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11/10
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James B. Wood MaryAnn Kelly David Geffner Arthur Bracco
Editor Assistant to the Editor Special Asst. to the Editor Staff Writer
The OFFICIAL BULLETIN (ISSN-0020-5885) is published quarterly by the General Secretary-Treasurer of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees,
Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, its Territories and Canada, (IATSE), 1430 Broadway, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10018.
Telephone: (212) 730-1770. FAX (212) 921-7699. Email: bulletin@iatse-intl.org
Material for publication must be received before the first day of January, April, July, and October, to meet deadlines, respectively, for the First, Second,
Third, and Fourth Quarter issues.
POSTMASTER: Send address change to the OFFICIAL BULLETIN, 1430 Broadway, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10018. Entered as periodical postage paid
matter at the Post Office at New York, NY and additional locations.
Canadian Publications Mail Agreement No.: 40845543. Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses To:
PO Box 503, RPO West Beaver Creek, Richmond Hill ON L4B 4R6
Subscriptions: IATSE members receive the OFFICIAL BULLETIN as part of their
IATSE membership services. Nonmembers may subscribe for $10.00 per year.
Timothy F. Magee
1st Vice President
20017 Van Dyke
Detroit, MI 48234
Michael Barnes
2nd Vice President
2237 Hartranft St.,
Philadelphia, PA 19145
J. Walter Cahill
3rd Vice President
5010 Rugby Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814
Thom Davis
4th Vice President
2520 West Olive Avenue
Burbank, CA 91505
Anthony M. DePaulo
5th Vice President
1430 Broadway, 20th Floor
New York, NY 10018
Damian Petti
6th Vice President
201-208 57th Ave., S.W.
Calgary, Alberta
Canada T2H 2K8
Brian J. Lawlor
7th Vice President
1430 Broadway, 20th Floor
New York, NY 10018
Michael F. Miller, Jr.
8th Vice President
10045 Riverside Drive
Toluca Lake, CA 91602
John T. Beckman, Jr.
9th Vice President
1611 S. Broadway, #110
St Louis, MO 63104
Daniel DiTolla
10th Vice President
1430 Broadway, 20th Floor
New York, NY 10018
John Ford
11th Vice President
326 West 48th Street
New York, NY 10036
John M. Lewis
12th Vice President
22 St. Joseph Street
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M4Y 1J9
Matthew D. Loeb
International President
James B. Wood
General Secretary–Treasurer
Thomas C. Short
International
President Emeritus
Michael W. Proscia
General Secretary–
Treasurer Emeritus
Thomas J. Cleary C. Faye Harper
216 S. Jefferson St., #400 2695 Dayview Lane
Chicago, IL 60661 Atlanta, GA 30331
George Palazzo
1811 W. Burbank Blvd., Burbank, CA 91506
E X E C U T I V E O F F I C E R S
C L C D E L E G A T E
Kelly Moon
1640 Boundary Road, Burnaby, BC V5K 4V4
G E N E R A L C O U N S E L
Dale W. Short
G E N E R A L O F F I C E
1430 Broadway, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10018
Tele: (212) 730-1770
FAX: Office of the President (212) 730-7809
FAX: General Secretary-Treasurer (212) 921-7699
W E S T C O A S T O F F I C E
10045 Riverside Drive
Toluca Lake, CA 91602
Tele: (818) 980-3499 FAX: (818) 980-3496
C A N A D I A N O F F I C E
22 St. Joseph St.
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4Y 1J9
Tele: (416) 362-3569 FAX: (416) 362-3483
C A N A D I A N
E N T E R T A I N M E N T I N D U S T R Y
R E T I R E M E N T P L A N
22 St. Joseph St.
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4Y 1J9
Tele: (416) 362-2665 FAX: (416) 362-2351
www.ceirp.ca
I . A . T . S . E . N A T I O N A L
B E N E F I T F U N D S O F F I C E
417 Fifth Avenue, Third Floor, New York, NY 10016
Tele: (212) 580-9092 Toll free: (800) 456-FUND
FAX: (212) 787-3607
www.iatsenbf.org
4 President’s
Newsletter
5 General Secretary-
Treasurer’s Message
6 IATSE and Labor
Movement News
10 Safety Zone
12 Local News & Views
16 On Location
28 On Stage In Focus
30 On The Road
33 On The Show Floor
34 In Memoriam
37 Directory of Local
Secretaries and
Business Agents
D E P A R T M E N T S
Labor 2010
IATSE Locals Play A Key Role
18
INTERNATIONAL ALLIANCE OF THEATRICAL
STAGE EMPLOYEES, MOVING PICTURE
TECHNICIANS, ARTISTS AND ALLIED CRAFTS
OF THE UNITED STATES, ITS TERRITORIES
AND CANADA, AFL-CIO, CLC
FOURTH QUARTER, 2010 NUMBER 630
F E A T U R E S
W W W . I A T S E – I N T L . O R G
B U L L E T I N A N D P H O T O S U B M I S S I O N G U I D E L I N E S
Please send your Bulletin submissions to bulletin@iatse-intl.org
All digital photos should be taken with a camera that is at least 3 megapixels or higher, and set on the highest quality/resolution setting.
JPEG or TIFF file formats only please.
Please do not crop or otherwise modify photos - the original version usually has the highest quality.
Edward C. Powell
International Vice President Emeritus
Craig Carlson
13th Vice President
216 S. Jefferson St., #400
Chicago, IL 60661
T R U S T E E S
IATSE Goes Green
New Email Subscription Program
9
M
My message in the previous issue of the Official Bulletin focused on
our new Member Email initiative which was successfully launched at
the beginning of October. Based on that message, many of you took the
time to go to the International’s Web site (www.iatse-intl.org) and regis-
tered individually.
In addition to the individual registration option, we also solicited the assis-
tance of our local unions by asking them to supply us with the Email address-
es of their members in order that we could send a registration message to
them. Thus far, thirty-five local unions have provided us with the requested
information (see page 9 for a complete listing) and a registration Email mes-
sage from the International has gone out to over 15,000 members. Thousands
of our members have now completed the brief verification process and have
been added to our general correspondence electronic distribution list.
After the initial registration, many members also took the next step and
logged into their newly created account to manage their electronic distribution
profile. These members are now registered to receive various International
publications, including the Official Bulletin, in electronic form. For them, this
may represent the first issue of the Official Bulletin that they are reading on a
computer screen or some other mobile device. Congratulations and welcome
to our newest form of distribution.
Some of you may have registered to receive an electronic copy and are
surprised that you also received a paper copy. This has to do with timing and
the requirement for us to provide our address labels a few weeks prior to you
receiving the Official Bulletin in the mail. If your registration for electronic dis-
tribution occurred after that time then this will be the last paper version you
receive. If any member would like to see an electronic version of the Official
Bulletin before registering, go to the International’s Web site and click on the
link in the bottom right.
In addition to the Member Email initiative, almost 150 local unions are now
using the International’s Web-enabled Online Membership Database System.
This program makes it possible for local union Secretaries and Treasurers to
change much of their communication with the General Office from a paper
environment to that of an online one. Locals are able to file Quarterly Reports,
update member information and place orders for per capita stamps and sup-
plies online over a secure network connection. If you are an Officer of a local
union that is not presently registered for this system and would like to begin
using it, please contact the General Office to get started.
To those that are participating in our initiatives to be more efficient and
environmentally friendly, I thank you, and if you have been considering sign-
ing up I encourage you to do so as soon as possible.
We Are Off To AGreat Start
Fourth Quarter 2010 5 4 Official Bulletin
B
Brothers and Sisters, last month we saw less than positive results
on Election Day. But we must move forward and begin the fight all
over again – for working families, for jobs, for building the middle
class, for protecting retirement security and so much more. Across
the nation, 64 percent of union members voted for union-endorsed
candidates, but for millions of union families who voted in the
midterm elections, and for the hundreds of thousands of union vol-
unteers who spent hours working for working family candidates,
the election results were disappointing.
The American people expressed their anger at everyone in Washington
regardless of which side of the aisle they sat on, and for good reason. The
pain of the economic collapse that has been paid for with jobs, homes
and sometimes hope, was too much to bear and the election results
demonstrated the anger and a cry for help. But more important than the
anger expressed, were feelings of anxiety.Worry about the future of
employment, stable retirements and the chance for children and genera-
tions to come to enjoy the same shared prosperity of their parents and
grandparents. It was about the economy and jobs and a mandate to fix the
economy and create jobs.
The midterm elections give pause to reflect on the shared obligation
among people, and between markets and government to create a prosper-
ous and forward-looking society. I am proud and grateful to all our IATSE
members and local unions that knew the importance of the elections and
felt a sense of obligation to get out and walk precincts, participate in
phone banking, leafleting and so much more. I have received reports from
District Secretaries and local unions all over the country and those reports
indicate that the efforts our members put forth to get out the vote leading
up to November 2nd were outstanding. Regardless of the outcome, from
Florida to California and in other key states like Ohio, New York, Pennsyl-
vania, Nevada and Colorado, IATSE members were out in full support of
labor-friendly candidates.
We must now be watchful over how the coming power-shift in Con-
gress, especially in the House, will affect those issues closest to us, particu-
larly in the area of piracy and our efforts to curb the theft of intellectual
property. The Obama administration has been sympathetic to our cause,
but committee leaderships in Congress will change and it is our responsi-
Where Do We
Go From Here?
Continued on page 8
The 2011 Supplies have been mailed to
those local unions that have submitted
their 3rd Quarter Report for 2010 and pur-
chased the appropriate number of per
capita stamps.
The number of per capita stamps that
must be purchased is based on the number
of members reported on the 1st and 2nd
Quarterly Reports plus two times the num-
ber of members reported on the 3rd Quar-
ter Report (to allow for an estimate of the
numbers that will be reported on the 4th
Quarter Report). When the 4th Quarter
Report is submitted in January 2011, an
adjustment to balance the local’s account
is made if necessary.
2011 SUPPLI ES
Delegates to the 66th Quadrennial Con-
vention voted to increase the per capita tax
for local unions by two dollars ($2.00)
effective 1/1/2011 and one dollar ($1.00)
effective 1/1/2012, all of which is to be
allocated to the General Fund. Per capita
tax for Special Department local unions
will remain unchanged.
2011 PER CAPI TA
This is to advise that the regular Mid-
Winter Meeting of the General Executive
Board is scheduled to be held at Paris Las
Vegas, 3655 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las
Vegas, NV 89109 at 10:00 a.m. on Monday,
January 24, 2011, and will remain in ses-
sion through and including Friday, January
28, 2011. All business to come before the
Board must be submitted to the General
Office no later than fifteen (15) days prior
to the meeting.
Local Union representatives planning to
attend the meeting must make hotel reser-
vations with Paris Las Vegas by calling 877-
796-2096 or 800-722-5597. Guest room rate
for the IATSE is $109.00, plus applicable
taxes, for both single and double occupan-
cy. In order to ensure that you receive the
preferred room rate established for our
meeting, you must identify your affiliations
with the IATSE.
Cut-off date: December 31, 2010
O F F I C I A L N O T I C E
6 Official Bulletin
Great News for Plan Members
A
“SexMoneyMedia” was an international symposium
on women in media held in Vancouver, BC from October
14 - 16, 2010. The IATSE was a Gold Sponsor of this
event, the first such symposium held in Canada. Goals
of the symposium were to generate a constructive
cross sector dialogue addressing gender diversity and
balance in Canadian media, and to promote awareness
of the cultural, social, economic and political costs of
gender inequity in the Canadian film and television
industries.
The program included a workshop on career devel-
opment for women in camera and publicity, presented
by IATSE Local 669, and a panel on union representation
of women in film and television. Many IATSE members
participated and found the events informative and ener-
gizing. Practical strategies were developed to overcome
systemic obstacles to women’s full participation in the
media industries, each tailored to specific facets of the
industry, policy and educational sphere.
New Online Lobbying Campaign Launched!
MAJOR PENSION REFORM NECESSARY FOR CANADIAN RETIREES
C
Canada's retirement income sys-
tem is in serious trouble. There is
too much risk and not enough secu-
rity to ensure that, after a lifetime of
work, people can retire and live out
their last years in dignity. Expanding
the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is
the most effective way to ensure all
Canadians have adequate retirement
incomes. The CPP is seen as secure,
reliable, cost-effective, and well
managed. I t cover s vi r t ual l y
all Canadian workers, whether
employed or self-employed, full-
time or part-time, it is fully portable
when workers change jobs; it is
indexed for inflation; and it accom-
modates the different work patterns
of women. This makes it the only
logical choice to work with when
discussing how to better ensure all
Canadians have sufficient means to
retire.
The labour movement, led by the
Canadian Labour Congress, has
therefore designed a plan to increase
the CPP and ensure that no Canadi-
an retirees are forced to live below
the poverty line. The two major
components of the plan would see a
doubling of the CPP benefits through
incremental increases to contribu-
tions over seven years, and an
increase of 15% to the Old Age Secu-
rity and the Guaranteed Income Sup-
plement for retirees.
The IATSE launched its own
online lobbying campaign for pen-
sion reform in late fall, which can be
found through the International’s
Web site at www.iatse-intl.org. Our
last campaign, on copyright reform,
has so far yielded great results, with
a strong response from government.
We therefore encourage all Canadian
members to go to the site and use
the software to email your federal
and provincial representatives. This
is an issue that affects every single
one of us. Make sure your voice is
heard.
After less than 5 years in exis-
tence, the Canadian Entertainment
Industry Retirement Plan passed $100
million in assets in early October
2010, which, according to Benefits
Canada magazine, puts it within the
range of the 50 largest reported
Defined Contribution Plans in Canada.
This phenomenal growth has allowed
the Plan to renegotiate the Investment
Management Fees (IMFs) with Great-
West Life, passing even more savings
on to members enrolled in the Plan.
In late October, the Retirement
Committee, which oversees the opera-
tion of the Plan, sat down with Great-
West Life and successfully negotiated a
significant reduction in the fees charged
to all Portfolio and
Cadence (Lifestyle) funds
in our Plan to 0.99%.
This represents a 13.9%
reduction in fees for the
Cadence Funds which
were previously at 1.15% and a 10.0%
reduction in fees for the Portfolio funds
which were at 1.10%. The full amount
of these savings will flow directly to
members’ accounts.
In addition to this announced fee
reduction, Great-West Life has also
agreed to renegotiate the fees again
once the Plan reaches $200 million in
assets. Incredibly, the Plan’s Consul-
tants estimate that the Plan will reach
this benchmark in less than 2 years.
Fees make a huge difference over
time and the lower the fees, the
faster members’ retirement savings
will grow. From the humble begin-
nings of the Plan, the Retirement
Committee has been committed to
lowering fees charged to members
without sacrificing quality of service.
The ability to negotiate such low fees
is largely the result of the mass buy-
ing strength of over 13,000 members
working together.
WOMEN IN VIEW
International President
Matthew Loeb swore in the
IATSE 10th District Executive
Board at the District’s
Convention on October 16,
2010 in Albany, New York.
From left to right President
Loeb, International Vice
President Anthony DePaulo,
Robert Gottschalk, John
Scardino, Mike Stas, Beverly
Miller, John Hill, Lee Squires,
Lewis Resnick (missing
from photo board member
Greg Hancox).
Fourth Quarter 2010 7
DISTRICT TEN’S NEW BOARD
From left to right: Dusty Kelly, Local 891 Corresponding
Secretary, Julia Neville, International Representative,
Mimi Wolch, Senior Business Agent, DGC Ontario,
Amanda Coles, Panel Moderator for Women in View,
Lise Lareau, President, Canadian Media Guild and
Kelly Moon, CLC Delegate and IA 891 Senior Steward.
8 Official Bulletin Fourth Quarter 2010 9
On October 20, 2010, Officers, representatives,
staff and friends honored Executive Assistant to the
General Secretary-Treasurer Barbara Jackson on her
retirement from the IATSE. A luncheon was held at the
Croton Reservoir Tavern in New York City. On behalf of
the International, General Secretary-Treasurer Wood
presented Ms. Jackson with a watch and thanked her
for her 22 years of dedicated service and commit-
ment to the membership of the Alliance.
bility to keep those new to these positions on track.
We must be watchful on the state level of bill intro-
ductions, and ballot initiatives. We will be faced with
challenges such as paycheck deception, “right to
work”, and other serious attacks on working families
and their unions. This is no time to let down our
guard, but a time to re-invigorate our efforts and stay
involved in the political and legislative process.
In this issue of the Bulletin you will read the fea-
ture article that summarizes the involvement of our
members across the country. It is clear that the mem-
bers of this great Alliance know the importance of par-
ticipating in the political process. The need to have
legislators who understand the needs of working fami-
lies and who will work hard to protect our interests is
ultimately what will enable us to maintain our rights to
organize and negotiate the best agreements possible to
represent our members.
So we must now take a fresh approach and begin
the fight all over again. We, in the IATSE have the
energy and the capacity to work hard to ensure that
our government and our generation lives up to the
promise of America: that we leave more opportunity,
not less, to those who come after us.
I thank you for all you did this year to make
change happen and all you will do to keep up the
fight. 2012 is not that far off and we have more chal-
lenges and hard work ahead of us. I know the IATSE
will continue to fight harder and to ensure that the
results of those elections are more promising.
President’s Newsletter
Continued from Page 4
At the direction of International President Loeb, the
IATSE Diversity Committee (pictured above) consisting
of (left to right) International Vice Presidents Dan Di
Tolla, Brian Lawlor and J. Walter Cahill, International
Trustee C. Faye Harper and CLC Delegate Kelly Moon –
met in Washington, DC on October 28th and 29th with
Rosalyn Pelles, Director of the AFL-CIO’s Civil, Human
and Women’s Rights Department and Alfonso Pollard
of the Communication Workers of America.
IATSE GOES TO WASHINGTON
General Secretary-Treasurer James Wood, General
Secretary-Treasurer Emeritus Michael Proscia, Barbara
Jackson and International President Matthew Loeb.
We all have to do our part to save the planet. Receiving your copy of
the Official Bulletin and other communications from the International
by Email will reduce paper usage, burn less fuel to deliver materials
and decrease the number of paper notifications sent out by direct
mail. Additionally, we’ll be able to get important information to you
more quickly.
Thank you to the following local unions that complied with the
International’s request to provide Email addresses for their members:
RECEIVE THE OFFICIAL BULLETIN AND OTHER COMMUNICATIONS BY EMAIL
4
16
22
53
210
212
260
295
412
416
470
476
479
480
482
484
491
492
493
495
514
631
667
669
675
720
822
829
USA829
849
856
875
892
927
ATPAM
Locals listed as of December 1, 2010
P
People have a tendency to
think about health and safety in
terms of big incidents. Someone
getting killed or losing a body part
gets peoples’ attention. The prevention of the hazards that
cause these incidents is important, but what about the lit-
tle pains? What about the everyday types of risks that to
most of us seem trivial because we deal with them away
from the job as well? What about the things small in our
youth that accumulate into a large problem?
