1.1, it is closed. Here, r = 4 and D = ¦1, 2, 4¦
which are all divisors of 4.
Theorem 1.2. The identity of a group is unique.
Proof. Let e and e

be identities. So, ee

= e

because e is an identity.
Also, ee

= e because e

is an identity as well. Since the binary
operation of a group is a function, and assigns the operation to a
single element in the group, there can only be one identity and so,
e = e

.
Exercise 1.5. Consider Z with the binary operation of subtraction.
Is Z a group? If so, what is the identity? If not, what axioms do not
hold? At first I thought that 0 could be the identity, because z−0 = z,
but for 0 to be an identity, it must be true that z − 0 = 0 − z = z.
That is not true because z − 0 = z ,= 0 − z = −z. Also, notice that
subtraction is not associative: (a −b) −c ,= a −(b −c).
Theorem 1.3. Let G be finite with order 2n, n ∈ N. Then, there’s
g ∈ G such that g
2
= e.
Proof. Let S = ¦g
1
, ..., g
2n
¦. Step one: remove from S all pairs
(g
−1
i
, g
i
) such that g
i
g
−1
i
= g
−1
i
g
i
= e with g
i
,= g
−1
i
. This removes an
even number of elements. We’re left with an even number of elements
in S. After step one, e ∈ S because e
−1
= e. Step two: remove e
2
from S. We’re left with an odd number of elements in S. So at least
one of these left will have to be its own inverse — since they come in
pairs.
Theorem 1.4. Let G = ¦1, 2, ..., p − 1¦, p prime. Let θ be multipli-
cation mod p on G. Then (G, θ) is a group.
Proof. Unfortunately, I haven’t proved this entirely; but here’s what
I can say: because p is prime, we have no g
1
g
2
∈ G such that g
1
g
2
divides p, so it never happens that g
i
θg
j
= 0 mod p. Multiplication
is a binary operation, but we would need to show closure with mod
p. The identity is always present by hypothesis. Multiplication is
associative, but we would need an argument for inverses.
Theorem 1.5. The multiplication table of a group is a latin square;
that is, each group element occurs once and only once in each row of
the body of the table and in each column of the body of the table.
Proof. Consider the elements of the ith row. They are g
i
g
1
, ..., g
i
g
j
.
The theorem claims that each element occurs once; so, suppose one
does not show up once; that is, two elements of the row must be
equal. In other words, suppose g
i
g
1
= g
i
g
2
, but notice that g
1
,= g
2
.
Then, since we’re dealing with a group, g
−1
i
is present; so, g
−1
i
(g
i
g
1
) =
g
−1
i
(g
i
g
2
) =⇒ (g
−1
i
g
i
)g
1
= (g
−1
i
g
i
)g
2
=⇒ eg
1
= eg
2
=⇒ g
1
= g
2
.
So, each element occurs once.
If the group is finite, we’re done. If the group is not finite, we must still
show that each element still occurs on a row. To prove for columns,
we can repeat the proof replacing the appropriate subscripts.
Definition 1.3 (permutation). A permutation P of a set S is a one-
to-one mapping of S into itself. In other words, P implies the existence
of a function f : S →S such that f is one-to-one and onto.
Exercise 1.6. Write the 4! = 24 possible arrangements of all four
letters A, E, P, T. Check which permutations are English words. What
is the probability of making an English word from these four letters by
chance arrangement? I’m not going to write them all here, but I will
tell the algorithm I’d use. Fix A and permute EPT; then fix E and
permute APT, then fix P and permute AET; then fix T and permute
APT. This will generate 3! + 3! + 3! + 3! = 24 permutations, and it’s
easy to do it this way. To permute EPT, the same can be done: fix
E, permute PT, fix P permute ET, fix T permute EP.
3
It turns out, we find the English words PATE, PETA, PEAT, TAPE,
TEPA. They mean, respectively: the human head, 10
15
, carbonized
vegetable matter, tape, a chemical compound: C
6
H
12
N
2
OP. So, we
have 5 chances out of 24 of making a word by chance arrangement;
that’s a probability of 5/24 = 0.208 which is aproximatelly 20% of
chances of making a word out of random permutation; a pretty good
chance, if you will.
Exercise 1.7. Let Mr. 1, Mrs 2, Mr. 3 and Mrs 4 be seated on a table.
How many seating arrangements are possible? 4! = 24. Write down all
seating arrangements in which men and women are alternated. There
are 8 possibilities because once you fix 1, there are two possibilities
to follow: 2 and 4. Fix 2, there are two possiblities: 1 and 3. Fix 3,
there are two possibilities; fix 4, there are two possibilities. What’s
the probabilitity that a random permutation of the four people will
alternate men and women? That’d be 8/24 = 1/3 which means 33%.
Theorem 1.6. The permutations of a set S form a group under com-
position.
Proof. Let P and Q be two permutations; then, for any s ∈ S, there
is a unique Q(s) ∈ S because for any s
1
, s
2
∈ S, if Q(s
1
) = Q(s
2
),
then s
1
= s
2
. The fact that Q(s) ∈ S comes from the fact that Q is a
function from S into S. Also, because P is one-to-one and because Q
is onto, for all s ∈ S, there is a unique P(Q(s)) ∈ S.
Last paragraph implies P(Q(s)) is one-to-one. Now, to show compo-
sition is a binary operation, we need to show that the composition of
P and Q is onto; because that would be showing that it is closed in
S.
For all s ∈ S, there is q ∈ S such that q = Q(s). For all q ∈ S, there
is p ∈ S such that p = P(q). Then, for all s ∈ S, there is a q ∈ S such
that q = P(Q(s)) = (P ◦ Q)(s).
To show it forms a group, we state that composition is associative by
some theorem — which we haven’t proved yet. The identity would
be the permutation which maps each s ∈ S into itself. The inverses
of each permutation is the same permutation with domain and range
swaped.
Definition 1.4. If S is finite with n elements, then the set of all
permutations on S is called the symmetric group S
n
on n elements.
S
n
has n! members.
4
Exercise 1.8. Let
P =

1 2 3 4 5
2 3 1 4 5

What is the image of 3 under the permutation? It’s 1. Which elements
are fixed under the permutation? 4 and 5. Which are moved? 1, 2, 3.
Write the inverse permutation with respect to composition.
P
−1
=

2 3 1 4 5
1 2 3 4 5

.
Exercise 1.9. Let
Q =

1 2 3 4 5
1 4 3 5 2

.
Find P ◦ Q and Q◦ P. Find Q
−1
.
P ◦ Q =

1 2 3 4 5
2 4 1 5 3

Q◦ P =

1 2 3 4 5
4 3 1 5 3

Q
−1
=

1 4 3 5 2
1 2 3 4 5

.
Exercise 1.10. Find Q
−1
◦ P
−1
. Find (P ◦ Q) ◦ (Q
−1
◦ P
−1
).
Q
−1
◦ P
−1
=

2 3 1 4 5
1 5 3 2 4

(P ◦ Q) ◦ (Q
−1
◦ P
−1
) =

2 3 1 4 5
2 3 1 4 5

5
Permutations can be written in cycle notation, which is easier to write.
For the permutation P above, we would write (123)(4)(5) meaning 1
goes to 2, 2 goes to 3, 3 goes to one and we close. We close because it
has cycled. The same happens to 4 and 5 because they didn’t move
at all; we may as well omit the ones which don’t move.
In general, start the first cycle with the first element of the permuta-
tion; go on writing which follows which until the first element appears;
then we close the cycle. If the first cycle has not exhausted all ele-
ments, start a new cycle with an element that has been used. Repeat
until all elements have been used.
If we omit the 1-cycles, then someone who only sees the permutation in
cycle notation would not know possible elements which were omited.
But usually this is not a problem.
Cycle multiplication is cycle composition. You apply the right side
first, then the left. For example,
(1234)(2465) =

2 4 6 5 3 1
1 6 5 3 4 2

,
because 2 goes to 4 which goes to 1, 4 goes to 6 which goes to 6 (since
it does not appear), 6 goes to 5 which goes to 5 (since it does not
appear), 5 goes to 2 which goes to 3, 1 goes to 1 which does to 2, 3
goes to 3 which goes to 4.
Exercise 1.11. Q used previously in cycle notation is (245).
Exercise 1.12. Write the permutations of S
3
as cycles. S
3
is the sym-
metric group of all permutations on n = 3 elements. Then, S
3
has 3! =
6 elements; they are: e, (12), (13), (23), (123), (132). It’s a bit tough
to be sure that this is correct; but I built the table and it does work.
For example, (12)
−1
= (12), (13)
−1
= (13), (23)
−1
, (23), (123)
−1
=
(132), (132)
−1
= (123). It’s not commutative, though: (12)(13) =
(132) ,= (123) = (13)(12).
Exercise 1.13. Write the following cycles in permutation form.
(134) =

1 3 4 2
3 4 1 2

,
(12)(34) =

3 4 1 2
4 3 2 1

,
6
(1423) =

1 4 2 3
4 2 3 1

,
(13)(12) =

1 2 3 4
2 3 1 4

,
(14)(13)(12) =

1 2 3 4
2 3 4 1

,
Definition 1.5. A transposition is a 2-cycle.
Theorem 1.7. Let G be a group in which every element g ∈ G has
the property that g
2
= e. Then G is abelian.
Proof. Let a, b ∈ G. Then: (ab)
2
= e =⇒ a
2
b(ab) = a =⇒ b(ab) =
a =⇒ b
2
(ab) = ba =⇒ ab = ba.
Definition 1.6 (group isomorphism). Let (G, !) and (H, ∗) be groups.
We say G is isomorphic to H if and only if there exists a bijective
function f : G →H such that for all u, v ∈ G, it’s true that f(u!v) =
f(u) ∗ f(v). We write H

= G.
Theorem 1.8. If m ≤ n, there is a subgroup of S
n
isomorphic to S
m
.
Proof. Since m ≤ n, the set of all permutations of S
m
is a subset
of S
n
, and S
m
is closed because it is a group, so it is a subgroup of
S
n
; then, one isomorphism exists between S
m
and S
m
: the identity
map.
Theorem 1.9. The identity of a subgroup H of G is necessarily the
identity of the group G.
Proof. Let H be a subgroup G; for all h ∈ H, e
H
h = he
H
= h. Since
every element of H is also in G, we have e
G
h = he
G
= h, for all h ∈ H.
So, e
G
h = e
H
h =⇒ e
G
= e
H
by cancellation law.
Theorem 1.10. Inverses are unique.
Proof. Let h ∈ G. Now h
−1
1
h = e and h
−1
2
h = e =⇒ h
−1
1
= h
−1
2
.
7
Exercise 1.14. Find a collection of eight permutations in S
4
that is
a subgroup isomorphic to the dihedral group D
4
= ¦e, r, r
2
, r
3
, s, sr,
sr
2
, sr
3
¦. Give an explicit isomorphism from D
4
to the subgroup of
S
4
.
Let P
4
= ¦e, (1234), (13)(24), (1432), (12)(34), (14)(23), (13), (24)¦.
Map e
P
with e, (1234) with r, (13)(24) with r
2
, (1432) with r
3
,
(12)(34) with s, (13) with sr, (14)(23) with sr
2
, (24) with sr
3
.
Theorem 1.11. GL(n, R) denotes the group of invertible nn matri-
ces with real entries. The collection H of matrices with determinants
¦±1¦ forms a subgroup of GL
n
(R).
Proof. We only need to show that H is closed; that is, det(AB) =
±1 = det(A)det(B), for any A, B ∈ H. Let E be an elementary
matrix; det(E) = −1 whenever E comes from I by interchanging two
rows; det(E) = 1 whenever E comes from I by adding a row to a
multiple of another row of I; every invertible matrix can be expressed
as a product of elementary matrices.
Let P ∈ H; express P as E
k
...E
1
. For any E
i
, with 1 ≤ i ≤ k,
det(E
i
) = ±1, then det(P) = det(E
k
...E
1
) = det(E
k
)...det(E
1
) =
±1. So, for two matrices P, Q ∈ H, det(PQ) = det(E
k
...E
1
Q) =
det(E
k
)...det(E
1
)det(Q) = det(P)det(Q) = ±1. Then H is a subgroup
of GL(n, R).
Okay, this proof is not correct because we must also show that the
group is closed under inverses; the group is infinite. Also, det(AB) =
det(A) det(B) for any square matrices A and B, so we need not use
elementary matrices here.
On this next example, there’s a new notation there. When we write
σ(1) = 2, we mean that it’s a cycle in which 1 always goes to 2. So
the set described includes all permutations of S
6
in which 1 goes to 2.
Examples: (12), (123), (1234), (12345), and so on.
Exercise 1.15. Let C = ¦σ ∈ S
6
: σ(1) = 2¦. Is C ≤ S
6
? No,
because (1256)(1256) = (15...) ,= σ(1) = 2.
Definition 1.7. Let H ≤ G. Define as left cosets of H in G the sets
gH = ¦gh
1
, gh
2
, ..., gh
k
, ...¦ where g ∈ G and h
i
∈ H.
As you pick different elements g ∈ G, you create [G[/[H[ cosets. This
is called the index of H in G.
8
Definition 1.8. Let H ≤ G. Generate all left cosets of H in G.
Count the number of left cosets; call this number the index of H in
G.
These cosets are mutually exclusive and exhaustive, like equivalence
classes; in fact, each coset is an equivalence class. Cosets, however,
can have many names; but since they’re equivalence classes, one way
to know if two names are actually the same coset is to check if their
g’s are left equivalent modulo H. See the next example.
Exercise 1.16. Let V = ¦e, (12)(34),(13)(24), (14)(23)¦. Left cosets:
(12)V = ¦(12), (34), (1324), (1423)¦, (13)V = ¦(13), (1234), (24),
(1432)¦, (14)V = ¦(14), (1243), (1342), (23)¦, (123)V = ¦(123), (134),
(243), (142)¦, (124)V = ¦(124), (143), (132), (234)¦, (12)(34)V =
¦(12)(34), e, (14)(23), (13)(24)¦. What are the right cosets?.
Let W = ¦e, (12), (34), (12)(34)¦. Left cosets: (12)W = ¦(12), e,
(34)(12), (34)¦, (13)W = ¦(13), (123), (134), (1234)¦, (14)W = ¦(14),
(124), (143), (1243)¦, (23)W = ¦(23), (132), (1342), (234)¦, (24)W =
¦(24), (142), (1432), (243)¦, (1324)W = ¦(1324), (14)(23), (13)(24),
(1423)¦. What are the right cosets?
Take a look at the first coset of V — (12)V . Now, notice that the
coset (1423)V is the same coset, though with a different name, as
(12)V . Why? Because (1423) is left congruent to (12) modulo H.
Why? Recal the definition of the left congruence. Two elements, i
and j, of a group P are left congruent (mod Q ≤ P) to each other if
there’s q ∈ Q such that i = jq. So notice that the multiplication by q
happens on the right. In the example above, the subgroup is V , and
(12) is left congruent to (1423) because (12) = (1423)[(14)(23)] and
(14)(23) ∈ V .
Definition 1.9. Let H ≤ G. Define g
i

L
g
j
(mod H) if and only
if there is a h
k
∈ H such that g
i
= g
j
h
k
. Call this relation “left
congruence.”
Theorem 1.12. Left congruence is an equivalence relation.
Definition 1.10. Let H ≤ G. Define g
i

R
g
j
(mod H) if and only
if there is a h
k
∈ H such that g
i
= h
k
g
j
. Call this relation “right
congruence.”
Theorem 1.13. Right congruence is an equivalence relation.
9
Proof. Let H be a subgroup of G. Suppose that for some g
1
, g
2
∈ G,
there is h ∈ H such that g
1
= hg
2
; that is, g
1
≡ g
2
(mod H). Then
g ≡ g because g = e
H
g (reflexive). Suppose g
1
= hg
2
; then g
2
=
h
−1
g
1
(symmetric). Suppose g
1
= h
1
g
2
and g
2
= h
2
g
3
. Then g
1
=
(h
1
h
2
)g
3
implying g
1
≡ g
3
(mod H) (transitive). It is an equivalence
relation.
Theorem 1.14. In a group G, g, g
−1
∈ G have the same order.
Proof. Let g
t
= e. Then (g
−1
)
t
g
t
= (g
−1
)
t
e which implies e = (g
−1
)
t
.
Now we must show that t is the smallest such number in which
(g
−1
)
t
= e. Suppose not; then, there is n < t such that (g
−1
)
n
= e. Then, write (g
−1
)
t
as g
−1
multiplied t times: (g
−1
)
1
...(g
−1
)
t
.
Since n < t, we have that (g
−1
)
1
...(g
−1
)
n
= e. So, (g
−1
)
1
...(g
−1
)
t
=
e(g
−1
)
n+1
...(g
−1
)
t
. Now what? Where is the contradiction?
Definition 1.11 (cyclic). Call a “cyclic group” the group generated
by some element g, and write ¸g). If ¸g) is finite, then call the “order
of g” the least positive element f for which g
f
= e, where e is the
identity of the group. Call an “infinite cyclic group” the cyclic group
in which g
s
= g
t
if and only if s = t.
Notice that the distinct elements of ¸g) are g, g
2
, ..., g
f
= e. Also,
notice that the powers are not always positive. For example, 1 is a
generator for the integers under addition because 1
0
= 0, 1
1
= 1, 1
2
= 2, 1
3
= 3, and so on. But where are the inverses? Well, we do 1
−1
= −1, 1
−2
= −2, and so on.
Theorem 1.15. Let G be finite and cyclic. Then G is abelian.
Proof. Because G is finite, it has a finite order; call it n. Any element
of G is expressed g
k
, where 1 ≤ k ≤ n. Let g
i
, g
j
∈ ¸g). Now g
j
g
i
=
g
j+i
= g
i+j
= g
i
g
j
.
Exercise 1.17. Write, in cycle form, the members of the cyclic group
of order 8 and compare with the octic group. Are both groups abelian?
No; a cyclic group of order 8 is abelian, by the last theorem, but
D
4
is non-abelian. The cycles of the cyclic group of order 8 are e,
(12345678), (1357)(2468), (14725836), (15)(26)(37)(48), (16385274),
(1753)(2864), (18765432).
Theorem 1.16. Let G be finite with g ∈ G. Order of g divides [G[.
10
Proof. The “order of g” is the natural number n such that g
n
= e;
since G is finite, [G[ and n are natural numbers.
Suppose f is a natural number such that g
f
= e; since n is the smallest
such number, f ≥ n. By the division algorithm, f = nq +r, where q,
r ∈ Z with r < n. So g
f
= g
nq+r
= (g
n
)
q
g
r
= e
q
g
r
= eg
r
= g
r
= e.
But r < n by the division algorithm, and since n is the smallest natural
such that g
n
= e, r must be zero, so n divides f.
The distinct powers of g form a subgroup of G, because they’re closed
under the binary operation. Lagrange’s theorem states that, here in
particular, [G[ = [¸g)[ [G : ¸g)[, and [¸g)[ = n, so n divides [G[ with
[G : ¸g)[ as quotient.
Exercise 1.18. Write down all elements in D
4
, S
4
and S
5
which have
order 2. In D
4
, with order 2, we have: (13), (24), (13)(24), (14)(23),
(12)(34). In S
4
we have (12), (13), (14), (23), (24), (34), (12)(34),
(13)(24), (14)(23). In S
5
we have (12), (13), (14), (15), (23), (24),
(25), (34), (35), (45), (12)(34), (12)(35), (12)(45), (13)(24), (13)(25),
(13)(45), (14)(23), (14)(25), (14)(35), (15)(23), (15)(24), (15)(34),
(23)(45), (24)(35), (25)(34).
Exercise 1.19. We know that S
n
can be generated by transpositions;
that is, every σ ∈ S
n
can be written as a product of transpositions.
It is actually the case that S
n
can be generated by adjacent trans-
positions; that is, those of the form (i, i + 1). Prove this for n = 5
by expressing each (a,b) ∈ S
5
as a product of adjacent transpositions.
Proof. (12) = (12), (13) = (12)(23)(12), (14) = (12)(23)(34)(23)(12),
(15) = (12)(23)(34)(45)(34)(23)(12), (23) = (23), (24) = (23)(34)(23),
(25) = (23)(34)(45)(34)(23), (34) = (34), (35) = (34)(45)(34), (45) =
(45).
Exercise 1.20. Let H be a subgroup of a finite group G. If H is
abelian, then H is normal in G. Show this is not true with an example.
Consider the dihedral group with its subgroup V = ¦1, (12)(34)¦. Let
W = ¦e, (12), (34), (12)(34)¦ ≤ S
4
, which is abelian. Now the right
coset W (1234) = ¦(1234), (234), ...¦ ,= (1234) W = (1234), (134),
(123), (13...).
Exercise 1.21. Let K = ¦1, (12)(34), (14)(23), (13)(24)¦ ⊂ D
4
= G.
Show that V = ¦1, (12)(34)¦ is normal in K and that K is normal in
G, but V is not normal in G. We list the cosets; the left cosets are
eV = V and (14)(23)V = ¦(14)(23), (13)(24)¦ and the right cosets
11
are V e = V and V = ¦(14)(23), (13)(24)¦, so V normal in K. Now
the left cosets of K in G are eK = K and (1234)K = ¦(1234), (13),
(24), (1432)¦; the right cosets of K in G are Ke = K and K(1234)
= (1234)K because there are four elements left to be taken, so K is
normal in G. Now V is not normal in G because (1234)V = ¦(1234),
(13)¦ ,= V (1234) = ¦(1234), (24)¦.
Theorem 1.17. The intersection of two subgroups is a group.
Proof. Let H
1
, H
2
≤ G, then e ∈ H
1
∩ H
2
because e
1,2
∈ H
1,2
is the
e of G, so it’s the same identity. Let h ∈ H
1
∩ H
2
; because H
1,2
is
a group, h
−1
∈ H
1,2
. Associativity comes from the fact that G is
associative. Closure: let h, g ∈ H
1
∩ H
2
. Since h, g ∈ H
1
and H
1
is
a group, it is closed, then hg ∈ H
1
. Similarly, hg ∈ H
2
. Therefore,
hg ∈ H
1
∩ H
2
.
Exercise 1.22. Let N be a normal subgroup of a group G. Prove that
if n is an element of N, then g
−1
ng is an element of N for each element
g ∈ G. We start by letting n ∈ N. Since N is normal subgroup of
G, we have G/N as the group of cosets of N in G. So, gN ∈ G/H;
since n ∈ N, nN ∈ G/H and g
−1
N ∈ G/H. Since G/H is a group,
g
−1
NnNgN = g
−1
ngN. Since n ∈ N, it follows that nN = eN = N.
Then g
−1
NnNgN = g
−1
NeNgN = g
−1
egN = g
−1
gN = eN = N.
Therefore, g
−1
ngN = N which implies g
−1
ng ∈ N.
Exercise 1.23. Show that the converse of Lagrange’s Theorem is
false. For example, show that A
4
is a group with 12 elements that con-
tains no subgroup with 6 elements. We start by listing the twelve per-
mutations of A
4
: e, (12)(34), (13)(24), (14)(23), (123), (132), (124),
(142), (134), (143), (234), (243). There are 3 2-cycles, and 1 identity
which amounts to 4 elements, so to get to 6, we will need 3-cycles.
Theorem 1.18. A
4
has no subgroup with 6 elements.
Proof. Let H ≤ A
4
such that [H[ = 6. We want to show a contra-
diction. We know that H A
4
because the index is 2. H contains
a 3-cycle, for sure. Now, ghg
−1
∈ H for all g ∈ A
4
, for some h ∈ H.
Let’s say that (123) ∈ H. Then (124)(123)(142) ∈ H which implies
(243) ∈ H. Then (243) = g (123) g
−1
. Let’s say (234) ∈ H, then
(234)(123)(243) = (134). Then (134) = g

(123)g
−1
. If (123), (134),
(243) ∈ H, then we can square each of them because H is a subgroup.
We square the elements until we actually see that we don’t get only 6
elements, which we assumed we had.
12
Theorem 1.19. The intersection of two normal subgroups is normal.
Proof. Let subgroups H
1
, H
2
G. Then H
1
∩ H
2
is a subgroup by
Theorem 1.17; so must only show normality. Let g ∈ G; we must show
g(H
1
∩H
2
) = (H
1
∩H
2
)g, which is true if ghg
−1
∈ (H
1
∩H
2
) for some
h ∈ (H
1
∩H
2
) — see some example above. So, we have that gh = h

g
for some h

∈ (H
1
∩ H
2
). We multiply g
−1
on the right to get ghg
−1
= h

e = h

for some h

∈ (H
1
∩H
2
). So, ghg
−1
∈ (H
1
∩H
2
) and we’re
done.
Definition 1.12. The center Z(G) of a group is the set of all elements
of G which commute with every element of G. That is, Z(G) = ¦z ∈ G
such that zg = gz for all g ∈ G¦.
Definition 1.13. A subgroup H of G is a normal subgroup of G if
gH = Hg for all g ∈ G. We write H G.
Theorem 1.20. Z(G) G.
Proof. Associativity comes from the fact that G is a group. The iden-
tity is in Z(G) because eg = ge = g for all g ∈ G. Let z ∈ Z(G). Now,
since e ∈ Z(G) and e =zz
−1
, we have (zz
−1
)g = (z
−1
z)g =⇒ z(z
−1
g)
= (gz)z
−1
. Since z ∈ Z(G), it commutes, so z(z
−1
g) = (zg)z
−1
. By
cancellation law and associativity, z
−1
g = gz
−1
, so z
−1
∈ Z(G). Now,
normality comes from the fact that gz = zg for all g ∈ G, then gZ(G)
= Z(G)g.
To understand normality, we must understand cosets well. Let’s think
of cosets for a while. Consider a subgroup H ≤ G. What can we say
about the cosets of H? We can say that [gH[ = [H[; that is, the
group formed by the cosets of H has the same order as H. In fact,
such group has a name. Is it really a group? It is, as we prove on the
next theorem, and it also has a name.
Definition 1.14. The cosets of H in G is the quotient group G/H.
Theorem 1.21. The set of left cosets of H in G form a group under
the operation defined as (g
1
H)(g
2
H) = g
1
g
2
H whenever gH = Hg for
all g ∈ G.
Proof. This theorem defines the binary operation in which the group
is formed upon. This operation can only be used whenever some
condition about the left and right cosets holds; that is, that the left
13
cosets match the right cosets exactly. In other words, H must be
normal in G.
The definition of the binary operation gives us the fact that (g
1
g
2
H) is
a coset. Do we have an identity? Yes, because g
1
HeH = g
1
eH = g
1
H.
So, H is the identity. Is it associative? Since (g
1
g
2
)g
3
H = g
1
(g
2
g
3
)H,
then (g
1
Hg
2
H)g
3
H = g
1
H(g
2
Hg
3
H). So yes, it is associative. Do
we have inverses? Yes, because (gH)
−1
= g
−1
H; the proof of that is
(gH)(gH)
−1
= gg
−1
H = eH = H. So we have inverses, and we have
a group.
Because cosets have many names, it would be nice to have theorems
that would tell us when they’re equal. For instance, if I show you
g
1
H and g
2
H, such that g
1
,= g
2
, does that mean that the cosets are
different? Not necessarily. So, how can we tell?
One way, of course, is to take a look at the contents. Since cosets
are sets, if what they have as elements are all the same, in any order,
they’re equal.
Theorem 1.22. Let H ≤ G; now g
1
H =g
2
H if and only if g
−1
2
g
1
∈ H.
Proof. Because cosets are equivalence classes, g
1
H = g
2
H if g
1

