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General Motors of

 

There

will

be

so many

physicists

that

the

research centers will advertise for philoso-

phers."

The Journal is so spiced with

his personal opinions or private philoso- phy that the reader will absorb many of

them for himself.

 

APPLIFD MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Hamld S. Mickley, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, and Thomas K. Sherwood, Professor of Chemical Engi- neering, Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy; Charles E. Reed, Engineering Manager, Chemical Department, General Electric Ca. Second edition. McGraw.

Hill Book Co

..

New York, 1957.

xii

+

413 pp.

99 figs.

16 X

23.5 cm.

$9.

THE first edition of "Sherwood and Reed" which appeared in 1939 has been entirely rearranged and rewritten by Prc- fessor Mickley. Experience in using the text with students, and the many new mathematical techniques which are being used in chemical engineering, have called for new treatment of old material and the addition of new topics in the second edition.

Now Chapter I on Treatment of Engi- neering Data and Chapter I1 an Interpre- tation of Engineering Data deal withmate rial previously in Chapters I, VII, VIII, and IX on graphical representation, differ- entiation and integration, interpolation, and theory of errors. Chapter I1 now dis- cusses variance and design of experiments. Chapter I11 on the Mathematical Formulation of the Physioal Problem discusses the method of setting up the differential equation for a procesp. This naturally is followed by Chapter IV on the Solution of Ordinary Differential Equa- tions in which the usual methods of solu- tion are given. Because the usual meth- ods are not always applicable, Chapter V discusses Series and Numerical Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations. Chemical and physical prooesses fre quently involve more than two variables, so Chapter VI deals with the Formulation of Partial Differential Equations and Chapter VII with the Solution of Partial Differential Equations. Vector notation is introduced in the formulation of partial differential equations and used for flaw equations. A completely new section contains Chapter VIII on the Laplace Transform, Chapter IX on Analysis of Stagewise Processes by the Calculus of Finite Differences, and Chapter X an the Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations. The second edition appears to have a more uniform level of treatment of all subjects than did the first edition. It has much excellent material and has fulfilled

its "purpose of this hook is to consolidate the advanced methods of mathematics into a form that can be applied readily by both the student and the professional engineer." The man who desires to use advanced mathematics must know and be able to use his basic mathematics. He may need to review some of it before he can apply the advanced methods of mathematics given here.

KENNETH A. KOBE

THEUNIVEBBLTT

OI. TEXAS

an an^. TEXAS

ADVANCES IN CARBOHYDRATE

CHEMISTRY.

VOLUME 11

Edited by Melville L.

Wolfrom and R.

Stuart Tipson.

New York,

1956.

Academic Press Inc.,

viii

+

464

pp.

12

tables.

16 X 23.5 om.

$11.

THElatest volume of "Advances in Car- bohydrate Chemistry," published in 1956, maintains the same able and comprehen- sive treatment of subject matter and in- ternational scope of authorship that dis- tinguished the preceding volumes of this series. The topics presented are: Periodate Oxidation of Cmhohydrates, which is dis- cussed by J. M. Bohbitt; The Osones, by S. Bayne and J. A. Fewster; Reactions af the Monosaccharides, with beta-Ketonic Esters and Related Substances, by F. Gar- cia Gonzilez; Kojic Acid, by Andrew Bedik; The Biosyntheeis of the Mono-

JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION.