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TEXTILETEXTILE && BEADWORKBEADWORK CATALOGUECATALOGUE CollectionCollection byby HowardHoward G.G. CharingCharing
TEXTILETEXTILE && BEADWORKBEADWORK
CATALOGUECATALOGUE
CollectionCollection byby HowardHoward G.G. CharingCharing
ART OF THE SHIPIBO ‐ CATALOGUE EACH PIECE IS UNIQUE AND HAND ‐ CRAFTED CONTENTS
ART OF THE SHIPIBO ‐ CATALOGUE
EACH PIECE IS UNIQUE AND HAND ‐ CRAFTED
CONTENTS
1 EMBROIDERED AND PAINTED CHITONTI
2 HAND PAINTED TEXTILE (TOCUYO / HOME SPUN COTTON) PAINTINGS
3 SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES
4 HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED BAGS
5 CEREMONIAL MAITI (CROWNS)
6 CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS
7 BEADWORK
8 HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY
9 PRICE LIST, LINKS, & CONTACT INFO
10 ARTICLE ‘COMMUNION WITH THE INFINITE: THE VISUAL MUSIC OF THE
SHIPIBO’
ALL IMAGES: © HOWARD G CHARING. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
‘COMMUNION WITH THE INFINITE: THE VISUAL MUSIC OF THE SHIPIBO’ ALL IMAGES: © HOWARD G CHARING.
The Art of the Shipibo ‐ Introduction Underlying the intricate geometric patterns of great complexity
The Art of the Shipibo ‐ Introduction
Underlying the intricate geometric patterns of great complexity displayed in the art of the Shipibo
people is a concept of an all pervading magical reality which can challenge the Western linguistic
heritage and rational mind.
These patterns are more than an expression of the one ‐ness
of creation, the inter ‐changeability of light and sound, the
union or fusion of perceived opposites, it is an ongoing dia ‐
logue or communion with the spiritual world and powers of
the Rainforest. The visionary art of the Shipibo brings this
paradigm into a physical form. The Ethnologist Angelika
Gebhart‐Sayer, calls this “visual music”.
The Shipibo are one of the largest ethnic groups in the Peru‐
vian Amazon. These ethnic groups each have their own lan ‐
guages, traditions and culture. The Shipibo which currently
number about 20,000 are spread out in communities
through the Pucallpa / Ucayali river region.
All the textile painting, embroidery, and artisan craft is car ‐
ried out by the women. From a young age the Shipibo females are initiated by their mothers and
grandmothers into this practice. Teresa a Shipiba who works with us on our Amazon Retreats tells
that “when I was a young girl, my mother squeezed drops of the Piripiri (a species of Cyperus sp .) ber ‐
ries into my eyes so that I would have the vision for the designs; this is only done once and lasts a life ‐
time”.
The intricate Shipibo designs have their origin in the non ‐manifest and ineffable world in the spirit of
the Rainforest and all who live there. The designs are a representation of the Cosmic Serpent, the Ana ‐
conda, the great Mother, creator of the universe called
Ronin Kené . For the Shipibo the skin of Ronin Kené has
a radiating, electrifying vibration of light, colour, sound,
movement and is the embodiment of all possible pat ‐
terns and designs past, present, and future. The designs
that the Shipibo paint are channels or conduits for this
multi ‐sensorial vibrational fusion of form, light and
sound. Although in our cultural paradigm we perceive
that the geometric patterns are bound within the border
of the textile or ceramic vessel, to the Shipibo the pat ‐
terns extend far beyond these borders and permeate
the entire world.
One of the challenges for the Western mind is to acknowledge the relationship between the Shipibo
designs and music. For the Shipibo can “listen” to a song or chant by looking at the designs, and in ‐
versely paint a pattern by listening to a song or music .
From: ‘Communion with the Infinite’ by Howard G Charing
3
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Figure 1
This piece is a combination with intricate embroidery crafted in the traditional appliqué style with
the side panels painted using the juice of the crushed huito berry as a dye on mahogany bark.
Figure 2
This piece is has intricate embroidery on mahogany bark dyed white cotton.
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Figure 3
A combination piece with intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style
using the juice of the huito berry juice as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
Figure 4
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito
berry juice as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
5
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Figure 5
An intricate and richly embroidered piece with complex wide border patterns.
Figure 5a
6
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 6
A combination piece with intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style