Safety classes and safety rules are written because
someone was hurt or killed. This especially goes for the
boring classes that talk about proper lifting so you don’t
hurt your back or wearing safety glasses to protect your
eye sight. OSHA or whoever is in charge didn’t just decide
that this might be nice information to offer. The boring
classes deal with seemingly little things “we know” or
things we don’t think will affect us but can cause a
lifetime of problems.
For a couple of years the
authorities have been pushing
the wearing of orange or
reflective clothing when an
employee is exposed to traf-
fic. Sure it makes sense that
road workers wear them, but
some cities are having their
police officers wear them.
Notice the next time you go
to a major chain store, are the workers rounding up the
carts in the parking lot wearing vests?
The Hollywood crews are being asked to wear reflec-
tive vests when they are walking around their trucks or
otherwise exposed to traffic. Many people complained.
They roll their eyes. “I walk across the street every day,” is
grumbled. Many think it’s stupid. Statistically, being hit by
a vehicle is the way a large percentage of workers die in
America.
Many of our jobs require lifting something - bundles of
costumes, rigging equipment, lighting instruments, cases
of water, and boxes of who knows what. We lift and carry
and put down and do it over and over again. When we’re
young it’s easy. We do it to make a place for ourselves on
a crew. We do it to show off. We do it because someone
is pushing to go faster. We do it because the faster it’s
done the sooner we go home. And, for these reasons we
forget the things we were taught in our boring lifting
class: Lift within your limits; use lifting equipment; get
help; keep your back straight; use your legs. We all know
the rules.
How many people do you know with back issues?
There are many. But, many back injuries can be prevent-
ed by following the boring class.
It should be everyone’s plan to enjoy retirement. To
enjoy retirement must mean having good health. It is not
right that you are unable to go out and do the things you
want to do because of injuries you got over the course of
your working days. Use the training provided to you. Pay
attention to the way you work. Remember that how you
do something is not just for now but has an affect in your
future.
By Kent Jorgensen,
Chairman, IATSE Craft
Advancement Program Committee
Participation is Key to Our Future
10 Official Bulletin
LABOUR MOVEMENT SCORES VICTORY
IN ONTARIO FOR SAFE WORKPLACES
On Christmas Eve last year, four migrant workers in Toronto fell to their
deaths after the scaffold on which they were working collapsed. The
Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) demanded action and sought criminal
prosecution for those responsible, under the Criminal Code provision
known as Bill C-45. The bill allows for the criminal prosecution of corpo-
rate executives, directors and managers who act wrongfully or neglect to
uphold their responsibilities to make and keep workplaces healthy and
safe. There are no maximum financial penalties and guilty parties can
receive sentences of up to 20 years.
Since the bill was enacted six years ago, over 400 workers have died
and over 1.5 million have been injured in Ontario, yet not one C-45 prose-
cution had taken place. After the Christmas Eve deaths and the resulting
public outrage, the OFL poured on the pressure with its “Kill a Worker, Go
to Jail” campaign. The campaign garnered huge support as families,
unions and community organizations demanded action.
On October 13, the three co-owners of the company responsible were
arrested, and each face four charges of criminal negligence causing death.
This will be the first prosecution in Ontario under Bill C-45. OFL President
Sid Ryan stated, “This is the signal to employers that we have been waiting
for. It says to every CEO and manager that workers' deaths are serious
matters with real penalties attached and that they had better take safety
seriously.” Although the prosecution took place in Ontario, the Criminal
Code is federal legislation, so the impact of this case will be felt across
Canada.
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The boring classes deal with seemingly
little things “we know”or things we don’t
think will affect us but can cause a life-
time of problems.
Fourth Quarter 2010 11
12 Official Bulletin
CITT Recognizes Nova Scotia Tattoo
with Technical Award of Merit
F
For 31 years, the Royal Nova
Scotia International Tattoo has enter-
tained thousands of people, earning
it the label of the World's Largest
Annual Indoor Show. The Tattoo
began in 1979 as a gala to welcome
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth and
the Queen Mother to the Interna-
tional Gathering of the Clans in Hali-
fax. It was such a great success that
it became an annual tradition, grow-
ing from that one show to 8 shows
every year from July 1-8 and to a
cast of over 2,000 participants com-
bining civilian performers (singers,
musicians, dancers & gymnasts)
from all over the world with military
bands, drill teams and of course,
bagpipes.
This year, the Canadian Institute
of Theatre Technology (CITT) recog-
nized the Nova Scotia Tattoo with its
Award of Technical Merit, which is
presented to a production company
or theatre, or combination thereof,
for outstanding achievement in the
use of theatre technology on a spe-
cific project or production. This was
a major achievement for IATSE Local
680, which provides technicians for
the lighting, audio, stage and video
set up, as well as the 14 spotlight
operators and the audio technician
for the shows themselves. Colin
Richardson, Local 680's Secretary-
Business Agent, is also the Technical
Director of the Tattoo. Congratula-
tions are extended to Colin and to
Local 680 for their hard work and
professionalism.
Local 680 member and Chair of the 2010 Conference Committee Sean Burke (left)
and Local 680 Vice President Debbie Richardson (right) present the award to Colin
Richardson, Technical Director of Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo and
Secretary-Business Agent of Local 680
On September 24, 2010, Local 8 partici-
pated in the “Get out the Jobs” rally in
Philadelphia. Local 8 also donated the
stage and labor for the event.
On July 27, 2010,
Retired International Vice
President Mike Sullivan
and Assistant to the
President Sean McGuire
were present and partici-
pated in the swearing in
of ten new wardrobe
members of Local No. 96,
Worcester, Massachu-
setts.
PHOTO CREDIT: CITT/ICTS
Illinois Local Supports Senator
S
Senator Dick Durbin visited the
Local 476 meeting/training center this
past October in support of John Mul-
roe who was running for 10th District
of the Illinois Senate.
John Mulroe is a brother to Local
476 member Tom Mulroe who works
as a film medic and is also an active
worker as a Chicago Fire Department
Paramedic.
Local 476 is proud to have helped
John Mulroe to his victory on Novem-
ber 2nd. John will be one of our
close ties to Springfield for the
advancement of the motion picture
industry in the state of Illinois.
Pictured here are officers
and members of Local 22 march-
ing in the Labor Day Parade in
Kensington, Md. From left to
right: Brian Benson, Amelia Ben-
son, Lorrie Ledesma, Jeff Mon-
tague, and Bryan Badman (not
pictured Leslie Hartzell and John
Mielczarek).
From left to right: Local 476 Business Manager Mark Hogan, Illinois Senior US
Senator Richard Durbin, newly-elected Illinois 10th District State Senator John
Mulroe, Local 476 Recording Secretary Brad Matthys and Local 476 Vice President
Dan Clancy.
Fourth Quarter 2010 13
14 Official Bulletin
Local 183 in Beaumont, Texas celebrated their 100th Anniversary this year. The Local was chartered on April 20, 1910.
Included in the photo are: Back Row: L to R: John Wells, President JE Wells, Ken Kittell, John Roush, David Atmar, Jim
Wells, Mark Arrington, Christian Sykes, Retired International Representative Robert Trombetta, Shelby Cook. Second
Row: L to R: Danny Lisenby, Jeff Coward, Vice President Louis Loftin, Secretary-Treasurer Marie Pinner, Joyce Helton.
Seated: L to R: Allan Waldrep, Leland Waldrep, Business Agent Larry Allen, WJ Harris, Jamie Strawther.
Pictured here is Local 193's entry in the Bloomington,
Illinois Labor Day Parade. Local 193 was given a
position of prominence (first union entry) in the
parade this year, as this is their centennial year.
T
Local 129 Pitches in for
Tivoli Theatre Restoration
The Tivoli Theatre has served
many functions during the course of
its lifetime in downtown Hamilton,
Ontario. It's been a carriage factory, a
movie theatre, a playhouse, a record
store, a nickelodeon and a vaudeville
house. The Tivoli is tradition. The
Tivoli is memories. And sadly, the
Tivoli has seen better days.
The theatre sat unused and not
properly maintained for years, and it
appeared that nothing would change
that downward trajectory. That's when
Soul of the City: Toonies for Tivoli
was formed. The community group is
trying to raise $5 million towards the
$15 million cost of restoring the the-
atre building as a dance, arts and cul-
ture centre.
The group has formed key part-
nerships to encourage and involve
organizations in the restoration. One
of those is with IATSE Local 129, in
the form of an agreement in principle
to work together to make the restored
theatre a training ground for theatre
workers and apprentices.
“We want it to be a union house,”
says Diamante. “We want long-term
sustainability and quality, achieved
through solid relationships with grass-
roots community institutions, not fair-
weather speculators.”
Local 129 is to be congratulated
for forming this partnership, which
not only stands to increase future
labour opportunities but is simply
the right thing to do for the local
arts community. The campaign has
al l the el ements for success,
involving business, labour and the
community.
Hamilton, Ontario's
Tivoli Theatre, in 1947
Pictured here are IATSE Stagehands at the Lewis-
Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho for the 54th
annual Grace Carroll Rocky Mountain Labor School,
AFL-CIO. From front to back: Mosha Bialac, Nevada
State AFL-CIO Representative, Local 720; Dan
Schooner, Secretary, Local 99; Dan’l Cook, President,
Local 720; Monica Fabbi, 7th Vice President Southern
Idaho Region, Local 99; Andrew Lynch, President,
Local 7 and Fernando Rivera, Member, Local 720.
Fourth Quarter 2010 15
LABOR DAY IN ILLINOIS
Local 33's groundbreaking for
the new office building on the
same site they were previously
on in Burbank, CA. From left to
right: Business Representative-
TV Paul Paolasso, Business
Representative-Theatre James
Wright, Recording Secretary Jane
Leslie, President George Blanch
and Financial Secretary/
Treasurer William Jones.
O
S
Sometimes rank and file employees are asked
to interpret the contract. Don’t put yourself in an
awkward position! Refer employers to your local
union’s Business Representative. Your Business
Representative will know if the contract is held
by the local union or the International. Questions
relating to contracts held by the local union can
be answered by the Business Representative. She
or he will know the bargaining history and the
intent of the contract. Interpretation of contracts
held by the International should be referred to
the local union Business Representative who will
contact the International for interpretation. When
it comes to resolving grievances, it becomes
much more different when representatives have
to overcome the contention that a department
head or crew member “agreed” with a contractu-
al interpretation. This becomes an even more
serious obstacle if a Shop Steward is involved.
Interpretation of agreements by a Steward are
potentially precedent-setting, and can erode the
immediate contract, and in the case of a term sig-
natory company undermine our future bargain-
ing position.
Interpreting
the Contract
RELIGIOUS PRODUCTIONS
16 Official Bulletin Fourth Quarter 2010 17
IATSE, “Biggest Loser” Reach Agreement
Production crew, members, officers and representatives
of the West Coast Studio Locals, as well as the representa-
tives and staff of the IA West Coast office manned the
picket lines daily for the two week duration of the strike.
The Los Angeles County and California State Labor Federa-
tions both sanctioned the strike and provided support, as
did other entertainment industry unions, including AFTRA,
SAG, DGA, WGA and Teamsters Local 399.
On Friday, November 19th, President Loeb travelled to
LA to join the striking workers on the picket lines. Also,
that morning the IA and the employer met in what turned
out to be a marathon negotiating session that lasted until
the early morning on the 20th. A tentative four - year
agreement that is based upon the Videotape Supplemental
Basic Agreement (Green book) and modified to address
specific production issues unique to “The Biggest Loser”
was reached late on Sunday night and the following morn-
ing, the crew ratified the agreement unanimously.
Approximately 70 production and post-production techni-
cians will be covered by this agreement.
The crew of “The Biggest Loser” has demonstrated
what can be accomplished when a crew of skilled techni-
cians and artisans stand together for what they believe in,
and stay together in the face of job loss, replacement
workers and a recalcitrant employer. For the first time in
11 cycles, this crew will be under a union agreement that
will provide health and pension benefits.
There are increasing numbers of examples of faith-based pro-
ductions entering into the low budget motion picture market.
Many of these productions maintain a fidelity to their Christian
principles and willingly enter into agreements that provide crews
and their families with health insurance and retirement benefits-
however, many do not.
The IATSE has recently engaged in organizing campaigns relat-
ed to church-based productions. Sometimes the producers come to
understand that the right thing to do is to treat the crew the same
way as the actors (who thus far have had contracts). Other times
we have had to take the unfortunate measure of organizing the
jobs and even engaging in strikes.
Institutionally, we cannot pick and choose organizing targets
based on the message of the motion picture. Producers are all sub-
ject to the same clear rules- at certain budget levels and with a cer-
tain critical mass of support, we will seek an agreement that
assures your professional standards and provides you and your fam-
ily with contributions toward your health and retirement security.
If you are a member of a religious group that is contemplat-
ing a motion picture, be sure you express the importance of a
contract and the benefits to your family that flow from it. It is
much easier to address these matters in the months of pre-pro-
duction than out on the street during principle photography.
Know that on any non-union job- whether faith-based or not- if
the budget is sufficient and crew interest exists, it is an organizing
target.
Support the IATSE-PAC
YES! I want to support the IATSE-PAC and its efforts to make the voices of IATSE members heard in
Washington. I enclose my voluntary contribution to the IATSE-PACof:
_____ $25.00 _____ $50.00 _____ $100.00 $_____ (Other)
(THE IATSEIS UNABLE TOACCEPT MONIES FROMOUR CANADIAN MEMBERS)
Name: _________________________________________________________________________________________________
Occupation: ____________________________________________________________________________________________
Local No.: ______________________________________________________________________________________________
Current Employer*:_______________________________________________________________________________________
Mailing Address:_________________________________________________________________________________________
Please complete this form and return it with your contribution to the IATSE General Office. Thank you.
*If you are currently between jobs, but usually
work for a variety of entertainment industry
employers, you may state “Various Entertainment
Employers.”
All contributions to the IATSE-PAC are voluntary,
and not tax-deductible.
A person’s contribution to the IATSE-PAC may not
exceed $5,000.00 per year. The contribution
amounts listed are suggestions only, and you may
contribute more or less than the suggested
amount.
Federal Law requires the IATSE-PAC to use its
best efforts to collect and report the name, mail-
ing address, occupation and the name of the
employer of individuals whose contributions
exceed $200.00 in a calendar year.
The amount contributed, or the decision not to
contribute, will not be the basis for the IATSE or
any of its locals to benefit or disadvantage the
member or his/her family. Neither the IATSE nor
any of its locals will retaliate against a member for
deciding not to contribute, or based upon the
amount of the contribution.
On Monday, November 8th, 2010 the production crew of “The Biggest Loser” voted to
strike their employer in order to obtain recognition and a contract. “The Biggest Loser” is a
hit reality program that is produced by Reveille and 3 Ball Productions and airs on NBC.
President Loeb spoke to the striking
workers on the picket line
Maria Elena Durazo, Executive Secretary-Treasurer,
Los Angeles County Federation of Labor showed her
support at the picket line.
PHOTO CREDIT: BETH DUBBER, LOCAL 600
18 Official Bulletin Fourth Quarter 2010 19
We’re seeing Tea Party candidates in places like Alaska, Ken-
tucky, Nevada, and West Virginia saying they want to abolish mini-
mum wage and unemployment compensation, and that it’s the
workers faults they’re unemployed!”
Ackerman added, with a bit of political clairvoyance, that
should the many fringe right-wing candidates make it into office,
the potential for the “gutting of social protections” trade unionists
have spent more than 50 years building becomes a real concern.
“This election is a fight for economic security for working
people, and whether they’ll be pushed further away from the
middle class and fall through the cracks, or whether the country
will (elect leadership) that creates good Union jobs and rebuilds
our infrastructure,” Ackerman emphasized. “The American Labor
movement has a key role to play in mobilizing the working base.
Simply put: the stakes are as big as they ever been.”
Damn straight. Not since 1994 (remember Newt Gingrich’s
infamous “Contract with America”) have working families been
so under attack during a (presidential) mid-term election. And
political veterans like Ackerman, who’s been following such elec-
tions for decades, didn’t need to resort to hyperbole to make
their cases.The examples included former Lehman Brothers man-
aging director John Kasich’s successful bid for governor in Ohio,
and former corporate executives’
Meg Whitman and Carly Fiorina failed
challenges for governor and senator
in California, all of which highlight
the enormous personal wealth anti-
labor candidates funneled into races
this year (the $141.5 million of per-
sonal funds spent by Whitman was
the most inAmerican history).
“We’re talking about the power
elite – people who represent the
richest one percent in this country,”
Ackerman marveled, adding names
like Rob Portman, the former Direc-
tor of the Office and Budget and Man-
agement (OMB) for the Bush
Administration, who was victorious
in his Ohio senate bid against democ-
rat Lee Fisher.“They not only want to
destroy America’s infrastructure by
increasing unemployment in states
with high union density – building
trade unemployment in Nevada is at
60 percent, for example – but, if elect-
ed, they’ll have the power to shape
legislative bodies and redistricting for
a decade to come.”
BOOTS ON THE GROUND
Fortunately the IATSE’s member-
ship had been preparing for these
2010 mid-term elections far in
advance.They were urged on by Pres-
ident Matthew Loeb’s four-point strat-
egy (1. appoint Local Union
Coordinators and Worksite Coordina-
tors to work with AFL-CIO field staff
on the ground, 2. enhance worksite
communications to prevent anti-
worker politicians from defining elec-
tion races, 3. join Labor 2010 walks in
targeted districts, 4. mail Local Union
letters to inform members about spe-
cific state and district issues and the
reasons to vote with their union).
IATSE efforts in battleground and
“watch” states were substantial, per-
haps in some examples making the
difference between a fringe candi-
date bent on destroying working fam-
ilies, and his (or her) pro-labor
opponent.
Starting in California, the nation’s
largest state by population and labor
density (nearly 2.5 million Union
members), where International Rep-
resentative Ron Garcia says IA Locals
were “deeply committed” to helping
elect Jerry Brown for governor and
Barbara Boxer for senate.“Both candi-
dates have proven to be on the side
of working families,” Garcia noted,
months before an election night that
saw the Democrat, Brown, return to
the California governor’s office for
the third time, crushing the Republi-
can, Whitman, by nearly 20 percent-
age points. Boxer beat her opponent,
former Hewlett-Packard CEO Fiorina,
in a closer race – 50 to 45 percent.
Hollywood-based stage and pro-
duction locals played a huge role in
getting Brown elected: the returning
governor amassed 63 percent (one
million votes) in Los Angeles County.