L
g
2
(mod H) — we’re dealing with left cosets here. If this holds, then it’s
because there is an h ∈ H such that g
1
= g
2
h. Now, because G is
a group, we have the inverse of g
2
available; multiply it on the left:
g
−1
2
g
1
= eh = h. Then, if g
1
H = g
2
H, then g
−1
2
g
1
∈ H.
Now we must show that once g
−1
2
g
1
∈ H, it follows that g
1
H = g
2
H.
Well, because g
−1
2
g
1
∈ H, we can write g
−1
2
g
1
= h, for some h ∈ H.
Then, multiply g
2
on the right, so eg
1
= g
2
h =⇒ g
1
= g
2
h. Now, this
means that there’s an h ∈ H, such that g
1
= g
2
h. Therefore, g
1

L
g
2
(mod H). That is, g
1
H = g
2
H.
Theorem 1.23. Let H ≤ G; now g
1
H =g
2
H if and only if g
−1
1
g
2
∈ H.
Proof. Repeat last proof changing subscripts appropriately.
So, these two theorems give us a nice way to check if cosets are equal.
Next we prove a theorem about normal subgroups. It says that a nor-
mal subgroup of a group is normal only when an element of the group
times an element of the subgroup times the inverse of the element of
the group is in the subgroup. Verbal mathematics is very hard to
understand, but it’s a good exercise.
Theorem 1.24. A subgroup H of G is normal in G if and only if
ghg
−1
is in H, for all g in G.
14
Proof. Suppose H is normal in G. Let h in H and g in G be arbitrary
elements. Then, gh = h

g for some h

in H. Now multiply by g
−1
on
the right to get ghg
−1
= h

which is in H.
By hypothesis, ghg
−1
is in H, so let ghg
−1
= h

be in H. Multiply by
g on the right, so gh = h

g, which means that gh is in Hg, and since
h is an arbitrary element of H, gH is a subset of Hg.
Now since g
−1
and g are inverses of each other, we can write the
hypothesis as g
−1
hg = h

. Now multiply by g on the left to get hg =
gh

which means that hg is in gH and since h is an arbitrary element
of H, Hg is a subset of gH. So, gH = Hg, for all g in G.
Now, if you read this theorem carefully, you may notice that it gives
you a nice message. The message is, if G is abelian, then any subgroup
H of G is normal. How does it say that? Well, suppose G is abelian
and that H ≤ G. Then for any g ∈ G, gg
−1
= e ∈ H, right? Now,
multiply h on the right to get gg
−1
h = eh. But, since every element
of G commutes with every element of G, including those of H because
H ≤ G, we can alter their order; so gg
−1
h = eh =⇒ ghg
−1
= eh =
h ∈ H and whenever this happens, H G.
Now, how do we actually build a quotient group? Let’s look at an
example. Let G = (Z, +), H = nZ. Because addition is the binary
operation for this group, mathematicians like to write the cosets in
the form g + H to make explicit that the operation is addition. If it
were any other operation, they’d probably write gH as we have been
so far.
Let’s try to build the quotient group Z/nZ, for n = 3, so we’ll build
Z/3Z. The elements of Z/3Z are ¦3Z, 1+3Z, 2+3Z¦. If you’re asking
why, consider the integers mod 3. By the division algorithm, z ÷3 =
nq + r, where r < 3. So r is either 0, 1 or 2. That explains why the
members are as they are. Now, we set up the Cayley table.
θ 3Z 1 + 3Z 2 + 3Z
3Z 3Z 1 + 3Z 2 + 3Z
1 + 3Z 1 + 3Z 2 + 3Z 3Z
2 + 3Z 2 + 3Z 3Z 1 + 3Z
You may quickly notice that this group is abelian. How would one
quickly notice such thing? Think of the group as a matrix A. Now,
write A
T
and notice that they are equal. The fact that this group is
abelian may get us a new theorem. Once a group G is abelian, is it
true that G/H is also abelian? Yes; if G is abelian, every subgroup is
normal, and so G/H is also abelian.
15
Theorem 1.25. Let H G, with G abelian; then G/H is abelian.
Proof. Let g
1
H, g
2
H ∈ G/H. Now (g
1
H)(g
2
H) = (g
1
g
2
)H, right?
That’s the definition for the multiplication (the binary operation) of
a quotient group. But, because G is abelian, every g commutes with
every element of G, so (g
1
g
2
)H = g
2
g
1
H = g
2
Hg
1
H and this shows
that G/H is abelian.
Once I say H G, does it automatically follow that G is abelian? It
can’t be, because let H = ¦e¦ which is normal in G and is a subgroup
of any G non-abelian. But what if H is a proper normal subgroup of
G? Does that make G abelian automatically? If so, can you prove? If
not, can you show an example?
But now, once G is abelian, every subgroup of G is normal, and every
subgroup of G is abelian; and once a subgroup is normal, a quotient
group with respect to the subgroup is also abelian. So, abelianism is
a pretty powerful and nice property that a group may have.
Since we’re talking about abelianism, notice that when G is cyclic,
then there’s no way that a subgroup won’t be abelian. Think about
it; there’s just no way because all elements are expressed as a factor
of the generator, so it doesn’t matter which order you multiply any of
them.
Exercise 1.24. Let H G. What is the order of gH ∈ G/H? Recall
that the order of gH is the smallest k such that (gH)
k
= H = g
k
H
which happens when g
k
∈ H. Then, the order of gH is the order of
H; that is, [gH[ = [H[.
Theorem 1.26. Let [G : H] = 2. Then H G.
Proof. What do we have to show here? We have to show that once
the index of H is 2, the right cosets of H in G are the same as the
left cosets of H in G. Since the index of H in G is the number of left
cosets of H in G, there are 2 left cosets. Then, each gh is either in
H or in G−H. Then we have two left cosets: g
1
H = H and g
2
H =
G−H. Now, consider... I don’t clearly see this one right now.
Let’s talk about ways to produce groups quickly. Which groups do
we know? We know the number systems: (R, +), (R ,= 0, ), (Z, +),
(Q ,= 0, ), (Q, +).
We know how to generate some groups, like the dihedral group D
4
=
¦r,s : r
4
= s
2
= e, rs = sr
3
¦. And we can always write the Cayley
16
table for any group, but it’s very hard to check associativity for crazy
groups in which we may build a table for.
Associativity, then, makes is a hard enough thing to check so that we
may wish to build groups out of things which we already know will
be associtive. For example, any group under composition is associa-
tive, so we like composition as a binary operation. So, a group can
be formed out of invertible functions from a set S into itself under
composition; what kind of groups are those? These are the symmetric
groups S
n
; they’re built out of the symmetry of objects.
For example, think of a rectangle. What can we do with a rectangle?
We can flip it vertically and horizontally: we create two elements of
order 2. The identity is any of these two elements squared. We can
rotate it 180 degrees; which if we square this element, we also get
the identity. This is the symmetries of a rectangle in which we only
have elements which square to the identity; so each element is its own
inverse. This is the Klein 4-group.
Other ways to get away from checking associativity is to form groups
out of other groups. For example, let H ⊆ G. Then, by using the same
operation of G, we may form a group (H, op(G)) in which associativity
will be given by G, at no charge — a pretty good deal. Not to mention
that to check that H ≤ G we only need to check that for all h, h

∈ H,
hh

∈ H and h
−1
∈ H.
We can use generators. Pick some g ∈ G, and take a look at all
powers of g. This algorithm generates the group ¸g) which is cyclic
and, therefore, abelian, which makes every possible subgroup normal.
For example, let G = SL
2
(R). This is the special linear group of
matrices 2 2, under matrix multiplication as binary operation, with
real entries such that the determinant of each of these matrices is ±1.
Let
g =

1 1
0 1

,
and notice that ¸g)

= (Z, +).
Another interesting example is the center of every group. Every group
G has a center as a subgroup. Moreover, every center subgroup is
abelian. Let Z(G) = ¦z ∈ G : zg = gz for all g ∈ G¦, then Z(G) is an
abelian subgroup of G. Next, we show an interesting theorem about
centers.
17
Theorem 1.27. Suppose G/Z(G) is cyclic. Then G is abelian and so
Z(G) = G.
Proof. Since G/Z(G) is cyclic, we can let gZ(G) generate G/Z(G).
So G/Z(G) = ¦... g
−1
Z(G), Z(G), gZ(G), g
2
Z(G), ...¦. This means
that every element of G is in a coset g
a
Z(G). Now, pick g
1
, g
2
∈ G;
these elements look like g
a
z and g
b
z

in which each one is in some coset
of Z(G) in G, so z, z

∈ Z(G). Because they are in the center of Z,
they both commute with every other element of G; therefore, g
a
zg
b
z

= g
a
zz

g
b
= g
a
z

zg
b
= g
a
z

g
b
z which shows that every element of
G commutes with every other element of G, therefore G is abelian.
Now Z(G) = G because once G is abelian, every element satisfy the
condition to belong in the center. In other words, abelianism implies
global centralization.
Before we move on to rings and other algebras, let’s take a look at
the quaternion group. The quaternion group is a non-abelian group
of order 8. It is usually denoted by Q
8
= ¦1, −1, i, −i, j, −j, k, −k¦.
The quaternions are actually a number system, similarly constructed
to the complex numbers, but the quaternions don’t commute, which
is unsual for number systems.
An interesting thing about the quaternion group is that once we say
that i
2
= j
2
= k
2
= ijk = −1, you can get the whole group. There’s
another way to name the elements of the group, in which I happen to
prefer right now.
Let Q
8
= ¦1, a, a
2
, a
3
, b, ab, a
2
b, a
3
b¦. Let a
4
= e, b
2
= a
2
, and so
b
4
= e. Then a
−1
= a
3
and it follows that ba = a
−1
b. From this, we
can draw the whole multiplication table.
θ 1 a a
2
a
3
b ab a
2
b a
3
b
1 1 a a
2
a
3
b ab a
2
b a
3
b
a a a
2
a
3
1 ab a
2
b a
3
b b
a
2
a
2
a
3
1 a a
2
b a
3
b b ab
a
3
a
3
1 a a
2
a
3
b b ab a
2
b
b b a
3
b a
2
b ab a
2
a 1 a
3
ab ab a
2
b a
3
b b a
3
a
2
a 1
a
2
b a
2
b a
3
b b ab 1 a
3
a
2
a
a
3
b a
3
b b ab a
2
b a 1 a
3
a
2
They don’t commute because, for example, ab ,= ba = a
3
b. However,
notice that all of its proper subgroups are abelian, because they’re all
cyclic. They are: ¦1¦, ¸a), ¸a
2
), ¸b). So non-abelianism doesn’t imply
non-abelian subgroups.
18
With a quick glance at the table and at the nature of the elements of
the quaternion, we could think that they have something to do with
the dihedral D
4
group, but they are not that similar. The quaternion
group has two elements which square to the identity, while D
4
has at
least five, so D
4
is not isomorphic to Q
8
.
Exercise 1.25. Let G abelian, let H = ¦g ∈ G : g
2
= e¦. Prove
H ≤ G. Give an example to show G abelian is necessary for such
H. Proof. We have associativity from G; e
2
= e, so we have identity.
We have closure on H because: since G is abelian, and H is subset of
G, all elements of H also commute, then e
2
= h
2
h
2
= (hh

)(hh

) =
(hh

)
2
∈ H. We also have inverses, because for each h ∈ H, h
−1
=
h ∈ H. Then H ≤ G. For the example, we consider S
4
which is not
abelian. Both (12) and (14) square to the identity. But (12)(14) =
(142), but (142)
2
= (124) ,= e, so we don’t have closure. So abelianism
is necessary.
Exercise 1.26. Let G be a group and let a be one fixed element
of G. Show that H
a
= ¦x ∈ G : xa = ax¦ is a subgroup of G.
Proof. Associativity is given by G. The identity is present because
it commutes with every element of G, so it will commute with a just
fine. For inverses now, let x ∈ H, so ax = xa, then x
−1
ax = x
−1
xa
=⇒ x
−1
axx
−1
= x
−1
xax
−1
=⇒ x
−1
ae = eax
−1
=⇒ x
−1
a = ax
−1
,
so x
−1
∈ H. Now we need to show closure; let x, y ∈ H
a
. We must
show xy ∈ H
a
; xa = ax =⇒ (yx)a = yax =⇒ yax = (yx)a =⇒
a(yx) = (yx)a.
Exercise 1.27. Show that S
n
is non-abelian for any n ≥ 3. Proof.
Any S
n
, where n ≥ 3, has (12) and (23) as elements; but since (12)(23)
= (123) ,= (132) = (23)(12), then no S
n
, with n ≥ 3, is abelian.
Exercise 1.28. Give an example of a group G which has no elements
of finite order greater than 1, but has a factor group G/H, all of whose
elements have finite order. Let (Z,+) be the group which none of its
elements have finite order; that’s possible because there’s no power
t > 1 such that z
t
= 1. However, Z/2Z is such that all of its cosets
have order not greater than 2.
Exercise 1.29. Let H ≤ G and fix g ∈ G. Define gHg
−1
= ¦ghg
−1
: h ∈ H¦. Prove (a) that gHg
−1
≤ G. It is called a conjugate of H.
Suppose G is finite; then prove (b) that [gHg
−1
[ = [H[. Now suppose
19
G is a group and H is the unique subgroup of size [H[ in G; then,
prove (c) that H G.
For (a), we show first the identity is present. Since e ∈ H, then geg
−1
= gg
−1
= e ∈ gHg
−1
. Associativity comes from G because gHg
−1
is composed only of elements of G. We construct the inverses this
way: e = gg
−1
= geg
−1
= ghh
−1
g
−1
= gheh
−1
g
−1
= ghg
−1
gh
−1
g
−1
= (ghg
−1
)(gh
−1
g
−1
) = e. And e = gg
−1
= geg
−1
= gh
−1
hg
−1
=
gh
−1
ehg
−1
= gh
−1
g
−1
ghg
−1
= (gh
−1
g
−1
)(ghg
−1
). So we have in-
verses; therefore, gHg
−1
≤ G.
For (b), let H = ¦h
1
, h
2
, ..., h
k
¦ with H ≤ G finite. Then
gHg
−1
= ¦gh
1
g
1
, ..., gh
k
g
−1
¦.
Now, if I can show that all elements in gHg
−1
are distinct, then I’ve
shown that there’s one and only one ghg
−1
for each h ∈ H. Therefore,
they have the same number of elements, and therefore, the same order.
So, suppose gh

g
−1
= gh

g
−1
. By cancellation law, h

= h

and then
they’re all distinct, so they have the same order.
For (c), we have [gHg
−1
[ = [H[ ≤ G, by (b) and (a) respectively.
The right coset (gHg
−1
)g = ¦gh
1
g
−1
g, ..., gh
k
g
−1
g¦ = ¦gh
1
, ..., gh
k
¦
= gH. Now, since H is the unique subgroup with [H[ elements, then
gHg
−1
= H, and so gH = Hg — because Hg = (gHg
−1
)g — implying
H G. However, (b) assumes G is finite, but I think that gHg
−1
will
always have the same elements even when G is not finite; so I think
that G-finite in (b) is not a requirement. There’s a not so hard way to
show the same cardinality here, so that we may drop the requirement
that G-finite.
2 Homomorphisms
Definition 2.1. A group homomorphism from (G, ) to (H, ) is a
mapping φ that maps every g ∈ G to some h ∈ H so that the image of
an -product is the corresponding ()-product in H; that is φ(g
1
g
2
)
= φ(g
1
) φ(g
2
).
Definition 2.2. Let φ : G →H be a homomorphism. The set φ(G) ⊆
H of all images h ∈ H of elements g ∈ G is called the homomorphic
image of G. The various elements g sharing the common image φ(g)
= h form the pre-image of h. Also, we say φ is a homomorphism onto
H if the mapping is onto; that is, if φ(G) = H, so that every element
20
of H appears as the image of at least one g ∈ G. If φ is onto and
one-to-one, then φ is an isomorphism.
Definition 2.3. Let φ : G → G

be a homomorphism. Let H ≤ G.
Then we call the set φ[H] = ¦φ(h) : h ∈ H¦ the homomorphic image
of H on G

.
Definition 2.4. Let φ : G → G

be a homomorphism. The kernel of
φ is ker(φ) = ¦g ∈ G : f(g) = e¦ = f
−1
[e].
Theorem 2.1. φ[H] ≤ G

.
Definition 2.5. Let φ : G → G

be a homomorphism. Let H

≤ G

.
Then we call the set φ
−1
[H

] = ¦g ∈ G : φ(g) ∈ H

¦ the pre-image of
H

.
Definition 2.6. Let φ be a homomorphism from a group G to a
group H. The group K of pre-images of e
H
is called the kernel of the
homomorphism.
Exercise 2.1. The integers can be mapped onto the integers Z
n
=
¦0, 1, 2, ..., n − 1¦, and this mapping is a homomorphism for the
operation +. Is it also a homomorphism for ? Let f(i + rn) = i
(mod n), and show that f((i +rn)(j +sn)) = ij (mod n).
Proof. We let φ(p = i +rn) = i (mod n), φ(q = i +sn) = j (mod n).
Is φ(pq) = ij (mod n)? φ((i +rn)(j +sn)) = φ(ij +isn+jrn+rsn
2
)
= φ(ij + (is + jr + rsn)n) = ij (mod n). So it is a homormorphism
for as well.
Exercise 2.2. Let φ : G → H be a group homomorphism. Prove
that φ[G] is abelian if and only if for all x, y ∈ G we have xyx
−1
y
−1

ker(φ).
Proof. Suppose xyx
−1
y
−1
∈ ker(φ) for all x, y ∈ G. Let a, b in φ[G],
so we have x, y ∈ G such that a = φ(x), b = φ(y). We use the φ’s
properties, such as φ(x
−1
) = φ(x)
−1
to write
φ(xy)φ(x
−1
y
−1
) = e
φ(x)φ(y)φ(x
−1
)φ(y
−1
) = e
φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)
−1
φ(y)
−1
= e
φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)
−1
= φ(y)
φ(x)φ(y) = φ(y)φ(x)
ab = ba
21
Therefore, φ[G] is abelian. Now suppose φ[G] is abelian. Let x, y ∈ G.
Must show φ(xyx
−1
y
−1
) = e. So
φ(x)φ(y) = φ(y)φ(x)
φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)
−1
= φ(y)
φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)
−1
φ(y)
−1
= e
φ(x)φ(y)φ(x
−1
)φ(y
−1
) = e
φ(xyx
−1
y
−1
) = e
Therefore xyx
−1
y
−1
∈ ker(φ) for all x, y ∈ G.
Exercise 2.3. Let f : G →H be a group homomorphism. Prove that
f is one-to-one if and only if ker(f) = ¦e¦.
Proof. Assume f is one-to-one. Let x ∈ ker(f). Then f(x) = e =
f(e), and since f is one-to-one, we have that x = e, so ker(f) = ¦e¦.
Now assume ker(f) = ¦e¦. Let x, y ∈ G. Suppose f(x) = f(y). We
now use the fact that f is a homomorphism, to write
f(x) = f(y)
f(x)f(y)
−1
= e
f(x)f(y
−1
) = e
f(xy
−1
) = e
So xy
−1
∈ ker(f). Therefore, x = y.
Exercise 2.4. Let G be a group and fix g ∈ G. Define a map φ :
G →G by
φ(x) = gxg
−1
.
Show that φ is (a) one-to-one and (b) onto. Prove φ is a (c) homo-
morphism.
For (a), let x, y ∈ G. Suppose φ(x) = φ(y). So φ(x) = gxg
−1
= φ(y)
= gyg
−1
. Apply cancellation law on the left and on the right; then x
= y. So φ is one-to-one.
For (b) let y ∈ G. We must show that there is an x ∈ G such that
y = φ(x) = gxg
−1
. Multiply by g on the right, and by g
−1
on the left,
so g
−1
yg = x; so, φ is onto.
For (c), let x, y ∈ G. Then φ(x) = gxg
−1
and φ(y) = gyg
−1
. So
φ(x)φ(y) = gxg
−1
gyg
−1
= gxyg
−1
= φ(xy)
22
So φ is a homomorphism.
Exercise 2.5. Let φ : G →H be a homomorphism and K = ker(φ),
so K G. Let g ∈ G. Prove gK = φ
−1
[φ(g)]. That is, we are proving
that the elements of the coset gK are exactly the elements of G that
map to φ(g) ∈ ¦φ(g)¦.
Proof. Let φ : G →H be a (group) homomorphism, K = ker(φ). Let
K G. Let g ∈ G. Let gk ∈ gK for some k ∈ K. Must show gk ∈
φ
−1
[φ(g)]. Since G is a group, gk ∈ G; since φ is a homomorphism,
φ(gk) = φ(g)φ(k) = φ(g) ∈ φ[G].
Since φ(gk) ∈ φ[G], gk ∈ φ
−1
[φ(g)].
Now, since f is a homomorphism,
f(g
−1
u) = f(g
−1
)f(u)
= f(g)
−1
f(u)
But f(u) = f(g) because u ∈ f
−1
[¦f(g)¦]. So
f(g)
−1
f(u) = f(g)
−1
f(g)
= e
So g
−1
u is mapped to e, which means g
−1
u ∈ K. So g
−1
u = k for
some k ∈ K. Multiply g on the right, so u = gk; so u ∈ gK.
Exercise 2.6. Let H G. Define φ : G → G/H by φ(g) = gH.
Show that φ is onto and the kernel of φ is H.
Proof. As defined, φ takes each g ∈ G into a coset gH ∈ G/H; since
H is normal, G/H’s operation is defined as (g
1
H)(g
2
H) = (g
1
g
2
)H.
By definition, φ(g) = gH, so
φ(g
1
g
2
) = g
1
g
2
H
= g
1
Hg
2
H
= φ(g
1
)φ(g
2
)
Therefore, φ is a homomorphism.
The kernel of φ will be all elements which land in the identity of G/H;
that is, they land in H. Which elements g will satisfy φ(g) = H? By
definition, φ(g) = gH which is equal to H if and only if (g
−1
e) ∈ H.
23
Let h ∈ H. So φ(h) = hH = H because h
−1
∈ H. Therefore,
H = ker(φ).
To show φ is onto, let gH ∈ G/H. I must find g

∈ G such that
φ(g

) = gH; because g ∈ G, we certainly have one; let g = g

, so φ is
onto.
Definition 2.7. A group G ,= ¦e¦ is simple if and only if for every
N G, we have N = G or N = ¦e¦.
Exercise 2.7. Prove that a finite simple group G which is abelian
must be a cyclic group of prime order.
Proof. By definition, G ,= ¦e¦, so pick g ,= e; we know ¸g) ≤ G.
Suppose ¸g) ,= G; since G is abelian, ¸g) G, so ¸g) is normal and
proper in G, but G is simple, so that’s not possible. So, ¸g) = G.
By Theorem 5-3, if some prime p divides [G[, then G has a subgroup
H of order p. Since G is abelian, H must be normal. Since G is
simple, it’s not true that H is proper, so [G[ = p.
Theorem 2.2. Suppose H is a subgroup of G and N is normal in G.
Define HN a subset of G by HN = ¦hn : h ∈ H, n ∈ N¦. Then HN
is a subgroup of G.
Proof. We know e is in both H and N, so e
2
= e ∈ HN; hence HN
is not empty.
For closure, let a, b be in HN. Then there are h, h

∈ H and n, n

∈ N
such that a = hn and b = h

n

, so ab = hnh

n

. Now, since N
is normal, hN = Nh for all h ∈ G, so nh

∈ Nh

= h

N; hence,
nh

= h

n

for some n

∈ N, so ab = hh

n

n

. Since hh

∈ H and
n

n

∈ N, ab ∈ HN.
For inverses, let a be in HN, so a = hn for some h ∈ H and n ∈
N. We know a
−1
= n
−1
h
−1
, so we multiply h on the left to get
ha
−1
= hn
−1
h
−1
which is in N because N is normal. Since ha
−1
∈ N,
h
−1
(ha
−1
) ∈ HN, so a
−1
∈ HN; hence, HN is a subgroup of G.
Corollary 2.3. If H G, then HN G.
Proof. Let x in HN be arbitrary; then x = uv for some u in H and v
in N. Let g in G be arbitrary; we want to show that gxg
−1
is in HN.
Now gxg
−1
= guvg
−1
= gug
−1
gvg
−1
. But H and N are normal in G,
so gug
−1
is in H and gvg
−1
is in N, so gxg
−1
is in HN, as desired.
24
Exercise 2.8. Let G be a group. Define ∼ on G by x ∼ y if there
exists g ∈ G such that
gxg
−1
= y.
Prove (a) ∼ is an equivalence relation,(b) describe the conjugacy
classes of G if G is abelian, (c) write down the conjugacy classes of
S
3
.
Proof. Let x ∈ G. Then x ∼ x because xxx
−1
= x. Suppose x ∼ y.
So exists g such that
gxg
−1
= y
xg
−1
= g
−1
y
x = g
−1
y(g
−1
)
−1
.
Suppose x ∼ y, y ∼ z. So there exists g, h such that
gxg
−1
= y
hyh
−1
= z
So h(gxg
−1
)h
−1
= z. Let g

= hg, and notice g
−1
= g
−1
h
−1
. So
g

xg
−1
= z. So x ∼ z.
(b) If G is abelian, then the only y which will satisfy the relation is
y = x, but since ∼ is an equivalence relation, ∼ breaks G apart into
disjoint and exhaustive classes, so G has [G[ conjugacy classes of the
form ¦x¦.
(c) S
3
= ¦e, (12), (23), (13), (123), (132)¦. A 3-cycle has a 2-cycle
as a conjugate because 3-cycles are even permutations, 2-cycles are
odd, so even-cycle times odd-cycle is odd-cycle. Therefore, one class
C
1
will contain (123), (132). Now, by inspection I find (12)(13)(12)
= (12)(123) = (23), so (13) ∼ (23). Also, (23)(12)(23) = (23)(123) =
(13), so (12) ∼ (13). So, another class C
2
will contain (12), (13), (23).
3 Polynomials
We need definitions, notation explained, the theorems, the proofs; the
exercises are already here.
Exercise 3.1. Find all primes p such that x + 2 is a factor of
x
4
+x
3
+x
2
−x + 1 ∈ Z
p
[x].
Solution. If x +2 is a factor of x
4
+x
3
+x
2
−x +1 ∈ Z
p
[x], then it’s
because −2 is a root. By evaluating the polynomial at −2, we get 15
25
as the result. Now, 15 = 0 (mod 3) and 15 = 0 (mod 5). Hence we
have p in ¦3, 5¦.
Exercise 3.2. Find all irreducible polynomials of degree 3 in Z
3
[x].
Solution. We can express all polynomials of degree 3 over Z
3
by
ax
3
+bx
2
+cx +d.
The constant term d cannot be zero, or zero is a root. The coefficients
cannot sum to zero, or one is a root. Now, to derive a third rule,
evaluate x = 2 = −1: −a+b +−c +d = 0 which implies b +d = a+c.
That is, whenever the sum of the even coefficients equals the sum of
odd coefficients, we have 2 = −1 as a root. Since the degree must be
3, then a cannot be 0, so a is either 1 or 2.
Since factorization is unique except for scalar multiple (and order),
consider all monic polynomials and multiply each by 2 to notice that
factorization doesn’t change. So we may consider only the monic poly-
nomials; in case we want to distinguish them, we may multiply each
irreducible by 2 to obtain its match, doubling the total of irreducible
polynomials.
So, with these criteria, we have 2 choices for d, 3 choices for c, 3 choices
for b, with 1 choice for a. This gives us 18 polynomials p(x). Suppose
now that p(x) is reducible; then its factors will be of degree 2 and
degree 1; that is,
p(x) = g(x)h(x) = (x
2
+Ax +B)(x +C).
Since d isn’t zero, B and C are not zero. So, C = 1 or C = 2, B = 1 or
B = 2. This gives us 6 possibilities for g(x) and 2 possibilities for h(x);
that is, 12 factorizations, which are reducible. We take advantage of
the list to add the irreducibles in the order that they should appear.
We list only the coefficients of each polynomial in the order x
3
, x
2
,
x
1
, x
0
.
1 0 0 1
1 0 0 2
1 0 1 1
1 0 1 2
1 0 2 1 irreducible
1 0 2 2 irreducible
1 1 0 1
1 1 0 2 irreducible
26
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 2 irreducible
1 1 2 1 irreducible
1 1 2 2
1 2 0 1 irreducible
1 2 0 2
1 2 1 1 irreducible
1 2 1 2
1 2 2 1
1 2 2 2 irreducible
We found 8 polynomials. If we multiply each by 2, we would get their
matches, yielding 16 irreducible polynomials as shown below.
2 0 0 1
2 0 0 2
2 0 1 1 irreducible
2 0 1 2 irreducible
2 0 2 1
2 0 2 2
2 1 0 1
2 1 0 2 irreducible
2 1 1 1 irreducible
2 1 1 2
2 1 2 1
2 1 2 2 irreducible
2 2 0 1 irreducible
2 2 0 2
2 2 1 1
2 2 1 2 irreducible
2 2 2 1 irreducible
2 2 2 2
Exercise 3.3. Demonstrate that f(x) = x
4
−22x
2
+ 1 is irreducible
over Q. Solution. By the quadratic formula,
x
2
= 11 ±