using the juice of the huito berry juice as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
Fig. 7
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito berry juice
as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark. The corner pieces exhibit concentric Shipibo cross
motif .
7
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 8
A complex dual embroidery symmetrical pattern and wide border design on white cotton dyed with mahogany
Fig. 8a
8
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 9
A complex dual embroidery symmetrical circular pattern and wide border design on white cotton
dyed with mahogany bark.
Fig. 10
A complex dual embroidery symmetrical circular pattern on white cotton dyed with mahogany bark.
An interesting feature is that the panel border is painted in the traditional style using the juice of the
huito berry as a dye
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 11
An intricate embroidery on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
Fig. 12
A complex dual embroidery symmetrical pattern on white cotton dyed with mahogany bark.
10
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 13
An intricate embroidery on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
Fig. 14
An ornate embroidered pattern on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
cloth dyed with mahogany bark. Fig. 14 An ornate embroidered pattern on a white cotton cloth
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 15
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito
berry as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
Fig. 16
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito
berry as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
12
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 17
This cloth has been crafted in the traditional appliqué style, the constructions of the central patterns
are both simpler and bolder. The sides of this piece are painted with huito dye on mahogany dyed cot‐
Fig. 18
An ornate embroidered pattern on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark. With the side
panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito berry as a dye
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 19
A combination piece with intricate embroidery and the center design painted in the traditional style
using the juice of the huito berry as a dye. On a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
Fig. 20
A combination piece with intricate embroidery and the center design painted in the traditional style
using the juice of the huito berry as a dye. On a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark. This
piece is an exceptional example of the Shipibo craftwork.
14
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 21
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito
berry as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
Fig. 22
An ornate embroidered pattern on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
15
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 23
An ornate embroidered pattern on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
Fig. 24
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito
berry as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
16
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 25
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito
berry as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
Fig. 26
Intricate embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice of the huito
berry as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
17
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 27
An ornate embroidered pattern on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
Fig. 28
An ornate embroidered pattern on a white cotton cloth with deep borders, dyed with mahogany
bark.
18
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 29
Intricate dual patterned embroidery with the side panels painted in the traditional style using the juice
of the huito berry as a dye on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark
Fig. 30
An ornate embroidery with deep borders on a white cotton cloth dyed with mahogany bark.
19
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental
EMBROIDERED CHITONTIS
Often worn as a wrap ‐around skirt by Shipibo women. Used as ornamental wall hangings
and table covers. Typical size: 62cm (24.5 inches) X 148cm (58 inches).
Fig. 31
This again is a combination of traditional painting and embroidery. Interestingly the cotton used in
the embroidery has been dyed with mahogany. The ornate outer motif on the borders represents the
Cosmic Anaconda.
Fig. 31a
20
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 32
Fig. 32a
21
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 33
Very detailed piece with the Ayahuasca vine motif (cross section of vine) in the centre. Painted on