Local 80 (Grips) opened up their Bur-
bank facility every Tuesday evening
for six straight weeks prior to the
election for phone bank calling. “We
had nearly 300 volunteers show up
over the course of the phone banking
effort, and they placed more than
12,500 phone calls to IA members,”
Garcia says. “On the Saturday just
Here’s how Karen Ackerman, the Washing-
ton D.C.-based political director for the AFL-
CIO, described the November 2nd elections
just four weeks before the big day. “The
stakes are enormous. Many of the Republi-
can candidates for governor, Senate and
House are extraordinarily wealthy and
fiercely right wing.
IATSE LOCALS
PLAY A KEY ROLE
IN THE MOST
IMPORTANT
MID-TERM
ELECTIONS FOR
AMERICAN LABOR
IN 16 YEARS.
BY DAV I D G E F F N E R
PHOTO CREDIT: BETH DUBBER, LOCAL 600
Fourth Quarter 2010 21
1998 he attributed the victory to the
Nevada AFL-CIO,” Thompson adds.
“Had Sharron Angle been elected,
(Nevada) would have become the
laughing stock of the nation. She is so
far off the grid, it’s ridiculous.”
Thompson cites the recent City Cen-
ter project (in Las Vegas), which
employed more than 12,000 con-
struction workers, and another
10,000 local hires, making it the
largest privately funded job site in the
world. “City Center was 100 percent
union,” Thompson notes, “and when
their financing was put into jeopardy,
Harry Reid pressured the banks to
step in, while Sharron Angle proudly
said, ‘I wouldn’t have done anything
to save those jobs!’”
IA efforts in Nevada were not lim-
ited to federal campaigns. Local 720
members turned out in force for
incumbent Dina Titus, in a race she
lost by less than two thousand votes
to Republican Joe Heck in the Third
Congressional District. Cook says his
members also spearheaded an in-
depth review process earlier in the
year to flush out the best pro-labor
judicial candidates. In his report to
the Southern Nevada Central Labor
Council, Local 720 member Craig
Michie recalled his Local’s close col-
laboration with Sheet Metal Workers
Union 88 and Operating Engineers
Local 12. More than 76 percent of the
judicial candidates in the field were
interviewed over the course of the
five-day process, with 22 panelists
representing 13 CLC labor unions
helping to put together the list of
labor friendly endorsements.
Just to the south in New Mexico,
IATSE Local 480 (Studio Mechanics)
led the charge in several close races,
including Congressman Ben Ray
Luján’s winning campaign in the 3rd
District, and Martin Heinrich’s race
victorious in the 1st Congressional
District, along with Diane Denish’s
failed bid to become New Mexico’s
first female governor. Local 480 Busi-
ness Agent Jon Hendry, who is also
the New Mexico Federation of
Labor’s political director, says efforts
included purchasing billboards
(directed at Republican candidates)
with messages like “It’s not about
jets, it’s about jobs.”“Those billboards
were paid for by individual contribu-
tions from our members,” Hendry
points out. “Our PAC Chair, who is
also president of the Central Labor
Council, worked full time with the
501(c)(5) advocacy group “We Are
New Mexico” to print up thousands
of banners, and more than 10,000
copies over the last three months. On
one weekend we had dozens of vol-
unteers hand painting more than
1,000 signs, which volunteers then
hung on every post between Santa Fe
and Espanola welcoming President
Clinton [who was stumping for
Democratic candidates in the state].”
Hendry says Local 480, working in
conjunction with the Central Labor
Council, raised more than $9,000 for
a “Your Vote is Your Voice” Labor Day
rally that saw nearly 2,000 visitors.
“We also built floats that I personally
[Hendry has been a Teamster since
1984] drove the semi-rig for in
parades, and we produced YouTube
videos with volunteers from Locals
600 and 700,” he continues.“We made
a 30-second spot for Congressman
Luján in response to a Republican hit
piece launched against him in early
October, and our members made con-
stant set visits to get members regis-
tered and informed, always making
sure to wear our Labor 2010 shirts!”
Although the challenges in a
“blood-red” state like Utah were
many, International Representative
Brian W. Faulkner said IA efforts were
still aggressive. “In early October,
Local 838 (Exhibition Employees)
members joined with other Unions
to canvas a petition for Locomotive
Engineers member Jay Seegmiller,”
Faulkner reports. “And one week
later I participated in an outreach,
with 65 other Union members, on
behalf of State Senator, Karen Mayne,
an American Federation of Teachers
(AFT) member and a staunch advo-
cate for working families.”
20 Official Bulletin
before Election Day, we had almost
two-dozen volunteers show up to
walk the various precincts.”
Complimentary food and drinks
for the ongoing phone banking
events were provided by Locals 33
(Stagehands), 44 (Affiliated Property
Craftspersons), 80 (Grips), 600 (Inter-
national Cinematographers Guild),
700 (Motion Picture Editors Guild),
705 (Costumers), 800 (Art Directors
Guild), and 892 (Costumers Guild) in
a cause that was truly unified.
“Locals 33, 44, 80, 600, 700, 705,
706 [Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists
Guild], 728 [Motion Picture Studio
Electrical Lighting Technicians], 729
[Motion Picture Set Painters & Sign
Writers], 800, 871 [Script Supervi-
sors, Continuity Coordinators,
Accountants and Allied Production
Specialists Guild], and 892 all partici-
pated in this effort to help Brown
and Boxer support working families,”
Garcia adds.
Spirited efforts were also made in
Northern California, where Andrea
Pelous, Secretary-Treasurer, Local 784
(Theatrical Wardrobe Union), reports
her members at the San Francisco
Opera helped to pass out more than
400 postcards as part of the AFL-
CIO’s Working America campaign –
urging working women to host cof-
fee and postcards parties across the
nation to help get out the vote.
(Other participating Locals in the
AFL-CIO’s postcard campaign across
the country were: New York Locals
161 and 764, Orlando Local 631, Los
Angeles Locals 700 and 705, Chicago
Local 769, Cleveland Local 883, and
Indianapolis Local 893.) Pelous
included the AFL-CIO literature in
Local 784 newsletters, as well as can-
didate endorsements by local Labor
Councils in five Bay Area counties
(San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, San
Mateo, and North Bay). Further north,
in Washington, Local 600 contributed
$2,500 in support of efforts to re-
elect Patty Murray. The four-term sen-
ator beat back former commercial
real estate executive Dino Rossi, who
was endorsed by Washington state
Tea Party activists. The national reach
of Local 600 also included $7,500 to
help support Governor elect Brown’s
campaign, as well as a direct $5,000
contribution to Governor elect
Cuomo in New York. All the West
Coast locals contributed or exceeded
their per capita membership in mak-
ing donations to the California State
Federation of Labor’s One Million
NewVoter campaign.
No race this election season was
more important than the battle Sen-
ate Majority Leader Harry Reid waged
to retain his seat in nearby Nevada.
Las Vegas-based Local 720 (Stage-
hands) president, Dan’l Cook, says his
members “were extremely active” in
Reid’s hard-fought contest with far-
right fringe candidate Sharron Angle,
working in conjunction with the
Nevada State Labor Federation, the
Central Labor Council (CLC) and
local organizations like the Paradise
Democratic Club. Nevada State AFL-
CIO Executive Secretary-Treasurer
Danny Thompson says the Nevada
labor movement was a major contrib-
utor to Reid’s effort.
“We hired IATSE members who
were between jobs to go door-to-
door for us doing member-to-member
contact, phone banking, and job site
leafleting,” Thompson recalls. “With
over 200 people on the ground, this
was one of the biggest multi-Union
efforts of any campaign in recent
memory, and IATSE was a big part of
that.”
With more than 225,000 Union-
affiliated workers accounting for 32-
34 percent of the voting record
(depending on District) in Nevada,
labor has always played a huge role in
Nevada’s politics. “When Harry Reid
won his Senate seat (by 424 votes) in
“With over 200 people on the ground,
this was one of the biggest multi-
Union efforts of any campaign
in recent memory, and IATSE
was a big part of that.”
Nevada State AFL-CIO
Executive Secretary-Treasurer
Danny Thompson
Fourth Quarter 2010 23
Election Day, Local 491 members split
the cost (with Teamster 391) for a
bus to journey up to Washington D.C.
for Labor’s One Nation Working
Together march on October 2nd.
Roughly 100 members of the South
Eastern North Carolina Labor Council
(CLC) made the trip to the U.S. capi-
tol, where tens of thousands of work-
ing families came together to support
pro-labor candidates in advance of
Election Day.
Rosin, who has been working
with North Carolina’s State Federa-
tion of Labor for the past five years,
says that the organization “does more
with less” than any group he’s ever
seen. He points out that North Caroli-
na has the lowest union density of
any state in the country, and the
cooperation amongst the different
labor groups, IATSE included, has
proved hugely successful in changing
the political atmosphere toward
working people in the state.
“We put together an amazing field
program in 2008 that put Congress-
man Larry Kissell (8th District) into
office in an area that was a Republi-
can stronghold,” Rosin adds, “and
once, again, in 2010, this became a
targeted race that IATSE members
from Charlotte to the eastern portion
of his district were working his field
plan.” Given such efforts, democratic
voters returned Kissell to office on
election night, despite conservative
groups like Americans for Job Securi-
ty and Center for Individual Freedom
spending more than $1 million to
defeat him. Republicans had control
of the house when I first ran [in
2006],” Kissell said after his victory.
“It’s never been about Washington.
It’s always been about the district.”
One of the keys to IATSE efforts
in North Carolina, where early voting
began October 16th, was to insure
that all IA members who wanted to
vote but were not yet registered had
all the necessary information during
the early voting period. “Our mem-
bers in Wilmington volunteered to
put together mailings for the CLC and
other local unions,” Rosin says. “They
got involved in the AFL-CIO endorse-
ment process, whether it was for a
school or county board race, or a
state house or state senate election.
IA members sat down with candi-
dates to talk about issues that impact
us directly, so we had a meaningful
voice in the endorsement process.”
Despite a strong and mobilized
effort by IATSE locals in the Sunshine
state, anti-labor candidates managed
to prevail in three key races. Central
Florida was a battleground region, as
ultra-conservative former state sena-
tor Daniel Webster defeated 8th Dis-
trict incumbent Alan Grayson, a
provocative liberal who won in his
seat in 2008 despite Florida voting
Republican in the national election.
In a closely watched gubernatorial
race, wealthy Republican business-
man (and former health care execu-
tive) Rick Scott beat back a heavy
challenge from the state’s Chief
Financial Officer Adelaide “Alex” Sink,
a pro-environment, pro-labor candi-
date who was the first Democrat
22 Official Bulletin
Faulkner said IATSE efforts in
Utah went hand-in-hand with other
Get out the Vote (GOTV) members
like the Utah State Labor Federation,
the Utah Working Families Campaign,
the State Democratic Party and Utah
Common Values (an organization
dedicated to promoting Democratic
values to young Latter Day Saints
members). “We did bus tours around
the state,” he recounts,“including one
with 56 field organizers [and several
Local 838 members] that traveled to
St. George, the second fastest grow-
ing municipality in the nation. It was
the largest interaction with Democra-
tic and working family households in
Utah’s history.” GOTV’s targeted goal
of 65 percent participation of Union
households, and an overall participa-
tion of 51 percent of Democratic
households in Utah was key to blue
victories in the predominantly red
state, including incumbent Jim Math-
eson holding onto his seat in the 2nd
Congressional District, and democrat
Sim Gill-Lohra Miller winning the Salt
Lake County district attorney’s
office.
“The road to success was quite
steep,” Faulkner reflects.“But through
our association with other AFL-CIO
affiliates - Operating Engineers, Steel
Workers, AFSME, CWA, Iron Workers,
AFT, Fire Fighters, OPEIU, Painters,
and IBEW - the outlook for success
grew with each passing week.”
SOUTHERN VOICES
Elaine Marshall’s unsuccessful
attempt to unseat Senator Richard
Burr in North Carolina, who voted
thumbs down in extending unem-
ployment benefits and raising the
minimum wage, was, in many ways, a
referendum on where progressive
government is headed in America.
Marshall, a North Carolina Public
Employees Union member, became
the first woman ever elected to
statewide executive office, when she
won the 1996 Secretary of State elec-
tion by a whopping eight percent. Re-
elected three times since, Marshall
received the second highest vote total
of any candidate in the state (in
2008), mirroring the democratic victo-
ries of Governor Bev Perdue, U.S. Sen-
ator Kay Hagan, and President Barack
Obama in the same election cycle.
Jason Rosin, Business Agent for
Local 491 (Studio Mechanics) in
Wilmington, and President of the
Southeastern North Carolina AFL-CIO
Central Labor Council, says the rough-
ly 1,000 IATSE members across North
Carolina tried to build on the success
of 2008 in these mid-term elections.
Local 491 President Harrison Palmer
sent out hundreds of letters urging IA
members to vote for Marshall, as well
as Senate comparison pieces in the
Local 491 newsletter, in the weeks
leading up to November 2nd. More
pro-Marshall literature was sent
directly to Charlotte-area stagehands
in Local 322, as well as IA Locals 278
(Mixed), 417 (Mixed), 574 (Mixed),
and 635 (Mixed). One month before
International Representative Peter Marley and
International Vice President Thom Davis
“AFL-CIO endorsement literature was
distributed to all IATSE members in
the state, letting them know which
candidates were union friendly.”
Local 27 Business Manager Dave Vacca
Maria Elena Durazo, Executive
Secretary-Treasurer, Los Angeles, County Federation of Labor
Fourth Quarter 2010 25 24 Official Bulletin
elected to Florida’s state cabinet
since 1998; first-term congresswoman
Suzanne Kosmas, who bravely backed
Obama’s Health Care Reform in
Orlando’s right-leaning 24th district,
waged an equally tough campaign in
her loss to former deputy sheriff
Sandy Adams.
Josh Anijar was the AFL-CIO’s
Zone Coordinator in Central Florida.
He says Locals 835 (Exhibition
Employees) and 631 (Stagehands)
took “numerous steps to make sure
their members were educated, mobi-
lized and ready to make their voice
heard” on voting day. That included
taking part in statewide labor march-
es, manning phone banks, and passing
out leaflets at their jobsites. “Activists
like [Local 835 member] Fred Bevis
tirelessly committed themselves to
volunteering whenever humanly pos-
sible, “ Anijar says. [A letter of com-
mendation from IATSE President
Matthew Loeb was sent out to Bevis
in recognition for his efforts.] “As the
corporate assault continued in this
election cycle, our grassroots efforts
offered an alternative discourse that
challenges their money and Astroturf
mobilizing with rank and file activism
and education on how important this
election was for the working people
of Florida,”Anijar adds.
Although Louisiana was not consid-
ered a battleground state (legislative
elections are held in odd-number
years), 3rd District Congressman Char-
lie Melancon’s attempt to best Republi-
can David Vitter for a U.S. Senate seat
was a focus for IATSE members. Melan-
con, elected to the House in 2004 and
re-elected twice since, was the only
Democrat from Louisiana’s seven-mem-
ber House delegation. Russell Wing-
field, president of Local 298
(Stagehands) and a delegate to the
Central Trades & Labor Council, was
the IA union coordinator in Shreveport
and he approached the IATSE PAC for
a $5,000 contribution to Melancon’s
campaign, which ultimately fell short
of victory. Other efforts included “red
beans and rice” luncheons for Union
members in conjunction with IBEW
194, and mailing out the pro-labor slate
of candidates (as endorsed by the Cen-
tral Trades and Labor Council of
Shreveport and Vicinity AFL-CIO Com-
mittee on Political Education – COPE -
to all 298 members.
“We also worked closely with Phil
Locicero (President of Local 478 –
Studio Mecahnics) and his members
in North Louisiana,” Wingfield
recounts. “There are more than 150
(Local 478) members in Shreveport
working in films, and many are new
to the area.” Wingfield says his local
set its sights on the Shreveport may-
oral race to help get Cedric Glover re-
elected in the hopes of that he will
support Local 298 members working
in the new Shreveport Convention
Center. Louisiana voters put Glover
back in the mayor’s office for another
four years, winning by a whopping
margin of 64 to 34 percent.
WHERE THE RUBBER
MEETS THE ROAD
No race received more national
attention than Ohio Governor Ted
Strickland’s razor close loss (less than
100,000 votes) to former congressman
John Kasich in this heavily unionized
swing state. Local 27 (Stagehands) in
Cleveland led IATSE’s efforts. Working
alongside the LABOR 2010 Committee
and the North Shore Federation of
Labor (AFL-CIO), the stagehands
worked tirelessly to drive home the
importance of the mid-term election.
Business Manager Dave Vacca says
Local 27 members volunteered their
time for precinct walks and phone
banks, prepared and passed out litera-
ture, and staffed polls on election days.
“The election committee mailed
out letters encouraging members and
their families to get out the vote,”
Vacca explains. “AFL-CIO endorse-
ment literature was distributed to all
IATSE members in the state, letting
them know which candidates were
union friendly.” The key role Union
membership in Cleveland played was
made clear by the number of pre-
election visits from Democratic
heavyweights. “President Obama and
Vice President Biden held a rally for
Union members at Cleveland State
University,” Vacca adds, “just days
before the election.”And Union mobi-
lization paid off in three key Ohio
congressional districts, the 10th, 11th,
and 13th, where pro-labor candidates
Dennis Kuchinich, Marcia Fudge, and
Betty Sutton, all came out on top.
Ohio working families nearly man-
aged to push the incumbent governor
back into the lead, voting 72 percent
for Strickland versus 28 percent for
his anti-labor opponent, Kasich.
Pennsylvania is home to two-
dozen IA locals and, like Ohio, its
heavy union density is broken up
along demographic lines. As Interna-
tional Representative Joseph Hartnett
points out, “Philadelphia and Pitts-
burgh have always been (pro-labor)
strongholds and the rest of the state
tends to go conservative. [This past
election] was all about voter turnout
in the major cities and suburbs for
the statewide races, while the con-
gressional races were mostly a toss-
up.” Harnett says the Allegheny
County Labor Council (based in Pitts-
burgh) was very active with Key-
stone State union members,
coordinating phone-banking events at
the United Steel Workers’ headquar-
ters in downtown Pittsburgh. Spon-
sored events to view candidate
debates were also part of the effort,
along with COPE sending out infor-
mation on the endorsed candidates.
“Dan Onorato (D) versus Tom
Corbett (R) was a key race for Penn-
sylvania IA members,” Harnett contin-
ues. “The state typically votes for the
party that is out of power when it
comes to the governor’s office, so
Onorato [who lost by two percentage
points] had an uphill battle all the
way.” Harnett says the race for Arlen
Specter’s open Senate seat also was a
focus. “Joe Sestak [democratic con-
gressman from the 7th District] won
the primary in a big upset and closed
the race from a 9-point deficit to a
dead heat in the week before voting,”
Harnett relates. “Pat Toomey is a for-
mer Republican congressman from
the 15th district who carries a 97 per-
“Working America canvassers knocked on
more than 850,000 doors, operating out
of offices in 13 cities in nine states.