22
2
−4/2
= 11 ±2

30
27
So x = ±

11 ±2

30.
Now we can write f(x) as the product of 4 linear factors in R[x]. The
linear factors are irreducible polynomials in R[x]; so, the factorization
of f(x) is unique — except for order and scalar multiples. Therefore,
if f(x) were to factor in Q[x], we would see rational roots in these
linear factors, which we don’t.
Because the irrationals are not closed under multiplication, we must
also make sure that no factors of degree 2 will have rational coefficients.
We take the linear factors and multiply them in all possible ways.
Let
A = x −

11 + 2

30
B = x +

11 + 2

30
C = x −

11 −2

30
D = x +

11 −2

30.
So
AB = x
2
−11 −2

30
AC = x
2
+ (−

11 + 2

30 −

11 −2

30)x + 1
AD = x
2
+ (−

11 + 2

30 +

11 −2

30)x + 1
BC = x
2
+ (−

11 −2

30 +

11 + 2

30)x + 1
BD = x
2
+ (

11 −2

30 +

11 + 2

30)x + 1
CD = x
2
+ 241 −44

30
No factor with rational coefficients; so f(x) is irreducible in Q[x].
Exercise 3.4. Let φ : G → H be a group homomorphism which is
onto. Suppose G has 60 elements and H has 4 elements. Find [ker(φ)[.
Let h be in H. How many elements of G map to h?
Solution. By the fundamental theorem of homomorphisms, G/ker(φ)

= Image(φ). Since φ is onto, H

= Image(φ), so G/ker(φ)

= H.
Since [H[ = 4, 60/[ker(φ)[ = 4; hence, [ker(φ)[ = 15. Let h be in H;
so [φ
−1
[h][ = 15.
28
Exercise 3.5. Show that α =

2 +

3 is algebraic over Q by finding
f(x) in Q[x] such that f(α) = 0. Repeat for α =

3

2 −i.
Solution.
α
2
= 5 + 2

6
α
2
−5 = 2

6
α
4
−10α
2
+ 25 = 24
α
4
−10α
2
+ 1 = 0
So,

2 +

3 is algebraic over Q; so it’s an algebraic number.
For the other, we write
α
2
=
3

2 −i
α
2
−i =
3

2

2
−i)
3
= 2

4
−2iα
2
−1)(α
2
−i) = 2
α
6
−iα
4
−2iα
4
−2α
2
−α
2
+i = 2
α
6
−3iα
4
−3α
2
+i = 2
α
6
−3α
2
−2 = 3iα
4
−i

6
−3α
2
−2)
2
= −9α
8
+ 6α
4
+ 1

6
−3α
2
−2)
2
+ 9α
8
−6α
4
−1 = 0
Now the coefficients are rational. Since α is a root of the polynomial
above, and α is in C and C is an extension field of Q, then α is algebraic
over Q, so α is algebraic number.
Exercise 3.6. The complex numbers s + ti and s − ti with s, t in R
are often called conjugates. Show that they satisfy the definition of
conjugates. What happens if t = 0?
Solution. If the coefficients of the polynomial
p(x) = (x −s +ti)(x −s −ti),
are real numbers, then we can pick R = F and C = E to satisfy the
definition, because C is an extension field of R. Also, p(x) would be
irreducible over R because all of its roots are complex numbers. Since
p(x) = x
2
−2sx + (s
2
+t
2
),
29
we have p(x) in R[x] satisfying the definition. If t = 0, then the dis-
criminant found in the application of the quadratic formula is greater
than zero which implies that all roots are real which causes p(x) to be
reducible in R failing the definition for the chosen fields here. If we
want to, however, we can pick other fields to satisfy the definition for
when t = 0.
Exercise 3.7. Let F be the field of rational numbers and let p(x) =
x
2
+x/3−1. Show that x
3
+1, −1/3x
2
+x+1 and 10x/9+2/3 are in
the same equivalence class. Show that x
4
+x
2
+1 and −28x/27+28/9
are in the same equivalence class.
Solution. We have x
3
+1 = 10x/9+2/3 and −x
2
/3+x+1 = 10x/9+
2/3. This shows they’re all in the same equivalence class. For the
other class, we have x
4
+x
2
+ 1 = −28x/27 + 28/9.
Exercise 3.8. Still using Q/¸p(x) = x
2
+ x/3 − 1), find linear poly-
nomials equivalent to x
2
, x
3
, x
4
. Use the results to find a linear
polynomial equivalent to 3x
4
+x
3
−2/3x
2
+x + 1.
Solution. For the first part, we do long division on each. So
x
2
= −x/3 + 1
x
3
= 10x/9 −1/3
x
4
= −19x/27 + 10/9.
For the second part, we use the equivalences above to perform the
appropriate substituitions for 3x
4
+ x
3
− 2/3x
2
+ x + 1. That is, we
can write it as
3(−19x/27) + 10/9 + (10x/9) −1/3 + (−2/3) −(x/3) + 1 +x + 1,
which is equivalent to (46 + 16x)/9.
Exercise 3.9. What is the multiplicative identity of F[x]/¸p(x))?
Solution. The multiplicative inverse e(x) is an element of the field
such that k(x)e(x) = e(x)k(x) = k(x). If we take any member of k(x)
and multiply it by a constant term, we get a member of k(x), so all
constants are members of e(x).
Exercise 3.10. Let q(x) = x + 1/2; check if q(x)
−1
= −4/5x + 2/5
is the inverse of q(x) in the field Q[x]/¸x
2
+ 1).
30
Solution. To check, we verify that q(x) q(x)
−1
= e(x) and we divide
e(x) by x
2
+ 1. If we get a constant polynomial, it worked. It does
because
q(x) q(x)
−1
= 1/5 −4x
2
/5 = 1.
But it could’ve been any constant other than 1, since all constants are
members of the class 1.
Exercise 3.11. Find the inverse of x in Q[x]/¸x
2
+ 1).
Solution. What polynomial that when multiplied by x will yield a
constant mod x
2
+ 1? The polynomial x itself, because (x)(x) = x
2
= −1 mod x
2
+ 1. So x
−1
= x.
Exercise 3.12. Divide θ
2
+ 1 by tθ + s, express their gcd linearly,
find the inverse of s+ti, and compare with the preceding result of the
book.
Solution. The division algorithm yields
θ
2
+ 1 = (tθ +s)(θ/t −s/t
2
) + (1 +s
2
/t
2
).
Since (1 +s
2
/t
2
) is a constant, it is a gcd(θ
2
+ 1, tθ +s). We express
it linearly now with

1 +
s
2
t
2

= θ
2
+ 1 −

tθ +s

θ
t

s
t
2

= θ
2
+ 1 −

θ
t

s
t
2

tθ +s

We want to express 1 as a combination of θ
2
+ 1 and tθ + s. So we
multiply the equation by 1/(1 +s
2
/t
2
), which yields
1 =

θ
2
+ 1 −

θ
t

s
t
2

tθ +s

1
1 +s
2
/t
2
=

1
1 +s
2
/t
2

θ
2
+ 1


1
1 +s
2
/t
2

θ
t

s
t
2

tθ +s

=

t
2
t
2
+s
2

θ
2
+ 1

tθ −s
t
2
+s
2

tθ +s

So
1 +¸θ
2
+ 1) = −
tθ −s
t
2
+s
2

tθ +s

+¸θ
2
+ 1).
The inverse of s +ti is
s −ti
s
2
+t
2
.
31
The comparison we can make here is that
s −ti
s
2
+t
2
seems to be the same as

tθ −s
t
2
+s
2
=
s −tθ
t
2
+s
2
,
where θ plays the role of i.
Exercise 3.13 (7-12).
Exercise 3.14 (7-14).
Exercise 3.15. Find the minimum polynomials over the small field
of the following elements in the following extensions: (a) i in C : Q,
(b)
3

7 in R : Q, (c) (1 +
5

)/2 in C : Q, (d)

5 +

3 in C : Q.
Solution. We set x = r, where r is the desired root, then we work
with the equation until we get the coefficients over the desired field.
For (a), we have x
2
+1, for (b) x
3
−7, (c) x
2
−x−1, (d) x
4
−16x
2
+4.
Exercise 3.16. Find an irreducible polynomial p(x) in Z
3
[x] of degree
2. Explain why it is irreducible. Contruct the field E = Z
3
[x]/¸p(x)).
Factor p(x) into two linear terms in E[x].
Solution. For a prime p, Z
p
is a field, so it has no zero divisors and
it’s closed under the operations, so a polynomial is reducible if and
only if it has a root. In Z
3
, x
2
+ 1 has no roots.
Let the roots be caled T and −T = 2T. We attach the roots to Z
3
,
and we compute what other elements will be appear in the field by
computing the addition and multiplication tables.
+ | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T
-----------------------------------------------------------
0 | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T
1 | 1 2 0 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T T 2T
2 | 2 0 1 2+T 2+2T T 2T 1+T 1+2T
T | T T+1 T+2 2T 0 1+2T 1 2+2T T
2T | 2T 1+2T 2+2T 0 T 1 1+T 2 2+T
1+T |1+T 2+T T 1+2T 1 2+2T 2 2T 0
1+2T |1+2T 2+2T 2T 1 1+T 2 2+T 0 T
32
2+T |2+T T 1+T 2+2T 2 2+2T 0 1+2T 1
2+2T |2+2T 2T 1+2T 2 2+T 0 T 1 1+T
* | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T
-----------------------------------------------------------
0 | 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T
2 | 0 2 1 2T T 2+2T 2+T 1+2T 1+T
T | 0 T 2T 2 1 2+T 1+T 2+2T 1+2T
2T | 0 2T T 1 2 1+2T 2+2T 1+T 2+T
1+T | 0 1+T 2+2T 2+T 1+2T 2T 2 1 T
1+2T | 0 1+2T 2+T 1+T 2+2T 2 T 2T 1
2+T | 0 2+T 1+2T 2+2T 1+T 1 2T T 2
2+2T | 0 2+2T 1+T 1+2T ---- T 1 2 2T
We can now factor every polynomial in Z
3
(T, 2T) all the way to linear
factors. The roots of x
2
+ 1 are T and 2T, so
x
2
+ 1 = (x +T)(x + 2T).
4 Algebraic field extensions
Definition 4.1. If every element of a field F is an element of a field
E and if F has the same field operations as E, then F is a subfield of
E and E is an extension of F. We write F ⊆ E.
Definition 4.2. Let a
0
+a
1
x+a
2
x
2
+... +a
n
x
n
= 0 be a polynomial
equation of degree n with coefficients a
i
in a field F, and let E be an
extension field of F. If r in E is a root of such an equation, then r is
said to be algebraic over F. If F is Q, then r is an algebraic number.
Definition 4.3. A real number that is not the root of any polynomial
equation with rational coefficients is called transcendental.
Knowing that π is transcendental from hearing people say it, makes
one wonder if we can show that it is not transcendental. All we have
to do is find a polynomial with rational coefficients which has π as a
root. We can’t consider x −π = 0 because we can’t assume that π is
rational. A rational number times an irrational number is irrational,
so we will need at least a polynomial of degree 2.
33
Why? Because the idea is: if π isn’t transcendental, then eventually
we would find some natural n such that π
n
= r, where r is a rational
number. Consider the irrational

2. If we square it, we get 2; so this
way we can find a polynomial to which

2 is a root. For example,
x
2
− 2 = 0. So, if we can apply some power to π and get it to
become a rational number, then we would be done. If I believe the
mathematicians, then I have to say that this is not possible and if not,
then this is another way to think of transcendental numbers: numbers
which won’t square to a rational number, ever.
Definition 4.4. An algebraic number is called an algebraic integer
if and only if it is a root of a monic polynomial equation of degree n
with coefficients in Z.
Every algebraic number r is a root of an equation with coefficients in
Z. Why? Because r is a root of an equation with coefficients in Q, by
definition. So, multiply the equation by the least common multiple of
the denominators of the rational coefficients and we get an equation
with integral coefficients; the polynomial equation won’t necessarily
be monic.
Theorem 4.1. Let F be a field and let r be in E ⊆ F be algebraic
with respect to F. Then r is a root of a unique monic irreducible
polynomial p(x) in F[x] and p(x) divides each polynomial in F[x]
that has r as a root.
Definition 4.5. Let F be a field. Then r
1
, r
2
in E ⊆ F are conjugates
if they are roots of the same irreducible polynomial in F[x].
Definition 4.6. If every element of an extension E of F is algebraic
with respect to F, then E is an algebraic extension of F.
Definition 4.7. Let F be a field and let p(x) be in F[x] such that p(x)
is irreducible in F[x]. We let F[x]/¸p(x)) stand for the polynomials
with coefficients in F taken modulo ¸p(x)) with equivalence classes
described as ¦r(x) + p(x)q(x), where q(x) is in F[x]¦, represented by
r(x) mod p(x).
The uniqueness of the remainder of a long division is guaranteed by
the Division Algorithm, so the representation is described in the defi-
nition above is also unique. Also, we must check that p(x), from the
definition above, is really irreducible.
34
Definition 4.8. We may write the representative of an equivalence
class of polynomials as a polynomial with a bar on top; for example,
(10/9)x + 2/3.
Theorem 4.2 (Kronecker). Let F be a field, and let p(x) be irre-
ducible in F[x]. Then F[x]/¸p(x)) is a field, and contains a subfield
isomorphic to F. The polynomial p(x) has a root in F[x]/¸p(x)).
Let’s review some concepts. Let F be a field. Suppose r is algebraic
over F which means r is the root of some polynomial over F. If we
require r to be the root of some irreducible polynomial, then there’s
only one polynomial to which r is a root of. We call such polynomial,
the minimum polynomial of r over F.
For example, if F = Q and r =
3

2, then p(x) = x
3
− 2. But if F =
Q, then
3

2 implies the existence of p(x) = x −
3

2. So, it depends on
the field. Now, consider π as the root of some polynomial over Q.
Theorem 4.3 (Kronecker, in new words). We have a polynomial p(x)
which is irreducible over F. We can take all polynomials in F[x] and
quotient it out with p(x); that is, we can create F[x]/¸p(x)); this is a
field, with nice properties.
The first property is that the field, mentioned in the theorem of Kro-
necker, has F inside it: the constant polynomials. Now x is a root
of p(x). For example, x
2
+ 2x + 2 is irreducible by E.I.C. Now take
Q[x]/¸p(x)) and notice that since p(x) is congruent to zero by defini-
tion, x is a root. To check, just plug x in the polynomial.
Another way to think of the previous example is to declare r to be a
root of p(x). Now, we form a field F(r) — read this as “F adjoin r”.
Now use the fact that p(r) = 0 to “multiply” things around — what
would this mean?
Going on; if p(x) has degree n, then every element of F(r) is of the
form c
0
+ c
1
r + c
2
r
2
+ ... + c
n−1
ra
n−1
with c
i
in F. Let’s look at an
example.
Declare r a root of x
2
+2x+2. In Q(r), we know that r
2
+2r+2 = 0 or
r
2
= −2r −2. Now Q(r) = ¦x+yr : x, y ∈ Q¦. With this information
now, we write (6 + 2r)(−1 −3r) = −6 −20r −6r
2
= −6 −20r −6r
2
= 6 −8r because r
2
= −2r −2.
Remark 4.1. So, we have a field. But how do we divide things in it?
That is, what’s 1/a, for example? We can use the divison algorithm to
35
answer that. The multiplication by conjugates doesn’t always work;
that is, in C you can define division in terms of multiplication by
inverses, but it seems to me that this works in C and not on every
field. So, I should be able to find one field in which this does not work,
right? This is my task now, because I don’t know one right now, but
I will say that I believe that not all the time we get something like i
2
= −1 in a field that will answer all of our questions. So I say that C
is a very nice field, but there are some mean ones.
Definition 4.9. A simple extension is an extension which includes
only one element. The degree of an extension F ⊆ E is the number
of elements of E that we need to span E over F.
What does this mean? Take
Q(

2,

3) = ¦a +b

2 +c

3 +d

6¦,
and notice that it is a degree 4 extension of Q, because we absolutely
need 1,

2,

3, and

6.
Now, we have to notice that Q(

2 +

3) = Q(

2,

3), but they
have different bases and different degrees. Doesn’t this sound not
well-defined? This alters perhaps what we call, in this document, a
splitting field. I owe an explanation here.
Theorem 4.4. If r has minimum polynomial p(x) of degree n over
F, then F(r) : F is an extension of degree n.
So, for example, take p(x) = x
5
+ 2x
2
+ 2x + 6, which is irreducible
over Q, and declare r as a root, so
Q(r) = ¦a +br +cr
2
+dr
3
+er
4
¦
has degree 5.
Now, consider x
2
+ 2x + 2. Here,
Q(r) = ¦a +br : a, b ∈ Q¦.
The rule for multiplication here is r
2
= −2r −2. This is just like the
complex i such that i
2
= −1. Now, we have a root, so we can factor
it. We do the long division between x −r and x
2
+ 2x + 2. We get
x
2
+ 2x + 2 = (x −r)(x + 2 +r) + 0.
So r and −r −2 are conjugates in Q(r).
36
Consider now x
3
−2 which is irreducible over Q. So we extend the field
by adjoining
3

2. So a division should happen with zero remainder.
We get
x
3
−2 = (x −
3

2)(x
2
+

2 +
3

4) + 0.
Now (x
2
+

2 +
3

4) is irreducible. We then expand the field to get
it to be reducible. So Q(
3

2,
3

2(−1/2 +i

3/2)). I wondered if these
additions to the field would make the field completely factorable, but it
doesn’t; these additions make these polynomials factorable, but others
are still irreducible, so what happens to C? C somehow is completely
factorable. This is a miracle; it turns out that R[x] mod x
2
+1 makes
C a beautiful field.
Definition 4.10. Let p(x) be irreducible over F. Suppose F ⊆ E ⊆ D
are fields. The polynomial “splits” if it factors into linear terms. We
say D is a spliting field for p(x) if p(x) splits in D[x], and p(x) does
not split in E[x] for any F ⊂ E ⊂ D.
By the way, all roots of p(x) lie in the splitting field. Why? Because
if it factors then
p(x) = (x −r
1
)(x −r
2
)...(x −r
n
).
Theorem 4.5. There exists is a unique splitting field. Take F(r
1
, r
2
,
..., r
n
) which are the roots of p(x).
Let’s now see an example. Find a splitting field of x
4
−3x
2
+1. How
do we do it? Find the roots of the polynomial; use the quadratic
formula. So x
2
= (3 ±

5)/2, so x = ±

(3 ±

5)/2. Now,
Q

(3 +

5)/2,

(3 −

5)/2

is a splitting field. We’re done. There may be a better way to write
this field, and this is one of the frustrating thing: there is so many
ways to write it and it’s not always easy to figure out whether we have
the simplest.
Theorem 4.6. F(r
1
, r
2
) = F(r
1
)F(r
2
) = F(r
2
)F(r
1
) et cetera.
Theorem 4.7. Suppose F ⊆ E ⊆ D with degree E : F = m, degree
D : E = n. Then D : F = mn.
37
An example of this theorem is F = Q and E = Q(

2) = ¦a + b

2
: a, b ∈ Q¦. Degree E : F = 2. Now, look at E = Q(

2) and
D = E(
4

2). The minimum polynomial of
4

2 over Q(

2) is x
2


2
so degree D : E = 2 and degree E : Q = 4. I don’t really follow this
example, so if there’s anything wrong here I wouldn’t be able to tell.
Degree Q(π) : Q = ∞. Now consider Q(π) : Q(π
2
) which has degree
2, and π is root of x
2
−π
2
.
In this section, we’ve studied algebraic numbers and transcendental
numbers. We have seen irreducible polynomials over a field F. We
have seen Kronecker’s theorem which claims the existence of a field
F[x]/¸p(x)) which is an extension field of F where p(x), in particular,
has a root; we can think of F[x]/¸p(x)) as a simple degree n extension
F(r) where p(r) = 0 degree p(x) = n.
We’ve seen minimum polynomials, conjugates of field elements. On
the next section, we will be looking at roots in which when we permute
them around, we will find nice properties; that is, we’ll be building a
group of permutations of roots.
Exercise 4.1. Prove that 1, i =

−1 form a linear basis for R(i),
where R is the real field. Show that g =

2 −2i is algebraic relative
to R by finding a polynomial having g as a zero.
Solution. Every element of R(i) can be written as a + bi, so 1 and i
span R(i). To show linear independence, we must show that for all r
in R(i), r = a 1 +b i = 0 if and only if a = b = 0.
If a = b = 0, then r = 0. Now if r = 0, then
r = a +ib = 0
a = −ib
a
2
= (−ib)
2
= (−i)
2
b
2
= −b
2
a
2
+b
2
= 0
But since a and b are real numbers, a
2
and b
2
are non-negative, so
a = b = 0.
38
To show that g =

2 −2i is algebraic relative to R, we write
g
2
= 2 + 4i
2
−4i

2
g
2
−2 + 4 = −4i

2
(g
2
+ 2)
2
= (−4i

2)
2
= −32
(g
2
+ 2)
2
+ 32 = 0
Exercise 4.2. Construct a splitting field for p(x) = x
4
− 8x
2
+ 15
over Q.
Solution. We factor p(x) into linear terms and see which elements
we’re missing into some field, so that we can build the smallest possible
field such that p(x) factors completely.
p(x) = (x
2
−5)(x
2
−3)
= (x +

5)(x −

5)(x +

3)(x −

3)
So p(x) splits into linear factors in Q(

5,

3).
Exercise 4.3. Is Q(π) a finite extension? If so, give a basis of Q(π)
: Q.
Solution. Suppose it is finite. Then we could try 1 and π as a basis,
but we need to account for π
2
, so we could try, 1, π, π
2
as a basis, but
then we would have to account for π
3
as well, so we could expand the
basis again and so on, so it doesn’t look like this will ever terminate.
Exercise 4.4. Find minimal polynomial of α ∈ Q[x] and degree of
Q(α) : Q.
(a) α =

3 −

6
a
2
= 3 −

6
a
2
−3 = −

6
(a
2
−3)
2
= 6
(a
2
−3)
2
−6 = 0
a
4
−6a
2
+ 3 = 0
Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. Let p = 3, so by E.I.C. it is irreducible.
39
(b) α =

1
3
+

7
α
2
=
1
3
+

7
α
2

1
3
=

7

α
2

1
3

2
= 7

α
2

1
3

2
−7 = 0
α
4


2
3

62
9
= 0

4
−6α
2
−62 = 0
Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. Let p = 2, so by E.I.C. it is irreducible.
(c) α =

2 +i
α
2
= 1 + 2i

2
α
2
−1 = 2i

2
α
4
−2α
2
+ 9 = 0
Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. E.I.C. doesn’t seem to help here. What would
be another approach? The only thing I can think of is to compute the
roots and show they won’t allow reducibility over Q.
The polynomial factors into
(α +

2 +i)(α +

2 −i)(α −

2 +i)(α −

2 −i).
Let A, B, C, D be first, second, third, forth factors, respectively. Then
AB has an irrational coefficient, AC has a complex one, AD has a
complex one, BC has a complex one, BD has a complex one and CD
has a complex one; brute force shows no factors over Q are possible.
(d) α =

2 +

5
α
2
= 2 + 5 + 2

10

2
−7)
2
−40 = 0
α
4
−14α
2
+ 9 = 0
Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. Brute force again. The roots are r
1
=

2 +

5,
r
2
=

2 −

5, r
3
= −

2 +

5, r
4
= −

2 −

5. So it factors over R
as
(x −r
1
)(x −r
2
)(x −r
3
)(x −r
4
).
40
Let A, B, C, D be the factors in the other they appear above. So
AB, AC, AD, BC, BD and CD have an irrational coefficient. So
factorization over Q is not possible.
Exercise 4.5. For each α ∈ C and each given field F, classify α as
either algebraic or transcendental over F. If α is algebraic, find the
degree of F(α) : F.
(a) α = i, F = Q.
α
2
= i
2
α
2
+ 1 = 0.
So i is algebraic over Q, and degree of Q(i) : Q = 2.
(b) α = π, F = Q. Transcendental.
(c) α = π
2
, F = Q(π). We have −π
2
as a root of p(α) = α − π
2
, so
π
2
is algebraic over Q(π) and the degree of Q(π
2
) : Q(π) = 1.
(d) α = π
2
, F = Q(π
3
). Transcendental.
Exercise 4.6. Find degree and basis for the given field extensions.
(a) Q(

2) : Q. Basis (1,

2), degree 2.
(b) Q(

2,

3,

18) : Q. Basis (1,

2,

3,

6), degree 4.
(c) Q(
3

2,

3) : Q. Basis (1,

3,
3

2,
3

4,

3
3

2,

3
3

4), degree 6.
(d) Q(

2,

3) : Q(

2 +

3). Since

3 +

2 is in the field, we also
have

6,

2,

3, so the fields here are the same, and we have 1 as a
basis, so degree is 1.
Exercise 4.7. Find all conjugates for α =

2 +

3 over Q. Repeat
for α =
3

2.
Solution. We look for an irreducible polynomial over Q which has α
as a root. So p(x) = x
4
−10a
2
+ 1 is irreducible over Q and its roots
are α itself, and all of its conjugates which are −

3 −

2, −

3 +

2,

3 −

2.
Exercise 4.8. Let σ, τ: F → F be two field automorphisms. Prove
that σ
−1
and (σ ◦ t) are also field automorphisms.
Proof. Since σ is an automorphism, it is one-to-one and onto and takes
each f ∈ F to some f