tocuyo with the juice of crushed berries of huito.
22
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 34
DETAIL
23
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 35
DETAIL
24
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 36
A very large 180cm x
175cm painted textile.
With an intricate sym ‐
metric pattern.
This is an outstanding
example of Shipibo geo‐
metric designs.
DETAIL
25
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 37
DETAIL
26
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 38
DETAIL
27
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 39
DETAIL
28
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 40
DETAIL
29
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 41
This is an exceptional Kené design. Large size piece 180cm x 175 cm.
DETAIL
30
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 42
DETAIL
31
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 43
DETAIL
32
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES. In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’.
HAND PAINTED TOCUYO (HOME SPUN COTTON) TEXTILES.
In Shipibo these are known as ‘Chupa Quenaya’. They dye the fabrics in mahogany bark
to produce the characteristic brown colours. Typical sizes: 160cm (60 inches) X 155cm
Fig. 44
DETAIL
33
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES Fig. 46. 20cm (8 inches) X 36cm (14 inches)
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES
Fig. 46. 20cm (8 inches) X 36cm (14 inches)
Fig. 47. 30cm (12 inches) X 30cm
Fig. 48. 30cm (12 inches) X 30cm
Fig. 49. 36cm (14 inches) X 23cm (9 inches)
34
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES Fig. 50 25cm (10 inches) X 25cm Fig. 51
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES
Fig. 50 25cm (10 inches) X 25cm
Fig. 51 30cm (12 inches) X 25cm (10 inches)
Fig. 52 30cm (12 inches) X 25cm (10 inches)
Fig. 53 30cm (12 inches) X 25cm (10 inches)
Fig. 54 30cm (12 inches) X 25cm (10 inches)
Fig. 55 30cm (12 inches) X 30 cm
35
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES Fig. 56. 20cm (8 inches) X 20cm Fig. 57.
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES
Fig. 56. 20cm (8 inches) X 20cm
Fig. 57. 30m (12 inches) X 20cm (8 inches)
Fig. 58. 30m (12 inches) X 20cm (8 inches)
36
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES Fig. 59. 23cm (9 inches) X 28cm (11 inches)
SMALL HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED TEXTILES
Fig. 59. 23cm (9 inches) X 28cm (11 inches)
Fig. 60. 23cm (9 inches) X 20cm (8 inches)
Fig. 61. 23cm (9 inches) X 23cm
37
HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED BAGS Fig. 62 Fig. 63 Fig. 64 Fig. 65 38
HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED BAGS
Fig. 62
Fig. 63
Fig. 64
Fig. 65
38
HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED BAGS Fig. 66 Fig. 66A Fig. 66A DETAIL 39
HAND PAINTED & EMBROIDERED BAGS
Fig. 66
Fig. 66A
Fig. 66A DETAIL
39
CEREMONIAL MAITI (CROWNS) Fig. 67 Front & Rear 40
CEREMONIAL MAITI (CROWNS) Fig. 67 Front & Rear
40
CEREMONIAL MAITI (CROWNS) Fig. 68 Front & Rear 41
CEREMONIAL MAITI (CROWNS) Fig. 68 Front & Rear
41
CEREMONIAL MAITI (CROWNS) Fig. 69 Front 42
CEREMONIAL MAITI (CROWNS) Fig. 69 Front
42
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS. Fig. 70 DETAIL 43
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS. Fig. 70
DETAIL
43
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS. Shipibo Shaman: Enrique Lopex wearing ceremonial Cushma and Mati. Shipibo Shaman: Leoncio Garcia
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS.
Shipibo Shaman: Enrique Lopex wearing
ceremonial Cushma and Mati.
Shipibo Shaman: Leoncio Garcia wearing
ceremonial Cushma
44
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS. Fig. 70a FRONT DETAIL 45
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS. Fig. 70a FRONT
DETAIL
45
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS. Fig. 70a BACK DETAIL 46
CEREMONIAL CUSHMAS. Fig. 70a BACK
DETAIL
46
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 71 Fig. 72 Fig. 73 Fig. 74 47
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 71
Fig. 72
Fig. 73
Fig. 74
47
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 75 Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds 48
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 75 Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds
48
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 76 Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds 49
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 76 Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds
49
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 77 Pectoral Piece with choloque seeds 50
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 77 Pectoral Piece with choloque seeds
50
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 78 Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds 51
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 78 Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds
51
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 79 Fig. 80 Fig. 81 Fig. 82 52
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 79
Fig. 80
Fig. 81
Fig. 82
52
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 83. An exceptional Pectoral piece (Museum quality). With convex pendants
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 83. An exceptional Pectoral piece (Museum quality). With convex pendants made from
aircraft aluminium
53
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 84. Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds 54
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 84. Pectoral Piece with Shacapa seeds
54
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 85 Fig. 86 Fig. 87 Fig. 88 55
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 85
Fig. 86
Fig. 87
Fig. 88
55
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 89 Pectoral Piece with Hurayruro seeds 56
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 89 Pectoral Piece with Hurayruro seeds
56
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 89 Pectoral Piece with Hurayruro seeds DETAIL 57
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 89 Pectoral Piece with Hurayruro seeds DETAIL
57
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK Fig. 90 A beautiful bag made from the small round seeds
SHIPIBO HAND CRAFTED BEADWORK
Fig. 90 A beautiful bag made from the small round seeds of Achira (Canna) seeds with the 'clasp' the
red and black Huayruro (Ormosia) seed. The twine is made from Tamshi (Heteropsis jenmanii).
58
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY 59
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY
59
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY Shipibo Shaman: Benkamin Ochavano with family BEADWORK 60
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY
Shipibo Shaman: Benkamin Ochavano with family
BEADWORK
60
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY BANNER AT ICPNA (LIMA) EXHIBITION OF SHIPIBO ART; ‘UNA VENTANA
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY
BANNER AT ICPNA (LIMA) EXHIBITION
OF SHIPIBO ART;
‘UNA VENTANA HACIA EL INFINITO’
2002
61
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY Me with Shipibas looking at their artisan work. Pablo Amaringo
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY
Me with Shipibas looking at their
artisan work.
Pablo Amaringo ‐
with traditional
Shipibo wood bark
painting using the
resin of the tree
'Sangre de
grado' (Croton
lechleri) as paint.
Photo: March
2009 Pucallpa
62
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY Teresa: A super sweet friend of long standing, who works
HOWARD’S ‐ SHIPIBO PHOTO GALLERY
Teresa: A super sweet
friend of long standing,
who works with us at
our Retreats in the
Amazon.
She has shown and
taught me much about
the the magical art of
the Shipibo.
63
INDEX & PRICE LIST: CHITONTIS ITEM EUROS US$ Fig. 1 160 200 Fig. 2 100
INDEX & PRICE LIST: CHITONTIS
ITEM
EUROS
US$
Fig. 1
160
200
Fig. 2
100
130
Fig. 3
160
200
Fig. 4
100
130
Fig. 5
160
200
Fig. 6
140
180
Fig. 7
120
160
Fig. 8
160
200
Fig. 9
160
200
Fig. 10
160
200
Fig. 11
120
160
Fig. 12
160
200
Fig. 13
120
160
Fig. 14
140
180
Fig. 15
160
200
Fig. 16
160
200
Fig. 17
NFS
Fig. 18
160
200
Fig. 19
140
180
Fig. 20
NFS
Fig. 21
160
200
Fig. 22
100
130
Fig. 23
100
130
Fig. 24
160
200
Fig. 25
160
200
Fig. 26
160
200
Fig. 27
140
180
Fig. 28
120
160
Fig. 29
160
200
Fig. 30
120
160
Fig. 31
NFS
64
INDEX & PRICE LIST: PAINTINGS ON TOCUYOS & SMALL TEXTILES ITEM EUROS US$ Fig. 32
INDEX & PRICE LIST: PAINTINGS ON TOCUYOS & SMALL TEXTILES
ITEM
EUROS
US$
Fig. 32
100
130
Fig. 33
140
180
Fig. 34
120
160
Fig. 35
120
160
Fig. 36
NFS
Fig. 37
120
160
Fig. 38
120
160
Fig. 39
120
160
Fig. 40
100
130
Fig. 41
140
180
Fig. 42
120
160
Fig. 43
120
160
Fig. 44
120
160
Fig. 45
Fig. 46
10
13
Fig. 47
10
13
Fig. 48
10
13
Fig. 49
40
52
Fig. 50
NFS
Fig. 51
10
13
Fig. 52
15
20
Fig. 53
15
20
Fig. 54
15
20
Fig. 55
15
20
Fig. 56
30
40
Fig. 57
30
40
Fig. 58
30
40
Fig. 59
25
32
Fig. 60
NFS
Fig. 61
25
32
INDEX & PRICE LIST: BEADWORK , BAGS, & CUSHMAS ITEM EUROS US$ Fig. 62 30
INDEX & PRICE LIST: BEADWORK , BAGS, & CUSHMAS
ITEM
EUROS
US$
Fig. 62
30
40
Fig. 63
50
65
Fig. 64
15
20
Fig. 65
NFS
Fig. 66
15
20
Fig. 66A
40
52
Fig. 67
100
120
Fig. 68
140
180
Fig. 69
140
180
Fig. 70
200
260
FIG. 70A
200
260
Fig. 71
40
52
Fig. 72
40
52
Fig. 73
50
65
Fig. 74
65
85
Fig. 75
120
160
Fig. 76
120
160
Fig. 77
120
160
Fig. 78
120
160
Fig. 79
50
65
Fig. 80
40
52
Fig. 81
40
52
Fig. 82
40
52
Fig. 83
P.O.A
Fig. 84
120
160
Fig. 85
40
52
Fig. 86
40
52
Fig. 87
40
52
Fig. 88
50
65
Fig. 89
80
105
Fig.90
60
78