Karen Nussbaum, Executive Director, Working America
cent lifetime rating from the Ameri-
can Conservative Union, so his victo-
ry was not a good thing for working
families in Pennsylvania. The Interna-
tional made a contribution to Sestak’s
campaign at a PAC fundraiser at the
General Executive Board Meeting
way back in early August.”
In Philadelphia, Local 8 (Stage-
hands) joined with members of
AFSCME, AFT, APWU, CWA, IAM, IBB,
IBEW, IBT, Ironworkers, IUPAT, LIUNA,
NALC, OPEIU, Roofers, SEIU, SMWIA,
UA, UFCW, and USW to support labor-
endorsed candidates. Hundreds of
Union brothers and sisters turned out
for a rally in the city’s famed Love
Park, where IUPAT General President
James Williams, Southeastern PA Area
Labor Federation Chair John Meyer-
son, and Pennsylvania AFL-CIO Secre-
tary-Treasurer Frank Snyder urged
working families to get out the vote
for labor-endorsed candidates like Joe
Sestak, Dan Onorato, Patrick Murphy
and Bryan Lentz, even though such
efforts were not enough to overcome
unrest over the economy in all of the
afore-mentioned races.
Just up the interstate, 10th Dis-
trict Secretary-Treasurer John Hill,
reports a very busy election cycle for
the roughly 10,000 IATSE members
based in New York and New Jersey.
“We endorsed 55 candidates for
office in the two states,” Hill recounts,
“with all of them being carefully vet-
ted to make sure they were friends of
organized labor. The vetting process,
which started in late spring and
included working with the New York
and New Jersey AFL-CIO’s, continued
throughout the summer. Nearly five
dozen IATSE locals were advised on
which candidates deserved our
Union’s support.”
Hill adds that the 10th District
also made donations totaling $27,850
to labor-friendly candidates in the
months leading up to elections. Many
of the donations were hand carried
to the candidates with messages of
support from the IATSE. “From Buffa-
lo to Atlantic City, our members con-
tributed many hours of time and
talent working on political cam-
paigns,” Hill continues. “From neigh-
borhood walks to leaf leting and
phone banks, their voices were
heard. We had face-to-face meetings
with Andrew Cuomo, Eric T. Schnei-
derman and Thomas P. DiNapoli.”
State comptroller DiNapoli was
appointed to the office to complete
the term when the previous comp-
troller was removed from office,
while Governor Elect Cuomo, and
Attorney General Elect Schneiderman
won their races by hefty margins.
Cuomo’s victory was highly publi-
cized after voters deemed his oppo-
nent, Carl Paladino, wildly off the
grid.The 64-year old real estate devel-
oper and Tea Party fringe candidate
blatantly dismissed voters in union-
dense NewYork City, while promising
to “take a baseball bat” to the state
government inAlbany.
BACK TO WORK
So what are the lessons to be
gleaned from Decision 2010? Accord-
ing to Karen Nussbaum, Executive
Director, Working America (the com-
munity affiliate for the AFL-CIO), it
was not what the mainstream media,
or even ballot returns, would have us
all believe.
“Voters may have been angry
about the economy,” Nussbaum notes.
“But they were not in favor of Repub-
lican solutions.” In fact, the 3 million
strong membership of Working Amer-
ica (72 percent who self-identify as
“moderate or conservative”) voted 71
percent to 29 percent in the House
races, and 70 percent to 30 percent
in the Senate elections, in favor of
pro-labor endorsed candidates.
“Between September 1 and
November 2nd,” Nussbaum details,
“Working America canvassers
knocked on more than 850,000
doors, operating out of offices in 13
cities in nine states. We worked on
high-profile wins like the Nevada and
Colorado Senate races and the Min-
nesota and Oregon gubernatorial
races, but our work continues all the
way down the ballot to state legisla-
tures and ballot initiatives.”
The challenges faced by Union
members mobilizing the pro-labor
vote were, in many respects, unprece-
dented, even by 1994 standards.
Heavyweight Beltway lobbying
groups, like the U.S. Chamber of Com-
Fourth Quarter 2010 27 26 Official Bulletin
The Tea Party, the resurging Republican agenda, vows
to repeal healthcare reform, legislative attacks on trade
unions.... As Yogi Berra put it, “it’s déjà vu all over again”.
Frustration with the economic meltdown has caused
voters to lash out against the current administration and
the heads of Democratic lawmakers were chopped off in
record numbers on November 2nd. The Republicans did a
great job of playing, “pin the tail on the donkey” blaming
the Democrats for the financial mess that was orchestrat-
ed and delivered by the Republican party under George W.
Bush.
The Republican base seems a mile wide, but an inch
deep. Seeming to forget who is responsible for turning a
blind eye to who caused massive spending overages, irre-
sponsible tax cuts to the wealthy and allowed the financial
sector to rob the American public.
Political involvement by all IATSE members and their
families is going to be critical to stop the radical Tea Party
agenda that seems to be the rudder steering the Republi-
can ship. Talk to your local Democratic party, State Labor
Council and if you can afford to give of your time or
money, do it. If you can’t, be sure to vote and talk with
others about important issues like healthcare, tax cuts for
millionaires and urge them to vote too.
2012 will be an epic battleground. The Supreme Court
has lifted corporate spending limits on political campaigns
and ever since the taxpayers bailed them out, many of
these corporations are hoarding piles of cash (rather than
hiring) and licking their chops at the prospect of deposing
Democrats and those with pro-labor agendas through all
manner of Swift boat-like attacks.
Get involved NOW!! Because if you didn’t like the Bush
years, you really don’t want to see what a President Palin
would be like.
P O L I T I C A L LY I N C O R R E C T
merce, spent more than $32 million to
attack Democratic candidates in the
weeks leading up to the election.
American Crossroads and its nonprof-
it sister group, Crossroads GPS (found-
ed with support from GOP strategists
Karl Rove and Ed Gillespie), spent $40
million in a similar effort. [By compar-
ison, the top independent Democratic
group, the American Federation of
State, County and Municipal Employ-
ees, spent about $12 million.]
In fact, the rise of non-profit polit-
ical donors, who are not required to
support their funding sources and are
overwhelmingly aligned with far-right
interest groups, played a huge role in
pro-labor defeats this past election
cycle.According to a Washington Post
analysis, such“shadowy” groups spent
twice as much on congressional races
this year as they did in 2008, and
more than five times as much as they
did in 2006. Jim Jordan, a political
strategist who founded Common-
sense Ten, a super PAC that spent $3
million in support of Democrats, says
the bar will be raised even higher for
working families in 2012.
“Obviously, we find this kind of
politics distasteful,” Jordan related in a
recent Washington Post article. “But
we'll have to ask ourselves whether
our causes and constituencies are
best served by disarming or by getting
in the game in a more robust way.”
Either way, the effort put forth by
IATSE members in support of work-
ing family candidates was unprece-
dented, and will, hopefully, only be
surpassed in 2012. IA members
placed tens of thousands of phone
calls to get out the vote, and donated
thousands of more hours walking
precincts, attending rallies and
marches, and vetting pro-labor candi-
dates in advance of election day. As
President Matthew Loeb reflects: “At
the end of the day I am proud of the
work we all did in these Mid-Term
elections. There were numerous suc-
cesses on the state and local levels,
and this Union was instrumental in
helping to return many pro-labor
congressmen and women to office.
But clearly the overall results only
increased the challenges for working
families and the labor community as
we move forward. The most impor-
tant thing to take back from all this
hard work is how important it is for
this membership to stay connected
to the issues and leaders that impact
working families, so that the 2012
elections yield results that are far
more promising.”
28 Official Bulletin
O
On June 21, 2010, Long Island
Local 340 honored Brother Jack Cas-
sidy with his 50 year Gold Card,
presented by General Secretary-
Treasurer James Wood.
The presentation was a memo-
rable occasion for Brother Cassidy,
who was surrounded by family and
friends including his three sons, all
IA members, who flew in from
around the country to attend. Also
in attendance were International
Vice Presidents Anthony DePaulo
and John Ford, Local One President
James Claffey, Jr. and Local 52 Vice
President John Fundus.
Long Island Local Honors Long-time Member
International President Matthew Loeb and
International Vice President Anthony DePaulo
presented Brother Richard Rider with a plaque for 14
years of dedicated service to the IATSE 10th District
Executive Board. Brother Rider retired from the Board
at the District Convention on October 16, 2010.
At a celebration held in his
honour, Local 212 Member
Barry Merrells received a 50-
year scroll and gold pin from
International Vice President
Damian Petti, who is also the
President of Local 212. Early in
his career, Barry worked as a
grip, electrician and property
master on numerous motion
picture projects. He later
served as one of the Local’s
most prolific stage shop stew-
ards. Barry also held the posi-
tions of Stage and Production
Bus i ne s s Age nt . Bar r y
expressed his gratitude to the
Local and the International for
the honour. Held on a family
ranch near Irricana, Alberta,
the celebration included a
BBQ, dancing, campfire and
fireworks.
From left to right: International Vice President John Ford, Local 340 Business Agent
Brian Frankel, International Vice President Anthony DePaulo, International General
Secretary-Treasurer James Wood, Brother Jack Cassidy, Local 340 President Robert
Sullivan, Local 340 Vice President Charles Trantum and Local 340 Treasurer Robert
Gottschalk, Jr.
New Orleans Local 39 hon-
ored Brother Walter A. Weysham,
Jr. with his Gold Card. Walter
joined Stage Local 39 in 1967.
Over his long career, he worked
in every department of the IA-
Stage, Movies, and Tradeshows.
Congratulations Walter and all
the best in your retirement.
50-YEAR MILESTONE FOR LOCAL 212 MEMBER
Local 212 Member Barry Merrells and
International Vice President Damian Petti
Brother Lenny Perry of Local 720 received the
Opportunity Villages Good Guy Award on May
22, 2010. Opportunity Village serves people with
intellectual disabilities. From left to right: Local
720 Business Agent John Hanson, Local 720 President
Dan’l Cook, Brother Lenny Perry, Local 720 Member
Tony Gennarelli and International Representative
Peter Marley.
Fourth Quarter 2010 29
S U P P O RT F O R U N I T E H E R E !
Hyatt Regency Boston (Boston, MA)
Hyatt Harborside at Logan Airport
(Boston, MA)
Hyatt Regency Cambridge
(Cambridge, MA)
Hyatt Regency Chicago (Chicago, IL)
Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
(Indianapolis, IN)
Hyatt Regency Century Plaza
(Los Angeles, CA)
Hyatt Regency Long Beach
(Long Beach, CA)
Hyatt Regency O’Hare (Rosemont, IL)
Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego
(San Diego, CA)
Hyatt Regency San Francisco
(San Francisco, CA)
Grand Hyatt San Francisco
(San Francisco, CA)
Hyatt Fisherman’s Wharf
(San Francisco, CA)
Andaz West Hollywood
(West Hollywood, CA)
Hyatt Regency Vancouver
(Vancouver, BC)
UNITE HERE is facing major challenges with Hyatt
Hotels. Hyatt has taken the lead in its attempts to
weaken union standards across the United States
and Canada. Hyatt has also refused to permit non-
union workers to have a fair process to unionize. On
August 31, 2009, Hyatt fired their entire non-union
housekeeping staff in 3 Boston area hotels and
replaced them with minimum wage subcontracted
workers.
Earlier this year, workers in 15 cities staged demon-
strations outside Hyatt hotels from Boston to Honolulu,
from Miami to Vancouver. In September 2010, workers
walked out on strike at five Hyatt hotels demanding that
Hyatt negotiate fair contracts.
Hyatt’s actions have made it clear that they are com-
mitted to making difficult, dangerous and low paying hotel
jobs worse.
The IATSE supports our brothers and sisters of UNITE
HERE and asks that you join in their boycott against Hyatt
Hotels.
D O N O T P A T R O N I Z E :
RESUMES FOR THE ROAD
The Stagecraft Department has seen a recent surge in requests for ACT cards for traveling members on tiered tours
for the Networks, Troika’s, Big League’s, Phoenix’s, and WorkLight’s of the world, as well as for Broadway League Modi-
fied and SET tours. We are rapidly approaching 500 members in the department and although many of these individuals
are represented by specialty skills, a good number are entry level or assistant positions on these traveling attractions.
These numbers do not include our members who travel with Disney On Ice or VEE Corporation.
Several Official Bulletins ago, the Department offered to gather resumes to provide to these Employers with the
assumption that within our current member base there are those who want to travel on the road and hone their skills.
We would once again solicit resumes for individuals interested in traveling and urge those interested members to
forward their resumes to the General Office in care of the Stagecraft Department or via the Stagecraft Email address at
Stagecraft@iatse-intl.org. Alternatively the department would urge those members interested in touring opportunities to
visit the websites of the aforementioned employers. This solicitation will not result in employment opportunities until
we build a substantial amount of resumes and the Employer get comfortable seeing the General office as a reliable
resource for individuals interested in traveling.
30 Official Bulletin
A
A Lifetime
To Some,
A Career
To Others
As quickly as the world is chang-
ing, the IATSE has made remarkable
changes to the way we administer
and address the issuance of traveling
contracts under the leadership
of International President Loeb.
Whether it be the introduction of the
Passport system or the morphing of
one-off touring agreements into term
agreements, the changes made in the
last several years have been very
well accepted by the traveling mem-
bers. The introduction of the new
traveling members’ computer system
will allow the department to monitor
changing street conditions more eas-
ily and allow us and the IA’s website
to know in real time who is touring
with each attraction any given day
versus the myriad of challenges that
the old system had.
Towards that end, a veteran Pink
Contract employee recently asked a
question about when Annuity con-
tributions started in the traditional
full Pink Contract, which drove us
to the archives to gather the answer.
Although we were only able to give
an approximate answer, which was
sufficient to the member, the
Department was able to review con-
tracts that were negotiated a mere
30 years ago. Thus the header “A
Lifetime to Some, A Career to Oth-
ers” - consider if you will that:
I In 1980 the minimums were $350
for heads, $300 for assistants.
Effective January 1st, 2011 those
minimums are $1025 for heads,
$925 for assistants.
I Per Di em was $150 a
week, effective January 1st,
2011 it will be $840 a week.
I Holidays were defined as Christ-
mas and Holy Week, now we
have eleven holidays where vari-
ous premiums are paid or guar-
anteed.
I The 1980 contract was a seven
day a week agreement, 24 hours
a day. Now it is a six day agree-
ment with restricted work hours
with premiums beyond.
I The Pension Contribution was
$24 a week or $4.80 a day.
Today that contribution is $80
per week, $16 a day.
I The Health and Welfare contribu-
tion was $22.75 a week, or $3.25
a day. Effective January 1st, 2011
that contribution will be $295.50
a week, or $49.25 a day.
I The Vacation contribution was
7% of the minimum salary, today
it is 5% of the actual salary (7%
for wardrobe personnel.)
I There was no Annuity Contribu-
tion in 1980. As of January 1st,
2011 the contribution will be
11.5% of the actual salary.
There are so many working con-
dition changes that time will not
allow them all to be shared. But
rest assured that they are signifi-
cant, and recognize the achieve-
ments in the several decades to the
Pink Contract system by Retired
International Vice President Michael
J. Sullivan and those who came
before him. In addition at the direc-
tion of, and with dedication and
determination, our current Interna-
tional President engaged addition-
al staff to service the traveling
community at large. Changes have
been made to our computer sys-
tems, we have negotiated and intro-
duced term agreements and the
passport system, and we feel that
the best is yet to come.
T
Final Curtain for Phantom of the Opera
The final performance of the
long-running North American tour of
The Phantom of the Opera was on
October 31st, Halloween night, at the
Pantages Theatre in Los Angeles.
The musical has been represent-
ed on the road since the first national
tour began performances in Los
Angeles in May 1989. Since that time,
there have been three U.S. national
touring productions. The first nation-
al tour (Christine Company) played
Los Angeles and San Francisco for a
combined total run of almost ten
years, grossing $305,192,485 with
3,902 performances and 6.6 million
patrons. The second national tour
(Raoul Company) played major mar-
kets during an eight-and-a-half-year
run, grossing $393,608,819 with 3,364
performances and 7.5 million
patrons. The third national tour
(Music Box Company) is the only
production still currently touring the
U.S. and will have played 7,284 per-
formances at the time of its closing,
spanning almost 18 years on the
road (there have been some breaks
during that time).
The three U.S. national tours
have grossed over $1.5 billion in
combined box office sales. When the
Music Box Company concluded its
run on Oct. 31, the three touring
companies played 216 engagements
in 77 cities for an unprecedented
combined total of over 14,500 perfor-
mances. Three IA members were
with the show from beginning to
end. Congratulations to Randy More-
land, Head Carpenter, Local 421,
Mike Gosensik, Advanced Rigger,
Local 251 and Francis Fehr, Head
Wardrobe, Local 799.
Fourth Quarter 2010 31
Here is the last photo taken of the crew of Phantom. From left to right: (Back row)
Don Adcock, Keith Harris, Marvin Crosland, Henry Talarowski, Mo Ellis, Randall
Moreland, Sean Collins, Jacel Evans, Jim Hegwood (Front) Steve Ruelle, Dan
Frasco,Tara Gaige, Marc Mannonni, Brian Weinkauf.
O
Blizzcon 2010
32 Official Bulletin
A
Anaheim Local 504 enjoyed a week of
work doing the installation, show, and dis-
mantling of the Blizzcon 2010 tradeshow at
the Orange County Convention Center. The
Blizzcon Show is a popular computer gam-
ing show that attracts over 26,000 attendees.
Tickets for the show sold out in four and
one-half seconds.
Local 504 received a major assist in
staffing the calls from Los Angeles Local 33,
San Bernardino Local 614 and Palm Springs
Local 707. Labor calls averaged 160 workers
per day and peaked at 227. IATSE members
hung 405 rigging points to suspend 7,000
feet of lighting truss and large amounts of
audio visual equipment.
The show was broadcast pay-per-view
in the U.S. and by webcast in several for-
eign countries.
EDUCATION SEMINAR IN LAS VEGAS
In conjunction with the regular Mid-Winter meeting of the General Exec-
utive Board, there will be an Education Seminar on Wednesday, January 26,
2011 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 pm. in the Champagne 4 Ballroom at the Paris
Las Vegas Hotel. James Heinzman, Partner with the firm of Schultheis &
Panettieri will present a seminar on “Best Practices in Union Administra-
tion”. Topics to be covered include record keeping, document retention, a
discussion of IRS and DOL required filings and issues, as well as practical
ways to avoid future catastrophes. This seminar is open to all representa-
tives from Local Unions, who are encouraged to attend.
IATSE PAC FUND
As was most recently
demonstrated by the recent
2010 elections, money has
become the most significant
determinant in getting our mes-
sage heard among politicians at
all levels. You may have read
that over three billion dollars
was spent in the last election
cycle. As much as we may find
this process unpalatable, the
IATSE must continue to raise
funds to compete with the enti-
ties that want to take us back-
wards on many important
i ssues, i ncl udi ng r ecent
advancements in Labor Law
from the Obama administration.
As the Stagecraft Depart-
ment hopes you are aware,
every Pink Contract that the
IATSE holds with every Employer
allows for the remittances of
monies to be contributed to the
IATSE Political Action Committee
Fund. The Department includes
the check-off forms with the ACT
kits we send to new members.
In addition the IATSE Web site
has an area dedicated to the
IATSE PAC Fund and has down-
loadable donation forms and an
online contribution system. We
also have hard copy check-off
forms that can be sent out to
each tour upon the request of
the show’s steward.
Please consider helping us
by participating in the PAC. It is
never too soon to start partici-
pating as the 2012 election
cycle is already starting to gear
up even as we read this article.
Modified Term Touring
Agreement Set To Expire
Our groundbreaking and maiden term agreements with Networks, Troika,
Big League, Phoenix, and WorkLight are set to expire at the end of June, 2011.
The Stagecraft Department would like to begin getting recommendations for
changes to these agreements from individuals currently traveling under them.
Please forward your recommendations, either individually or by tour, to the
IATSE General Office or to the Stagecraft Department Email address at Stage-
craft@iatse-intl.org.
The Department assumes that under the direction of International President
Loeb, a committee of bargaining unit employees will be appointed and
assigned to assist the Co-Directors and other staff in negotiating a successor
agreement with these Employers. It is also our intent to morph these agree-
ments into the Passport system and to continue to reduce the amount of Pink
Contracts being issued as opposed to negotiating collective bargaining agree-
ments that accompany the passports.
We will put another reminder in the 1st Quarter Issue of the Official Bul-
letin to remind our members traveling under these contracts but urge you to
start thinking about negotiating the contract.
Fourth Quarter 2010 33
Fourth Quarter 2010 35 34 Official Bulletin
William J. Bratton 1
July 1, 2010
Michael W. Gibbs 1
August 10, 2010
Edward R. Leddy, 1
August 5, 2010
Joseph T. Loglisci 1
August 9, 2010
Joseph M. Lynch 1
September 27, 2010
Richard Mercado 1
July 1, 2010
Michael F. Milne 1
September 16, 2010
George D. Patterson, Jr. 1
January 25, 2010
Seth M. Sternberg 1
September 6, 2010
William Suraci, Jr. 1
July 28, 2010
Leonard S. Will 1
July 8, 2010
Robert D. Yaeger 1
September 14, 2010
Martin B. Walsh 2
April 6, 2010
Edward C. Brown 3
September 20, 2010
Gabriel Negri 3
August 31, 2010
Robert J. Helms 4
September 9, 2010
Peter Gill 10
May 25, 2010
Dennis Souder 12
July 4, 2010
Craig Kinkel 13
August 10, 2010
Kenneth R. Sjogren 16
July 1, 2010
Mary K. Doherty 24
July 23, 2010
Richard J. Saxe 25
July 1, 2010
Donald Jonke 27
August 3, 2010
Ronald Carnegie 28
August 8, 2010
Irving G. Ewen 28
March 8, 2010
Steven H. Smith 28
September 5, 2010
Oscar A. Smith 33
August 2, 2010
Calvin Pickett 33
July 2, 2010
Frank A. Otello 33
August 9, 2010
Arnold F. Meusborn 33
August 11, 2010
John W. Aldays 44
June 14, 2010
Lavernia N. Curry 44
July 18, 2010
Santo D'Arienzo 44
September 26, 2010
Patrick C. Johnston 44
July 12, 2010
Charles F. Mattson 44
August 10, 2010
Robin D. Peyton 44
July 1, 2010
Jack B. Torpin 44
April 6, 2010
Bradford H. Turner 44
August 31, 2010
Floyd Valero 44
June 30, 2010
James W. Callahan 52
October 27, 2010
Francesco Finocchio 52
September 18, 2010
Kenneth G. Fitzpatrick 52
July 18, 2010
Deane Helms 52
November 7, 2010
Michael Jordan 52
November 27, 2010
Lee Hartman, Jr. 55
July 28, 2010
Rolland Dicaire 56
September 21, 2010
William J. Hamilton 58
September 18, 2010
Richard Pikula 58
July 10, 2010
Vic Fontaine 63
September 15, 2010
Neil MacDonald 63
July 20, 2010
Robert E. Taylor, Jr. 69
September 1, 2010
Jonathan Whitlock 76
July 4, 2010
Terry R. Gilberry 97
August 22, 2010
Harry W. Lewis 110
September 13, 2010
Colin Campbell 118
June 30, 2010
Daniel P. Flanagan 181
September 23, 2009
Jane K. Paunicka-Zusman 187
September 14, 2010
Paul H. Jackson, III 209
July 4, 2010
Martin Shostak 210
August 15, 2010
Greg A. Leatherman 217
September 6, 2010
Karl F. Wikstrom 219
June 1, 2010
Brian D. Archer 274
July 9, 2010
Michael D. Price 274
September 25, 2010
Greg McKinnon 300
April 5, 2010
Israel Moon 322
September 1, 2010
Stetson Poleahla 336
September 16, 2010
Kenneth Leslie-Smith 411
October 5, 2010
John Crisman 476
July 24, 2010
Noah D. Smith 478
August 23, 2010
Bradford H. Turner 488
September 7, 2010
Lester McGraw 500
September 3, 2010
Joseph Logar 514
June 19, 2010
Charles E. Hamlett 614
August 1, 2010
Michael W. Gibbs 631
August 10, 2010
Kenneth Leslie-Smith 667
October 5, 2010
Robert L. Forshier 695
January 19, 2010
Dana B. Wood 695
July 1, 2010
Daniel Blake 700
May 18, 2002
James Clark 700
July 20, 2000
Gordon A. Daniel 700
August 21, 2009
Vincent R. Gutierrez 700
April 6, 2010
Gerald Kleppel 700
April 1, 2010
Leonard Kroll 700
September 17, 2005
William Laubender 700
November 3, 2003
Joseph A. Mayer 700
July 16, 2007
William H. Wistrom 700
April 10, 2010
Michael P. Dennison 705
September 1, 2010
Sherry Caudle 706
May 8, 2010
Lynn Masters 706
June 5, 2010
Ray W. Hartzell 720
July 24, 2010
Robert Donn 728
July 20, 2010
Joe P. Milinovic 728
September 8, 2010
Robert Matthews 729
August 6, 2010
Jess Lee Powell 731
September 6, 2010
Laura Desario 751
July 4, 2010
Helen Martynick 751
July 7, 2010
Joyce Burevitch 764
September 16, 2010
Charlotte Clarke 764
April 7, 2010
Yvonne David 764
April 10, 2010
Harry Edwards 764
January 12, 2010
May Ishimoto 764
November 20, 2009
George Newman 764
February 23, 2010
Clarence Sims 764
April 16, 2010
James Ivey 772
September 13, 2010
Betty J. Cash 774
June 30, 2010
George Walsh 774
September 30, 2010
NAME LOCAL NAME LOCAL NAME LOCAL NAME LOCAL NAME LOCAL NAME LOCAL NAME LOCAL NAME LOCAL
Donald J. Domas 780
August 24, 2010
Enrico A. Cortese 798
September 1, 2010
Lawrence L. Lannin 819
December 1, 2008
Denis Adelsberger 834
January 1, 2010
Alston A. Emanuel 834
September 10, 2010
Priscilano Romanillos 839
July 17, 2010
Steve Fleury 849
July 17, 2010
Esther Vivante 871
July 1, 2010
Brian Beck 873
August 2, 2010
Jack D. Breeze 873
May 23, 2010
Ron Bunt 873
June 9, 2010
Des Dollery 873
April 6, 2010
James Kennedy 873
May 29, 2010
Michael Lotosky 873
September 24, 2010
Allan Meuse 873
April 11, 2010
Frank Norris 873
May 3, 2010
Nancy Eagles 891
September 11, 2010
Barbara Gasior 891
October 25, 2010
Frederik Jones 891
October 7, 2010
Stuart Robinson 891
July 14, 2010
Michael Smith 891
September 25, 2010
Kevin M. Stadnyk 891
September 8, 2010
Michael P. Dennison 892
September 2, 2010
Thomas Watson 927
July 20, 2010
Michael M. Sweeley 18032
June 30, 2010
Guerino "Jerry" Maiorani B90
August 20, 2010
John King B751
September 19, 2010
Sante Fiore USA829
May 17, 2010
William H. Morse, II USA829
July 18, 2010
Robert Motley USA829
September 28, 2010
Patricia Watkins USA829
September 5, 2010
WILLIAM JOHN HAMILTON
Bill Hamilton passed away on Saturday, September 18,
2010, after a valiant battle with cancer. Bill is survived by
Marie, his devoted wife of 52 years, four wonderful
daughters, Joan, Laurie, Kelly and Leeann, and eight beau-
tiful grandchildren. Bill started his
working life at the Toronto Star news-
paper. It was during a strike at the
Star that, in order to support his
young family, Bill started picking up
extra work with Local 58. Bill proved
to be a natural on the flyfloor. He was
offered an apprenticeship in 1973 and
was sworn in as a member in 1976.
In 1979, Bill was elected to the Office
of Local 58 Business Agent, a position he held continuous-
ly for 29 years. Upon his retirement, Bill was named Local
58 Business Agent Emeritus in recognition of his outstand-
ing contribution and dedication to Local 58 and its mem-
bers. This same dedication to the IA was recognized by
the International in 2005 when, at the Quadrennial Con-
vention held in Honolulu, Bill was presented with the
International President’s Award; this was one of Bill’s
proudest moments.
Bill loved baseball and hockey - both watching and
playing, and was a diehard Toronto Maple Leafs fan. He
also attended every home season
opener of the Toronto Blue Jays, from
their inaugural season at the old Exhi-
bition Stadium in 1977 right up to this
past season. Bill’s true love though,
was Local 58 and the union. After
retiring as Business Agent, Bill contin-
ued to serve as a valued member of
the Executive Board, he continued to
assist with contract negotiations and
he was elected as a convention delegate. He attended his
last District 11 Convention just this past summer in Win-
nipeg. Bill Hamilton was a great mentor to many of the
present Officers of Local 58 and his advice and counsel
was regularly sought. Local 58 and this Alliance were built
on the backs of members like Bill Hamilton. We will
always cherish his memory and he will be deeply missed.
36 Official Bulletin
Local Secretaries and
Business Agents
(Unless otherwise specified, street address or post office
box number listed is in city shown in bold-face type after
local number.)
Reference Letters:
ADG Art Directors Guild
AG&AOE&GA Animation Guild and Affiliated Optical
Electronic and Graphic Arts
AMPE Airline Motion Picture Employees
APC Affiliated Property Craftspersons
ATPAM Association of Theatrical Press Agents and Managers
C Camerapersons
CDG Costume Designers Guild
CHE Casino Hotel Employees
E,S&CST Electronic, Sound & Computer Service Technicians
EE Exhibition Employees
EE/BPBD Exhibition Employees/ Bill Posters, Billers and
Distributors
FAE First Aid Employees
ICG International Cinematographers Guild
LF/VT Laboratory Film/Video Technicians
M Mixed
MAHS Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists
MAHSG Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild
MPC Motion Picture Costumers
MPEG Motion Picture Editors Guild (inclusive of Editors and
Story Analysts)
MPP,AVE&CT Motion Picture Projectionists, Audio Visual
Engineers and Computer Technicians
MPP,O&VT Motion Picture Projectionists, Operators and
Video Technicians
MPP,O,VT&AC Motion Picture Projectionists, Operators,
Video Technicians & Allied Crafts
MPP,O,VT&CT Motion Picture Projectionists, Operators,
Video Technicians & Computer Technicians
MPP,VT&CT Motion Picture Projectionists, Video and
Computer Technicians
MPSELT Motion Picture Studio Electrical Lighting Technicians
MPSG/CS Motion Picture Studio Grips/Crafts Service
MPSP&SW Motion Picture Set Painters & Sign Writers
MPSPT Motion Picture Studio Production Technicians
MPST Motion Picture Studio Teachers and Welfare Workers
MPVT/ LT/ AC&GE Mot i on Pi ct ur e Vi deot ape
Techni ci ans/ Laboratory Techni ci ans/Al l i ed Crafts and
Government Employees
O Operators
PC,CP&HO Production Coordinators, Craftservice Providers
and Honeywagon Operators
PST,TE,VAT&SP Production Sound Technicians, Television
Engineers, Video Assist Technicians and Studio Projectionists
S Stage Employees
SA&P Scenic Artists and Propmakers
S&FMT Sound & Figure Maintenance Technicians
SM Studio Mechanics
SM&BT Studio Mechanics & Broadcast Technicians
SS,CC,A&APSG Script Supervisors, Continuity Coordinators,
Accountants and Allied Production Specialists Guild
SS,PC,CC&PA Script Supervisors, Production Coordinators,
Continuity Coordinators and Production Accountants
TBR&SE Television Broadcasting Remote & Studio Employees
TBSE Television Broadcasting Studio Employees
T&T Treasurers & Ticket Sellers
TW,MA&HS Theatrical Wardrobe, Make-Up Artists & Hair
Stylists
TWU Theatrical Wardrobe Union
USA United Scenic Artists
ALABAMA
S 078 BIRMINGHAM-Sam Barnett, P.O. Box 10251,
Birmingham, 35202. (205-251-1312) (Fax: 205-322-8447)
Bus. Agt.: Terry Wilkins.
S 142 MOBILE-Helen Megginson, P.O. Box 2492, Mobile,
36652. (251-675-1451) (Fax: 251-675-9090) Bus. Agt.: Philip
Tapia.
M 900 HUNTSVILLE- David Hendricks, P.O. Box 12,
Huntsville, 35805. (256-551-2243) (Fax: 256-551-2329) Bus.
Agt.: Leah Moss.
ALASKA
S 918 ANCHORAGE-Ann Reddig, P.O. Box 100421,
Anchorage, 99510. (907-278-3146) (Fax: 907-278-3145) Bus.
Agt.: Richard Benavides.
ARIZONA
S 336 PHOENIX/PRESCOTT-Pamela Boyd, 1425 E.
Washington St., Suite B, Phoenix, 85034-1181. (602-253-4145)
(Fax: 602-253-2103) Bus. Agt.: Bill Hennessy.
M 415 TUCSON-Joanne Knoebel, P.O. Box 990, Tucson,
85702. (520-882-9126) (Fax: 520-882-9127) Bus. Agt.: Reg E.
Williams.
SM 485 STATE OF ARIZONA-Rose Lujan, 2714 West
Magee Road, Tucson, 85742. (520-743-8407) (Fax: 520-423-
3372) Bus. Agts.: (North) William J. Randall; (South) Roy
Zarow.
TBSE 748 STATE OF ARIZONA-David Warner, P.O. Box
1191, Phoenix, 85001. Bus. Agt.: Eric Falkner.
TWU 875 PHOENIX-Kay Harmon, 11328 E. Renfield
Avenue, Mesa, 85212. (480-380-3933) (Fax: 480-380-3933).
Bus. Agt.: Sandy Allen (480-298-2216) (Fax: 480-380-3933).
ARKANSAS
M 204 LITTLE ROCK-Nikki M. Kelly, P.O. Box 848,
Mabelvale, 72103 (501-227-7301) (Fax: 501-227-7404) Bus.
Agt.: Russell G. Hardy.
CALIFORNIA
S 016 SAN FRANCISCO/MARIN COUNTY/SANTA
ROSA/LAKE MENDOCINO/PALO ALTO/SONOMA
COUNTY/ NAPA COUNTY/ SAN MATEO COUN-
TY-Francis X. Crowley, 240 Second Street, 1st Floor, San
Francisco, 94105. (415-441-6400) (Fax: 415-243-0179) Bus.
Agt.: Francis X. Crowley.
S 033 LOS ANGELES/LONG BEACH/PASADENA/
SANTA MONICA-Jane E. Leslie, 2919 Thornton Avenue,
Burbank, 91504. (818-841-9233) (Fax: 818-567-1138) Bus.
Agts.: (TV) Paul Paolasso; (Legit) James M. Wright.
APC 044 HOLLYWOOD-Anthony Pawluc, 12021 Riverside
Drive, North Hollywood, 91607. (818-769-2500) (Fax:
818-769-3111) Bus. Agt.: Edmond Brown.
S 050 SACRAMENTO/CHI CO/STOCKTON/
MARYSVILLE-Betsy Martin, 410 N. 10th Street, Sacramento,
95811. (916-444-7654) (Fax: 916-444-2263) Bus. Agt.: John
Kelly.
MPSG/CS 080 HOLLYWOOD-Rick Schunke, 2520 W.
Olive Avenue, Suite 200, Burbank, 91505-4529. (818-526-0700)
(Fax: 818-526-0719) Bus. Agt.: Thom Davis.
S 107 ALAMEDA COUNTY/OAKLAND/BERKELEY/
CONTRA COSTA COUNTY/SOLANO COUNTY/
RICHMOND-Marc Campisi, 8130 Baldwin Street, #134,
Oakland, 94621. (510-351-1858) (Fax: 510-844-9696) Bus.
Agt.: Mark Thompson.
TBSE 119 SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA-Daniel
Nicholson, P.O. Box 911, San Carlos, 94070. (510-206-7987)
Bus. Agt.: Daniel Nicholson.
S 122 SAN DIEGO-Kate Barry, 3737 Camino del Rio South,
Suite 307, San Diego, 92108. (619-640-0042) (Fax: 619-640-
0045) Bus. Agt.: Carlos Cota.
M 134 SAN JOSE/SANTA CLARA-Elizabeth Overstreet,
P.O. Box 28585-Parkmoor, San Jose, 95159-8585.
(408-294-1134) (Fax: 408-294-1250) Bus. Agt.: Bill
Fairweather.
O 150 LOS ANGELES/SAN BERNARDI NO/
RIVERSIDE/POMONA/REDLANDS/LONG BEACH-
Ricardo Costa, P.O. Box 92548, Pasadena, 91109-2548 (626-
398-3456) (Fax: 626-398-3456) Bus. Agt.: Leonard Del Real.
S 158 FRESNO/MODESTO/STOCKTON-Scott Ellis, P.O.
Box 5274, Fresno, 93755. (559-224-3151) Bus. Agt.: Eddie
Williams (559-432-3277).
O 166 SAN FRANCISCO/SAN MATEO/PALO
ALTO/MARIN COUNTY-Mark Woodall, 4909 Railroad Flat
Road, Mountain Ranch, 95246. (209-754-9966) (Fax: 209-
754-9977). Bus. Agt.: Donald E. Johanson.