∈ F for each f

∈ F. By definition, σ
−1
is the
41
one-to-one and onto function such that (σ ◦ σ
−1
)(f) = (σ
−1
◦ σ)(f) =
f for all f ∈ F.
So, if we show that σ
−1
is a homomorphism, we would have shown
that it is an isomorphism, and therefore, an automorphism. Let a, b
be in F. Since σ is an automorphism, there are u, v in F with a =
σ(u), b = σ(v). So,
σ
−1
(ab) = σ
−1
(σ(u)σ(v))
= σ
−1
(σ(uv))
= uv
= σ
−1
(a)σ
−1
(b).
Similarly for addition,
σ
−1
(a +b) = σ
−1
(σ(u) +σ(v))
= σ
−1
(σ(u +v))
= u +v
= σ
−1
(a) +σ
−1
(b).
Now σ ◦ τ. Since σ and τ are field automorphisms, they preserve the
operations. Let a and b be in F. So, for multiplication, we do
(σ ◦ τ)(ab) = σ(τ(ab))
= σ(τ(a)τ(b))
= σ(τ(a))σ(τ(b))
= (σ ◦ τ)(a)(σ ◦ τ)(b).
For addition,
(σ ◦ τ)(a +b) = σ(τ(a +b))
= σ(τ(a) +τ(b))
= σ(τ(a)) +σ(τ(b))
= (σ ◦ τ)(a) + (σ ◦ τ)(b).
So (σ ◦ τ) is a homomorphism. To show that it is onto, let f

be in F
and then we must show that there’s an f in F such that (σ ◦ τ)(f) =
f

, for all f

in F.
Since τ is an automorphism, then for each f

in F, there is an f in F
such that τ(f) = f

. Since σ is also an automorphism, then for each
f

in F, there’s τ(f) in F such that σ(τ(f)) = f

. So for each f

in
F, there’s an f in F such that σ(τ(f)) = (σ ◦ τ)(f) = f

, so it’s onto,
and hence, an automorphism.
42
Exercise 4.9. Prove that G(C/R) is cyclic with 2 elements.
Proof. By definition, the Galois group G(C/R) is the group of auto-
morphisms of C that fix every r ∈ R, where the binary operation is
composition. One automorphism is the identity map, which is one-to-
one and onto, and is the identity of the group.
We will try to find a second one. Define a map σ that maps conjugates;
that is, the rule is “map a +bi to a −bi” and notice that every r ∈ R
is of the form “a + b 0,” so for a real number r, σ(r) = r, so every
r ∈ R is fixed. Now, if σ is an isomorphism, then it is a member of
the group, and if we can show that σ
2
= (σ ◦ s) = e, then we would
have shown that there are no more elements in the group, hence that
the group is cyclic.
Let a +bi, c +di ∈ C. So,
s((a +bi)(c +di)) = s(ac −bd + (ad +bc)i)
= ac −bd −(ad +bc)i
= (a −bi)(c −di)
= s(a +bi)s(c +di).
Also,
s((a +bi) + (c +di)) = s((a +c) + (b +d)i)
= a +c −(b +d)i
= a −bi +c −di
= s(a +bi)s(c +di)
So σ is a homomorphism. Let a+bi be in C. We want to show that σ
is onto; that is, we want to show that there is a c +di in C such that
σ(c +di) = a +bi.
We know that σ(c + di) = c − di, where c and −d are real numbers.
The task was to find c and d such that c = a, d = −b or −d = b. There
are such numbers, pick c = a and d = −b. So σ is an isomorphism.
Now we must show that σ
2
= (σ ◦ s) = e. Let a + bi in C. Compute
(σ ◦ σ)(a +bi) = σ(σ(a +bi)) = σ(a −bi) = a +bi = e(a +bi); hence,
the group is cyclic with two elements, e and σ.
Exercise 4.10. Let F be a field. Define the characteristic of F to be
the smallest n ≥ 1 such that 1 + 1 + ... + 1 = 0 where we are adding
1 to itself n times. If no such n exists, we say F has characteristic
zero. What is char(Q)? What is char(Z
7
)? Suppose F has finite
43
characteristic n. Prove that n must be prime. Hint: fields have no
zero divisors.
We have char(Q) = 0, and char(Z
7
) = 7.
Now char(F) = n. Proof. Let F have finite characteristic n; n must
be composite or prime. Suppose n is composite. Then there is a prime
p < n such that n = pq, for some natural q.
Then (1 + 1 + ... + 1)
p
(1 + 1 + ... + 1)
q
= 0, where the index p
means 1 added p times, and similarly for q. Since fields have no zero
divisors, F isn’t a field if n is composite; hence, n is prime.
5 Galois theory
Definition 5.1. An automorphism σ of a mathematical system S
with an operation defined on S is a one-to-one correspondence from
S onto itself that is an isomorphism with respect to the operation.
Definition 5.2. An automorphism σ of a field F is an automorphism
of F that preserves both field operations. An element f in F is fixed
by an automorphism σ if σ maps f to itself; that is, σ(f) = f; it is
moved by σ if σ(f) ,= f.
Theorem 5.1. Let D be a finite extension of F, let E be an inter-
mediate field F ⊆ E ⊆ D. Let G(D/F) be the automorphisms of D
that fix every f in F. Let G(D/E) be the automorphisms of D that
fix every e in E. Then G(D/F) is a group under composition and
G(D/E) is a subgroup of G(D/F).
Proof. Suppose that G(D/F) is a group under composition. Then it’s
easy to believe that G(D/E) is a subgroup of G(D/F) because we
know that we would have a similar set with less automorphisms. So
anyway, we will first prove that G(D/F) is a group.
We show that we have closure under composition. Let σ
1
, σ
2
be in
G(D/F). So any d in D has an image σ
2
(d) in D because σ
2
is an
automorphism of D, and σ
1

2
(d)) is in D. So the composition of two
automorphisms produces an element in D. Now... oh well, can you
go on?
Definition 5.3. Let E be the splitting field of a polynomial f(x) in
F[x]. The group G(E/F) of automorphisms of E that fix every f in
44
F is the Galois group or group of the polynomial and the group of the
equation f(x) = 0.
Theorem 5.2. Let F be a field. Let F(r) : F = n. Any automor-
phism σ in G(F(r)/F) is completely determined by σ(r). It’s true
that [G(F(r)/F)[ ≤ n. Let E be the splitting field of an irreducible
polynomial p(x) in F[x]. The Galois group G(E/F) is isomorphic to a
group of permutations of the k zeros of p(x) in E, hence to a subgroup
of the symmetric group S
k
.
Notice the importance of this theorem. It links group theory to the
permutations of the roots of an equation. The theory of groups, as we
see in the Abstract Algebra books today wasn’t very much developed
by Galois or Abel. They studied particular groups formed by the per-
mutations of the roots of an equation, but in 1870, Kronecker isolated
the group properties in their own right.
Theorem 5.3 (). Suppose r is algebraic over F with a minimal
polymonial of degree n. Then [G(F(r)/F)[ ≤ n.
Proof. Let σ be in G(F(r)/F). By definition, the group leaves every
u in F fixed, so there are at most n possible images of r under σ.
Since every σ is one-to-one and onto, and since every u in F is already
taken, there are at most n possible mappings available because there
at most n roots for the minimal polynomial.
Consider the extension field Q(r) : Q, and let the minimum polynomial
of r be p(x) = x
5
+
2
3
x
3
+ 2x + 1. How do we know that σ(r) must
be a root? We know that p(r) = 0. So now apply σ to r, so σ(p(r))
= σ(0) = 0 because 0 is in Q and so it is fixed. Now, since σ is an
automorphism, we can write
σ(p(r)) = σ(r
5
+
2r
3
3
+ 2r + 1)
= σ(r
5
) +
2σ(r
3
)
3
+ 2σ(r) + 1
= σ(r)
5
+
2σ(r)
3
3
+ 2σ(r) + 1 = 0
So σ(r) is a root.
So, suppose that σ is in G(E/F) and p(x) is in F[x], then σ permutes
any roots of p(x) which lie in E. We prove this with the argument
above.
45
Definition 5.4. A field extension E ⊆ F is normal if and only if any
irreducible p(x) in F[x] which has a root in E must factor completely
in E.
Here’s an example of a non-normal extension. Consider Q(
3

2) : Q,
which is not normal; it isn’t because x
3
− 2 has a root, but doesn’t
factor completely, and this is a problem for us. We want a bigger field
with a Galois group.
E : F is normal if and only if every irreducible p(x) in F[x] with a
root in E splits in E, since “to split” means to factor all the way down
into linear terms.
This is the same as saying that E is the splitting field of some poly-
nomial. Or equivalently, ¦a ∈ E : σ(a) = a for all σ ∈ G(E/F)¦ = F.
Normal extensions will correspond to normal subgroups.
Definition 5.5. A field F is called a field of characteristic zero if F
contains a subfield isomorphic to the field Q of rational numbers.
Let’s review some stuff. Suppose E ⊂ F is a field extension. The Ga-
lois group G(E/F) = ¦σ : E →E such that σ is a field automorphism
and σ(r) = r for every r in F¦.
We have to check that field automorphism form a group under com-
position. I also have to check that if σ and τ both fix f, then so do
σ
−1
and σ ◦ τ.
Remark 5.1. Let σ be in G(E/F), then σ fixes polynomials in F[x],
thus σ permutes roots of polynomials in F[x].
Galois group elements take roots to roots, but the roots must belong
in the field. Suppose a cubic root is a a root of some polynomial with
only one real solution. Suppose the complex roots do not belong in
the field. Then the only element will be the identity.
Proposition 5.4. Suppose r is algebraic over F with minimal poly-
nomial of degree n. Then G(F(r)/F) has at most n elements.
Proof. Let r have minimal polynomial
p(x) = a
0
+a
1
x +... +a
n
x
n
.
46
So p(r) = 0. Let u be in G(F(r)/F). So
p(u(r)) = a
0
+a
1
u(r) +... +a
n
(u(r))
n
= a
0
+a
1
u(r) +... +a
n
(u(r)
n
)
= u(a
0
) +u(a
1
r) +... +u(a
n
r
n
)
= u(a
0
) +a
1
r +... +a
n
r
n
)
= u(p(r))
= u(0)
= 0
The last two equations hold because p(r) = 0 and u(0) = 0 because u
is an automorphism, so it maps 0 to 0. So u(r) is also a root. Now, we
notice that every element of G(F(r)/F) corresponds, in a one-to-one
and onto fashion — because they’re automorphisms —, with a root
of p(x). Since there are at most n roots for p(x), there are at most n
automorphisms in G(F(r)/F).
A word on degrees. The degree of E:F depends on both E and F.
Sure, compare Q(

2,

3) : Q with Q(

2,

3) : Q(

2).
By the way, in this document, our definition of splitting field is the
smallest possible for a minimal polynomial. There seems to be other
equivalent definitions.
Proposition 5.5. Suppose E is a splitting field of a polynomial of
degree k in F[x]. Then G(E/F) is a subgroup of S
k
.
Proof. Let r
1
, r
2
, ..., r
k
be roots of p(x) over E. We know that over
E, p(x) splits. Then E = F(r
1
, r
2
, ..., r
k
).
Let σ be in G(F(r
1
, ..., r
k
)/F). To finish the proof, we must show that
(1) σ is completely determined by σ(r
1
), ..., σ(r
k
). (2) σ(r
i
) must be
r
j
for some j. To conclude, notice that (1) and (2) tell us that the
Galois group is isomorphic to some subgroup of S
k
.
Definition 5.6. Galois group of p(x) in F[x] is G(E/F) for E a
splitting field of p(x).
Exercise 5.1. Find the Galois group of x
4
−2 over Q.
Solution. We first look for the roots of x
4
−2. The polynomial factors
as
(x
2
+

2)(x
2


2) = (x +
4

2i)(x −
4

2i)(x +
4

2)(x +
4

2)
47
Let r =
4

2. So roots are r, −r, ri, −ri. What’s the splitting field?
Well, throw, in the basis, the elements r and ri, but notice that we
only need r and i.
What do we need now? Let f be in G(Q(r, i)/Q). To determine f, we
need to know f(r) and f(i). What are the possibilities for f(r)? All
the roots of x
4
−2. What about f(i)? It goes to i or −i.
So we have 4 possibilities for r, and 2 for i, so 4 2 = 8. This
group has at most 8 elements. It is not necessary that all of these
possibilities will work. We need more theory to show how this could
work, but they are all technically possible so for.
Let’s list them. As we read the table, notice that σ
2
(r) = σ(σ(r)) =
−r. That’s σ(−r) = −ir. So σ
4
is the identity. We introduce τ. Now,
we do σ ◦ τ.
automorphism domain range
1 r i
σ ir i
σ
2
−r i
σ
3
−ir i
τ r −i
σ ◦ τ ir −i
σ
2
◦ τ −r −i
σ
3
◦ τ −ir −i
Do you recognize this table? This group is isomorphic to D
8
, the
dihedral group with 8 elements; the symmetries of a square. We can
describe it by τ ◦ σ = σ
3
◦ τ.
Theorem 5.6. Suppose F ⊂ E ⊂ D. Then (1) G(D/E) ≤ G(E/F).
(2) Suppose H ≤ G(D/F). Let D
H
= ¦d ∈ D : σ(d) = d for all
σ ∈ H¦. Then F ⊆ D
H
⊆ D.
Recall that E/F is a normal extension if any of the following 3 equiv-
alent conditions hold: (1) E is a splitting field of some polynomial
in F[x], (2) any irreducible polynomial p(x) in F[x] with a root in E
must split in E, (3) fixed field of G(E/F) is F.
Theorem 5.7 (Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory). Suppose
the characteristic of F = 0, and F ⊂ D is a normal extension. Let F ⊆
E ⊆ D; then (1) E ←→ G(D/E) gives a one-to-one correspondence
between intermediate fields E and subgroups of G(D/F), (2) The
48
degree [D : E] = [G(D/E)[, (3) F ⊆ E
1
E
2
⊆ D if and only if
¦e¦ ≤ G(D/E
2
) G(D/E
1
) ≤ G(D/F), (4) E is normal over F if
and only if G(E/F) G(D/F).
We now solve a series of exercises which will help us to understand
the claims of the Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory.
Exercise 5.2. Determine the Galois group of
(x
2
−2)(x
2
−3)(x
2
−5),
over Q.
Solution. The polynomial splits in Q(

2,

3,

5). Now, let σ be
arbitrary in G(Q(

2,

3,

5)/Q). Then, the splitting field must also
split r’s minimal polynomial which is r
2
−2 = 0, and so σ must take

2 to

2 or −

2. The same goes for

3; σ must take

3 to

3 or


3, and the same for

5; σ must take

5 to

5 or −

5.
So, the automorphisms are
automorphisms

2

3

5
1

2

3

5
σ

2

3 −

5
τ

2 −

3

5
σ ◦ τ

2 −

3 −

5
γ −

2

3

5
γ ◦ σ −

2

3 −

5
γ ◦ τ −

2 −

3

5
γ ◦ σ ◦ τ −

2 −

3 −

5
So the galois group is determined, and it is completely determined by
σ :

5 →−

5, τ :

3 →−

3 and γ :

2 →−

2.
Exercise 5.3. Now determine all subfields of the splitting field found
in the previous exercise.
Solution. The subfields of the “second level” of the field diagram
would be Q(

2,

3), Q(

2,

5), Q(

3,

5), Q(

2,

15), Q(

6,

5),
Q(

6,

10), Q(

3,

10). In the “third level” we would get Q(

2),
Q(

3), Q(

5), Q(

6), Q(

10), Q(

15), Q(

30). So, including the
trivial ones, we get a total of 16 in the diagram.
What if I wanted to know the fixed field of this Galois group? I would
have to look at every automorphism and see which elements of the
49
basis never get moved. So I collect these elements and throw them in
Q to get the fixed field.
When we look at each of automorphism, we see that
σ(a +b

2 +c

3 +d

5 +e

6 +f

10 +g

15 +h

30) =
a +b

2 +c

3 −d

5 +e

6 −f

10 −g

15 −h

30),
τ(a +b

2 +c

3 +d

5 +e

6 +f

10 +g

15 +h

30) =
a +b

2 −c

3 +d

5 −e

6 +f

10 −g

15 −h

30),
σ ◦ τ(a +b

2 +c

3 +d

5 +e

6 +f

10 +g

15 +h

30) =
a +b

2 −c

3 −d

5 −e

6 −f

10 +g

15 +h

30,
γ(a +b

2 +c

3 +d

5 +e

6 +f

10 +g

15 +h

30) =
a −b

2 +c

3 +d

5 −e

6 −f

10 +g

15 −h

30,
γ ◦ σ(a +b

2 +c

3 +d

5 +e

6 +f

10 +g

15 +h

30) =
a −b

2 +c

3 −d

5 −e

6 +f

10 −g

15 +h

30,
γ ◦ σ ◦ τ(a +b

2 +c

3 +d

5 +e

6 +f

10 +g

15 +h

30) =
a −b

2 −c

3 −d

5 +e

6 +f

10 +g

15 −h

30,
so it looks like that the only field that is fixed by every automorphism
is Q itself.
If now I wanted to know each corresponding subgroup of G(Q(

2,

3,

5)/Q),
then one way would be to work with Z
2
Z
2
Z
2
. We assign (0,0,1)
to σ because σ moves only

5, so we consider

5 as the 1 in the third
component of the 3-tuple. Similarly, we assign (0, 1, 0) with τ, and
(1, 0 ,0) with γ, and (0,0,0) with the identity map.
We then work with Z
2
Z
2
Z
2
under addition. To get each sub-
group now, we can consider (0,0,0), (0,0,1) and notice that it would
correspond to Q(

(2),

(3)) because it moves only

5. The others
would be found similarly.
Exercise 5.4 (8-3). Let F = Q, D = Q(

2, i), E
1
= Q(

2), E
2
=
Q(i). Then F has characteristic 0 and D = F(r), where r =

2 +fi,
f ,= 0 is in Q. Find σ(r) for each automorphism σ ∈ G(D/E
1
) and
τ(r) for each τ ∈ G(D/E
2
). Find the four conjugates of r = r
1
, hence,
by Theorem 8-2, the four automorphisms of G(D/F).
They say D = F(r), but isn’t D = Q(

2, i)? So are they saying that
D can be written as F(r) where r is the root of some polynomial that
when adjoined will give us

2 and i? I think so.
50
Such root is r =

2 +fi, with f ,= 0, f ∈ Q. Its minimal polynomial
is
r
2
= 2 −f
2
+ 2fi

2
r
2
−2 +f
2
= 2fi

2
(r
2
−2 +f
2
)
2
= −8f
2
(r
2
−2 +f
2
)
2
+ 8f
2
= 0
This polynomial has degree 4 and therefore will have at most 4 roots.
Since one root is complex, I guess the fundamental theorem of algebra
implies that we will have 4 distinct roots.
Now I must find σ(r) for each automorphism in G(D/E
1
). Since E
1
= Q(

2), then each automorphism moves only i, so s(r) = i or s(r)
= −i. So all of the automorphisms here are
automorphism i
1 i
σ −i
Similarly for τ(r) ∈ G(D/E
1
). Since E
2
= Q(i), then each automor-
phism moves

2 only, so σ(

2) =

2 or s(r) = −

2. So all of the
automorphisms here are
automorphism

2
1

2
τ −

2
The four conjugates of r
1
=

2 +fi are r
2
= −

2 +fi, r
3
= −

2 −
fi, r
4
=

2 − fi. Now I must find, by the theorem above, the 4
automorphisms of G(D/Q). I’m failing to see a clear way to use the
theorem, even though I may have gotten the automorphisms correctly
here. The exercise suggests that by the theorem, we are able to get
all the automorphisms. I guess it must be all permutations of the
elements that get moved in G(D/E
1
) and G(D/E
2
).
Any automorphism of G(D/Q) fixes Q and moves

2 and i.
automorphism

2 i
1

2 i
σ −

2 i
τ

2 −i
γ −

2 −i
51
The theorem says that this Galois group, in particular, is isomorphic
to a group of permutations of 4 zeros of p(x) in Q(

2, i); hence isomor-
phic to a subgroup of the symmetric group S
4
. Every automorphism
squares to the identity, so it should be isomorphic to the Klein-4 which
is isomorphic to the flips of a square.
Exercise 5.5 (8-4). Still with F = Q and D = Q(

2,i). Notice
that G(D/F) is isomorphic to the Klein-4 group. Find the unique
subgroup of G(D/F) that corresponds to each intermediate field E
1
= Q(

2) and E
2
= Q(i). Also, find the subfield corresponding to each
subgroup.
Solution. As proper subgroups of G(D/F), we have ¦1, σ¦, ¦1, τ¦, ¦1,
γ¦, which are isomorphic to subgroups of the Klein-4. The exercise
is asking for the subgroups that correspond to the fields E
1
and E
2
.
Which subgroup would correspond to Q(

2)?
It would be the subgroup that is linked to the maps that do not move
Q(

2), so it’s ¦1, τ¦. For Q(i), it would be the subgroup that is linked
to the maps that do not move Q(i); so it’s ¦1, σ¦.
Here’s a question. The claim iii of the Fundamental Theorem of
Galois Theory seems to say that we have Q(

2, i) ⊆ Q(i) ⊂ Q(

2) ⊆
Q if and only if ¦1¦ ⊆ G(Q(

2, i)/Q(i)) ⊂ G(Q(

2, i)/Q(

2)) ⊆
G(Q(

2, i)/Q). Q(i) is not an of Q(

2); it’s not even a subset. Is
this a case in which we don’t satisfy the hypothesis of the claim iii?
Or is my interpretation wrong?
The exercise also says “find the subfield corresponding to each sub-
group.” Isn’t this the same task above? Once we find the subgroup
correspondent to the subfield, then we’ve found the subfield corre-
spondent to the subgroup.
Exercise 5.6 (8-5). Verify that the claim ii of the Fundamental The-
orem of Galois Theory holds for the example we’ve been working with.
Solution. The claim says, for this example in particular, that
[Q(

2, i) : Q(i)] = [G(Q(

2, i)/Q(i))[
which is true because the degree of the extension is 2 since the basis
is a +b

2 for a, b ∈ Q(i), and for the Galois group we have only two
possible automorphisms; one that takes

2 to −

2 and the identity.
The Theorem also claims that
[Q(

2, i) : Q(

2)] = [G(Q(

2, i)/Q(

2))[
52
which is almost the same case as above. Here, we have the basis as
a + bi, for a, b ∈ Q(

2). The degree of the extension is 2 and there
are only two possible automorphisms in the Galois group; they are the
identity and another one that takes i to −i.
Also, the theorem claims that
[Q(i) : Q] = [G(Q(

2, i)/Q) : G(Q(

2, i)/Q(i))].
I think that this is a link between a degree extension and the number
of left cosets of a subgroup in its group. The degree extension is 2.
G(Q(

2, i)/Q) = G has 4 automorphisms, and G(Q(

2, i)/Q(i)) =
H has 2. Now, by Lagrange’s theorem, we have that 4 = 2 [G : H],
so [G : H] = 2 as well and it matches the degree extension Q(i) : Q.
Also, the theorem claims that
[Q(

2) : Q] = [G(Q(

2, i)/Q) : G(Q(

2, i)/Q(

2))].
The degree extension is 2,
[G[ = [G(Q(

2, i)/Q)[ = 4,
[H[ = [G(Q(

2, i)/Q(

2))[ = 2.
So again, by Lagrange’s theorem, 4 = 2 [G : H], so [G : H] = 2
matching the degree extension of Q(

2) over Q.
Exercise 5.7 (8-6). Still with F = Q and D = Q(

2, i). Show
that ¦1¦ is a proper subset of G(D/E) which is a proper subset of
G(D/F) for E = E
1
= Q(

2) and for E = E
2
= Q(i) but that
G(D/E
2
) G(D/E
1
). Why are the inclusions reversed in order in
the second clause of the third claim of the Fundamental Theorem of
Galois Theory?
Solution. Let E = Q(

2). Then G(D/E) has two automorphisms ¦1,
σ¦, where σ takes i to −i, so ¦1¦ is a proper subset of G(D/E). We
also know that G(D/F) has 4 automorphisms: ¦1, σ, τ, γ¦ as defined
in Exercise 5.4. So, evidently, G(D/E) is a proper subset of G(D/F).
Let E = Q(i). Then G(D/E) has two automorphisms ¦1, τ¦, where
τ takes

2 to −

2, so ¦1¦ is a proper subset of G(D/E). We also
know that G(D/F) has 4 automorphisms: ¦1, σ, τ, γ¦ as defined in
Exercise 5.4. So, evidently, G(D/E) is a proper subset of G(D/F).
Is G(D/E
2
) ⊂ G(D/E
1
)? No, because σ is in G(D/E
2
), but not in
G(D/E
1
). Also, τ is in G(D/E
1
), but not in G(D/E
2
). That is, my
observations here do not satisfy claim iii.
53
Why are the inclusions reversed? They are reversed because the less
elements the Galois group has to permute, the smaller it gets. So if
the field increases in elements to be fixed, the Galois group decreases
in order.
Exercise 5.8 (8-7). Still working the same D, F, E
1
, and E
2
fields,
show that G(D/E
1
) is normal in G(D/F) and that G(E
1
/F) is iso-
morphic to G(D/F)/G(D/E
1
). Repeat for E
2
.
Solution. We can show that the left cosets match the right cosets,
since we’re working with a particular case. G(D/E
1
) is ¦1, τ¦ = H.
So the left cosets are H, and ¦σ, σ ◦ τ = γ¦. But the index is 2; so,
it’s normal, by some theorem we’ve seen in the past.
To show that G(E
1
/F) is isomorphic to G(D/F)/G(D/E
1
), we need
to find a one-to-one and onto map that preserves the operations be-
tween them. That’s easy here because we have only two automor-
phisms in G(E
1
/F), and identity goes with identity, so the other map
goes with the other map.
Repeating for E
2
, we know that G(D/E
2
) is normal because the in-
dex is 2; it’s isomorphic to G(D/F)/G(D/E
2
) for the same reason
described above.
Exercise 5.9. Recall that we determined that the splitting field of
x
4
− 2 over was Q(ζ, i) where ζ =
4

2. Also, we’ve calculated before
that the Galois group was isomorphic to the dihedral group with eight
elements: D
8
= ¸σ, τ : σ
4
= τ
2
= e, τ ◦ σ = σ
3
◦ τ). Now, let H be the
subgroup ¦1, σ
3
◦ τ¦. Show by explicit calculation that the fixed field
Q(ζ, i)
H
is equal to Q((1 −i)ζ).
Solution. No idea.
Theorem 5.8 (9-3). Let E
0
be a field of characteristic zero containing
all the nth roots of unity. Let f ∈ E
0
and let E be a splitting field for
x
n
−f over E
0
. If w is any zero of x
n
−f in E, then E = E
0
(w) and
G(E/E
0
) is cyclic.
Exercise 5.10. In Theorem 9-3, let E
0
= Q, n = 2, f = 7. Find the
splitting field for x
2
−7 over Q. Show that G(E/E
0
) has order 2.
Solution. The splitting field for x
2
− 7 over Q is Q(

7) since x
2
− 7
= (x −

7)(x +

7). So, in the theorem, E = Q(

7), and E
0
= Q.
We must show that G(Q(

7)/Q) is cyclic.
54
Here, the w of the theorem is either

7 or −

7, so the theorem
says that we can adjoin

7 or −

7 and get a cyclic Galois group
G(Q(w)/Q). We let w =

7. So now we must show that G(Q(w)/Q)
has order 2.
Since it’s cyclic of order 2, we must show that every element squares
to the identity. The identity itself does. The only non-trivial element
is σ that takes

7 to −

7 and squares to the identity as well because
(σ ◦ σ) takes

7 to −

7 and then back to

7.
Here, Q(

7) is a normal extension of Q because (1) Q is the fixed field
of G(Q(w)/Q) or instead we could justify by saying that (2) Q(

7) is
the splitting field over Q for x
2
−7 over Q.
Exercise 5.11. In Theorem 9-3, let E
0
= Q, n = 2, f = 4. Show that
x
2
−f in this case splits in E
0
so that G(E/E
0
) has only the identity
automorphism.
Solution. It’s true that x
2
−4 = (x −2)(x +2) which evidently splits
in Q. So, in the Galois group of Q over Q, there’s really “nothing”
to permute because the roots of the polynomial were already in Q
anyway. The degree of the extension is 1, so we have only one element:
the identity.
Exercise 5.12. In Theorem 9-3, let E
0
= Q(r) where r is a primitive
third root of unity. Let n = 3, f = 7. Factor x
3
−f into linear factors
in its splitting field over E
0
. Show that the Galois group G(E/E
0
) is
cyclic of order 3.
Solution. The roots of unity for n = 3 are
1,
−1
2
+