Underlying the intricate geometric patterns of great complexity displayed in the art of the Shipibo people is a concept of an all pervading magical reality which can challenge the Western linguistic heritage and rational mind.

challenge the Western linguistic heritage and rational mind. COMMUNION with the INFINITE The visual music of

COMMUNION with the

INFINITE

heritage and rational mind. COMMUNION with the INFINITE The visual music of the Shipibo people of

The visual music of the Shipibo people of the Amazon

HOWARD G. CHARING

Above left: Shipibo women (shipiba) in traditional dress gathered at Iquitos to show their craft and artisan work

Above right: Shipibo textile, a combination of embroidery and traditional painting with huito dyes on mahogany bark dyed white cotton

The Shipibo are one of the largest indigenous peoples in the Peruvian Amazon. These ethnic groups each have their own languages, traditions and culture. The Shipibo, who currently number about 20,000, are spread out in communities through the Pucallpa - Ucayali river region. They are highly regarded in the Amazon as being masters of the hallucinogenic vine, Ayahuasca, and many aspiring shamans and Ayahuasqueros from the region study with the Shipibo to learn their language, chants, and plant medicine knowledge. In their visionary art the Shipibo create complex geometric patterns which convey an all pervading magical reality which can challenge the Western linguistic heritage and rational mind. These intricate patterns are more than an expression of the one-ness of Creation, the inter-changeability of light and sound, or the union of perceived opposites. They are an

ongoing dialogue or communion with the spiritual world and powers of the Rainforest. Their art forms bring this paradigm into a physical form. The Ethnologist Angelika Gebhart-Sayer, calls this ‘visual music’.

Initiated women

All the textile painting, embroidery, and artisan craft is carried out by the women. From a young age the Shipibo females are initiated by their mothers and grandmothers into this practice. Teresa, a Shipiba who works with us on our Amazon Retreats, tells that when I was a young girl, my mother squeezed drops of the piripiri (a species of cyperus sp.) berries into my eyes so that I would have the vision for the designs. This is only done once and lasts a lifetime. The intricate designs have their origin in the non-manifest and ineffable world within the spirit of the Rainforest and all who live there. They are a representation of

the Cosmic Serpent, the Anaconda, the great Mother, Creator of the universe called Ronin. For the Shipibo the skin of Ronin has a radiating, electrifying vibration of light, colour, sound, movement and is the embodiment of all possible patterns and designs past, present, and future. The designs that the Shipibo paint are channels or conduits for this multi-sensorial vibrational fusion of form, light and sound. Although in our cultural paradigm we perceive that the geometric patterns are bound within the border of the textile or ceramic vessel, to the Shipibo the patterns extend far beyond these borders and permeate the entire world.

Painting music

One of the challenges for the Western mind, is to acknowledge the relationship between these designs and music. For the Shipibo can listento a song or chant by looking at the designs - and inversely, paint a pattern by listening to a song or music. As an astonishing demonstration of this I witnessed two Shipiba paint a large ceremonial ceramic pot known as a mahuetá. The pot was nearly five feet high and had a diameter of about three feet. Neither could see what the other was painting, yet both were whistling the same song. When they had finished both

were whistling the same song. When they had finished both Imports), enamoured by these designs, ordered

Imports), enamoured by these designs, ordered via the project twenty thousand textiles with the same design. This order could never be fulfilled - the Shipibo simply couldnt comprehend the concept of replicating identical designs.

Singing the patterns of healing

The Shipibo believe that our state of health, both physical and

psychological, is dependent on the

sides of the

complex

geometric

pattern were

identical and

matched each

side perfectly.