O 169 ALAMEDA/SOLANO/NAPA AND CONTRA
COSTA COUNTIES-Stephen Shelley, P.O. Box 29284,
Oakland, 94604-9284. (415-515-3387) Bus. Agt.: Jason
Mottley.
M 215 BAKERSFIELD/VISALIA-Jodi Robinson, P.O. Box
555, Bakersfield, 93302. (661-862-0215) Bus. Agt.: Matt
Bernon.
O 297 SAN DIEGO COUNTY-Gary Livengood, 4579 Lisann
Street, San Diego, 92117. (858-270-1196) Bus. Agt.: Dale Hyder.
M 363 LAKE TAHOE and RENO, NV. (See Nevada)
M 442 SANTA BARBARA TRI-COUNTIES(SANTA
BARBARA/VENTURA/SAN LUIS OBISPO COUN-
TIES)-Paul Kaessinger, P.O. Box 413, Santa Barbara, 93102.
(805-878-0013) (Fax: 805-937-3342) Bus. Agt.: Pat
Barsocchini.
SM 495 SAN DIEGO-Jack Shepherd, 1717 Morena Blvd.,
San Diego, 92110-3635. (619-275-0125)(Fax: 619-275-2578).
Bus. Agt.: Jack Shepherd.
M 504 ORANGE COUNTY/PARTS OF CORONA-Jerry
Omasta, 671 S. Manchester Avenue, Anaheim, 92802-1434.
(714-774-5004) (Fax: 714-774-7683) Bus. Agt.: Leslie
Blanchard.
ICG 600 INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS
GUILD-(See also Florida, Illinois and New York) Alan Gitlin;
National Executive Director, Bruce Doering; Western Region
Director, David Behm, 7755 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, 90046.
Fourth Quarter 2010 37
THANK YOU
The Trustees of the Richard F. Walsh/Alfred W. DiTolla/ Harold P. Spivak Foundation would like to take this opportunity to
thank all the friends, colleagues, members and officers that have made donations in memory of their dearly departed.
For those who would like to make a donation, please send your check to the IATSE General Office to the attention of the
Richard F. Walsh/Alfred W. DiTolla/ Harold P. Spivak Foundation.
CONTRIBUTOR IN MEMORY OF
Bernard Fishbein Bill Hamilton
REMEMBERING KEN LESLIE-SMITH
The IATSE was sorry to learn of the passing of Brother
Ken Leslie-Smith on October 5, 2010.
Ken joined I.A.T.S.E. Local 644C in 1963 as an Assistant
Cameraman working on the Canadian TV Series The Forest
Rangers .... the first Canadian TV Series shot in colour. Ken
often talked of the good old days on that series, when most
shooting days were only 8 hours long! He continued to
work as a Camera Assistant in the commercial industry for
the next 25 years.
In October of 1981, Ken was instrumental in securing
the Local 667 charter for all of Canada. He ran the local out
of his house for the first few years, using his kitchen table
as his desk. Under Ken’s leadership, Local 667 grew steadi-
ly and secured the camera jurisdiction in Ontario and
Atlantic Canada, working with the industry to ensure
strong wages and conditions for all members.
As the film and television industry grew in Canada,
Local 669 was formed in 1990 to represent camera in
western Canada, while Local 667 continued to represent
camera in eastern Canada. Throughout the early 90’s, Ken
signed contracts with Canadian producers such as Power
Pictures, Shaftesbury Films and Alliance Corporation, cap-
turing virtually all of the non-union work in Ontario. In
1994, Ken was instrumental in orchestrating the merger of
The Camera Guild into Local 667, resulting in more than 50
new members and securing many of the productions that
the Camera Guild traditionally worked on. This manoeuvre
meant that the IATSE, through Locals 667 and 669, now
represented the only camera locals in the country.
In January 1998, Ken moved on to act as Business
Agent for the newly chartered Local 411 Production Co-
ordinators , continuing his work of organizing and ensuring
members were well represented. Throughout his career,
Ken was a staunch defender and loyal believer in the
I.A.T.S.E. He worked tirelessly for the members he repre-
sented and never turned his back on a good fight to
improve the working conditions for the workers. Ken was
a mentor to many and will be remembered fondly by all
who knew and worked with him. Fold your head, Kenny.
Fourth Quarter 2010 39 38 Official Bulletin
MPSPT 873 TORONTO, ON-Kirk Cheney, 1315 Lawrence
Ave. East, Unit 104, Toronto, ON, M3A 3R3. (416-368-1873)
(Fax: 416-368-8457) Bus. Agt.: Kirk Cheney.
MPSPT 891 BRITISH COLUMBIA/YUKON
TERR.-Dusty Kelly, 1640 Boundary Road, Burnaby, BC, V5K
4V4. (604-664-8910) (Fax: 604-298-3456) Bus. Agt.: Paul
Klassen.
M 906 CHARLOTTETOWN, PE-Bill Higgins, P.O. Box
2406, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 8C1. Bus. Agt.: Damon
Compton.
TWU 924 STRATFORD, ON-Inez Khan, P.O. Box 21151,
Stratford, ON, N5A 7V4. (519-949-4040) (Fax: 519-508-0955)
Bus. Agt.: Sherri Neeb.
COLORADO
S 007 DENVER/BOULDER-James Taylor, 1475 Curtis
Street, Denver, 80202. (303-534-2423) (Fax: 303-534-0216)
Bus. Agt.: James E. Taylor.
S 047 PUEBLO-Bob Krasovec, 1330 W. Abriendo Avenue,
Pueblo, 81004. (719-320-6220) Bus. Agt.: Saul Trujillo, 27850
Hwy. 50 East, Pueblo, 81006.
M 062 COLORADO SPRINGS-Bryan Patrick, 1828 E.
Kiowa Street, Colorado Springs, 80909. (719-520-1059) (Fax:
719-520-1090) Bus. Agt.: Gina Manning.
S 229 FORT COLLINS, CO./CHEYENNE/LARAMIE,
WY.-Dan Schoonover, P.O. Box 677, Fort Collins, 80522. Bus.
Agt.: David Denman (970-226-2292) (Fax: 970-490-2292).
TWU 719 DENVER-Elisa Spadi, 12010 West 52nd Place,
Unit #7, Arvada, 80002. (303-431-7561) (Fax: 303-431-7561)
Bus. Agt.: Steve Davis (303-829-1567) (Fax: 303-948-3414).
CONNECTICUT
SM 052 STATES OF CONNECTICUT/NEW YORK/
NEW JERSEY/NORTHERN DE. /GREATER PA.-William
McGavin, 326 W. 48th Street, New York, NY 10036.
(212-399-0980) (Fax: 212-315-1073) Bus. Mgr.: John Ford;
Bus. Reps.: John Fundus and Raymond Fortune.
S 074 SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT–David Barata, P.O.
Box 9075, New Haven, 06532. (203-773-9139) (Fax: 203-516-
2398). Bus. Agt.: Jon Damast (203-981-8479).
S 084 HARTFORD/NEW LONDON/NORTHERN
CONNECTICUT-Joseph Davis, 1145 D New Britain Ave.,
West Hartford, 06110. (860-233-8821) (Fax: 860-233-8827).
Bus. Agt.: William Philbin.
SS,PC,CC&PA 161 CONNECTICUT/NEW YORK/
NEW JERSEY-Beverly Billin, 630 9th Avenue, #1103, New
York, NY 10036. (212-977-9655) (Fax: 212-977-9609) Bus.
Agt.: Colleen Donahue.
DELAWARE
SM 052 STATES OF NEW YORK/ NEW JER-
SEY/CONNECTICUT/NORTHERN DE. /GREATER
PA.-William McGavin, 326 W. 48th Street, New York, NY
10036. (212-399-0980) (Fax: 212-315-1073) Bus. Mgr.: John
Ford; Bus. Reps.: John Fundus and Raymond Fortune.
S 284 WILMINGTON-Eva Lynne Penn, P.O. Box 1503,
Wilmington, 19899-1503. (302-652-4626) (Fax: 302-475-
4903) Bus. Agt.: Michael Harrington.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
S 022 WASHINGTON, DC/WASHINGTON DC SUB-
URBS, MD/NORTHERN VIRGINIA-John Page, 1810
Hamlin Street, NE, Washington, DC 20018. (202-269-0212)
(Fax: 202-635-0192) Bus. Agt.: John Brasseux.
SM&BT 487 MID-ATLANTIC AREA-Carol Everson,
2031 Clipper Park Road, Suite 105, Baltimore, MD 21211.
(410-685-4141) (Fax: 410-685-3939) Bus. Agt.: Rosemarie
Levy.
TWU 772 WASHINGTON-Sara Butt, P.O. Box 10999,
McLean, VA 22102. (571-420-2990) (Fax: 301-322-3125). Bus.
Agt.: Linda Boyland.
E,S&CST 815 WASHINGTON-Robert E. McFadden, 2512
Cliffbourne Pl., N.W., #2a, Washington, 20009-1512. (202-265-
9067) Bus. Agt.: Samuel J. Mc Fadden.
TBSE 819 WASHINGTON-Renee Moore, P.O. Box 5745
Friendship Sta., Washington, 20016. (202-966-4110) Bus. Agt.:
David Lee.
T&T 868 WASHINGTON-Anita Wilkinson, P.O. Box 58129,
Washington, 20037. (202-419-9207) Bus. Agt.: Michael Gilotte.
FLORIDA
M 060 PENSACOLA/PANAMA CITY/DESTIN-Robert
L. Wilson, P.O. Box 1084, Pensacola, 32591 (850-390-2367)
(Fax: 850-455-0135). Bus. Agt.: Steve Brown.
M 115 J ACKS ONVI LLE/ TALL AHAS S E E/
GAINESVILLE-Nick Ciccarello, P.O. Box 462, Jacksonville,
32201. (904-723-6070) (Fax: 904-723-6090) Bus. Agt.: Kevin
Jackson.
M 321 TAMPA/CLEARWATER/LAKELAND/ST.
PETERSBURG-Judy Philips, 7211 N. Dale Mabry, #209,
Tampa, 33614. (813-931-4712) (Fax: 813-931-7503) Bus. Agt.:
Richard McGauley.
M 412 BRADENTON/SARASOTA- Michael Verbil, P.O.
Box 1307, Tallevast, 34270. (941-359-1254) (Fax: 941-359-
1254) Bus. Agt.: Roy Sorensen (941-914-1553).
SM 477 STATE OF FLORIDA-Nancy Flesher, 10705 N.W.
33rd Street, #110, Miami, 33172. (305-594-8585) (Fax:
305-597-9278) Bus. Agt.: William F. Moyse.
M 500 SOUTH FLORIDA-Alan Glassman, 1001 NW 62nd
Street, Suite 220, Fort Lauderdale, 33309. (954-202-2624)
(Fax: 954-772-4713). Bus. Agt.: Alan Glassman.
ICG 600 INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS
GUILD-(See also California, Illinois and New York) Alan Gitlin;
National Executive Director, Bruce Doering; Central Region
Director, John Hilsman, 690 Lincoln Road, Suite 203, Miami
Beach 33139 (305-538-9226) (Fax: 305-538-9259). Illinois
Office: 901 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 201, Chicago, IL 60068.
(312-243-3841) (Fax: 312-243-4275).
M 631 ORLANDO/CAPE CANAVERAL/COCOA/
MELBOURNE/LAKE BUENA VISTA/DAYTONA
BEACH-Kimberly A. Bowles, 5385 Conroy Road, Suite #200,
Orlando, 32811-3719. (407-422-2747) (Fax: 407-843-9170)
Bus. Agt.: Michael LaNinfa.
S 647 NAPLES/FT. MYERS/MARCO ISLAND-
Christopher Grenier, P.O. Box 700, Estero, 33929. (239-498-
9090) (Fax: 239-282-1346) Bus. Agt.: Maria Colonna.
MPVT/LT/AC&GE 780 (See also Illinois)-Debbie
Bedard, 3585 N. Courtenay Pkwy., Suite 4, Merritt Island, FL
32953. (321-453-1018) (Fax: 321-453-1178) Bus. Agt.: Larry
Gianneschi.
EE 835 ORLANDO/DAYTONA BEACH-Richard Vales,
4403 Vineland Road, Quorum Ctr. B4, Orlando, 32811. (407-
649-9669) (Fax: 407-649-1926). Bus. Agt.: Richard Vales.
GEORGIA
M 320 SAVANNAH-Wayne Roelle, P.O. Box 5731,
Savannah, 31414. (912-507-8558) (Fax: 208-979-8533) Bus.
Agt.: Wayne Roelle.
SM 479 STATE OF GEORGIA (Except Savannah
and Vicinity)-Terry Moody, 1000 Iris Drive, Suite F, Conyers,
30094. (770-483-0400) (Fax: 770-483-0999) Bus. Agt.:
Michael Akins.
SM 491 SAVANNAH, GA/STATES OF NORTH AND
SOUTH CAROLINA-Andrew Oyaas, 1707 Castle Hayne
Road, Wilmington, NC 28401. (910-343-9408) (Fax:
910-343-9448) Bus. Agt.: Jason Rosin.
S 629 AUGUSTA-Anthony Capaz, 2314 Washington Road,
Augusta, 30904. (706-738-2312) (Fax: 706-738-2312). Bus.
Agt.: Bruce Balk.
M 824 ATHENS-Margi Flood, P.O. Box 422, Athens, 30603.
(706-549-8244) (Fax: 706-549-0828) Bus. Agt.: William
Jackson.
EE 834 ATLANTA-C. Faye Harper, 500 Bishop Street, NW,
Suite F-1, Atlanta, 30318. (404-875-8848) (Fax: 404-875-
4578) Bus. Agt.: C. Faye Harper.
TWU 859 ATLANTA-Rita Cochran, 2970 Leah Lane,
Douglasville, 30135. (770-714-6927) (Fax: 678-838-1456) Bus.
Agt.: Sue Cochran.
S 927 ATLANTA-Dave Fedack, 449 ½ Moreland Avenue,
Suite 215, Atlanta, 30307. (404-870-9911) (Fax:
404-870-9906) Bus. Agt.: Dave Fedack.
HAWAII
M 665 STATE OF HAWAII-Kay Carter, 875 Waimanu
Street, Suite 610, Honolulu, 96813. (808-596-0227) (Fax:
808-591-8213). Bus. Agt.: Donovan K. Ahuna
IDAHO
M 093 WALLACE/KELLOGG, ID/SPOKANE, WA-Jill
Scott, P.O. Box 1266, Spokane, 99210. Bus. Agt.: Jacel Evans.
Bus. Rep.: Pat Devereau (509-999-5073) (Fax: 208-623-6496).
S 099 BOISE/NAMPA/CALDWELL/TWIN FALL/SUN
VALLEY, ID/STATE OF UTAH-Susan Foretich, 526 West
800 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. (801-359-0513) (Fax:
801-532-6227) Bus. Agt.: Patrick Heltman.
EE 838 SOUTHERN IDAHO/SALT LAKE CITY, UT-
Kathy Peck, 230 West 200 South, Suite 2220, Salt Lake City,
UT 84101 (801-320-0701) (Fax: 801-320-0705) Bus. Agt.:
Nancy Trouse.
ILLINOIS
S 002 CHICAGO-Thomas J. Cleary, 216 S. Jefferson Street,
Suite 400, Chicago, 60661. (312-705-2020) (Fax: 312-705-
2011) Bus. Agt.: Craig P. Carlson.
S 085 ROCK ISLAND/MOLINE, IL/DAVENPORT,
IA-Rich Harris, P.O. Box 227, Davenport, IA 52805. (563-579-
3526) Bus. Agt.: Joseph Goodall.
MPP,AVE&CT 110 CHICAGO-Steve Altman, 216 S.
Jefferson Street, Suite 203, Chicago, 60661. (312-454-1110)
(Fax: 312-454-6110) Bus. Agt.: Steve Altman.
S 124 JOLIET-Tim Kelly, P.O. Box 333, Joliet, 60434-0333.
(815-546-0124) Bus. Agt.: Lorin Lynch.
S 138 SPRINGFIELD/JACKSONVILLE-Richard Meidel,
P.O. Box 6367, Springfield, 62708. (217-787-5440) (Fax: 217-
787-5440) Bus. Agt.: Noel Dalbey, 2121 Westview Drive,
Springfield, 62704. (217-787-5440) (Fax: 217-787-5440).
M 193 BLOOMINGTON/ NORMAL/ SPRINGFIELD/
JACKSONVILLE/ MACOMB/ PEORIA-Mary Roffers,
P.O. Box 172, Bloomington, 61701-0172 (217-201-3969). Bus.
Agts.: Tim Noe (Peoria), Chris Fields (Bloomington).
M 217 ROCKFORD-Kim Whitmore, P.O. Box 472, Rockford,
61105. (815-670-9264)(Fax: 815-484-1085). Bus. Agt.: Dale
Posey.
(323-876-0160) (Fax: 323-876-6383) Eastern Region Director,
Chaim Kantor (New York: 212/647-7300); Central Region
Director, John Hilsman (Chicago/Orlando: 312-243-3841 /
305-538-9226).
M 611 WATSONVILLE/SANTA CRUZ/ SALINAS/
GILROY/ HOLLISTER/ MONTEREY/ PACIFIC
GROVE/SEASIDE-Steve Retsky, P.O. Box 7571, Santa Cruz,
95061. (831-458-0338) Bus. Agt.: Poco Marshall.
S 614 SAN BERNARDINO/ RIVERSIDE/ BARSTOW/
POMONA/ REDLANDS/ ONTARIO/ BISHOP-Windy
J.Maxon, P.O. Box 883, San Bernardino, 92402.
(909-888-1828) (Fax: 909-864-1172) Bus. Agt.: Robert Szoke.
PST,TE,VAT&SP 695 HOLLYWOOD-Elizabeth Alvarez,
5439 Cahuenga Boulevard, North Hollywood, 91601. (818-985-
9204) (Fax: 818-760-4681) Bus. Agt.: Jim Osburn.
MPEG 700 MOTION PICTURE EDITORS GUILD
(see also New York)-Diane Adler; Exec. Dir.: Ron Kutak;
Asst. Exec. Dir.: Catherine Repola. 7715 Sunset Blvd., #200,
Los Angeles, 90046, (323-876-4770) (Fax: 323-876-0861);
Asst. Exec. Dir. (New York): Paul Moore (212-302-0700) (Fax:
212-302-1091).
MPC 705 HOLLYWOOD-Paul DeLucca, 4731 Laurel
Canyon Blvd, #201, Valley Village, 91607-3911. (818-487-
5655) (Fax: 818-487-5663) Bus. Agt.: Buffy Snyder.
MAHSG 706 HOLLYWOOD-John Jackson, 828 N.
Hollywood Way, Burbank, 91505. (818-295-3933) (Fax:
818-295-3930) Bus. Agt.: Tommy Cole.