3i
2
,
−1
2
+

3i
2
.
They form a cyclic group under multiplication. We can’t let r = 1,
though, otherwise it wouldn’t generate the group. Let’s let
r =
−1
2
+

3i
2
.
So x
3
−1 splits over E
0
.
We’re interested in x
3
−7. Its roots are
3

7,

3

7
2
+

3
3

7i
2
,

3

7
2


3
3

7i
2
.
55
So, we really just need
3

7, because we can express the roots as r
3

7,
r
2
3

7, r
3
3

7 — noticing that r
3
= 1, the identity of the cyclic group
of roots of unity. So the factorization can be written as
(x −r
3

7)(x −r
2
3

7)(x −r
3
3

7).
So we adjoin
3

7 to get E = Q(r,
3

7). We now consider G(E/E
0
) and
show that it’s cyclic of order 3.
The Galois group fixes Q(r), and roots must be taken to roots. Let
σ(
3

7) = r
3

7, so σ
2
(
3

7) = σ(σ(
3

7) = σ(r
3

7) = r
2
3

7 because σ is,
by definition, multiplying its argument by r. Finally, σ
3
= r
3
3

7 =
3

7. That shows that we have only 3 elements and that they’re cyclic
with r
3

7 as generator.
Exercise 5.13. Show that the Galois group for x
3
− 7 over Q is
isomorphic to S
3
and therefore nonabelian.
Solution. Take a look at the Fundamental Theorem. Notice how many
elements the group has, and that there is a theorem that claims that
the Galois group would be isomorphic to some subgroup of S
n
, but
here we will find 6 elements and this can be seen by using the degree
of the extension field and therefore it will have to be isomorphic to S
3
itself, which is nonabelian.
Exercise 5.14. Prove that A
5
is not abelian. Why doesn’t the chain
S
5
¸1) provide a solvability chain for S
5
?
Solution. A
5
is not abelian because
(1324)(1432) = (234) ,= (123) = (1432)(1324)
and (1324), (1432) are even permutations.
The definition of solvability requires a chain of subgroups G = G
0

G
1
... G
t
= ¸1) to have the property that G
i
/G
i+1
is abelian for
i = 0, 1, ..., t −1.
For the chain S
5
¸1) satisfy the definition, we need G
0
/G
1
abelian,
but G
0
/G
1
= S
5
/¸1) = S
5
, and S
5
isn’t abelian.
56

Exercise 1.3. Are the odd positive integers closed under addition? Yes. Proof. Because 2n+1+2n+1 = 4n+1 is odd and positive. Under multiplication? Yes. Proof. Because (2n + 1)(2n + 1) = 4n2 + 4n + 1 is odd and positive. Theorem 1.1. Let r be a nonzero integer. Let D be the set of all divisors of r. The system of all fractions, in lowest terms, with the property that their denominators is di ∈ D, is closed under addition. Proof. Let 0 = r ∈ Z. Let D be the set of divisors of r. Let d1 = ar, d2 = br. Then, p q ap + bq + = , d1 d2 lcd(d1 , d2 ) where lcd(d1 , d2 ) ∈ D and p, q ∈ Z. Exercise 1.4. Show that the system of fractions having denominators of 1, 2, or 4 when written in lowest terms is closed under addition. Proof. By Theorem 1.1, it is closed. Here, r = 4 and D = {1, 2, 4} which are all divisors of 4. Theorem 1.2. The identity of a group is unique. Proof. Let e and e be identities. So, ee = e because e is an identity. Also, ee = e because e is an identity as well. Since the binary operation of a group is a function, and assigns the operation to a single element in the group, there can only be one identity and so, e=e. Exercise 1.5. Consider Z with the binary operation of subtraction. Is Z a group? If so, what is the identity? If not, what axioms do not hold? At first I thought that 0 could be the identity, because z −0 = z, but for 0 to be an identity, it must be true that z − 0 = 0 − z = z. That is not true because z − 0 = z = 0 − z = −z. Also, notice that subtraction is not associative: (a − b) − c = a − (b − c). Theorem 1.3. Let G be finite with order 2n, n ∈ N. Then, there’s g ∈ G such that g 2 = e. Proof. Let S = {g1 , ..., g2n }. Step one: remove from S all pairs −1 −1 −1 −1 (gi , gi ) such that gi gi = gi gi = e with gi = gi . This removes an even number of elements. We’re left with an even number of elements in S. After step one, e ∈ S because e−1 = e. Step two: remove e

2

from S. We’re left with an odd number of elements in S. So at least one of these left will have to be its own inverse — since they come in pairs. Theorem 1.4. Let G = {1, 2, ..., p − 1}, p prime. Let θ be multiplication mod p on G. Then (G, θ) is a group. Proof. Unfortunately, I haven’t proved this entirely; but here’s what I can say: because p is prime, we have no g1 g2 ∈ G such that g1 g2 divides p, so it never happens that gi θgj = 0 mod p. Multiplication is a binary operation, but we would need to show closure with mod p. The identity is always present by hypothesis. Multiplication is associative, but we would need an argument for inverses. Theorem 1.5. The multiplication table of a group is a latin square; that is, each group element occurs once and only once in each row of the body of the table and in each column of the body of the table. Proof. Consider the elements of the ith row. They are gi g1 , ..., gi gj . The theorem claims that each element occurs once; so, suppose one does not show up once; that is, two elements of the row must be equal. In other words, suppose gi g1 = gi g2 , but notice that g1 = g2 . −1 −1 Then, since we’re dealing with a group, gi is present; so, gi (gi g1 ) = −1 −1 −1 gi (gi g2 ) =⇒ (gi gi )g1 = (gi gi )g2 =⇒ eg1 = eg2 =⇒ g1 = g2 . So, each element occurs once. If the group is finite, we’re done. If the group is not finite, we must still show that each element still occurs on a row. To prove for columns, we can repeat the proof replacing the appropriate subscripts. Definition 1.3 (permutation). A permutation P of a set S is a oneto-one mapping of S into itself. In other words, P implies the existence of a function f : S → S such that f is one-to-one and onto. Exercise 1.6. Write the 4! = 24 possible arrangements of all four letters A, E, P, T. Check which permutations are English words. What is the probability of making an English word from these four letters by chance arrangement? I’m not going to write them all here, but I will tell the algorithm I’d use. Fix A and permute EPT; then fix E and permute APT, then fix P and permute AET; then fix T and permute APT. This will generate 3! + 3! + 3! + 3! = 24 permutations, and it’s easy to do it this way. To permute EPT, the same can be done: fix E, permute PT, fix P permute ET, fix T permute EP.

3

It turns out, we find the English words PATE, PETA, PEAT, TAPE, TEPA. They mean, respectively: the human head, 1015 , carbonized vegetable matter, tape, a chemical compound: C6 H12 N2 OP . So, we have 5 chances out of 24 of making a word by chance arrangement; that’s a probability of 5/24 = 0.208 which is aproximatelly 20% of chances of making a word out of random permutation; a pretty good chance, if you will. Exercise 1.7. Let Mr. 1, Mrs 2, Mr. 3 and Mrs 4 be seated on a table. How many seating arrangements are possible? 4! = 24. Write down all seating arrangements in which men and women are alternated. There are 8 possibilities because once you fix 1, there are two possibilities to follow: 2 and 4. Fix 2, there are two possiblities: 1 and 3. Fix 3, there are two possibilities; fix 4, there are two possibilities. What’s the probabilitity that a random permutation of the four people will alternate men and women? That’d be 8/24 = 1/3 which means 33%. Theorem 1.6. The permutations of a set S form a group under composition. Proof. Let P and Q be two permutations; then, for any s ∈ S, there is a unique Q(s) ∈ S because for any s1 , s2 ∈ S, if Q(s1 ) = Q(s2 ), then s1 = s2 . The fact that Q(s) ∈ S comes from the fact that Q is a function from S into S. Also, because P is one-to-one and because Q is onto, for all s ∈ S, there is a unique P (Q(s)) ∈ S. Last paragraph implies P (Q(s)) is one-to-one. Now, to show composition is a binary operation, we need to show that the composition of P and Q is onto; because that would be showing that it is closed in S. For all s ∈ S, there is q ∈ S such that q = Q(s). For all q ∈ S, there is p ∈ S such that p = P (q). Then, for all s ∈ S, there is a q ∈ S such that q = P (Q(s)) = (P ◦ Q)(s). To show it forms a group, we state that composition is associative by some theorem — which we haven’t proved yet. The identity would be the permutation which maps each s ∈ S into itself. The inverses of each permutation is the same permutation with domain and range swaped. Definition 1.4. If S is finite with n elements, then the set of all permutations on S is called the symmetric group Sn on n elements. Sn has n! members.

4

Exercise 1.8. Let P = 1 2 3 4 5 2 3 1 4 5

What is the image of 3 under the permutation? It’s 1. Which elements are fixed under the permutation? 4 and 5. Which are moved? 1, 2, 3. Write the inverse permutation with respect to composition. P −1 = 2 3 1 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 .

Exercise 1.9. Let Q= 1 2 3 4 5 1 4 3 5 2 .

Find P ◦ Q and Q ◦ P . Find Q−1 . P ◦Q= 1 2 3 4 5 2 4 1 5 3 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 1 5 3 1 4 3 5 2 1 2 3 4 5

Q◦P =

Q−1 =

.

Exercise 1.10. Find Q−1 ◦ P −1 . Find (P ◦ Q) ◦ (Q−1 ◦ P −1 ). Q−1 ◦ P −1 = 2 3 1 4 5 1 5 3 2 4 2 3 1 4 5 2 3 1 4 5

(P ◦ Q) ◦ (Q−1 ◦ P −1 ) =

5

12. 1 goes to 1 which does to 2. It’s a bit tough to be sure that this is correct.13. Exercise 1. (132)−1 = (123). (123). because 2 goes to 4 which goes to 1. 6 . (23). (13)−1 = (13). Repeat until all elements have been used. we may as well omit the ones which don’t move. then the left. (134) = 1 3 4 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 4 3 2 1 . Then. Write the permutations of S3 as cycles. (132). (12). The same happens to 4 and 5 because they didn’t move at all. You apply the right side first. S3 is the symmetric group of all permutations on n = 3 elements. It’s not commutative. (123)−1 = (132). If we omit the 1-cycles. 2 goes to 3. Q used previously in cycle notation is (245). Exercise 1. they are: e. (12)(34) = . (23)−1 . In general. If the first cycle has not exhausted all elements. 3 goes to one and we close. For the permutation P above. then we close the cycle. For example. Cycle multiplication is cycle composition. 6 goes to 5 which goes to 5 (since it does not appear). but I built the table and it does work. S3 has 3! = 6 elements. For example. which is easier to write. (23). Exercise 1. Write the following cycles in permutation form. But usually this is not a problem. 3 goes to 3 which goes to 4. (12)−1 = (12). (1234)(2465) = 2 4 6 5 3 1 1 6 5 3 4 2 . 5 goes to 2 which goes to 3. We close because it has cycled. then someone who only sees the permutation in cycle notation would not know possible elements which were omited. go on writing which follows which until the first element appears. 4 goes to 6 which goes to 6 (since it does not appear). start the first cycle with the first element of the permutation.11. (13). though: (12)(13) = (132) = (123) = (13)(12). start a new cycle with an element that has been used. we would write (123)(4)(5) meaning 1 goes to 2.Permutations can be written in cycle notation.

Proof.5. (13)(12) = . it’s true that f (u!v) = f (u) ∗ f (v).10. Then G is abelian. Inverses are unique. (14)(13)(12) = . The identity of a subgroup H of G is necessarily the identity of the group G. we have eG h = heG = h. and Sm is closed because it is a group. !) and (H. = Theorem 1. A transposition is a 2-cycle. Let G be a group in which every element g ∈ G has the property that g 2 = e. the set of all permutations of Sm is a subset of Sn . Let h ∈ G. If m ≤ n. Then: (ab)2 = e =⇒ a2 b(ab) = a =⇒ b(ab) = a =⇒ b2 (ab) = ba =⇒ ab = ba. for all h ∈ H. one isomorphism exists between Sm and Sm : the identity map. for all h ∈ H. Let H be a subgroup G.7.(1423) = 1 4 2 3 4 2 3 1 1 2 3 4 2 3 1 4 1 2 3 4 2 3 4 1 . Theorem 1. Definition 1. 1 2 1 2 7 . Proof. Proof. So. so it is a subgroup of Sn . ∗) be groups. then. We say G is isomorphic to H if and only if there exists a bijective function f : G → H such that for all u.8. Since m ≤ n. Theorem 1. Since every element of H is also in G. eG h = eH h =⇒ eG = eH by cancellation law. eH h = heH = h. Now h−1 h = e and h−1 h = e =⇒ h−1 = h−1 .9. Let (G. v ∈ G. there is a subgroup of Sn isomorphic to Sm .6 (group isomorphism). Let a. Definition 1. Theorem 1. Proof. We write H ∼ G. b ∈ G.

When we write σ(1) = 2. (1432). Also.. (1432) with r3 . for two matrices P. so we need not use elementary matrices here. (1234) with r. (1234). As you pick different elements g ∈ G...11.. 8 . (123). (14)(23) with sr2 . Definition 1.. GL(n. det(E) = −1 whenever E comes from I by interchanging two rows. express P as Ek . (13)(24) with r2 . (24)}. (13)(24).) = σ(1) = 2.. Give an explicit isomorphism from D4 to the subgroup of S4 .E1 . Map eP with e. ghk . Then H is a subgroup of GL(n. s. Theorem 1.E1 Q) = det(Ek ). .} where g ∈ G and hi ∈ H.det(E1 ) = ±1.. Let H ≤ G. every invertible matrix can be expressed as a product of elementary matrices.. (14)(23). Find a collection of eight permutations in S4 that is a subgroup isomorphic to the dihedral group D4 = {e. we mean that it’s a cycle in which 1 always goes to 2. Exercise 1. (12)(34).7.. r3 . gh2 . Let P ∈ H. Let E be an elementary matrix. det(AB) = det(A) det(B) for any square matrices A and B. On this next example.. B ∈ H. This is called the index of H in G. det(Ei ) = ±1. . R) denotes the group of invertible n×n matrices with real entries. Q ∈ H. det(E) = 1 whenever E comes from I by adding a row to a multiple of another row of I. Proof. For any Ei . Is C ≤ S6 ? No. Let P4 = {e.14. Define as left cosets of H in G the sets gH = {gh1 . r. (24) with sr3 . (13) with sr. that is... you create |G|/|H| cosets. So. (1234). Examples: (12).. there’s a new notation there. the group is infinite.E1 ) = det(Ek ). (13). The collection H of matrices with determinants {±1} forms a subgroup of GLn (R).. (12)(34) with s. (12345). R).. sr3 }. and so on. We only need to show that H is closed. Let C = {σ ∈ S6 : σ(1) = 2}. with 1 ≤ i ≤ k. then det(P ) = det(Ek . because (1256)(1256) = (15. So the set described includes all permutations of S6 in which 1 goes to 2. Okay. sr2 . this proof is not correct because we must also show that the group is closed under inverses. r2 . det(P Q) = det(Ek ..det(E1 )det(Q) = det(P )det(Q) = ±1.Exercise 1. for any A. sr.. det(AB) = ±1 = det(A)det(B).15.

and (12) is left congruent to (1423) because (12) = (1423)[(14)(23)] and (14)(23) ∈ V . (123). Left cosets: (12)W = {(12). Let H ≤ G. call this number the index of H in G. (13)(24). In the example above. (1342). as (12)V . Right congruence is an equivalence relation. Count the number of left cosets. can have many names. (1234). (23)W = {(23). notice that the coset (1423)V is the same coset. (1243). Exercise 1. each coset is an equivalence class.10. Two elements. Now. (34). (1234)}. (132). Generate all left cosets of H in G. (34)(12). Let W = {e. (34)}. e. in fact. though with a different name. Cosets. (124)V = {(124). of a group P are left congruent (mod Q ≤ P ) to each other if there’s q ∈ Q such that i = jq. (1432)}. (132). Left congruence is an equivalence relation. Left cosets: (12)V = {(12). e. (1342). (142)}. (124). (134). Define gi ≡R gj (mod H) if and only if there is a hk ∈ H such that gi = hk gj . (243)}. Definition 1.” Theorem 1. the subgroup is V . Call this relation “right congruence. Let H ≤ G. (134). Definition 1. Let H ≤ G. (1243)}. however. (1423)}. i and j. one way to know if two names are actually the same coset is to check if their g’s are left equivalent modulo H.12. (12)(34)}. What are the right cosets?. (34).Definition 1. (24). Call this relation “left congruence. (14)(23)}. (13)(24)}. but since they’re equivalence classes.9. Define gi ≡L gj (mod H) if and only if there is a hk ∈ H such that gi = gj hk . (143).13. (14)(23). So notice that the multiplication by q happens on the right.(13)(24). (12). (12)(34). (243). (1432).8. (142). (13)W = {(13). (143). (1324). Why? Recal the definition of the left congruence. (14)V = {(14). 9 . (23)}. (234)}. (14)(23).16. What are the right cosets? Take a look at the first coset of V — (12)V . (1324)W = {(1324). (24)W = {(24). See the next example. (12)(34)V = {(12)(34). (1423)}. (234)}. These cosets are mutually exclusive and exhaustive. like equivalence classes. (123)V = {(123). Let V = {e. Why? Because (1423) is left congruent to (12) modulo H. (13)V = {(13). (14)W = {(14).” Theorem 1.

(14725836). Theorem 1.. (g −1 )1 .11 (cyclic). then g2 = h−1 g1 (symmetric). 10 . Let G be finite and cyclic.15.. it has a finite order. Then. The cycles of the cyclic group of order 8 are e. Call a “cyclic group” the group generated by some element g. then. (15)(26)(37)(48).(g −1 )n = e. and so on. Suppose that for some g1 . It is an equivalence relation.14. In a group G. g −1 ∈ G have the same order. (1357)(2468). there is n < t such that (g −1 )n = e. 1 is a generator for the integers under addition because 10 = 0. the members of the cyclic group of order 8 and compare with the octic group. Let g i . that is.. Proof. 1−2 = −2. Then g ≡ g because g = eH g (reflexive). we have that (g −1 )1 . Then G is abelian. in cycle form. Suppose g1 = h1 g2 and g2 = h2 g3 . write (g −1 )t as g −1 multiplied t times: (g −1 )1 . So. Notice that the distinct elements of g are g. and so on. (12345678). . notice that the powers are not always positive. we do 1−1 = −1. by the last theorem.16.. where 1 ≤ k ≤ n. g1 ≡ g2 (mod H). Any element of G is expressed g k .. But where are the inverses? Well. Because G is finite. (18765432). g f = e. Then g1 = (h1 h2 )g3 implying g1 ≡ g3 (mod H) (transitive). (16385274). g 2 .. Then (g −1 )t g t = (g −1 )t e which implies e = (g −1 )t . Theorem 1. Proof.(g −1 )t . Now what? Where is the contradiction? Definition 1. there is h ∈ H such that g1 = hg2 . Since n < t. Let H be a subgroup of G. Now we must show that t is the smallest such number in which (g −1 )t = e.(g −1 )t = e(g −1 )n+1 . g. Call an “infinite cyclic group” the cyclic group in which g s = g t if and only if s = t. Order of g divides |G|. 12 = 2. Are both groups abelian? No. g j ∈ g . Theorem 1. (1753)(2864). 11 = 1.. For example. where e is the identity of the group. Let g t = e. but D4 is non-abelian.. Write. Suppose not. call it n. and write g . g2 ∈ G. Also. Exercise 1.Proof.. a cyclic group of order 8 is abelian. Suppose g1 = hg2 ..17. Now g j g i = g j+i = g i+j = g i g j . Let G be finite with g ∈ G. 13 = 3..(g −1 )t . then call the “order of g” the least positive element f for which g f = e. If g is finite.

Prove this for n = 5 by expressing each (a. (13)(24). (12)(34)} is normal in K and that K is normal in G. because they’re closed under the binary operation. (14)(23).b) ∈ S5 as a product of adjacent transpositions. the left cosets are eV = V and (14)(23)V = {(14)(23). that is. those of the form (i. . since G is finite. Exercise 1. Now the right coset W (1234) = {(1234). (25)(34). (12)(34)}. (13)(24)} ⊂ D4 = G. which is abelian.). so n divides |G| with |G : g | as quotient.} = (1234) W = (1234). Write down all elements in D4 . In D4 . (14)(35). (12) = (12). here in particular. (25). f = nq + r. (14). (13)(24). (13). (24)(35). (25) = (23)(34)(45)(34)(23). |G| and n are natural numbers. (15)(24). (34). Let H be a subgroup of a finite group G. (24). Proof. Show this is not true with an example. If H is abelian. (23). (15)(34). (234). (12)(34). (23)(45). We list the cosets. (13. We know that Sn can be generated by transpositions. (12)(34). In S4 we have (12).. so n divides f .Proof. (24). (14) = (12)(23)(34)(23)(12). But r < n by the division algorithm.. (134). (14)(25). (13) = (12)(23)(12). (35). (13). (12)(34)} ≤ S4 . (15) = (12)(23)(34)(45)(34)(23)(12). that is. (13)(24). (13)(25). (24).19. every σ ∈ Sn can be written as a product of transpositions. (34). Suppose f is a natural number such that g f = e.18. Consider the dihedral group with its subgroup V = {1. (14). By the division algorithm.21. |G| = | g | · |G : g |. Show that V = {1. (15). (24) = (23)(34)(23). (12)(35).. (45). then H is normal in G. (23). (45) = (45). and since n is the smallest natural such that g n = e. Exercise 1. (13)(24)} and the right cosets 11 . and | g | = n. Let K = {1. It is actually the case that Sn can be generated by adjacent transpositions. Exercise 1. f ≥ n. (12)(34). (123). r ∈ Z with r < n. (13)(45). (14)(23). where q. The “order of g” is the natural number n such that g n = e. (34). (23) = (23). (12).20. with order 2. we have: (13). Exercise 1. since n is the smallest such number. The distinct powers of g form a subgroup of G. Let W = {e. S4 and S5 which have order 2.. (14)(23). (34) = (34). (14)(23). r must be zero. In S5 we have (12). (12)(34). i + 1). (15)(23). (12)(45). but V is not normal in G. Lagrange’s theorem states that. (35) = (34)(45)(34). So g f = g nq+r = (g n )q g r = eq g r = eg r = g r = e.

so V normal in K. (13)(24)}. (234). a 3-cycle. A4 has no subgroup with 6 elements. Let H1 . g ∈ H1 ∩ H2 . Since h. For example. (24). Closure: let h. Since G/H is a group. h−1 ∈ H1. (1432)}. (132). Theorem 1. we have G/N as the group of cosets of N in G. Since n ∈ N . The intersection of two subgroups is a group. Therefore. Since N is normal subgroup of G. hg ∈ H2 . for sure. which we assumed we had. (143). Now. so K is normal in G. (243). We want to show a contradiction. then we can square each of them because H is a subgroup.2 is a group. Similarly. g −1 N ·nN ·gN = g −1 ngN . We square the elements until we actually see that we don’t get only 6 elements. g ∈ H1 and H1 is a group. Then g −1 N nN gN = g −1 N eN gN = g −1 egN = g −1 gN = eN = N . Proof. (13)(24).2 . for some h ∈ H. We start by letting n ∈ N . so it’s the same identity.are V e = V and V = {(14)(23). and 1 identity which amounts to 4 elements. (134). Theorem 1. Therefore. (142). then hg ∈ H1 . Then (134) = g (123)g −1 . So.17. nN ∈ G/H and g −1 N ∈ G/H. H contains −1 ∈ H for all g ∈ A .2 is the e of G. since n ∈ N . then e ∈ H1 ∩ H2 because e1. (24)}. Show that the converse of Lagrange’s Theorem is false. Let h ∈ H1 ∩ H2 . (124). because H1.18.23. (12)(34). then g −1 ng is an element of N for each element g ∈ G. the right cosets of K in G are Ke = K and K(1234) = (1234)K because there are four elements left to be taken. (13). Then (243) = g (123) g −1 . (14)(23). Exercise 1. gN ∈ G/H. Associativity comes from the fact that G is associative. Proof. it is closed. we will need 3-cycles. We know that H A4 because the index is 2. Exercise 1. We start by listing the twelve permutations of A4 : e. (134). (13)} = V (1234) = {(1234).22. If (123). Now V is not normal in G because (1234)V = {(1234). so to get to 6. ghg 4 Let’s say that (123) ∈ H. Prove that if n is an element of N . 12 . Now the left cosets of K in G are eK = K and (1234)K = {(1234). H2 ≤ G. show that A4 is a group with 12 elements that contains no subgroup with 6 elements.2 ∈ H1. hg ∈ H1 ∩ H2 . There are 3 2-cycles. Let N be a normal subgroup of a group G. then (234)(123)(243) = (134). g −1 ngN = N which implies g −1 ng ∈ N . (243) ∈ H. (123). Let’s say (234) ∈ H. Let H ≤ A4 such that |H| = 6. it follows that nN = eN = N . Then (124)(123)(142) ∈ H which implies (243) ∈ H.