The Shipibo

designs are

traditionally

carried out on natural un-dyed cotton - which they often grow themselves - or on cotton dyed in mahogany bark (usually three or four times) which gives the distinctive brown colour. They paint using either a pointed piece of chonta (bamboo), or an iron nail, with the juice of the crushed huito berry fruits (genipa americana) which turns into a blue- brown-black dye once exposed to air. Each of the designs are unique, even the very small pieces, and they cannot be commercially or

mass produced. In Lima I met with

a woman who had set up a

government-funded community project which, amongst other matters, established a collective

for the Shipibo to sell their artisan work and paintings. She tells that

a major USA corporation (Pier 1

Shipibo to sell their artisan work and paintings. She tells that a major USA corporation (Pier
balanced union between mind, spirit and body. If an imbalance in this occurs - such

balanced union between mind, spirit and body. If an imbalance in this occurs - such as through emotions of envy, hate, anger - this will generate a negative effect on the health of that person. The shaman will re-establish the

balance by chanting the icaros, which are the geometric patterns of harmony made manifest in sound, into the body of the person. The shaman in effect transforms the visual code into an acoustic code.

shaman the luminous geometric patterns of energy. These filaments drift towards the mouth of the shaman where they metamorphose into a chant or icaro. The icaro is a conduit for the patterns of Creation, which then permeate the body of the shamans patient, bringing harmony in the form of the geometric patterns which re-balance the patients body. The vocal range of the Shipibo shamans when they chant the icaros is astonishing; they can range from the highest falsetto one moment to a sound which resembles a thumping pile driver, and then to a gentle soothing melodic lullaby. Speaking personally of my experience of this, it produced a feeling as if every cell in my body was floating and embraced in a nurturing all- encompassing vibration, even the air around me was vibrating in acoustic resonance with the icaro of the maestro. The shaman knows when the healing is complete, as the design is clearly distinct in the patients body. It make take a few sessions to complete this, and when completed the geometric healing

arkana This internal patterning is deemed to be permanent and to protect a persons spirit. Angelika Gebhart-Sayer, Professor of Ethnology, University of Marburg writes that Essentially, Shipibo-Conibo therapy is a matter of visionary design application in connection with aura restoration; the shaman heals his patient through the application of a visionary design, every person feels spiritually permeated and saturated with designs. The shaman heals his patient through the application of the song-design, which saturates the patientsbody and is believed to untangle distorted physical and psycho- spiritual energies, restoring harmony to the somatic, psychic and spiritual systems of the patient. The designs are permanent and remain with a persons spirit even after death.Whilst it is not easy for Westerners to enter and engage with the world view of the Shipibo, which has been developed far away from

A key element in this magical dialogue with the energy which permeates Creation and is
A key element in this magical
dialogue with the energy which
permeates Creation and is
embedded in the Shipibo designs,
is the work with ayahuasca by the
Shipibo shamans or muraya.
In the deep ayahuasca trance,
designs are embedded in the
patient’s body, this is called an
the ayahuasca reveals to the
our linguistic structures and psychological models, there is an underlying sophisticated and complex symbolic language
our linguistic structures and psychological models, there is an underlying sophisticated and complex symbolic language
our linguistic structures and psychological models, there is an underlying sophisticated and complex symbolic language

our linguistic structures and psychological models, there is an underlying sophisticated and complex symbolic language embedded in these geometric patterns. The main figures in the Shipibo designs are the square, the rhombus, the octagon, and the cross. The symmetry of the patterns emanating from the centre (which is our world) is a representation of the outer and inner worlds, a map of the Cosmos. The cross represents the Southern Cross constellation which dominates the night sky and divides the cosmos into four quadrants, the intersection of the arms of the cross is the centre of the

universe, and becomes the Cosmic Cross. The Cosmic Cross represents the eternal spirit of a person and the union of the masculine and feminine principles - the very cycle of life and death - which reminds us of the great act of procreation of not only the universe, but also of humanity, and our individual selves. The smaller, flowing patterns within the geometric forms are the

radiating power of the Cosmic Serpent which turns this way and that, betwixt and between, constantly creating the universe as it moves. The circles are often a direct representation of the Cosmic Anaconda, and within the circle itself is the central point of creation.

The primal rhythm

In the Western tradition, from the Pythagoreans and Plato through to the Renaissance, music was used to heal the body and to elevate the soul. It was also believed that earthly music was no more than a faint echo of the universal harmony of the spheres. This view of the harmony of the universe was held both by artists and scientists until the mechanistic universe of Newton. Joseph Campbell, perhaps the foremost scholar of mythology, suggested that there is a universe of harmonic vibrations which the human collective unconscious has always been in communion with. Our beings beat to the ancient rhythms of the Cosmos. The traditional ways of the Shipibo and other indigenous peoples still reflect this primal rhythm, and their perception of the universal forces made physical is truly a communion with the infinite.

Above:

ceremonial

or

Mahuetá

Shipibo

pot

Above : ceremonial or Mahuetá Shipibo pot HOWARD G. CHARING has organised journeys to the Amazon

HOWARD G. CHARING has organised journeys to the Amazon Rainforest for the past seven years to work with the ayahuasca shamans and the sacred jungle doctors(healing and visionary plants) of this area. He has written numerous articles about the Amazonian plant medicines, and has worked with some of the most respected shamans in the region. He was baptised into their tribe by the Shipibo Indians in the Amazon If you would like to discover more about this work, he conducts Plant Spirit Medicine journeys to the Amazon Rainforest working with the Shipibo people.

Enquiries to Eagles Wing BM BOX 7475 London WC1N 3XX, tel: (01273) 882 027, or website www. shamanism.co.uk

Photos: © Howard G. Charing

or website www. shamanism.co.uk Photos: © Howard G. Charing Above: Shipibo textiles. The one at the
Above: Shipibo textiles. The one at the top of the page showes the cosmic cross
Above: Shipibo textiles. The one at the top of the page showes the cosmic cross

Above: Shipibo textiles.

Above: Shipibo textiles. The one at the top of the page showes the cosmic cross within

The one at the top of the

page showes the cosmic

textiles. The one at the top of the page showes the cosmic cross within the circle

cross within the circle of

the Anaconda

showes the cosmic cross within the circle of the Anaconda Right: Painted Shipibo textile. As with
showes the cosmic cross within the circle of the Anaconda Right: Painted Shipibo textile. As with
showes the cosmic cross within the circle of the Anaconda Right: Painted Shipibo textile. As with

Right: Painted Shipibo

within the circle of the Anaconda Right: Painted Shipibo textile. As with all Shipibo paintings, they

textile. As with all Shipibo

Right: Painted Shipibo textile. As with all Shipibo paintings, they start in the centre and the

paintings, they start in the

textile. As with all Shipibo paintings, they start in the centre and the pattern moves out

centre and the pattern

moves out from this point.

paintings, they start in the centre and the pattern moves out from this point. The cosmic

The cosmic cross is

paintings, they start in the centre and the pattern moves out from this point. The cosmic

again at the centre

paintings, they start in the centre and the pattern moves out from this point. The cosmic
paintings, they start in the centre and the pattern moves out from this point. The cosmic

Los shipibo-conit peruana. Perteneo Ucayali y sus afluei JamayayYanna. Se no arriba el Conibc dos zonas, porque personas repartida nes arqueologicas ha sido ocupada p El grupo shipibo Dicen que sus ant< bianco como el shi El primer europe

Reaparecen enroj o y negro sobre las paredes de una ceramica para tomar masato c

tallados e n la palet a d e u n remo . Aparece n d e nu< disehos azulados de genipa en el rostro de la mujer. por disehos», dice una cancion shipibo. El significado d e los disehos casi se h a perdido. explique su simbolismo, ella sonrio y dijo que solo Ic

nundo entero esta cubiertc

como telaraha e n los fino<

>edir a un a mujer que m itepasados lo sabfan. «Esta< las representan serpientes», viejita, «la boa misma no^

Artif

En los pueblos shipibo se encuentran arboles de ale

proximidad d e la casa fam\\\ar r con sus

de color rojoy morado, ademas del bianco corriente sin embargo, en la mano de una aspirante, el hifo se r shipib o qu e l a araha le s enseh o a hilar . A su s hija s re< muhecas telarahas para asegurar su habilidad como

mujeres pinta n la tela tejida co n los disefios sirr

flores rosadas

Las

corto pincei de caha brava (shetan). Se trazan los disc oro, que se obtiene de un arbol. Luego cubren toda

Chitonte tima, Shipibo-Uvayali, c. 1920. Algodon, tejidoy pintado. 81 x 76 cm. Coleccion Sucesion Jimenez Borja. Museo de Artes y Tradiciones Populares. Inst. Riva Aguero, PUCF

el bermejo del achiote (mashe), el ama- rillo tornado de la rafz del guisador (con- ron) y el purpura que viene de la hoja de una planta (ami). Esos colores no son permanentes y hay que evitar lavar la tela.