M 707 PALM SPRINGS/PALM DESERT/HEMET/
BANNING/ELSINORE/29 PALMS-Shay Funk, P.O. Box
2240, Palm Desert, 92261 (760-340-6323) (Fax: 760-340-
6323) Bus. Agt.: Shay Funk.
MPSELT 728 HOLLYWOOD-Patric Abaravich, 1001 W.
Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, 91506. (818-954-0728) (Fax:
818-954-0732) Bus. Agt.: Patric Abaravich
MPSP&S-W 729 HOLLYWOOD-George Palazzo, 1811 W.
Burbank Blvd., Burbank, 91506. (818-842-7729) (Fax: 818-
846-3729) Bus. Agt.: George Palazzo.
FAE 767 LOS ANGELES-Margaret Budd-Loa, P.O. Box
43000, Florence, OR 97439. (818-842-7670)(Fax: 818-474-
1570). Bus. Agt.: Rana Jo Platz-Petersen (310-532-1345)(Fax:
310-352-4485).
TWU 768 LOS ANGELES/LONG BEACH/
PASADENA/SANTA MONICA/CERRITOS-Mary B.
Seward, 1023 N. Hollywood Way, #203, Burbank 91505.
(818-843-8768) (Fax: 818-843-8787) Bus. Agt.: Ann Kelleher.
TWU 784 SAN FRANCI SCO/OAKLAND/
BERKELEY/SAN MATEO/CUPERTINO/SAN JOSE/
CONCORD-Andrea Pelous, 1182 Market Street, Suite 213,
San Francisco, 94102. (415-861-8379) (Fax: 415-861-8384).
Bus. Agt.: David Besser.
TBSE 795 SAN DIEGO-Mark Gleason, 3755 Avocado Blvd.,
PMB 437, La Mesa, 91941. (619-335-0795) (Fax: 858-715-
0640). Bus. Agt.: Darin Haggard.
ADG 800 LOS ANGELES (See also Illinois, New
York and North Carolina)-Lisa Frazza, 11969 Ventura
Boulevard, 2nd Floor, Studio City, 91604. (818-762-9995) (Fax:
818-762-9997) Executive Director: Scott Roth; Assoc.
Executive Director: John Moffitt.
USA829 CALIFORNIA REGIONAL OFFICE (See
Also New York) - 5225 Wilshire Blvd., #506, Los Angeles,
90036. (323-965-0957) Bus. Agt.: Charles Berliner.
AG&AOE&GA 839 HOLLYWOOD-Jeffrey N. Massie, 1105
N. Hollywood Way, Burbank, 91505. (818-845-7500) (Fax:
818-843-0300) Bus. Agt.: Steven Hulett.
T&T 857 LOS ANGELES/ORANGE COUNTIES-Ann
Simmons, 13245 Riverside Dr., #300C, Sherman Oaks, 91423.
(818-990-7107) (Fax: 818-990-8287) Bus. Agt.: Sergio A.
Medina.
SS,CC,A&APSG 871 HOLLYWOOD-Margery
Kimbrough, 11519 Chandler Blvd., N. Hollywood, 91601.
(818-509-7871) (Fax: 818-506-1555) Bus. Agt.: Missy
Humphrey.
TWU 874 SACRAMENTO AND VICINITY-Mary Kay
Morris, P.O. Box 188787, Sacramento, 95818-8787 (916-832-
3396) Bus. Agt.: Sheryl Emmons (916-373-0652) (Fax: 916-
374-9609).
MPST 884 HOLLYWOOD-Cheryl Diamond, P.O. Box
461467, Los Angeles, 90046. (818-907-8703) (Fax: 818-907-
8703) Bus. Agt.: Polly Businger.
CDG 892 HOLLYWOOD-Ann Somers Major, 11969 Ventura
Blvd., 1st Floor, Studio City, 91604. (818-752-2400) (Fax:
818-752-2402) Executive Director: Cheryl Downey; Asst.
Executive Director: Rachael Stanley.
TWU 905 SAN DIEGO-Linda Laird, P.O. Box 124741, San
Diego, 92112-4741. Bus. Agt.: Robin Lemon (619-980-6709).
AMPE 916 LOS ANGELES-Conrad Villaflor, 17410 Fontlee
Lane, Fontana, 92335-5925. (909-823-1695). Bus. Agt.: Myrel
Hodge.
S&FMT 923 ANAHEIM-Lyle Worsley, P.O. Box 9031,
Anaheim, 92812-9031. (714-342-1255) Bus. Agt.: Michael
Rao.
CANADA
S 056 MONTREAL, QC-Carl Bluteau, 1, rue de Castlenau
Est, Local 104, Montreal, QC, H2R 1P1. (514-844-7233) (Fax:
514-844-5846) Bus. Agt.: Jason Vergnano.
S 058 TORONTO, ON-Christopher Wilson, 511 Adelaide
Street West, Toronto, ON, M5V 1T4. (416-364-5565) (Fax:
416-364-5987) Bus. Agt.: Andre Ouimet.
M 063 WINNIPEG, MB-Stuart Aikman, 2nd Floor – 175
McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R3B 0S1. (204-944-0511)
(Fax: 204-944-0528) Bus. Agt.: John Gallagher.
M 105 LONDON/ST. THOMAS/SARNIA, ON-Al
Fowler, P.O. Box 182, Station Ctr. CSC, London, ON, N6A 4V6.
(519-661-8639) (Fax: 519-433-5742) Bus. Agt.: Terry Barker.
S 118 VANCOUVER, BC-Mike Phelan, Suite #202 - 601
Cambie Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 2P1. (604-685-9553) (Fax:
604-685-9554) Bus. Agt.: Alex McGibbon.
S 129 HAMILTON/BRANTFORD, ON-Cindy Jennings,
P.O. Box 57089, Jackson Station, Hamilton, ON, L8P 4W9.
(905-577-9193) (Fax: 905-525-6657) Bus. Agt.: Gary Nolan.
S 168 VANCOUVER ISLAND, BC-Brendan Keith, P.O.
Box 5312, Station B, Victoria, BC, V8R 6S4. (250-381-3168)
(Fax: 866-618-3848). Bus. Agt.: Cameron Stewart.
S 210 EDMONTON, AB-Tara Gale, 10428-123 Street,
Edmonton, AB, T5N 1N7. (780-423-1863)(Fax: 780-426-0307)
Bus. Agt.: Malcolm Kerr.
S 212 CALGARY, AB-Vince Bevans, 201-208 57th Avenue
S.W., Calgary, AB, T2H 2K8. (403-250-2199) (Fax:
403-250-9769) Bus. Agts.: (Prod.) Tom MacRae; (Stage) Ellen
Leavitt.
O 262 MONTREAL, QC-Sylvain Bisaillon, 3414 Avenue du
Parc, Montreal, QC, H4C 1G7. (514-937-6855) (Fax: 514-844-
5846) Bus. Agts.: (Proj.): Gilles DesJardins; (FOH) Stephane
Ross.
M 295 REGINA/MOOSE JAW, SK-Lisa Falk, 1831
College Avenue, 3rd Floor, Regina, SK, S4P 4V5.
(306-545-6733) (Fax: 306-545-8440) Bus. Agts.: (Film) Latif
Cavanaugh; (Stage) Ken Grad.
M 300 SASKATOON, SK-Jennifer Rathie-Wright, P.O. Box
1361, Saskatoon, SK, S7K 3N9. (306-343-8900) Bus. Agt.:
Jennifer Rathie-Wright.
M 357 KITCHENER/STRATFORD/CAMBRIDGE/
GUELPH/WATERLOO, ON-Mike Walsh, P.O. Box 908,
Stratford, ON, N5A 6W3. (519-746-7474) (Fax: 519-746-3030).
Bus. Agt.: Larry Miller.
PC, CP&HO 411 PROVINCE OF ONTARIO-Robert
Shea, 1315 Lawrence Avenue East, Unit 103, Toronto, ON, M3A
3R3 (416-645-8025) (Fax: 416-645-8026) Bus. Agt.: Robert
Shea.
M 461 ST. CATHARINES/WELLAND/NIAGARA
FALLS, ON-Archie Mackenzie, P.O. Box 1594, Niagara On
Lake, ON, L0S 1J0. (905-932-4461) Bus. Agt.: George Galanis.
S 467 THUNDER BAY, ON-James Austin, 541 Hyde Park
Avenue, Thunder Bay, ON, P7E 1Y1. (807-622-7407). Bus. Agt.:
Terry Smith, 243 Ford St., Thunder Bay, P7C 4L5. (807-627-
1460).
M 471 OTTAWA/KINGSTON/BELLEVILLE, ON-
James Reynolds, P.O. Box 1373, Station B, Ottawa, ON, K1P
5R4. (613-852-7321) (Fax: 613-233-6454) Bus. Agt.: Mark
Hollingworth.
MPSPT 514 PROVINCE OF QUEBEC-Ian Lavoie, 705
rue Bourget, Bureau 201, Montreal, QC H7K 3H8. (514-937-
7668) (Fax: 514-937-3592). Bus. Agt.: Michel Charron.
M 523 QUEBEC, QC-Robert Masson, 2700, Jean Perrin,
#490, Quebec, QC, G2C 1S9. (418-847-6335) (Fax:
418-847-6335) Bus. Agts.: (Stage) Guy Journeault; (Proj.)
Mario Giguère; (Wardrobe) Sylvia Bernard.
M 580 WINDSOR/CHATHAM, ON-Alan Smith, 538-
2679 Howard Avenue, Windsor, ON, N8X 3X2. (519-965-3732)
(Fax: 519-966-7677) Bus. Agt.: Richard Edwards.
M 634 SUDBURY/NORTH BAY, ON-Keith Clausen, P.O.
Box 68, Naughton, ON, P0M 2M0. (705-665-1163) (Fax: 705-
692-9726) Bus. Agt.: Jamie Adamson (705-788-2447) (Fax:
705-788-2448).
ICG 667 EASTERN CANADA-David Rumley, 9 Gloucester
St., Toronto, ON, M4Y 1L8. (416-368-0072) (Fax:
416-368-6932) Bus. Agt.: Richard J. Perotto.
C 669 WESTERN CANADA-Simon Jori, 3823 Henning
Drive, Suite 217, Burnaby, BC, V5C 6P3. (778-330-1669) (Fax:
778-330-1670) Bus. Agt.: Marcus Handman.
M 680 HALIFAX/DARTMOUTH, NS/SAINT JOHN/
MONCTON/FREDERICTON, NB-Colin Richardson, P.O.
Box 711, Halifax, NS, B3J 2T3. (902-455-5016) (Fax: 902-455-
0398) Bus. Agt.: Colin P. Richardson.
TW,MA&HS 822 TORONTO, ON-Michael Felix, 511
Adelaide Street West, Toronto, ON, M5V 1T1 (416-782-3518)
(Fax: 416-785-5667). Bus. Agt.: Cheryl Batulis, 2 Neilor
Crescent, Toronto, M9C 1K4 (416-622-9000) (Fax: 416-622-
0900).
SA&P 828 PROVINCE OF ONTARIO-Daniela Mazic, P.O.
Box 22562-300 Coxwell Avenue, Toronto, ON, M4L 2A0. (416-
438-3388) (Fax: 416-438-3388) Bus. Agt: Katherine Lilley.
M 848 SYDNEY/GLACE BAY, NS-David Bailey, 28
Norwood Street, Glace Bay, NS, B1A 3M5. (902-849-4957)
Bus. Agt.: David Bailey.
MPSPT 849 ATLANTIC CANADA-Rod Dominey, 15
McQuade Lake Crescent, 2nd flr., Halifax, NS, B3S 1C4.
(902-425-2739) (Fax: 902-425-7696) Bus. Agt.: Gary Vermeir
MPSPT 856 PROVINCE OF MANITOBA-Rob Rowan,
454 Edmonton St., Winnipeg, MB, R3B 2M3. (204-953-1100)
(Fax: 204-953-1109) Bus. Agt.: Maryam Decter.
TWU 863 MONTREAL, QC-Faith Halsey, 390 rue des
Hirondelles, Beloeil, PQ, J3G 6G7 (514-944-2916). Bus. Agt.:
Silvana Fernandez (514-944-2673).
Fourth Quarter 2010 41 40 Official Bulletin
S 053 SPRINGFIELD/PITTSFIELD-Valentino Larese, P.O.
Box 234, Springfield, 01101. (413-530-4747) (Fax: 413-783-
9977) Bus. Agt.: Michael Afflitto.
M 083 NORTH ADAMS-David Blair, 172 Notch Road,
North Adams, 01247-3614. (413-664-4669) Bus. Agt.: David
Blair.
M 096 WORCESTER-Mark Apholt, P.O. Box 582,
Worcester, 01613. (508-929-0378) (Fax: 508-929-0385) Bus.
Agts.: Donald R. Apholt, Jr., P.O. Box 212, Oakham, 01068.
(508-882-3339).
O 182 BOSTON/LYNN/SALEM/WALTHAM/
BROCKTON-Stephen Livernash, P.O. Box 390234,
Cambridge, 02139 (617-426-1540) Bus. Agt.: Ken Eisenberg.
O 186 SPRINGFIELD/HOLYOKE/PITTSFIELD-
Geraldine Hanley, 194 Kendall Street, Ludlow, 01056.
(413-583-5170) Bus. Agt.: Kenneth A. Hanley.
M 195 LOWELL, MA./NEW HAMPSHIRE-Elizabeth
Cleveland, P.O. Box 514, Mt. Vernon, NH 03057 (603-566-
2510). Bus. Agt.: Joyce Cardoza (603-654-4097) (Fax: 603-
654-4098).
M 232 NORTHAMPTON/AMHERST-Paul Yager, P.O. Box
96, Deerfield. 01342. (413-687-3679) Bus. Agt.: Ted Hodgen.
SM 481 NEW ENGLAND AREA-James MacDonald, 10
Tower Office Park, Suite 218, Woburn, MA 01801. (781-376-
0074) (Fax: 781-376-0078) Bus. Agt.: Chris O’Donnell.
T&T 753 BOSTON-Diane M. Blaskovich, 8 Admirals Lane,
Salem, 01970. (617-407-9222) (Fax: 978-744-7976) Bus. Agt.:
Stephen Colburn (617-894-1020).
TWU 775 BOSTON-Carol F. Colantuoni, 9 Randolph Road,
Stoneham, 02180. (781-438-6338)(Fax: 781-438-6338) Bus.
Agt.: Carol F. Colantuoni.
M 792 PLYMOUTH/CAPE COD-Robert Woodward Jr, 18
West Pond Road, Plymouth, 02360. (508-747-0248) Bus. Agt.:
Maureen Crockett, Box 180 Newton Jct., New Hampshire, VT
03859. (603-382-7348).
MICHIGAN
M 026 GRAND RAPIDS/MUSKEGON/BATTLE
C R E E K / K A L A M A Z O O / H O L L A N D / S T.
JOSEPH-Matthew Taylor, 931 Bridge Street, NW, Grand
Rapids, 49504. (616-742-5526) (Fax: 616-742-1088) Bus. Agt.:
Stasia Savage.
S 038 DETROIT/PONTIAC/MT. CLEMENS/PORT
HURON-Edwin J. Miller, 20017 Van Dyke, Detroit, 48234.
(313-368-0825) (Fax: 313-368-1151) Bus. Agt.: Calvin
Hazelbaker.
M 187 NILES, MI/SOUTH BEND/ MISHAWAKA/
ELKHART/ GOSHEN/ PLYMOUTH/ CULVER, IN-
Catherine Smith, P.O. Box 474, South Bend, IN 46624.
(574-292-1871) (Fax: 574-288-0233) Bus. Agt.: Deborah
Mayers.
MPP, VT&CT 199 DETROIT-Paul Bratfish, 22707
Dequinder Road, Hazel Park, 48030. (248-399-7864) (Fax:
248-399-7866) Bus. Agt.: Donald M. Lewis.
S 201 FLINT/OWOSSO-Edward Hinderer Jr., 967 Mann
Avenue, Flint, 48503. (810-767-1580) Bus. Agt.: William
Hinderer, 4272 Round House Rd., #6, Swartz Creek, MI 48473
(810-635-4267).
M 274 LANSING/EAST LANSING/JACKSON/
SAGINAW/CADILLAC/NORTH CENTRAL MICHI-
GAN/TRAVERSE CITY/ALPENA-John McDaniel, 419 S.
Washington Square, Suite 103, Lansing, 48933. (517-374-5570)
(Fax: 517-374-5589) Bus. Agt.: William Minihan.
M 395 ANN ARBOR/MONROE-Mark Berg, P.O. Box
8271, Ann Arbor, 48107. (734-845-0550)(Fax: 734-482-0380).
Bus. Agt.: Dean Neeb.
MPP,O& VT 472 FLINT/OWOSSO-Harold Skinner, II,
P.O. Box 90605, Burton, 48509-9998. (810-836-4556) Bus.
Agt.: Guy Courts.
T&T 757 DETROIT-Tina Bell, 2565 Armada Drive, Auburn
Hills, 48326. Bus. Agt.: Frederick Schefsky.
TWU 786 DETROIT-Diane McDoniel, 27830 Jefferson, St.
Clair Shores, 48081. (586-771-3870) (Fax: 586-771-3870)
Bus. Agt.: Beverly Llombart-Ignich.
SM 812 DETROIT-John DeMonaco, 20017 Van Dyke,
Detroit, 48234. (313-368-0825) (Fax: 313-368-1151) Bus. Agt.:
John DeMonaco.
MID-ATLANTIC AREA
SM&BT 487 MID-ATLANTIC AREA-Carol Everson, ,
2031 Clipper Park Road, Suite 105, Baltimore, MD 21211.
(410-685-4141) (Fax: 410-685-3939) Bus. Agt.: Rosemarie
Levy.
MINNESOTA
S 013 MI NNEAPOLI S/ST. CLOUD/LITTLE
FALLS/BRAINERD/ST. JOHN’S UNIVERSITY/
COLLEGE OF ST. BENEDICT/ ST. PAUL-Royce Jackson,
312 Central Ave. S.E. Rm 398, Minneapolis, 55414.
(612-379-7564) (Fax: 612-379-1402) Bus. Agt.: Dirk Ostertag.
S 032 DULUTH-James Rigstad, 2011 Garfield Avenue,
Superior, WI 54880-2310. (715-392-5805) Bus. Agt.: Al
Eastman.
MPP,O&VT 219 MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL/ST.
CLOUD/LITTLE FALLS/BRAINERD/ST. JOHN’S UNI-
VERSITY-Davin C. Anderson, 6066 Elm Creek Pkwy., Suite
1161, Minneapolis, 55311. (612-868-9711) Bus. Agt.: Davin C.
Anderson.
M 416 ROCHESTER/AUSTI N/MANKATO/
WINONA-Edward D. Searles, P.O. Box 9095, Rochester,
55903-9095. (507-288-5197) Bus. Agt.: Paul Sund (507-753-
3262).