Z(G) = {z ∈ G such that zg = gz for all g ∈ G}. Associativity comes from the fact that G is a group. since e ∈ Z(G) and e = zz −1 . H2 G. so z −1 ∈ Z(G). that the left 13 . Definition 1.Theorem 1. The intersection of two normal subgroups is normal. Theorem 1.21. we must understand cosets well. Proof. By cancellation law and associativity. we have (zz −1 )g = (z −1 z)g =⇒ z(z −1 g) = (gz)z −1 . z −1 g = gz −1 . Z(G) G. Theorem 1. To understand normality.14. The cosets of H in G is the quotient group G/H. ghg −1 ∈ (H1 ∩ H2 ) and we’re done. Now. Is it really a group? It is. Now.19. and it also has a name. the group formed by the cosets of H has the same order as H. we have that gh = h g for some h ∈ (H1 ∩ H2 ). Definition 1. The center Z(G) of a group is the set of all elements of G which commute with every element of G. Let g ∈ G. The identity is in Z(G) because eg = ge = g for all g ∈ G.12. That is. Definition 1. then gZ(G) = Z(G)g. so z(z −1 g) = (zg)z −1 .13. Let z ∈ Z(G).20. we must show g(H1 ∩ H2 ) = (H1 ∩ H2 )g. it commutes. A subgroup H of G is a normal subgroup of G if gH = Hg for all g ∈ G. Proof. which is true if ghg −1 ∈ (H1 ∩ H2 ) for some h ∈ (H1 ∩ H2 ) — see some example above. The set of left cosets of H in G form a group under the operation defined as (g1 H)(g2 H) = g1 g2 H whenever gH = Hg for all g ∈ G. Proof. that is. Consider a subgroup H ≤ G. that is. So. So. We write H G. as we prove on the next theorem. We multiply g −1 on the right to get ghg −1 = h e = h for some h ∈ (H1 ∩ H2 ). Let subgroups H1 . This operation can only be used whenever some condition about the left and right cosets holds. What can we say about the cosets of H? We can say that |gH| = |H|.17. normality comes from the fact that gz = zg for all g ∈ G. In fact. Then H1 ∩ H2 is a subgroup by Theorem 1. Let’s think of cosets for a while. so must only show normality. Since z ∈ Z(G). This theorem defines the binary operation in which the group is formed upon. such group has a name.

g1 H = g2 H. if g1 H = g2 H. Then. it is associative. Verbal mathematics is very hard to understand. −1 Now we must show that once g2 g1 ∈ H. and we have a group. If this holds. then (g1 Hg2 H)g3 H = g1 H(g2 Hg3 H). it would be nice to have theorems that would tell us when they’re equal. 14 . −1 Theorem 1. then it’s because there is an h ∈ H such that g1 = g2 h. Next we prove a theorem about normal subgroups. Theorem 1. these two theorems give us a nice way to check if cosets are equal. multiply it on the left: −1 −1 g2 g1 = eh = h. for some h ∈ H. now g1 H = g2 H if and only if g2 g1 ∈ H. so eg1 = g2 h =⇒ g1 = g2 h. this means that there’s an h ∈ H. So we have inverses. we can write g2 g1 = h. That is. Do we have inverses? Yes. Since cosets are sets. it follows that g1 H = g2 H. The definition of the binary operation gives us the fact that (g1 g2 H) is a coset. does that mean that the cosets are different? Not necessarily. how can we tell? One way.cosets match the right cosets exactly. Let H ≤ G. we have the inverse of g2 available. Let H ≤ G. in any order.23. Now. if what they have as elements are all the same. It says that a normal subgroup of a group is normal only when an element of the group times an element of the subgroup times the inverse of the element of the group is in the subgroup. A subgroup H of G is normal in G if and only if ghg −1 is in H. g1 ≡L g2 (mod H). they’re equal. Therefore. Because cosets have many names. Is it associative? Since (g1 g2 )g3 H = g1 (g2 g3 )H. of course. because G is a group. such that g1 = g2 . In other words.22. Now. the proof of that is (gH)(gH)−1 = gg −1 H = eH = H. Because cosets are equivalence classes. multiply g2 on the right. because g1 HeH = g1 eH = g1 H. −1 −1 Well. now g1 H = g2 H if and only if g1 g2 ∈ H. Repeat last proof changing subscripts appropriately. but it’s a good exercise. for all g in G. For instance. such that g1 = g2 h. then g2 g1 ∈ H. Then. because (gH)−1 = g −1 H. if I show you g1 H and g2 H. H is the identity. because g2 g1 ∈ H. Proof. −1 Theorem 1. g1 H = g2 H if g1 ≡L g2 (mod H) — we’re dealing with left cosets here. Proof. So. Do we have an identity? Yes. So. So yes. H must be normal in G. So. is to take a look at the contents.24.

we can write the hypothesis as g −1 hg = h . so let ghg −1 = h be in H. 1+3Z. Now multiply by g on the left to get hg = gh which means that hg is in gH and since h is an arbitrary element of H. The elements of Z/3Z are {3Z. Once a group G is abelian. every subgroup is normal. suppose G is abelian and that H ≤ G. Now multiply by g −1 on the right to get ghg −1 = h which is in H. gh = h g for some h in H. Let G = (Z. how do we actually build a quotient group? Let’s look at an example. where r < 3. Now. But. so gg −1 h = eh =⇒ ghg −1 = eh = h ∈ H and whenever this happens. Now. if G is abelian. Then for any g ∈ G. gH is a subset of Hg. gH = Hg. which means that gh is in Hg. you may notice that it gives you a nice message. right? Now. z ÷ 3 = nq + r. Suppose H is normal in G. we set up the Cayley table. write AT and notice that they are equal. then any subgroup H of G is normal. How does it say that? Well. gg −1 = e ∈ H. That explains why the members are as they are. So r is either 0. ghg −1 is in H. and so G/H is also abelian. Because addition is the binary operation for this group. is it true that G/H is also abelian? Yes. So. Hg is a subset of gH. so gh = h g. Now since g −1 and g are inverses of each other. mathematicians like to write the cosets in the form g + H to make explicit that the operation is addition. +). since every element of G commutes with every element of G. Let h in H and g in G be arbitrary elements. 1 or 2. The fact that this group is abelian may get us a new theorem. and since h is an arbitrary element of H. If it were any other operation. By hypothesis. By the division algorithm. If you’re asking why. θ 3Z 1 + 3Z 2 + 3Z 3Z 3Z 1 + 3Z 2 + 3Z 1 + 3Z 1 + 3Z 2 + 3Z 3Z 2 + 3Z 2 + 3Z 3Z 1 + 3Z You may quickly notice that this group is abelian. so we’ll build Z/3Z. How would one quickly notice such thing? Think of the group as a matrix A. multiply h on the right to get gg −1 h = eh. for n = 3. H = nZ. H G. Let’s try to build the quotient group Z/nZ. The message is. Multiply by g on the right.Proof. consider the integers mod 3. 15 . if you read this theorem carefully. for all g in G. 2+3Z}. we can alter their order. Now. Now. they’d probably write gH as we have been so far. including those of H because H ≤ G. Then. if G is abelian.

the order of gH is the order of H. Since we’re talking about abelianism. that is. Then H G. every g commutes with every element of G. consider. can you prove? If not. can you show an example? But now. once G is abelian. right? That’s the definition for the multiplication (the binary operation) of a quotient group.24. I don’t clearly see this one right now.. Then we have two left cosets: g1 H = H and g2 H = G − H. Since the index of H in G is the number of left cosets of H in G. because let H = {e} which is normal in G and is a subgroup of any G non-abelian.s : r4 = s2 = e. then there’s no way that a subgroup won’t be abelian. (Q = 0. and every subgroup of G is abelian. |gH| = |H|. Think about it. ·). Now (g1 H)(g2 H) = (g1 g2 )H. (Z. Which groups do we know? We know the number systems: (R. a quotient group with respect to the subgroup is also abelian. there’s just no way because all elements are expressed as a factor of the generator. Proof. and once a subgroup is normal.Theorem 1. does it automatically follow that G is abelian? It can’t be. Let [G : H] = 2. We know how to generate some groups. But. Theorem 1. +). Proof. rs = sr3 }. the right cosets of H in G are the same as the left cosets of H in G. Exercise 1. ·). so it doesn’t matter which order you multiply any of them. like the dihedral group D4 = {r. Let H G. Now. then G/H is abelian. Let H G. g2 H ∈ G/H. Let g1 H. abelianism is a pretty powerful and nice property that a group may have. And we can always write the Cayley 16 . each gh is either in H or in G − H. (R = 0. Then.. (Q.26. because G is abelian. Once I say H G. there are 2 left cosets. +).25. What do we have to show here? We have to show that once the index of H is 2. every subgroup of G is normal. with G abelian. What is the order of gH ∈ G/H? Recall that the order of gH is the smallest k such that (gH)k = H = g k H which happens when g k ∈ H. Then. So. so (g1 g2 )H = g2 g1 H = g2 Hg1 H and this shows that G/H is abelian. +). notice that when G is cyclic. Let’s talk about ways to produce groups quickly. But what if H is a proper normal subgroup of G? Does that make G abelian automatically? If so.

Then. therefore. under matrix multiplication as binary operation. This is the special linear group of matrices 2 × 2. we also get the identity. For example. makes is a hard enough thing to check so that we may wish to build groups out of things which we already know will be associtive. What can we do with a rectangle? We can flip it vertically and horizontally: we create two elements of order 2. Let Z(G) = {z ∈ G : zg = gz for all g ∈ G}. +). at no charge — a pretty good deal. This algorithm generates the group g which is cyclic and. hh ∈ H and h−1 ∈ H. h ∈ H. We can use generators. 17 . then Z(G) is an abelian subgroup of G. So. then. We can rotate it 180 degrees. For example. which makes every possible subgroup normal. = Another interesting example is the center of every group. by using the same operation of G. which if we square this element. so we like composition as a binary operation. any group under composition is associative. Not to mention that to check that H ≤ G we only need to check that for all h. Let g= and notice that g ∼ (Z. Pick some g ∈ G. abelian. let G = SL2 (R). op(G)) in which associativity will be given by G. This is the Klein 4-group. Next. they’re built out of the symmetry of objects. Associativity. and take a look at all powers of g. what kind of groups are those? These are the symmetric groups Sn . every center subgroup is abelian. let H ⊆ G. 1 1 0 1 . a group can be formed out of invertible functions from a set S into itself under composition. Every group G has a center as a subgroup. so each element is its own inverse. For example. we show an interesting theorem about centers. Other ways to get away from checking associativity is to form groups out of other groups. but it’s very hard to check associativity for crazy groups in which we may build a table for. For example.table for any group. with real entries such that the determinant of each of these matrices is ±1. The identity is any of these two elements squared. think of a rectangle. This is the symmetries of a rectangle in which we only have elements which square to the identity. Moreover. we may form a group (H.

g a zg b z = g a zz g b = g a z zg b = g a z g b z which shows that every element of G commutes with every other element of G. a3 b}. a2 . From this. Now. j. Z(G). g 2 Z(G). a. a . θ 1 a a2 a3 b ab a2 b a3 b 1 1 a a2 a3 b ab a2 b a3 b a a a2 a3 1 a3 b a2 b a3 b b a2 a2 a3 1 a a2 b a3 b b ab a3 a3 1 a a2 ab b ab a2 b b b ab a2 b a3 b a2 a3 1 a ab ab a2 b a3 b b a a2 a3 1 a2 b a2 b a3 b b ab 1 a a2 a3 a3 b a3 b b ab a2 b a3 1 a a2 They don’t commute because. abelianism implies global centralization. 18 . This means that every element of G is in a coset g a Z(G). Let a4 = e. a2 . let’s take a look at the quaternion group.}. Since G/Z(G) is cyclic. a2 b. g −1 Z(G). The quaternion group is a non-abelian group of order 8. ab = ba = a3 b. It is usually denoted by Q8 = {1. −i. gZ(G).27. So non-abelianism doesn’t imply non-abelian subgroups. However. Proof. therefore. The quaternions are actually a number system. z ∈ Z(G). −1. b2 = a2 . b. Before we move on to rings and other algebras. They are: {1}. There’s another way to name the elements of the group. Then a−1 = a3 and it follows that ba = a−1 b. Suppose G/Z(G) is cyclic. you can get the whole group. ab. Because they are in the center of Z... these elements look like g a z and g b z in which each one is in some coset of Z(G) in G. a3 . and so b4 = e.. which is unsual for number systems. Now Z(G) = G because once G is abelian. so z. An interesting thing about the quaternion group is that once we say that i2 = j 2 = k 2 = ijk = −1. i. they both commute with every other element of G. k. Let Q8 = {1. Then G is abelian and so Z(G) = G. So G/Z(G) = {. In other words. in which I happen to prefer right now.. every element satisfy the condition to belong in the center. but the quaternions don’t commute. we can draw the whole multiplication table. b . −j. because they’re all cyclic.Theorem 1. pick g1 . we can let gZ(G) generate G/Z(G). . notice that all of its proper subgroups are abelian. for example. −k}. g2 ∈ G. similarly constructed to the complex numbers. therefore G is abelian.

then no Sn .+) be the group which none of its elements have finite order. However. e2 = e. h−1 = h ∈ H. all elements of H also commute. because for each h ∈ H. Proof. is abelian.25. xa = ax =⇒ (yx)a = yax =⇒ yax = (yx)a =⇒ a(yx) = (yx)a. It is called a conjugate of H. Exercise 1. Let (Z. Both (12) and (14) square to the identity. but (142)2 = (124) = e. let H = {g ∈ G : g 2 = e}.28. Give an example of a group G which has no elements of finite order greater than 1. let x ∈ H. but since (12)(23) = (123) = (132) = (23)(12). But (12)(14) = (142). The identity is present because it commutes with every element of G. so it will commute with a just fine. then prove (b) that |gHg −1 | = |H|. so we don’t have closure. Exercise 1. all of whose elements have finite order. We also have inverses. Show that Ha = {x ∈ G : xa = ax} is a subgroup of G. so D4 is not isomorphic to Q8 . let x. we could think that they have something to do with the dihedral D4 group. Give an example to show G abelian is necessary for such H. Prove (a) that gHg −1 ≤ G. y ∈ Ha . Any Sn . then e2 = h2 h 2 = (hh )(hh ) = (hh )2 ∈ H. Proof. Suppose G is finite. has (12) and (23) as elements. Exercise 1. then x−1 ax = x−1 xa =⇒ x−1 axx−1 = x−1 xax−1 =⇒ x−1 ae = eax−1 =⇒ x−1 a = ax−1 . For the example. Prove H ≤ G. So abelianism is necessary. where n ≥ 3. Let G be a group and let a be one fixed element of G.27. Associativity is given by G. so x−1 ∈ H. Now suppose 19 . Proof. but has a factor group G/H. we consider S4 which is not abelian. Show that Sn is non-abelian for any n ≥ 3. Now we need to show closure. The quaternion group has two elements which square to the identity. with n ≥ 3. so ax = xa. while D4 has at least five. We have associativity from G. Let H ≤ G and fix g ∈ G. Exercise 1. but they are not that similar. so we have identity. We must show xy ∈ Ha .With a quick glance at the table and at the nature of the elements of the quaternion.26. Let G abelian. Then H ≤ G. We have closure on H because: since G is abelian.29. Define gHg −1 = {ghg −1 : h ∈ H}. For inverses now. that’s possible because there’s no power t > 1 such that z t = 1. Z/2Z is such that all of its cosets have order not greater than 2. Exercise 1. and H is subset of G.

ghk g −1 g} = {gh1 . then gHg −1 = H. .. Now... so that we may drop the requirement that G-finite. so I think that G-finite in (b) is not a requirement. so that every element 20 .2. h = h and then they’re all distinct. and therefore. . Also.. by (b) and (a) respectively. And e = gg −1 = geg −1 = gh−1 hg −1 = gh−1 ehg −1 = gh−1 g −1 ghg −1 = (gh−1 g −1 )(ghg −1 )... Now. So. ghk g −1 }. 2 Homomorphisms Definition 2. Associativity comes from G because gHg −1 is composed only of elements of G. h2 . ·) is a mapping φ that maps every g ∈ G to some h ∈ H so that the image of an ×-product is the corresponding (·)-product in H.. let H = {h1 .1. that is. However. . (b) assumes G is finite. if φ(G) = H. ghk } = gH. .. By cancellation law. For (b). so they have the same order. if I can show that all elements in gHg −1 are distinct. therefore. and so gH = Hg — because Hg = (gHg −1 )g — implying H G.. we have |gHg −1 | = |H| ≤ G. then geg −1 = gg −1 = e ∈ gHg −1 . The set φ(G) ⊆ H of all images h ∈ H of elements g ∈ G is called the homomorphic image of G. hk } with H ≤ G finite. Since e ∈ H. we say φ is a homomorphism onto H if the mapping is onto. So we have inverses. then I’ve shown that there’s one and only one ghg −1 for each h ∈ H. but I think that gHg −1 will always have the same elements even when G is not finite. The right coset (gHg −1 )g = {gh1 g −1 g. For (a). prove (c) that H G. the same order. then. ×) to (H. since H is the unique subgroup with |H| elements. they have the same number of elements.. Let φ : G → H be a homomorphism. suppose gh g −1 = gh g −1 .. that is φ(g1 × g2 ) = φ(g1 ) · φ(g2 ). We construct the inverses this way: e = gg −1 = geg −1 = ghh−1 g −1 = gheh−1 g −1 = ghg −1 gh−1 g −1 = (ghg −1 )(gh−1 g −1 ) = e. gHg −1 ≤ G. For (c).. Therefore.G is a group and H is the unique subgroup of size |H| in G. Definition 2. The various elements g sharing the common image φ(g) = h form the pre-image of h. we show first the identity is present. There’s a not so hard way to show the same cardinality here. Then gHg −1 = {gh1 g 1 . A group homomorphism from (G.

Let φ be a homomorphism from a group G to a group H. We let φ(p = i + rn) = i (mod n). b = φ(y).1. then φ is an isomorphism. Proof. Theorem 2. Prove that φ[G] is abelian if and only if for all x. y ∈ G we have xyx−1 y −1 ∈ ker(φ). 2. Let φ : G → G be a homomorphism. such as φ(x−1 ) = φ(x)−1 to write φ(xy)φ(x−1 y −1 ) = e φ(x)φ(y)φ(x−1 )φ(y −1 ) = e φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)−1 φ(y)−1 = e φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)−1 = φ(y) φ(x)φ(y) = φ(y)φ(x) ab = ba 21 .5. Suppose xyx−1 y −1 ∈ ker(φ) for all x. Definition 2.6. y ∈ G such that a = φ(x). Then we call the set φ[H] = {φ(h) : h ∈ H} the homomorphic image of H on G . The group K of pre-images of eH is called the kernel of the homomorphism. The integers can be mapped onto the integers Zn = {0. Let H ≤ G. Let a. Definition 2. φ(q = i + sn) = j (mod n).1.of H appears as the image of at least one g ∈ G.3. So it is a homormorphism for × as well. 1.4. Definition 2.. . Is φ(pq) = ij (mod n)? φ((i + rn)(j + sn)) = φ(ij + isn + jrn + rsn2 ) = φ(ij + (is + jr + rsn)n) = ij (mod n). φ[H] ≤ G . We use the φ’s properties. so we have x. Let H ≤ G . n − 1}. b in φ[G].. Let φ : G → H be a group homomorphism. Exercise 2.2. y ∈ G. If φ is onto and one-to-one. Let φ : G → G be a homomorphism. and this mapping is a homomorphism for the operation +. The kernel of φ is ker(φ) = {g ∈ G : f (g) = e} = f −1 [e]. Is it also a homomorphism for ×? Let f (i + rn) = i (mod n). Exercise 2.. Definition 2. Let φ : G → G be a homomorphism. Proof. Then we call the set φ−1 [H ] = {g ∈ G : φ(g) ∈ H } the pre-image of H. and show that f ((i + rn)(j + sn)) = ij (mod n).

x = y. Therefore. so ker(f ) = {e}. y ∈ G. Apply cancellation law on the left and on the right. For (c). Multiply by g on the right. Exercise 2. so. Define a map φ : G → G by φ(x) = gxg −1 . Prove that f is one-to-one if and only if ker(f ) = {e}. Suppose φ(x) = φ(y). y ∈ G.Therefore. Assume f is one-to-one. Proof. Suppose f (x) = f (y). For (a). y ∈ G. Exercise 2. Let x. Then φ(x) = gxg −1 and φ(y) = gyg −1 . So φ(x) = gxg −1 = φ(y) = gyg −1 . we have that x = e. We must show that there is an x ∈ G such that y = φ(x) = gxg −1 . Let x. Let G be a group and fix g ∈ G. to write f (x) = f (y) f (x)f (y)−1 = e f (x)f (y −1 ) = e f (xy −1 ) = e So xy −1 ∈ ker(f ). So φ is one-to-one. φ[G] is abelian. then x = y. so g −1 yg = x. Let x ∈ ker(f ). let x. So φ(x)φ(y) = φ(y)φ(x) φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)−1 = φ(y) φ(x)φ(y)φ(x)−1 φ(y)−1 = e φ(x)φ(y)φ(x−1 )φ(y −1 ) = e φ(xyx−1 y −1 ) = e Therefore xyx−1 y −1 ∈ ker(φ) for all x. We now use the fact that f is a homomorphism. For (b) let y ∈ G. So φ(x)φ(y) = gxg −1 gyg −1 = gxyg −1 = φ(xy) 22 . y ∈ G. Show that φ is (a) one-to-one and (b) onto. Must show φ(xyx−1 y −1 ) = e. let x. φ is onto. Now suppose φ[G] is abelian. Then f (x) = e = f (e). and since f is one-to-one. and by g −1 on the left. Now assume ker(f ) = {e}.4. Prove φ is a (c) homomorphism.3. Let f : G → H be a group homomorphism. y ∈ G.

so u ∈ gK. f (g −1 u) = f (g −1 )f (u) = f (g)−1 f (u) But f (u) = f (g) because u ∈ f −1 [{f (g)}]. As defined. Since φ(gk) ∈ φ[G]. Exercise 2. since H is normal. Define φ : G → G/H by φ(g) = gH. φ takes each g ∈ G into a coset gH ∈ G/H. since φ is a homomorphism. So g −1 u = k for some k ∈ K. Let K G.5. gk ∈ φ−1 [φ(g)].6. Proof. so u = gk. The kernel of φ will be all elements which land in the identity of G/H. φ(gk) = φ(g)φ(k) = φ(g) ∈ φ[G]. So f (g)−1 f (u) = f (g)−1 f (g) =e So g −1 u is mapped to e. Which elements g will satisfy φ(g) = H? By definition. we are proving that the elements of the coset gK are exactly the elements of G that map to φ(g) ∈ {φ(g)}. Show that φ is onto and the kernel of φ is H. K = ker(φ). By definition. Let φ : G → H be a homomorphism and K = ker(φ). φ(g) = gH which is equal to H if and only if (g −1 e) ∈ H. Exercise 2. so K G. that is. Let φ : G → H be a (group) homomorphism. Now. Must show gk ∈ φ−1 [φ(g)]. That is. Multiply g on the right. Proof. Prove gK = φ−1 [φ(g)]. since f is a homomorphism. so φ(g1 g2 ) = g1 g2 H = g1 Hg2 H = φ(g1 )φ(g2 ) Therefore. G/H’s operation is defined as (g1 H)(g2 H) = (g1 g2 )H.So φ is a homomorphism. gk ∈ G. φ(g) = gH. Let gk ∈ gK for some k ∈ K. 23 . Let H G. they land in H. Let g ∈ G. Let g ∈ G. Since G is a group. φ is a homomorphism. which means g −1 u ∈ K.

so a−1 ∈ HN . Define HN a subset of G by HN = {hn : h ∈ H. H = ker(φ). hence HN is not empty. since G is abelian. n ∈ N }. For closure. if some prime p divides |G|. For inverses. 24 . g = G. so we multiply h on the left to get ha−1 = hn−1 h−1 which is in N because N is normal. so pick g = e. Definition 2. Since ha−1 ∈ N . we want to show that gxg −1 is in HN . so φ is onto. then HN G.3. I must find g ∈ G such that φ(g ) = gH. so ab = hh n∗ n . so ab = hnh n . Proof. Then there are h. we know g ≤ G. Proof. To show φ is onto. So φ(h) = hH = H because h−1 ∈ H. A group G = {e} is simple if and only if for every N G. then x = uv for some u in H and v in N .2. Now gxg −1 = guvg −1 = gug −1 gvg −1 . so g is normal and proper in G. then G has a subgroup H of order p. let gH ∈ G/H. Theorem 2. Let x in HN be arbitrary. But H and N are normal in G. G = {e}. so |G| = p. By Theorem 5-3. let g = g . ab ∈ HN . as desired. g G. Corollary 2. h−1 (ha−1 ) ∈ HN . By definition. HN is a subgroup of G. Then HN is a subgroup of G. So. Let g in G be arbitrary. We know e is in both H and N .7. so a = hn for some h ∈ H and n ∈ N . so nh ∈ N h = h N . Suppose g = G. nh = h n∗ for some n∗ ∈ N . hence. hN = N h for all h ∈ G.7. We know a−1 = n−1 h−1 . it’s not true that H is proper. let a. Suppose H is a subgroup of G and N is normal in G. so that’s not possible. b be in HN . Since G is simple. let a be in HN . because g ∈ G. Since hh ∈ H and n∗ n ∈ N . hence. If H G. but G is simple. Now. h ∈ H and n. we have N = G or N = {e}. Since G is abelian. n ∈ N such that a = hn and b = h n . H must be normal. so gxg −1 is in HN .Let h ∈ H. Therefore. since N is normal. we certainly have one. so e2 = e ∈ HN . Exercise 2. so gug −1 is in H and gvg −1 is in N . Prove that a finite simple group G which is abelian must be a cyclic group of prime order. Proof.

then it’s because −2 is a root. So x ∼ z. h such that gxg −1 = y hyh−1 = z So h(gxg −1 )h−1 = z. Exercise 3. but since ∼ is an equivalence relation. So there exists g. (23). Now. Let x ∈ G. (23)(12)(23) = (23)(123) = (13). Let G be a group. 3 Polynomials We need definitions. Then x ∼ x because xxx−1 = x. so (13) ∼ (23). the exercises are already here. Solution. so (12) ∼ (13). by inspection I find (12)(13)(12) = (12)(123) = (23). and notice g −1 = g −1 h−1 . Suppose x ∼ y. (c) write down the conjugacy classes of S3 . A 3-cycle has a 2-cycle as a conjugate because 3-cycles are even permutations. By evaluating the polynomial at −2. (b) If G is abelian. Prove (a) ∼ is an equivalence relation. (23). y ∼ z. Also. So g xg −1 = z. (13).1. (132)}. 2-cycles are odd.Exercise 2. (132).8. (c) S3 = {e.(b) describe the conjugacy classes of G if G is abelian. So exists g such that gxg −1 = y xg −1 = g −1 y x = g −1 y(g −1 )−1 . another class C2 will contain (12). (123). the theorems. (12). Find all primes p such that x + 2 is a factor of x4 + x3 + x2 − x + 1 ∈ Zp [x]. then the only y which will satisfy the relation is y = x. Suppose x ∼ y. we get 15 25 . Define ∼ on G by x ∼ y if there exists g ∈ G such that gxg −1 = y. ∼ breaks G apart into disjoint and exhaustive classes. So. (13). one class C1 will contain (123). Let g = hg. Therefore. the proofs. If x + 2 is a factor of x4 + x3 + x2 − x + 1 ∈ Zp [x]. notation explained. Proof. so even-cycle times odd-cycle is odd-cycle. so G has |G| conjugacy classes of the form {x}.

That is. Since the degree must be 3. Now. p(x) = g(x)h(x) = (x2 + Ax + B)(x + C). which are reducible. So we may consider only the monic polynomials. Solution. we have 2 = −1 as a root. The constant term d cannot be zero. Exercise 3. Hence we have p in {3. Since d isn’t zero. in case we want to distinguish them. B = 1 or B = 2. with these criteria. 12 factorizations. We take advantage of the list to add the irreducibles in the order that they should appear. So. So. so a is either 1 or 2. The coefficients cannot sum to zero. This gives us 18 polynomials p(x). then a cannot be 0.2. x0 . 3 choices for b. that is. 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 irreducible 2 irreducible 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 irreducible 26 . Find all irreducible polynomials of degree 3 in Z3 [x]. We can express all polynomials of degree 3 over Z3 by ax3 + bx2 + cx + d. We list only the coefficients of each polynomial in the order x3 . that is.as the result. 5}. then its factors will be of degree 2 and degree 1. we have 2 choices for d. 15 = 0 (mod 3) and 15 = 0 (mod 5). whenever the sum of the even coefficients equals the sum of odd coefficients. x1 . consider all monic polynomials and multiply each by 2 to notice that factorization doesn’t change. Suppose now that p(x) is reducible. evaluate x = 2 = −1: −a + b + −c + d = 0 which implies b + d = a + c. with 1 choice for a. we may multiply each irreducible by 2 to obtain its match. doubling the total of irreducible polynomials. This gives us 6 possibilities for g(x) and 2 possibilities for h(x). B and C are not zero. to derive a third rule. x2 . or one is a root. Since factorization is unique except for scalar multiple (and order). C = 1 or C = 2. Now. or zero is a root. 3 choices for c.