La alfarena

La ceramica polfcroma del grupo shi- pibo destaca en Sudamerica por su be- lleza. Cuando morfa una mujer shipibo era costumbre quebrar sus ceramios para enterrarlos junt o con ella. Los arqueolo-

Chitonte quehueya, Shipibo-Ucayali, c. 1920. Algodbn, tenidoy bordado. 70 x 77 cm. Colec- ci6n Sucesi6n Jimenez Borja. Museo de Artes y Tradiciones Populares. Inst. Riva Aguero, PUCP

gos han encontrado vinculos entre la ceramica prehispanica de Cumancaya (territorio actual de los shipibo) y las vasi- jas contemporaneas. Una mujer ceramista siempre escoge a una de sus nietas como aprendiz. A la edad d e cuatro o cinco ahos la chica ira a vivir con su

abuela para aprender el arte. Cada alfarera tiene su taller particular cerca de la casa, pero en u n lugar apartado. Al l se encuentran piezas en todas las etapas de produccion. Hay que predsar que tradicionaimente un gran lote de cerami- ca era elaborado para la gran fiesta (Ani Sheati) que tenia lugar cada ocho o diez ahos. En un pueblo shipibo la vida de un ceramio es breve. Se rompe. Lo que no tiene mayor importancia para ellos pues mahana se puede fabricar otro para

pieza ? que

remplazarlo. D e los muchos ahos que pase en e l Ucayall nunca vi tuviera mas de u n aho de antiguedad.

Tres colores, rojo (ocre), negro y crema figuran < grupo. Sin embargo, entre las tres zonas del Uca^ cias en su combinacion. Los disehos de los Conib delicados, especialmente alrededor del cuello de mundo celestial. Disehos curvilfneos, y bien espa fondo claro, evocador del mundo-cielo. Por el r

predomina n los colores rojo y negro. Los

dos con fuerza y determinacion. La Jinea princip deada de negro.

disehos

Dolicroma de

?s las diferer- ayali son ma:

representa a acan sobre e

Bajo Ucayal

ntes, ejecuta

ilea, esta bor

EI tiempo nos venci o

El hombre shipibo tenia la costumbre de pelear con la macana, un palo de

chonta largo de mas de un metro, con el que propinaba golpes en la cabeza

del adversario. Hace

deras adornad a co n sus disehos simbolico s y dijo : «Yo hic e esta macan a hace veinticinco ahos. He ayunado para darle mas poder. La hice bien dura para pe!ear». "iY peleaste?", pregunte yo, viendo en su rostro que algo le preocu paba. <(No", contesto el hombre triste, "el tiempo nos vencio. Vino la civiliz clonyya no habia tiempo para pelear. Todo se cambio».

poc o u n shipibo trajo una de las ultimas macanas verda

Cancion del curandcro de Cushushcaya

Curadora

Joni chomo, Conibo-Alto Ucayali, c.

1950. 77 x41.5x4 7 cm. Coleccion Alfonso Cabrera Ganoza

Joni chomo, Conibo-Alto Ucayali, c.

1950. 78.3 x 48.5 x 52 cm. Coleccibn Vivian y Jaime Uebana

Actividades complementarias en el marco de la exposition Una ventana hacia el infinito: Arte shipibo-conibo"

11,

12 y 13 dejuli o

de

10 am.

a 12 m.

y

de 5 a 7 pm.

Demostracion de las tecnicas alfarera y textil shipibo-conibo a cargo de maestros artesanos

de

15 de julio

10 am a

1

pm.

Seminario: Tecnicas del arte shipibo-conibo (previa inscripcidn)

24 de julio

7 pm.

Conferencia: Arte shipibo-conibo a cargo de Felix Oiiva

7 de agosto

7 pm.

Conferencia: Simbolismo del arte shipibo-conibo

a cargo d e Carolyn Heath (curadora de la muestra)

.fC.de agosto

7 pm.

Presentacion del libro "Una ventana hacia e l infinito: arte shipibo- conibo"

Del 10 de julio al 1 de setiembre del 2002

GALERIA GERMAN KRUGER ESPANTOSO

http.V/icpnacultural. perucultural. org. pe