Solution.3.1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 2 irreducible 1 irreducible 2 1 irreducible 2 1 irreducible 2 1 2 irreducible We found 8 polynomials. By the quadratic formula. 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 irreducible 2 irreducible 1 2 1 2 irreducible 1 irreducible 2 1 2 irreducible 1 irreducible 2 1 2 irreducible 1 irreducible 2 Exercise 3. x2 = 11 ± 222 − 4/2 √ = 11 ± 2 30 27 . If we multiply each by 2. Demonstrate that f (x) = x4 − 22x2 + 1 is irreducible over Q. we would get their matches. yielding 16 irreducible polynomials as shown below.

which we don’t. = = = Since |H| = 4.√ So x = ± 11 ± 2 30. we would see rational roots in these linear factors. Now we can write f (x) as the product of 4 linear factors in R[x]. The linear factors are irreducible polynomials in R[x]. Therefore. G/ker(φ) ∼ Image(φ). if f (x) were to factor in Q[x]. so f (x) is irreducible in Q[x]. so |φ−1 [h]| = 15. so G/ker(φ) ∼ H.4. Let A=x− B =x+ C =x− D =x+ So √ AB = x2 − 11 − 2 30 √ √ AC = x2 + (− 11 + 2 30 − 11 − 2 30)x + 1 √ √ AD = x2 + (− 11 + 2 30 + 11 − 2 30)x + 1 √ √ BC = x2 + (− 11 − 2 30 + 11 + 2 30)x + 1 √ √ BD = x2 + ( 11 − 2 30 + 11 + 2 30)x + 1 √ CD = x2 + 241 − 44 30 No factor with rational coefficients. Let h be in H. we must also make sure that no factors of degree 2 will have rational coefficients. so. the factorization of f (x) is unique — except for order and scalar multiples. By the fundamental theorem of homomorphisms. Find |ker(φ)|. Exercise 3. hence. 28 . Let φ : G → H be a group homomorphism which is onto. 60/|ker(φ)| = 4. Because the irrationals are not closed under multiplication. |ker(φ)| = 15. √ 11 + 2 30 √ 11 + 2 30 √ 11 − 2 30 √ 11 − 2 30. Suppose G has 60 elements and H has 4 elements. We take the linear factors and multiply them in all possible ways. How many elements of G map to h? Solution. Since φ is onto. Let h be in H. H ∼ Image(φ).

Repeat for α = 2 − i. and α is in C and C is an extension field of Q.6.5. √ 3 2−i √ 3 2 α −i= 2 α2 = (α2 − i)3 = 2 (α4 − 2iα2 − 1)(α2 − i) = 2 α6 − iα4 − 2iα4 − 2α2 − α2 + i = 2 α6 − 3iα4 − 3α2 + i = 2 α6 − 3α2 − 2 = 3iα4 − i (α6 − 3α2 − 2)2 = −9α8 + 6α4 + 1 (α6 − 3α2 − 2)2 + 9α8 − 6α4 − 1 = 0 For the other. If the coefficients of the polynomial p(x) = (x − s + ti)(x − s − ti).√ √ Exercise 3. t in R are often called conjugates. Show that α = 2 + 3 is algebraic over Q by finding √ 3 f (x) in Q[x] such that f (α) = 0. Since p(x) = x2 − 2sx + (s2 + t2 ). 29 . then we can pick R = F and C = E to satisfy the definition. Show that they satisfy the definition of conjugates. are real numbers. p(x) would be irreducible over R because all of its roots are complex numbers. Exercise 3. so α is algebraic number. so it’s an algebraic number. Also. we write Now the coefficients are rational. Solution. The complex numbers s + ti and s − ti with s. √ √ 2 + 3 is algebraic over Q. √ α2 = 5 + 2 6 √ α2 − 5 = 2 6 α4 − 10α2 + 25 = 24 α4 − 10α2 + 1 = 0 So. What happens if t = 0? Solution. then α is algebraic over Q. Since α is a root of the polynomial above. because C is an extension field of R.

The multiplicative inverse e(x) is an element of the field such that k(x)e(x) = e(x)k(x) = k(x). Exercise 3. we do long division on each. Show that x3 + 1. For the first part. That is. we can pick other fields to satisfy the definition for when t = 0. Exercise 3.8. Let q(x) = x + 1/2. So x2 = −x/3 + 1 x3 = 10x/9 − 1/3 x4 = −19x/27 + 10/9. For the other class. Use the results to find a linear polynomial equivalent to 3x4 + x3 − 2/3x2 + x + 1. If we want to. Exercise 3. we can write it as 3(−19x/27) + 10/9 + (10x/9) − 1/3 + (−2/3) − (x/3) + 1 + x + 1. This shows they’re all in the same equivalence class. we get a member of k(x). x3 . −1/3x2 + x + 1 and 10x/9 + 2/3 are in the same equivalence class.9. For the second part. If t = 0. Exercise 3. however. We have x3 + 1 = 10x/9 + 2/3 and −x2 /3 + x + 1 = 10x/9 + 2/3. Let F be the field of rational numbers and let p(x) = x2 + x/3 − 1. which is equivalent to (46 + 16x)/9. If we take any member of k(x) and multiply it by a constant term. x4 . we use the equivalences above to perform the appropriate substituitions for 3x4 + x3 − 2/3x2 + x + 1. so all constants are members of e(x). Solution. we have x4 + x2 + 1 = −28x/27 + 28/9. Show that x4 + x2 + 1 and −28x/27 + 28/9 are in the same equivalence class.we have p(x) in R[x] satisfying the definition. Still using Q/ p(x) = x2 + x/3 − 1 . check if q(x) is the inverse of q(x) in the field Q[x]/ x2 + 1 . find linear polynomials equivalent to x2 .10. What is the multiplicative identity of F [x]/ p(x) ? Solution. then the discriminant found in the application of the quadratic formula is greater than zero which implies that all roots are real which causes p(x) to be reducible in R failing the definition for the chosen fields here.7. Solution. −1 = −4/5x + 2/5 30 .

If we get a constant polynomial. What polynomial that when multiplied by x will yield a constant mod x2 + 1? The polynomial x itself. It does because −1 q(x) q(x) = 1/5 − 4x2 /5 = 1. we verify that q(x) q(x) = e(x) and we divide e(x) by x2 + 1. So x−1 = x. Since (1 + s2 /t2 ) is a constant. Find the inverse of x in Q[x]/ x2 + 1 . Solution.11. Exercise 3. because (x)(x) = x2 = −1 mod x2 + 1. find the inverse of s + ti. t2 + s2 s − ti . To check. Exercise 3.12. express their gcd linearly. since all constants are members of the class 1. Solution. So we multiply the equation by 1/(1 + s2 /t2 ). Divide θ2 + 1 by tθ + s. it worked.Solution. tθ + s). which yields 1 = θ2 + 1 − 1 1 + s2 /t2 1 1 θ s = θ2 + 1 − − 2 2 /t2 2 /t2 t 1+s 1+s t 2 t tθ − s = 2 θ2 + 1 − 2 tθ + s 2 t +s t + s2 tθ + s 1 + θ2 + 1 = − The inverse of s + ti is s θ − 2 t t tθ + s So tθ − s tθ + s + θ2 + 1 . s2 + t2 31 . and compare with the preceding result of the book. it is a gcd(θ2 + 1. The division algorithm yields θ2 + 1 = (tθ + s)(θ/t − s/t2 ) + (1 + s2 /t2 ). We express it linearly now with 1+ s2 t2 = θ2 + 1 − tθ + s = θ2 + 1 − s θ − 2 t t s θ − 2 t t tθ + s −1 We want to express 1 as a combination of θ2 + 1 and tθ + s. But it could’ve been any constant other than 1.

Contruct the field E = Z3 [x]/ p(x) . √ √ √ (b) 3 7 in R : Q. Solution. Solution. We attach the roots to Z3 . (d) x4 − 16x2 + 4. 2 + s2 t t + s2 where θ plays the role of i. so a polynomial is reducible if and only if it has a root. Exercise 3. Factor p(x) into two linear terms in E[x]. so it has no zero divisors and it’s closed under the operations. and we compute what other elements will be appear in the field by computing the addition and multiplication tables.The comparison we can make here is that s − ti s2 + t2 seems to be the same as − s − tθ tθ − s = 2 . we have x2 + 1. + | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T ----------------------------------------------------------0 | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T 1 | 1 2 0 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T T 2T 2 | 2 0 1 2+T 2+2T T 2T 1+T 1+2T T | T T+1 T+2 2T 0 1+2T 1 2+2T T 2T | 2T 1+2T 2+2T 0 T 1 1+T 2 2+T 1+T |1+T 2+T T 1+2T 1 2+2T 2 2T 0 1+2T |1+2T 2+2T 2T 1 1+T 2 2+T 0 T 32 . Exercise 3. In Z3 . Let the roots be caled T and −T = 2T . For (a).14 (7-14). Zp is a field. Exercise 3. where r is the desired root. Find an irreducible polynomial p(x) in Z3 [x] of degree 2. (d) 5 + 3 in C : Q.16. We set x = r. x2 + 1 has no roots.13 (7-12).15. then we work with the equation until we get the coefficients over the desired field. for (b) x3 − 7. Explain why it is irreducible. For a prime p. (c) (1 + 5 )/2 in C : Q. (c) x2 − x − 1. Find the minimum polynomials over the small field of the following elements in the following extensions: (a) i in C : Q. Exercise 3.

makes one wonder if we can show that it is not transcendental. then F is a subfield of E and E is an extension of F .2+T |2+T 2+2T |2+2T T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+2T 2 2 2+T 2+2T 0 0 T 1+2T 1 1 1+T * | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T ----------------------------------------------------------0 | 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 | 0 1 2 T 2T 1+T 1+2T 2+T 2+2T 2 | 0 2 1 2T T 2+2T 2+T 1+2T 1+T T | 0 T 2T 2 1 2+T 1+T 2+2T 1+2T 2T | 0 2T T 1 2 1+2T 2+2T 1+T 2+T 1+T | 0 1+T 2+2T 2+T 1+2T 2T 2 1 T 1+2T | 0 1+2T 2+T 1+T 2+2T 2 T 2T 1 2+T | 0 2+T 1+2T 2+2T 1+T 1 2T T 2 2+2T | 0 2+2T 1+T 1+2T ---T 1 2 2T We can now factor every polynomial in Z3 (T.2. The roots of x2 + 1 are T and 2T . Definition 4. Let a0 + a1 x + a2 x2 + . + an xn = 0 be a polynomial equation of degree n with coefficients ai in a field F . A real number that is not the root of any polynomial equation with rational coefficients is called transcendental. If every element of a field F is an element of a field E and if F has the same field operations as E. Knowing that π is transcendental from hearing people say it.1. If F is Q. and let E be an extension field of F . then r is an algebraic number. We write F ⊆ E. Definition 4. A rational number times an irrational number is irrational. All we have to do is find a polynomial with rational coefficients which has π as a root.3. 2T ) all the way to linear factors. 33 . so x2 + 1 = (x + T )(x + 2T ). 4 Algebraic field extensions Definition 4. so we will need at least a polynomial of degree 2.. If r in E is a root of such an equation.. then r is said to be algebraic over F . We can’t consider x − π = 0 because we can’t assume that π is rational.

Also. Definition 4. then this is another way to think of transcendental numbers: numbers which won’t square to a rational number. so this √ way we can find a polynomial to which 2 is a root. We let F [x]/ p(x) stand for the polynomials with coefficients in F taken modulo p(x) with equivalence classes described as {r(x) + p(x)q(x). Let F be a field and let p(x) be in F [x] such that p(x) is irreducible in F [x]. Definition 4. then I have to say that this is not possible and if not. represented by r(x) mod p(x). Consider the irrational 2. Let F be a field. r2 in E ⊆ F are conjugates if they are roots of the same irreducible polynomial in F [x]. the polynomial equation won’t necessarily be monic. Why? Because r is a root of an equation with coefficients in Q. If every element of an extension E of F is algebraic with respect to F .Why? Because the idea is: if π isn’t transcendental. Let F be a field and let r be in E ⊆ F be algebraic with respect to F . So. Definition 4. If we square it. then eventually we would find some natural n such that π n = r. then E is an algebraic extension of F .5.6. is really irreducible. we must check that p(x). where r is a rational √ number. Theorem 4. Then r1 . 34 . If I believe the mathematicians. ever. So. Then r is a root of a unique monic irreducible polynomial p(x) in F [x] and p(x) divides each polynomial in F [x] that has r as a root. The uniqueness of the remainder of a long division is guaranteed by the Division Algorithm. we get 2. by definition. if we can apply some power to π and get it to become a rational number.4. from the definition above.1. x2 − 2 = 0. For example. then we would be done. where q(x) is in F [x]}. Definition 4. Every algebraic number r is a root of an equation with coefficients in Z. An algebraic number is called an algebraic integer if and only if it is a root of a monic polynomial equation of degree n with coefficients in Z.7. multiply the equation by the least common multiple of the denominators of the rational coefficients and we get an equation with integral coefficients. so the representation is described in the definition above is also unique.

then p(x) √ x3 − 2. x2 + 2x + 2 is irreducible by E. x is a root. and let p(x) be irreducible in F [x]. in new words). we can create F [x]/ p(x) . But how do we divide things in it? That is. Remark 4. In Q(r). we know that r2 +2r+2 = 0 or r2 = −2r − 2.. We have a polynomial p(x) which is irreducible over F . we have a field. y ∈ Q}. for example? We can use the divison algorithm to 35 .I. Now. √ For example. then 3 2 implies the existence of p(x) = x − 3 2. Then F [x]/ p(x) is a field. it depends on the field. mentioned in the theorem of Kronecker. With this information now.2 (Kronecker). So. Now. To check. But if F = = √ Q. If we require r to be the root of some irreducible polynomial. with nice properties. We can take all polynomials in F [x] and quotient it out with p(x). Declare r a root of x2 +2x+2. Now Q(r) = {x + yr : x.3 (Kronecker.8. Suppose r is algebraic over F which means r is the root of some polynomial over F . for example.. The first property is that the field. if p(x) has degree n.C. if F = Q and r = 3 2. that is. Another way to think of the previous example is to declare r to be a root of p(x). The polynomial p(x) has a root in F [x]/ p(x) . Let’s look at an example. Theorem 4. Theorem 4. Let F be a field. For example. Let’s review some concepts. we write (6 + 2r)(−1 − 3r) = −6 − 20r − 6r2 = −6 − 20r − 6r2 = 6 − 8r because r2 = −2r − 2. then there’s only one polynomial to which r is a root of. just plug x in the polynomial. We call such polynomial. consider π as the root of some polynomial over Q. Now use the fact that p(r) = 0 to “multiply” things around — what would this mean? Going on. + cn−1 ran−1 with ci in F . and contains a subfield isomorphic to F . this is a field. We may write the representative of an equivalence class of polynomials as a polynomial with a bar on top.1. the minimum polynomial of r over F . So. then every element of F (r) is of the form c0 + c1 r + c2 r2 + . has F inside it: the constant polynomials. Now x is a root of p(x).Definition 4. what’s 1/a. Now take Q[x]/ p(x) and notice that since p(x) is congruent to zero by definition. (10/9)x + 2/3. we form a field F (r) — read this as “F adjoin r”. Let F be a field.

√ √ Now. because we absolutely √ √ = Q( 2. so Q(r) = {a + br + cr2 + dr3 + er4 } has degree 5. So.9. that is. and 6. 3). I owe an explanation here. in this document. we have a root. So. 36 . I should be able to find one field in which this does not work. So r and −r − 2 are conjugates in Q(r). 3) = {a + b 2 + c 3 + d 6}. We get x2 + 2x + 2 = (x − r)(x + 2 + r) + 0. A simple extension is an extension which includes only one element. then F (r) : F is an extension of degree n. which is irreducible over Q. in C you can define division in terms of multiplication by inverses. Now. The rule for multiplication here is r2 = −2r − 2. So I say that C is a very nice field. Q. Now.4. we have to notice that Q( 2 + 3) have different bases and different degrees. and notice that it is a degree 4 extension of √ √ √ need 1. We do the long division between x − r and x2 + 2x + 2. The multiplication by conjugates doesn’t always work. 3. well-defined? This alters perhaps what we splitting field. and declare r as a root. take p(x) = x5 + 2x2 + 2x + 6. but they Doesn’t this sound not call. consider x2 + 2x + 2. right? This is my task now. a Theorem 4. Here. for example. Definition 4. but it seems to me that this works in C and not on every field. because I don’t know one right now. b ∈ Q}. Q(r) = {a + br : a. This is just like the complex i such that i2 = −1.answer that. If r has minimum polynomial p(x) of degree n over F . but there are some mean ones. but I will say that I believe that not all the time we get something like i2 = −1 in a field that will answer all of our questions. so we can factor it. What does this mean? Take √ √ √ √ √ Q( 2. 2. The degree of an extension F ⊆ E is the number of elements of E that we need to span E over F .

How do we do it? Find the roots of the polynomial. ..Consider now √3 −2 which is irreducible over Q. but others are still irreducible.(x − rn ). it turns out that R[x] mod x2 + 1 makes C a beautiful field.6. so x = ± (3 ± 5)/2. and p(x) does not split in E[x] for any F ⊂ E ⊂ D. so what happens to C? C somehow is completely factorable. We then expand the field to get √ √ √ it to be reducible. Suppose F ⊆ E ⊆ D are fields.. Find a splitting field of x4 − 3x2 + 1. The polynomial “splits” if it factors into linear terms. Theorem 4. So x2 = (3 ± 5)/2. r2 . r2 ) = F (r1 )F (r2 ) = F (r2 )F (r1 ) et cetera. We get √ √ √ 3 3 x3 − 2 = (x − 2)(x2 + 2 + 4) + 0. Suppose F ⊆ E ⊆ D with degree E : F = m. and this is one of the frustrating thing: there is so many ways to write it and it’s not always easy to figure out whether we have the simplest. all roots of p(x) lie in the splitting field. rn ) which are the roots of p(x).5. Let’s now see an example. degree D : E = n. Then D : F = mn. So Q( 3 2. Definition 4. So a division should happen with zero remainder. This is a miracle. So we extend the field x by adjoining 3 2. Why? Because if it factors then p(x) = (x − r1 )(x − r2 ).. There exists is a unique splitting field.10. 37 . We say D is a spliting field for p(x) if p(x) splits in D[x].. Theorem 4. 3 2(−1/2 + i 3/2)). Now. (3 − √ 5)/2 is a splitting field. We’re done. I wondered if these additions to the field would make the field completely factorable. F (r1 .. use the quadratic √ √ formula. Theorem 4. but it doesn’t. √ √ Now (x2 + 2 + 3 4) is irreducible. Let p(x) be irreducible over F .7. There may be a better way to write this field. these additions make these polynomials factorable. By the way. Take F (r1 . Q (3 + √ 5)/2.

we must show that for all r in R(i). so 1 and i span R(i). Degree E : F = 2. 38 . a2 and b2 are non-negative. we’ve studied algebraic numbers and transcendental numbers. I don’t really follow this example. We have seen irreducible polynomials over a field F . we can think of F [x]/ p(x) as a simple degree n extension F (r) where p(r) = 0 degree p(x) = n. we’ll be building a group of permutations of roots. so a = b = 0. then r = 0. √ Exercise 4. √ look at E √ Q( 2) and = √ D = E( 4 2). In this section. Degree Q(π) : Q = ∞.√ √ An example of this theorem is F = Q and E = Q( 2) = {a + b 2 √ : a. that is. Prove that 1. We’ve seen minimum polynomials. then r = a + ib = 0 a = −ib a2 = (−ib)2 = (−i)2 b2 = −b2 a2 + b2 = 0 But since a and b are real numbers. We have seen Kronecker’s theorem which claims the existence of a field F [x]/ p(x) which is an extension field of F where p(x). so if there’s anything wrong here I wouldn’t be able to tell. i = −1 form a linear basis for R(i). Solution. Show that g = 2 − 2i is algebraic relative to R by finding a polynomial having g as a zero. conjugates of field elements. If a = b = 0. has a root. in particular. we will be looking at roots in which when we permute them around. To show linear independence. Every element of R(i) can be written as a + bi. and π is root of x2 − π 2 . √ where R is the real field. Now. The minimum polynomial of 4 2 over Q( 2) is x2 − 2 so degree D : E = 2 and degree E : Q = 4. Now consider Q(π) : Q(π 2 ) which has degree 2. Now if r = 0. we will find nice properties. On the next section. r = a · 1 + b · i = 0 if and only if a = b = 0. b ∈√Q}.1.

3. so by E. Exercise 4. Exercise 4. 3). 39 . π 2 as a basis. give a basis of Q(π) : Q. so we could try. Then we could try 1 and π as a basis. We factor p(x) into linear terms and see which elements we’re missing into some field. so we could expand the basis again and so on. Construct a splitting field for p(x) = x4 − 8x2 + 15 over Q. we write √ g 2 = 2 + 4i2 − 4i 2 √ g 2 − 2 + 4 = −4i 2 √ (g 2 + 2)2 = (−4i 2)2 = −32 (g 2 + 2)2 + 32 = 0 Exercise 4. but then we would have to account for π 3 as well. Solution. Solution. Suppose it is finite. Find minimal polynomial of α ∈ Q[x] and degree of Q(α) : Q. 1.4. so that we can build the smallest possible field such that p(x) factors completely. but we need to account for π 2 . Let p = 3.C. it is irreducible. so it doesn’t look like this will ever terminate. √ (a) α = 3 − 6 √ a2 = 3 − 6 √ a2 − 3 = − 6 (a2 − 3)2 = 6 (a2 − 3)2 − 6 = 0 a4 − 6a2 + 3 = 0 Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. Is Q(π) a finite extension? If so.2.To show that g = √ 2 − 2i is algebraic relative to R. p(x) = (x2 − 5)(x2 − 3) √ √ √ √ = (x + 5)(x − 5)(x + 3)(x − 3) √ √ So p(x) splits into linear factors in Q( 5. π.I.

Let p = 2. √ (c) α = 2 + i √ α2 = 1 + 2i 2 √ α2 − 1 = 2i 2 α4 − 2α2 + 9 = 0 Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. √ √ (d) α = 2 + 5 √ α2 = 2 + 5 + 2 10 (α2 − 7)2 − 40 = 0 α4 − 14α2 + 9 = 0 √ √ Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. doesn’t seem to help here.C. Let A. it is irreducible.(b) α = 1 √ + 7 3 1 √ + 7 3 1 √ α2 − = 7 3 1 2 α2 − =7 3 α2 = 1 2 −7=0 3 2α2 62 α4 − − =0 3 9 9α4 − 6α2 − 62 = 0 α2 − Degree Q(α) : Q = 4. What would be another approach? The only thing I can think of is to compute the roots and show they won’t allow reducibility over Q. √ √ √ √ r2 = 2 − 5.I. third. r3 = − 2 + 5. C. The √ roots are r1 = 2 + 5. respectively. D be first.C. so by E. r4 = − 2 − 5. Brute √ force again. BC has a complex one. AC has a complex one. So it factors over R as (x − r1 )(x − r2 )(x − r3 )(x − r4 ). Then AB has an irrational coefficient. AD has a complex one. BD has a complex one and CD has a complex one. E.I. B. second. forth factors. 40 . The polynomial factors into √ √ √ √ (α + 2 + i)(α + 2 − i)(α − 2 + i)(α − 2 − i). brute force shows no factors over Q are possible.

3. Transcendental. Basis (1. 3. α2 = i2 α2 + 1 = 0. Basis (1. and we have 1 as a basis. AD. AC. 3 4. 3 2. BD and CD have an irrational coefficient. (c) α = π 2 . 2. Let σ. so the fields here are the same. F = Q(π 3 ). 3)√ Q( 2 + 3). 2. By definition. 3 3 2. so degree is 1. BC. D be the factors in the other they appear above. For each α ∈ C and each given field F . Transcendental.Let A. Exercise 4.7.5. σ −1 is the 41 . We have −π 2 as a root of p(α) = α − π 2 . degree 2. so π 2 is algebraic over Q(π) and the degree of Q(π 2 ) : Q(π) = 1. C. Exercise 4. (b) α = π. √ √ (a) Q( 2) : Q. √ √ √ √ √ √ (b) Q( 2. we also : √ √ have 6. 2).8. 6). (d) α = π 2 . find the degree of F (α) : F . degree 4. If α is algebraic. and all of its conjugates which are − 3 − 2. F = Q(π). Basis (1. degree 6. √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ (c) Q( 3 2. Exercise 4. − 3 + 2. (a) α = i. √ 3 − 2. F = Q. So AB. Proof. classify α as either algebraic or transcendental over F . √ √ √ √ √ √ (d) Q( 2. Since σ is an automorphism. 3. Since 3 + 2 is in the field. √ √ 2 + 3 over Q. Find degree and basis for the given field extensions. 3) : Q. 18) : Q. B. 3 3 4). We look for an irreducible polynomial over Q which has α as a root. 3. So p(x) = x4 − 10a2 + 1 is irreducible√ over √ and√ roots Q its √ are α √ itself. and degree of Q(i) : Q = 2. Repeat Solution. F = Q. So factorization over Q is not possible.6. So i is algebraic over Q. it is one-to-one and onto and takes each f ∈ F to some f ∈ F for each f ∈ F . Exercise 4. Prove that σ −1 and (σ ◦ t) are also field automorphisms. Find all conjugates for α = √ for α = 3 2. τ : F → F be two field automorphisms.

Now σ ◦ τ . b = σ(v). b be in F . (σ ◦ τ )(a + b) = σ(τ (a + b)) = σ(τ (a) + τ (b)) = σ(τ (a)) + σ(τ (b)) = (σ ◦ τ )(a) + (σ ◦ τ )(b). for multiplication. they preserve the operations. 42 . for all f in F. then for each f in F . if we show that σ −1 is a homomorphism. Let a.one-to-one and onto function such that (σ ◦ σ −1 )(f ) = (σ −1 ◦ σ)(f ) = f for all f ∈ F . we do (σ ◦ τ )(ab) = σ(τ (ab)) = σ(τ (a)τ (b)) = σ(τ (a))σ(τ (b)) = (σ ◦ τ )(a)(σ ◦ τ )(b). then for each f in F . we would have shown that it is an isomorphism. Since σ is also an automorphism. v in F with a = σ(u). Since τ is an automorphism. Since σ is an automorphism. there’s τ (f ) in F such that σ(τ (f )) = f . there are u. let f be in F and then we must show that there’s an f in F such that (σ ◦ τ )(f ) = f . σ −1 (a + b) = σ −1 (σ(u) + σ(v)) = σ −1 (σ(u + v)) =u+v = σ −1 (a) + σ −1 (b). For addition. and hence. So for each f in F . Since σ and τ are field automorphisms. So (σ ◦ τ ) is a homomorphism. Similarly for addition. So. there is an f in F such that τ (f ) = f . an automorphism. an automorphism. To show that it is onto. σ −1 (ab) = σ −1 (σ(u)σ(v)) = σ −1 (σ(uv)) = uv = σ −1 (a)σ −1 (b). there’s an f in F such that σ(τ (f )) = (σ ◦ τ )(f ) = f . So. So. and therefore. so it’s onto. Let a and b be in F .

Prove that G(C/R) is cyclic with 2 elements. then we would have shown that there are no more elements in the group. So σ is an isomorphism. where c and −d are real numbers. the rule is “map a + bi to a − bi” and notice that every r ∈ R is of the form “a + b · 0. If no such n exists. Let a + bi. s((a + bi)(c + di)) = s(ac − bd + (ad + bc)i) = ac − bd − (ad + bc)i = (a − bi)(c − di) = s(a + bi)s(c + di). we want to show that there is a c + di in C such that σ(c + di) = a + bi. There are such numbers. which is one-toone and onto.Exercise 4. e and σ. Let a + bi in C. c + di ∈ C. σ(r) = r. What is char(Q)? What is char(Z7 )? Suppose F has finite 43 . where the binary operation is composition. pick c = a and d = −b. We will try to find a second one. so every r ∈ R is fixed. Compute (σ ◦ σ)(a + bi) = σ(σ(a + bi)) = σ(a − bi) = a + bi = e(a + bi). Now we must show that σ 2 = (σ ◦ s) = e. Proof. One automorphism is the identity map. By definition. Let F be a field. and if we can show that σ 2 = (σ ◦ s) = e. that is... Exercise 4. s((a + bi) + (c + di)) = s((a + c) + (b + d)i) = a + c − (b + d)i = a − bi + c − di = s(a + bi)s(c + di) So σ is a homomorphism.” so for a real number r. Define the characteristic of F to be the smallest n ≥ 1 such that 1 + 1 + . We want to show that σ is onto. hence that the group is cyclic. then it is a member of the group. the group is cyclic with two elements. Now.10. d = −b or −d = b. Let a + bi be in C. We know that σ(c + di) = c − di. if σ is an isomorphism. + 1 = 0 where we are adding 1 to itself n times. and is the identity of the group. So. the Galois group G(C/R) is the group of automorphisms of C that fix every r ∈ R. Define a map σ that maps conjugates. we say F has characteristic zero. that is. Also.9. The task was to find c and d such that c = a. hence.

Let F have finite characteristic n. Then it’s easy to believe that G(D/E) is a subgroup of G(D/F ) because we know that we would have a similar set with less automorphisms. 5 Galois theory Definition 5. The group G(E/F ) of automorphisms of E that fix every f in 44 . n must be composite or prime. We show that we have closure under composition. and similarly for q. and char(Z7 ) = 7. Hint: fields have no zero divisors.1. and σ1 (σ2 (d)) is in D.characteristic n. where the index p means 1 added p times. Now. Since fields have no zero divisors.. So any d in D has an image σ2 (d) in D because σ2 is an automorphism of D. σ2 be in G(D/F). An automorphism σ of a field F is an automorphism of F that preserves both field operations... Definition 5. Proof. We have char(Q) = 0. + 1)q = 0. So anyway. Let σ1 . Then there is a prime p < n such that n = pq. Then (1 + 1 + . can you go on? Definition 5. for some natural q. Let E be the splitting field of a polynomial f (x) in F [x]. Let G(D/F ) be the automorphisms of D that fix every f in F . Theorem 5. it is moved by σ if σ(f ) = f . hence. An automorphism σ of a mathematical system S with an operation defined on S is a one-to-one correspondence from S onto itself that is an isomorphism with respect to the operation. let E be an intermediate field F ⊆ E ⊆ D.. we will first prove that G(D/F ) is a group... n is prime. Now char(F ) = n. oh well.2. Proof. Let D be a finite extension of F . Prove that n must be prime. Then G(D/F ) is a group under composition and G(D/E) is a subgroup of G(D/F ).3. So the composition of two automorphisms produces an element in D. that is. Suppose n is composite. σ(f ) = f . Suppose that G(D/F ) is a group under composition. F isn’t a field if n is composite. + 1)p × (1 + 1 + . Let G(D/E) be the automorphisms of D that fix every e in E. An element f in F is fixed by an automorphism σ if σ maps f to itself.1.

Notice the importance of this theorem. How do we know that σ(r) must 3 be a root? We know that p(r) = 0. then σ permutes any roots of p(x) which lie in E. we can write σ(p(r)) = σ(r5 + 2r3 + 2r + 1) 3 2σ(r3 ) = σ(r5 ) + + 2σ(r) + 1 3 2σ(r)3 = σ(r)5 + + 2σ(r) + 1 = 0 3 So σ(r) is a root. Consider the extension field Q(r) : Q. So now apply σ to r. but in 1870. So. Then |G(F (r)/F )| ≤ n. Proof. The Galois group G(E/F ) is isomorphic to a group of permutations of the k zeros of p(x) in E. 45 . It’s true that |G(F (r)/F )| ≤ n. suppose that σ is in G(E/F ) and p(x) is in F [x]. Let F (r) : F = n. It links group theory to the permutations of the roots of an equation. Now. so there are at most n possible images of r under σ. since σ is an automorphism. so σ(p(r)) = σ(0) = 0 because 0 is in Q and so it is fixed. We prove this with the argument above. The theory of groups.2. Theorem 5.F is the Galois group or group of the polynomial and the group of the equation f (x) = 0. Suppose r is algebraic over F with a minimal polymonial of degree n. there are at most n possible mappings available because there at most n roots for the minimal polynomial. hence to a subgroup of the symmetric group Sk . Let E be the splitting field of an irreducible polynomial p(x) in F [x]. Let σ be in G(F (r)/F ). Since every σ is one-to-one and onto. as we see in the Abstract Algebra books today wasn’t very much developed by Galois or Abel. Let F be a field. Any automorphism σ in G(F (r)/F ) is completely determined by σ(r). By definition.3 ( ). and since every u in F is already taken. Kronecker isolated the group properties in their own right. and let the minimum polynomial of r be p(x) = x5 + 2 x3 + 2x + 1. They studied particular groups formed by the permutations of the roots of an equation. Theorem 5. the group leaves every u in F fixed.

Remark 5. E : F is normal if and only if every irreducible p(x) in F [x] with a root in E splits in E. Let r have minimal polynomial p(x) = a0 + a1 x + . We have to check that field automorphism form a group under composition. I also have to check that if σ and τ both fix f .4..4. which is not normal. Consider Q( 3 2) : Q. Then G(F (r)/F ) has at most n elements. A field extension E ⊆ F is normal if and only if any irreducible p(x) in F [x] which has a root in E must factor completely in E. since “to split” means to factor all the way down into linear terms.Definition 5.. 46 . Suppose r is algebraic over F with minimal polynomial of degree n. and this is a problem for us. but doesn’t factor completely. Suppose E ⊂ F is a field extension. Then the only element will be the identity. then σ fixes polynomials in F [x]. thus σ permutes roots of polynomials in F [x]. Proposition 5. Proof. Or equivalently. Definition 5. + an xn . Suppose a cubic root is a a root of some polynomial with only one real solution. Let’s review some stuff.5. {a ∈ E : σ(a) = a for all σ ∈ G(E/F )} = F . This is the same as saying that E is the splitting field of some polynomial. Let σ be in G(E/F ). Normal extensions will correspond to normal subgroups. We want a bigger field with a Galois group. A field F is called a field of characteristic zero if F contains a subfield isomorphic to the field Q of rational numbers. Suppose the complex roots do not belong in the field. it isn’t because x3 − 2 has a root. then so do σ −1 and σ ◦ τ . √ Here’s an example of a non-normal extension. Galois group elements take roots to roots.1. but the roots must belong in the field. The Galois group G(E/F ) = {σ : E → E such that σ is a field automorphism and σ(r) = r for every r in F }.

The polynomial factors as √ √ √ √ √ √ 4 4 4 4 (x2 + 2)(x2 − 2) = (x + 2i)(x − 2i)(x + 2)(x + 2) 47 . Since there are at most n roots for p(x). Definition 5. compare Q( 2.... in this document. Then E = F (r1 .. Let r1 . + an (u(r))n = a0 + a1 u(r) + . our definition of splitting field is the smallest possible for a minimal polynomial. 3) : Q with Q( 2.. A word on degrees. Suppose E is a splitting field of a polynomial of degree k in F [x]. we notice that every element of G(F (r)/F ) corresponds. 3) : Q( 2). + an (u(r)n ) = u(a0 ) + u(a1 r) + . ..... we must show that (1) σ is completely determined by σ(r1 ). . rk ). in a one-to-one and onto fashion — because they’re automorphisms —. We first look for the roots of x4 − 2. with a root of p(x).. .. So u(r) is also a root.6. rk )/F )... r2 . σ(rk ).. Let σ be in G(F (r1 . + an rn ) = u(p(r)) = u(0) =0 The last two equations hold because p(r) = 0 and u(0) = 0 because u is an automorphism. There seems to be other equivalent definitions.1. ... So p(u(r)) = a0 + a1 u(r) + . By the way.. (2) σ(ri ) must be rj for some j. notice that (1) and (2) tell us that the Galois group is isomorphic to some subgroup of Sk . Then G(E/F ) is a subgroup of Sk .5. p(x) splits. Galois group of p(x) in F [x] is G(E/F ) for E a splitting field of p(x). Now. + u(an rn ) = u(a0 ) + a1 r + . Exercise 5. We know that over E.. rk be roots of p(x) over E. Let u be in G(F (r)/F ). Solution. so it maps 0 to 0. The degree of E:F depends on both E and F . r2 . Proposition 5. Find the Galois group of x4 − 2 over Q.So p(r) = 0. To conclude. Proof. √ √ √ √ √ Sure... To finish the proof. there are at most n automorphisms in G(F (r)/F ).

What about f (i)? It goes to i or −i. but notice that we only need r and i. the elements r and ri. the symmetries of a square. (2) The 48 . ri. So roots are r. (3) fixed field of G(E/F ) is F . −r. We need more theory to show how this could work. we do σ ◦ τ . What do we need now? Let f be in G(Q(r. What’s the splitting field? Well. We can describe it by τ ◦ σ = σ 3 ◦ τ . What are the possibilities for f (r)? All the roots of x4 − 2. This group has at most 8 elements. So we have 4 possibilities for r. we need to know f (r) and f (i). but they are all technically possible so for.7 (Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory). (2) any irreducible polynomial p(x) in F [x] with a root in E must split in E. −ri. It is not necessary that all of these possibilities will work. Then (1) G(D/E) ≤ G(E/F ).√ Let r = 4 2. then (1) E ←→ G(D/E) gives a one-to-one correspondence between intermediate fields E and subgroups of G(D/F ). and 2 for i. automorphism 1 σ σ2 σ3 τ σ◦τ σ2 ◦ τ σ3 ◦ τ domain r ir −r −ir r ir −r −ir range i i i i −i −i −i −i Do you recognize this table? This group is isomorphic to D8 . i)/Q). To determine f . in the basis. So σ 4 is the identity. Suppose the characteristic of F = 0. and F ⊂ D is a normal extension. Theorem 5. Recall that E/F is a normal extension if any of the following 3 equivalent conditions hold: (1) E is a splitting field of some polynomial in F [x]. notice that σ 2 (r) = σ(σ(r)) = −r. so 4 × 2 = 8. That’s σ(−r) = −ir. Let F ⊆ E ⊆ D. the dihedral group with 8 elements. Then F ⊆ DH ⊆ D. throw. Let’s list them. Let DH = {d ∈ D : σ(d) = d for all σ ∈ H}. Suppose F ⊂ E ⊂ D. We introduce τ . Now. (2) Suppose H ≤ G(D/F ).6. As we read the table. Theorem 5.

5). 3. The subfields of √ “second level” √ the field √ √ of √ diagram √ √ √ the √ √ would be Q( 2. 5). Now. Q( 5). and it is completely determined by is √ √ √ √ √ σ : 5 → − 5. 5). the automorphisms are automorphisms 1 σ τ σ◦τ γ γ◦σ γ◦τ γ◦σ◦τ √ √2 √2 √2 √2 2 √ −√2 −√2 −√2 − 2 √ √3 √3 3 √ −√3 − 3 √ √3 3 √ −√3 − 3 √ √5 5 √ − 5 √ 5 √ − 5 √ 5 √ − 5 √ 5 √ − 5 So the galois group √ determined. Exercise 5. (4) E is normal over F if and only if G(E/F ) G(D/F ). 10).degree [D : E] = |G(D/E)|. let σ be √ √ arbitrary in G(Q( 2.2. Q( 2. So. σ must take 5 to 5 or − 5. Q( 3. Q( 2. Q( 3. 10). √ the “third level” we would get Q( 2). √ √ − 3. Q( 10). we get a total of 16 in the diagram.3. √ √ Q(√6. the splitting field must also split r’s minimal polynomial which is r2 − 2 = 0. So. Q( 6). √ √ √ Solution. and the same for 5. Then. What if I wanted to know the fixed field of this Galois group? I would have to look at every automorphism and see which elements of the 49 . 5)/Q). Solution. Q( 30). Q( 6. In √ √ √ √ Q( 3). Determine the Galois group of (x2 − 2)(x2 − 3)(x2 − 5). 3. We now solve a series of exercises which will help us to understand the claims of the Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory. τ : 3 → − 3 and γ : 2 → − 2. including the trivial ones. The polynomial√ splits in Q( 2. 15). The√ same goes for √ σ must take √ 3 to 3 or 3. √ √ 3).√5). Q( 15). Now determine all subfields of the splitting field found in the previous exercise. and so √ must take σ √ √ √ √ √ 2 to 2 or − 2. (3) F ⊆ E1 E2 ⊆ D if and only if {e} ≤ G(D/E2 ) G(D/E1 ) ≤ G(D/F ). over Q. Exercise 5.

0. √ √ √ √ √ √ √ σ ◦ τ (a + b 2 + c 3 + d 5 + e 6 + f 10 + g 15 + h 30) = √ √ √ √ √ √ √ a + b 2 − c 3 − d 5 − e 6 − f 10 + g 15 + h 30. we can consider (0. the four automorphisms of G(D/F ). So I collect these elements and throw them in Q to get the fixed field. √ √ √ If now I wanted to know each corresponding subgroup of G(Q( 2. √ √ √ √ √ √ √ γ(a + b 2 + c 3 + d 5 + e 6 + f 10 + g 15 + h 30) = √ √ √ √ √ √ √ a − b 2 + c 3 + d 5 − e 6 − f 10 + g 15 − h 30.0.1) √ √ to σ because σ moves only 5.0. We then work with Z2 × Z2 × Z2 under addition. 1. D = Q( 2. 0) with τ . so we consider 5 as the 1 in the third component of the 3-tuple. and (1. Let F = Q. by Theorem 8-2. where r = 2 + f i. i). E1 = Q( 2). so it looks like that the only field that is fixed by every automorphism is Q itself. We assign (0. but isn’t D = Q( 2.0. Find the four conjugates of r = r1 . and (0. The others would be found similarly. then one way would be to work with Z2 × Z2 × Z2 . hence. we assign (0. 0 .0) with γ. √ They say D = F (r). f = 0 is in Q. Find σ(r) for each automorphism σ ∈ G(D/E1 ) and τ (r) for each τ ∈ G(D/E2 ).basis never get moved.4 (8-3). √ √ √ √ √ √ √ τ (a + b 2 + c 3 + d 5 + e 6 + f 10 + g 15 + h 30) = √ √ √ √ √ √ √ a + b 2 − c 3 + d 5 − e 6 + f 10 − g 15 − h 30). i)? So are they saying that D can be written as F (r) where r is the root of some polynomial that √ when adjoined will give us 2 and i? I think so.0) with the identity map. √ √ √ √ √ √ √ γ ◦ σ ◦ τ (a + b 2 + c 3 + d 5 + e 6 + f 10 + g 15 + h 30) = √ √ √ √ √ √ √ a − b 2 − c 3 − d 5 + e 6 + f 10 + g 15 − h 30. √ √ √ √ √ √ √ γ ◦ σ(a + b 2 + c 3 + d 5 + e 6 + f 10 + g 15 + h 30) = √ √ √ √ √ √ √ a − b 2 + c 3 − d 5 − e 6 + f 10 − g 15 + h 30.1) and notice that it would √ correspond to Q( (2).0). (3)) because it moves only 5. When we look at each of automorphism. E2 = √ Q(i). 3. √ √ Exercise 5. Then F has characteristic 0 and D = F (r). (0. we see that √ √ √ √ √ √ √ σ(a + b 2 + c 3 + d 5 + e 6 + f 10 + g 15 + h 30) = √ √ √ √ √ √ √ a + b 2 + c 3 − d 5 + e 6 − f 10 − g 15 − h 30). 5)/Q). Similarly. To get each subgroup now. 50 .

even though I may have gotten the automorphisms correctly here. I guess the fundamental theorem of algebra implies that we will have 4 distinct roots. √ √ √ phism moves 2 only. Since one root is complex. r3 = − 2 − √ f i. Since E1 I = Q( 2). automorphism 1 σ τ γ √ √2 2 √ − 2 √ 2 √ − 2 i i i −i −i 51 . So all of the automorphisms here are automorphism 1 σ i i −i Similarly for τ (r) ∈ G(D/E1√ Since E2 = Q(i). by the theorem above. so s(r) = i or s(r) = −i. so σ( 2) = 2 or s(r) = − 2. I guess it must be all permutations of the elements that get moved in G(D/E1 ) and G(D/E2 ). then each automorphism moves only i. Its minimal polynomial √ r2 = 2 − f 2 + 2f i 2 √ r2 − 2 + f 2 = 2f i 2 (r2 − 2 + f 2 )2 = −8f 2 (r2 − 2 + f 2 )2 + 8f 2 = 0 This polynomial has degree 4 and therefore will have at most 4 roots. with f = 0. Now I must find. So all of the automorphisms here are automorphism 1 τ √ √2 2 √ − 2 √ √ √ The four conjugates of r1 = 2 + f i are r2 = − 2 + f i. I’m failing to see a clear way to use the theorem. Now √must find σ(r) for each automorphism in G(D/E1 ). The exercise suggests that by the theorem. f ∈ Q. √ Any automorphism of G(D/Q) fixes Q and moves 2 and i. then each automor). r4 = 2 − f i. we are able to get all the automorphisms.Such root is r = is √ 2 + f i. the 4 automorphisms of G(D/Q).

τ }. √ Which subgroup would correspond to Q( 2)? It would be the subgroup that is linked to the maps that do not move √ Q( 2). Solution. Every automorphism squares to the identity. The claim iii of the Fundamental Theorem of √ √ Q(i) ⊂ Q( 2) ⊆ Galois Theory seems to say that we have Q( 2. so it’s {1. Exercise 5. σ}. Verify that the claim ii of the Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory holds for the example we’ve been working with. i). Here’s a question. As proper subgroups of G(D/F ). one that takes 2 to − 2 and the identity. then we’ve found the subfield correspondent to the subgroup. that √ √ [Q( 2. Is this a case in which we don’t satisfy the hypothesis of the claim iii? Or is my interpretation wrong? The exercise also says “find the subfield corresponding to each subgroup. The Theorem also claims that √ √ √ √ [Q( 2. we have {1.6 (8-5). b ∈ Q(i). it would be the subgroup that is linked to the maps that do not move Q(i). Also. {1.5 (8-4). i)/Q(i))| which is true because the degree of the extension is 2 since the basis √ is a + b 2 for a.i). which are isomorphic to subgroups of the Klein-4. Notice that G(D/F ) is isomorphic to the Klein-4 group. so it should be isomorphic to the Klein-4 which is isomorphic to the flips of a square. The claim says.” Isn’t this the same task above? Once we find the subgroup correspondent to the subfield. hence isomorphic to a subgroup of the symmetric group S4 . find the subfield corresponding to each subgroup. i)/Q). Find the unique subgroup of G(D/F ) that corresponds to each intermediate field E1 √ = Q( 2) and E2 = Q(i). i) : Q(i)] = |G(Q( 2. i)/Q( 2)) ⊆ √ √ G(Q( 2. The exercise is asking for the subgroups that correspond to the fields E1 and E2 . it’s not even a subset.The theorem says that this Galois group. Still with F = Q and D = Q( 2. Solution. √ Exercise 5. Q(i) is not an of Q( 2). τ }. so it’s {1. For Q(i). and for the Galois group we have only two √ √ possible automorphisms. σ}. i) : Q( 2)] = |G(Q( 2. i)/Q(i)) ⊂ G(Q( 2. γ}. {1. for this example in particular. in particular. is isomorphic √ to a group of permutations of 4 zeros of p(x) in Q( 2. i) ⊆√ √ √ Q if and only if {1} ⊆ G(Q( 2. i)/Q( 2))| 52 .

i)/Q( 2))]. The degree extension is 2. Here. Let E =√ Q(i). and G(Q( 2. σ. so [G : H] = 2 √ matching the degree extension of Q( 2) over Q. so [G : H] = 2 as well and it matches the degree extension Q(i) : Q. they are the identity and another one that takes i to −i. So. I think that this is a link between a degree extension and the number of left cosets of a subgroup in its group. my observations here do not satisfy claim iii. we have that 4 = 2 [G : H]. Then G(D/E) has two automorphisms {1. √ Exercise 5. We also know that G(D/F ) has 4 automorphisms: {1. evidently. So. That is. where √ τ takes 2 to − 2. σ}. b ∈ Q( 2). γ} as defined in Exercise 5. for a. 53 . the theorem claims that √ √ √ √ [Q( 2) : Q] = [G(Q( 2. i)/Q) = G has 4 automorphisms. i)/Q) : G(Q( 2. γ} as defined in Exercise 5. because σ is in G(D/E2 ). i)/Q)| = 4. by Lagrange’s theorem. τ is in G(D/E1 ). Is G(D/E2 ) ⊂ G(D/E1 )? No.which is almost the √ same case as above. i).4. so {1} is a proper subset of G(D/E). Also. i)/Q( 2))| = 2.4. but not in G(D/E1 ). but not in G(D/E2 ). Then G(D/E) has two automorphisms {1. √ |G| = |G(Q( 2. The degree √ extension is 2. σ. i)/Q(i)) = H has 2. Now. √ G(Q( 2. Also. Also. G(D/E) is a proper subset of G(D/F ). G(D/E) is a proper subset of G(D/F ). where σ takes i to −i. τ }. 4 = 2 [G : H]. Let E = Q( 2). Show that {1} is a proper subset √ G(D/E) which is a proper subset of of G(D/F ) for E = E1 = Q( 2) and for E = E2 = Q(i) but that G(D/E2 ) G(D/E1 ). τ . The degree of the extension is 2 and there are only two possible automorphisms in the Galois group. Still with F = Q and D = Q( 2. i)/Q) : G(Q( 2. by Lagrange’s theorem. Why are the inclusions reversed in order in the second clause of the third claim of the Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory? √ Solution. √ √ |H| = |G(Q( 2. the theorem claims that √ √ [Q(i) : Q] = [G(Q( 2. i)/Q(i))]. so {1} is a proper subset of G(D/E).7 (8-6). τ . We also know that G(D/F ) has 4 automorphisms: {1. we have the basis as a + bi. So again. evidently.

τ : σ 4 = τ 2 = e. by some theorem we’ve seen in the past. But the index is 2. Now. f = 7. Still working the same D. let H be the subgroup {1. E1 . i) where ζ = 4 2. Repeating for E2 . No idea.8 (9-3). If w is any zero of xn − f in E. we’ve calculated before that the Galois group was isomorphic to the dihedral group with eight elements: D8 = σ. Repeat for E2 . Exercise 5.10. and E2 fields. √ Solution. Exercise 5.Why are the inclusions reversed? They are reversed because the less elements the Galois group has to permute.9. Recall that we determined that the splitting field of √ x4 − 2 over was Q(ζ. the Galois group decreases in order. G(D/E1 ) is {1. Show by explicit calculation that the fixed field Q(ζ. show that G(D/E1 ) is normal in G(D/F ) and that G(E1 /F ) is isomorphic to G(D/F )/G(D/E1 ). τ ◦ σ = σ 3 ◦ τ . and {σ. then E = E0 (w) and G(E/E0 ) is cyclic. Show that G(E/E0 ) has order 2. it’s normal. Also. The splitting field for x2 − 7 over Q is Q( 7) since x2 − 7 √ √ √ = (x − 7)(x + 7). Find the splitting field for x2 − 7 over Q. Let f ∈ E0 and let E be a splitting field for xn − f over E0 . we need to find a one-to-one and onto map that preserves the operations between them.8 (8-7). let E0 = Q. We can show that the left cosets match the right cosets. In Theorem 9-3. Let E0 be a field of characteristic zero containing all the nth roots of unity. So. so. σ 3 ◦ τ }. So if the field increases in elements to be fixed. 54 . in We must show that G(Q( 7)/Q) is cyclic. the smaller it gets. Solution. since we’re working with a particular case. n = 2. F .√ the theorem. and E0 = Q. So the left cosets are H. and identity goes with identity. Theorem 5. Solution. To show that G(E1 /F ) is isomorphic to G(D/F )/G(D/E1 ). so the other map goes with the other map. we know that G(D/E2 ) is normal because the index is 2. Exercise 5. σ ◦ τ = γ}. i)H is equal to Q((1 − i)ζ). it’s isomorphic to G(D/F )/G(D/E2 ) for the same reason described above. That’s easy here because we have only two automorphisms in G(E1 /F ). τ } = H. E = Q( 7).

We can’t let r = 1. n = 2. We let w = 7. It’s true that x2 − 4 = (x − 2)(x + 2) which evidently splits in Q. 2 2 2 2 They form a cyclic group under multiplication. f = 7. let E0 = Q.11. The degree of the extension is 1. Since it’s cyclic of order 2. We’re interested in x3 − 7. Show that x2 − f in this case splits in E0 so that G(E/E0 ) has only the identity automorphism. So. 2 2 2 2 55 . √ The identity itself does. let E0 = Q(r) where r is a primitive third root of unity. So now we must show that G(Q(w)/Q) has order 2. Q( 7) is a normal extension of Q because (1) Q is the fixed field √ of G(Q(w)/Q) or instead we could justify by saying that (2) Q( 7) is the splitting field over Q for x2 − 7 over Q. Factor x3 − f into linear factors in its splitting field over E0 . Its roots are √ √ √ √ √ √ √ −37 3 3 7i − 3 7 3 3 7i 3 7. The roots of unity for n = 3 are √ √ 3i −1 3i −1 + . + . Solution. Exercise 5. Let’s let √ 3i −1 r= + . so we have only one element: the identity. Exercise 5. there’s really “nothing” to permute because the roots of the polynomial were already in Q anyway. In Theorem 9-3. f = 4.√ √ Here. + . 2 2 So x3 − 1 splits over E0 . Show that the Galois group G(E/E0 ) is cyclic of order 3.12. the w of the theorem is either 7 or − 7. Solution. The only non-trivial element √ is σ that takes 7 to − 7 and squares to the identity as well because √ √ √ (σ ◦ σ) takes 7 to − 7 and then back to 7. in the Galois group of Q over Q. otherwise it wouldn’t generate the group. √ Here. Let n = 3. In Theorem 9-3. though. we must show that every element squares to the identity. − . 1. so the theorem √ √ says that we can adjoin √ 7 or − 7 and get a cyclic Galois group G(Q(w)/Q).

we need G0 /G1 abelian. 3 7). Prove that A5 is not abelian. the identity of the cyclic group of roots of unity. . so σ 2 ( 3 7) = σ(σ( 3 7) = σ(r 3 7) = r2 3 7 because σ is. because we can express the roots as r 3 7. Take a look at the Fundamental Theorem.. t − 1.13. Why doesn’t the chain S5 1 provide a solvability chain for S5 ? Solution. r3 3 7 — noticing that r3 = 1.. Gt = 1 to have the property that Gi /Gi+1 is abelian for i = 0. but here we will find 6 elements and this can be seen by using the degree of the extension field and therefore it will have to be isomorphic to S3 itself. and S5 isn’t abelian. That shows that we have only 3 elements and that they’re cyclic √ with r 3 7 as generator. but G0 /G1 = S5 / 1 = S5 . which is nonabelian. √ √ r2 3 7. and that there is a theorem that claims that the Galois group would be isomorphic to some subgroup of Sn .. (1432) are even permutations. The Galois√ group fixes Q(r).. So the factorization can be written as √ √ √ 3 3 3 (x − r 7)(x − r2 7)(x − r3 7). Exercise 5. 56 . multiplying its argument by r.√ √ So. 1. σ 3 = r3 3 7 = √ 3 7. and roots must be taken to roots. Show that the Galois group for x3 − 7 over Q is isomorphic to S3 and therefore nonabelian. Exercise 5. Let √ √ √ √ √ 3 3 σ( 7) = r 7. we really just need 3 7. The definition of solvability requires a chain of subgroups G = G0 G1 . For the chain S5 1 satisfy the definition.. A5 is not abelian because (1324)(1432) = (234) = (123) = (1432)(1324) and (1324).14. Finally. We now consider G(E/E0 ) and show that it’s cyclic of order 3. Solution. Notice how many elements the group has. √ by definition. √ √ So we adjoin 3 7 to get E = Q(r.