SM 490 STATE OF MINNESOTA-Gary Surber, 312
Central Avenue SE, #398, Minneapolis, 55414. (612-627-0490)
(Fax: 612-627-9734) Bus. Agt.: Joe Gallup.
M 510 MOOREHEAD, MN/FARGO, ND-James Torok,
702 7th Street, North, Fargo, ND 58102. (701-237-0499) Bus.
Agt.: James Torok.
TBSE 745 MINNEAPOLIS-Int’l Vice President-in-Charge:
Daniel DiTolla, 1430 Broadway 20th Floor, New York, NY 10018
(212-730-1770) (Fax: 212-730-7809).
MISSISSIPPI
SM 478 SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI/STATE OF
LOUISIANA-Chandra Miller, 432 N. Anthony St., Suite 305,
New Orleans, LA 70119. (504-486-2192) (Fax: 504-483-9961)
Bus. Agt.: Mike McHugh.
SM 492 NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI/STATE OF TEN-
NESSEE-Theresa Morrow, P.O. Box 90174, Nashville, TN
37209. (615-386-3492) (Fax: 615-460-7492). Bus. Agt.: Robert
Hill.
M 589 JACKSON/VICKSBURG/NATCHEZ-Jill Lucas,
1665 Hwy 51, Madison, 39110-9097. (601-856-4374) (Fax:
601-856-2197) Bus. Agt.: Jill Lucas.
M 616 MERIDIAN-Jerry Tucker, Jr., P.O. Box 2903,
Meridian, 39302-2903. (601-481-5942).
M 674 BILOXI/GULFPORT-Darrel Volesky, 6030 S. Vista
Drive, Gulfport, 39507. (228-313-6865) Bus. Agt.: Martin G.
Elchos.
MISSOURI
S 006 ST. LOUIS-Norma L. West, 1611 S. Broadway, Suite
110, St. Louis, 63104. (314-621-5077) (Fax: 314-621-5709)
Bus. Agt.: John T. Beckman, Jr.
S 031 KANSAS CITY/ST. JOSEPH, MO/KANSAS
CITY/TOPEKA/LAWRENCE/EMPORIA, KS-Dan
Pfitzner, 923-A West 17th Street, Kansas City, 64108.
(816-842-5167) (Fax: 816-842-9481) Bus. Agt.: Gary L.
Thomas.
MPP,AVE&CT 143 ST. LOUIS-Miron Vulakh, 5214
Chippewa Street, St. Louis, 63109. (314-351-5600)(Fax: 314-
351-5600) Bus. Agt.: William Watkins.
M 421 CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO/HERRIN/
CENTRALIA, IL- Thomas Aken, P.O. Box 441, Murphysboro,
IL 62966. (618-967-2394) Bus. Agt.: Stephen Parhomski.
SM 493 STATE OF MISSOURI-Cat Cacciatore, P.O. Box
410151, St. Louis, 63141. (314-469-4931) (Fax: 314-469-
4931) Bus. Agt.: Gary Hansen.
T&T 774 ST. LOUIS-Mary Althage, 4056 Avenue F, St.
Louis, 63123 (314-631-5065). Bus. Agt.: Angie Walsh,
(314-647-9424).
TWU 805 ST. LOUIS-Kim Stone, 3937 Walsh Street, St.
Louis, 63116. (314-351-7184) (Fax: 314-351-7184). Bus. Agt.:
Karen Stone, 2433 Romaine Creek, Fenton, MO 63026 (314-
712-7013).
TWU 810 KANSAS CITY-Judith McElroy, 5113 West 70
Street, Prairie Village, KS 66208. (816-225-6131) Bus. Agt.:
Desiree Baird-Storey (913-362-0347).
MONTANA
M 240 BILLINGS-Gretchen Dibble, P.O. Box 545, Billings,
59103. (406-962-3655). Bus. Agt.: Dave Bakker (406-855-
1664).
M 33 9 MI S S OUL A/ K AL I S PE L L / BUT TE/
ANACONDA/GREAT FALLS/HELENA-Katherine Matz,
P.O. Box 6275, Great Falls, 59406-6275. (406-453-0447) Bus.
Agt.: Bruce Bull.
NEBRASKA
S 042 OMAHA/ F REMONT, NE/ COUNCI L
BLUFFS/SIOUX CITY, IA-Cassie Moore, P.O. Box 351,
Omaha, NE 68101. (402-639-7301) (Fax: 402-731-8284). Bus.
Agt.: Bob Lane.
M 151 LINCOLN-Eugene Trausch, P.O. Box 30201, Lincoln,
68503-0201. Bus. Agt.: Tony Polanka (402-465-5045) (Fax:
402-464-8100).
O 343 OMAHA-Lynn D. Rogers, 21504 Old Coach Road,
Elkhorn, 68022. Bus. Agt.: Jeffrey K. Jenkins (402-676-9166).
TWU 831 OMAHA, NE/COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA-Alice
George Holmes, 22108 Trailridge Blvd., Omaha, NE 68022
(402-289-1914) Bus. Agt.: Betty Haffner.
NEVADA
M 363 RENO/LAKE TAHOE-Claudia Johnson, 30 Mary
St., #14, Reno, 89509. (775-786-2286) (Fax: 775-786-7150)
Bus. Agt.: Charlotte Picerno.
M 720 LAS VEGAS-Ronald Poveromo, 3000 S. Valley View
Boulevard, Las Vegas, 89102. (702-873-3450) (Fax:
702-873-4703). Bus. Agt.: John Hanson.
M 421 HERRIN/CENTRALIA, IL/CAPE GIRARDEAU,
MO-Thomas Aken, P.O. Box 441, Murphysboro, IL 62966.
(618-967-2394) Bus. Agt.: Stephen Parhomski.
SM 476 CHICAGO-Mark A. Hogan, 6309 N. Northwest
Highway, Chicago, 60631-0490. (773-775-5300) (Fax:
773-775-2477) Bus. Agt.: Mark A. Hogan.
M 482 CHAMPAI GN/URBANA/DANVI LLE/
RANTOUL/CHARLESTON/DECATUR-Richard Hall, P.O.
Box 3272, Urbana, 61803-3272. (217-840-9969) (Fax: 217-
688-3042) Bus. Agt.: Nancy Manganelli-Bues.
ICG 600 INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS
GUILD-(See also California, Florida and New York) Alan Gitlin;
National Executive Director, Bruce Doering; Central Region
Director, John Hilsman, 901 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 201,
Chicago, IL 60068. (312-243-3841) (Fax: 312-243-4275).
Florida Office: 690 Lincoln Road, Suite 203, Miami Beach, FL
33139. (305-538-9226) (Fax: 305-538-9259).
T&T 750 CHICAGO-Michael P. Keenan, 446 N. Edgewood,
La Grange Park, 60526. (708-579-4305) (Fax: 708-579-4313)
Bus. Agt.: Ira S. Alper (847-778-0809) (Fax: 888-799-9973).
TBSE 762 CHICAGO-Tom Hoover, P.O. Box 3710, Lisle,
60532 (312-671-7679) Bus. Agt.: Dennis Gates.
TWU 769 CHICAGO-Cheryl Weber, 15253 S. Olympic Lane,
Lockport, 60441. (847-732-6326) (Fax: 815-836-3407) Bus.
Agt.: Shirley Berling.
MPVT/LT/AC&GE 780 CHICAGO (see also
Florida)-Debbie Bedard, 6301 N. Northwest Highway,
Chicago, IL 60631. (773-775-5020) (Fax: 773-775-5771) Bus.
Agt.: Larry Gianneschi.
ADG 800 CENTRAL OFFICE (See also California,
New York and North Carolina)-Gary Baugh, 5256 N.
Magnolia, Chicago, IL 60640. (773-805-1521).
USA829 ILLINOIS REGIONAL OFFICE (See also
New York)–111 North Wabash Avenue, #2107, Chicago,
60602. (312-857-0829) Bus. Agt.: J. Christopher Phillips.
INDIANA
S 030 INDIANAPOLIS/KOKOMO/RICHMOND/
EARLHAM COLLEGE /LOGANSPORT/ PERU/
CONNORSVILLE/ANDERSON/MUNCIE/PORTLAND-
John Baldwin, 1407 East Riverside Drive, Indianapolis,
46202-2037. (317-638-3226) (Fax: 317-638-6126). Bus. Agt.:
John Baldwin.
S 049 TERRE HAUTE-David G. Del Colletti, 210 Terre Vista
Drive, Terre Haute, 47803. (812-243-0524) (Fax:
812-237-3741) Bus. Agt.: David Target.
S 102 EVANSVILLE-Mark Fehr, 13 Dreier Blvd., Evansville,
47712 (812-467-0287) (Fax: 812-467-0287). Bus. Agt.: Steve
VanMeter.
M 125 LAKE PORTER/LA PORTE COUNTIES/
F ORT WAYNE/ LAFAYETTE/ F RANKF ORT/
CRAWFORDSVILLE–Greg Palmer, 2905 DeKalb St., Lake
Station, 46405. (219-718-8038) (Fax: 219-962-1250) Bus.
Agt.: Rick D. Wilbanks (219-718-8037).
S 146 FORT WAYNE-Steve Tarr, P.O. Box 13354, Fort
Wayne, 46868. (260-747-2643) Bus. Agt.: John H. Hinen, Jr.
O 163 CLARKSVILLE, IN/LOUISVILLE, KY-Kent L.
Green, 125 West Carter Avenue, Clarksville, IN, 47129. (812-
282-2716) Bus. Agt.: Larry W. Hopewell, 4703 Wolford Drive,
Floyds Knobs, IN, 47119. (812-923-1295).
M 1 87 S O UT H B E N D/ MI S H A WA K A /
E L KHART/ GOS HE N/ PLYMOUTH/ CULVE R,
IN/NILES, MI-Catherine Smith, P.O. Box 474, South Bend, IN
46624. (574-292-1871) (Fax: 574-288-0233) Bus. Agt.:
Deborah Mayers.
O 194 INDIANAPOLIS/ KOKOMO/ LOGANSPORT/
PERU/WABASH/ RICHMOND/ MUNCIE/ PORT-
LAND-Stephen A. Beeler, P.O. Box 7055, Greenwood, 46142.
(317-507-0717) (Fax: 317-888-5252) Bus. Agt.: Stephen Blair.
O 373 TERRE HAUTE-Richard Munn, P.O. Box 9294, Terre
Haute, 47808. Bus. Agt.: Richard T. Munn, 8774 N. Kennedy Cir.
Dr., Brazil, 47834. (812-446-2722)
M 618 BLOOMINGTON/BEDFORD/COLUMBUS/
FRENCH LICK-Mark R. Sarris, P.O. Box 552, Bloomington,
47402. (812-331-7472) (Fax: 812-331-8949) Bus. Agt.: Mark R.
Sarris.
TWU 893 INDIANAPOLIS/BLOOMINGTON-Joanne
M. Sanders, 5144 N. Carrollton Avenue, Indianapolis,
46205-1130. (317-283-6040) (Fax: 317-283-2890) Bus. Agt.:
Joanne M. Sanders.
IOWA
S 042 COUNCIL BLUFFS/SIOUX CITY, IA/OMAHA/
FREMONT, NE-Cassie Moore, P.O. Box 351, Omaha, NE
68101. (402-639-7301) (Fax: 402-731-8284). Bus. Agt.: Bob
Lane.
S 067 DES MOINES/AMES/WAUKEE/MASON
CITY-MaryJo Williams, 897 85th Place, Pleasantville, 50225.
(641-842-4703) Bus. Agt.: Ryan Anderson (515-707-8567).
S 085 DAVENPORT, IA/ROCK ISLAND/MOLINE,
IL-Rich Harris, P.O. Box 227, Davenport, IA 52805. (563-579-
3526) Bus. Agt.: Joseph Goodall.
M 690 IOWA CITY/CEDAR RAPIDS/WATERLOO/
DUBUQUE-Thomas E. Poggenpohl, P.O. Box 42, Iowa City,
52244-0042. (319-594-2690) Bus. Agt.: Roman Antolic.
TWU 831 COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA/OMAHA, NE-Alice
George Holmes, 22108 Trailridge Blvd., Omaha, NE 68022
(402-289-1914) Bus. Agt.: Betty Haffner.
KANSAS
S 031 KANSAS CITY/TOPEKA/LAWRENCE/
EMPORIA, KS/KANSAS CITY-ST. JOSEPH, MO-Dan
Pfitzner, 923-A West 17th Street, Kansas City, MO 64108.
(816-842-5167) (Fax: 816-842-9481) Bus. Agt.: Gary L.
Thomas.
M 190 WICHITA/HUTCHINSON/EL DORADO-Tim
McCulloch, P.O. Box 3052, Wichita, 67201. (316-267-5927)
(Fax: 316-267-5959) Bus. Agt.: Benjamen Juhnke.
M 464 SALINA-Kent Buess, P.O. Box 617, Salina,
67401-0617. (785-826-6160). Bus. Agt.: Bill Tuzicka.
KENTUCKY
S 017 LOUISVILLE/FRANKFORT/DANVILLE-George
Green, Jr., 119 W. Breckenridge Street, Louisville, 40203.
(502-587-7936) (Fax: 502-587-3422) Bus. Agt.: James R.
Madison.
O 163 LOUISVILLE, KY/CLARKSVILLE, IN-Kent L.
Green, 125 West Carter Avenue, Clarksville, IN 47129. (812-
282-2716) Bus. Agt.: Larry W. Hopewell, 4703 Wolford Drive,
Floyd Knobs, IN 47119. (812-923-1295).
M 346 LEXINGTON-Merrill Richardson, P.O. Box 5,
Lexington, 40588. (859-221-1921) Bus. Agt.: Donald A. Burton.
M 369 ASHLAND, KY/HUNTINGTON, WV/
IRONTON, OH-Judy M Chapman, P.O. Box 192, Huntington,
WV, 25707. Bus. Agt.: Chestle St. Clair (304-733-0880).
TWU 897 LOUISVILLE-Lisa Green, 5204 Saint Gabriel
Court, Louisville, 40291. (502-491-1071) (Fax: 502-491-1071)
Bus. Agt.: Rita Gagliardi.
LOUISIANA
S 039 NEW ORLEANS-Darrell Eik, P.O. Box 19289, New
Orleans, 70179. (504-872-2165) (Fax: 504-309-8198) Bus.
Agt.: Alan Arthur.
M 260 L AKE CHARLE S/ ALE X ANDRI A/
PINEVILLE/FORT POLK-George J. Hollier, 3702 Lakeview
Drive, Lake Charles, 70605. (337-598-3455) (Fax: 337-598-
3455). Bus. Agt.: Todd J. Johnson.
S 298 SHREVEPORT-Robbie Mayberry, 715 McNeil Street,
Shreveport, 71101. Bus. Agt.: William Gaston (318-423-1756).
SM 478 STATE OF LOUISIANA/SOUTHERN MIS-
SISSIPPI-Chandra Miller, 432 N. Anthony St., Suite 305, New
Orleans, LA 70119. (504-486-2192) (Fax: 504-483-9961) Bus.
Agt.: Michael McHugh.
M 540 BATON ROUGE-Patrick A. Acampora, 1852
Hobbiton Rd., Baton Rouge, 70810. (225-275-1891) (Fax: 225-
578-4135) Bus. Agt.: H. Hayes Taylor, 16632 Mockingbird Lane,
Baton Rouge, 70819.
M 668 MONROE-Dan Saterfield, 400 Lee Joyner
Expressway, Monroe, 71201. (318-329-2343). Bus. Agt.: Ross
Slacks.
TWU 840 NEW ORLEANS-Lesly Davi, 11186 Tuttle Road,
Hammond, 70403. Bus. Agt.: Bonnie Haase (225-294-3024)
(Fax: 225-294-3024).
MAINE
S 114 PORTLAND/LEWISTON/AUGUSTA/BANGOR-
Thomas Bull, P.O. Box 993, Portland, 04104 (207-657-7100)
(Fax: 207-657-7109). Bus. Agt.: Dave Herrman.
TBSE 926 AUBURN-Sarah Quaintance, 99 Danville Corner
Rd, Auburn, 04210 (207-782-1800). Bus. Agt.: Sharon Deveau-
Handy.
MARYLAND
S 019 BALTIMORE-Steve Wallace, 1111 Park Avenue, Suite
L-102, Baltimore, 21201-5651. (410-728-6527) (Fax:
410-728-6849) Bus. Agt.: Bruce Holtman.
S 022 WASHINGTON DC SUBURBS, MD/
WASHINGTON, DC/NORTHERN VIRGINIA-John Page,
1810 Hamlin Street, NE, Washington, DC 20018. (202-269-
0212) (Fax: 202-635-0192) Bus. Agt.: John Brasseux.
MPP,O&VT 181 BALTIMORE-Dave Foreman, 4834 Ridge
Road, Baltimore, 21237. (410-668-9545) Bus. Agt.: Karl O.
Gilbert.
SM&BT 487 MID-ATLANTIC AREA-Carol Everson, 2031
Clipper Park Road, Suite 105, Baltimore, MD 21211.
(410-685-4141) (Fax: 410-685-3939) Bus. Agt.: Rosemarie Levy.
M 591 HAGERSTOWN, MD/FREDERICK, MD/
WAYNE S BORO, PA/ WI NCHE STE R, VA/
MARTINSBURG, WV-Michael E. Clem, 10300 Moxley
Road, Damascus, MD 20872. (202-210-5200). Bus. Agt.: John
Nichols.
TBSE 833 BALTIMORE-James Coxson, P.O. Box 4834,
Baltimore, 21211. Bus. Agt.: William Poplovski, 3400 Dunran
Road, Baltimore, MD, 21222 (443-831-8181).
TWU 913 BALTIMORE- Suzanne Herbert-Forton, 301
Stonewall Rd., Catonsville, 21228. Bus. Agt.: Marybeth Chase,
7427 Watersville Rd., Mt. Airey, 21771. (410-340-0049).
MASSACHUSETTS
S 011 BOSTON/WALTHAM-John Walsh, 152 Old Colony
Avenue, South Boston, 02127. (617-269-5595) (Fax:
617-269-6252) Bus. Agt.: John Walsh
Fourth Quarter 2010 43 42 Official Bulletin
MAHS 798 NEW YORK-Joseph Cuervo, 152 West 24th
Street, New York, 10011. (212-627-0660) (Fax: 212-627-0664).
Bus. Agt.: Daniel Dashman.
ADG 800 NORTHEAST OFFICE (See also
California, Illinois and North Carolina)–Stan
Harris, 90 West St., #23H, NewYork, NY 10006 (646-246-
3722).
TBSE 821 ELMIRA-Norman Stull, 101 E. Water Street,
Elmira, 14901 (607-733-5518) Bus. Agt.: Jon Shaban.
EE/BPBD 829 NEW YORK-John V. McNamee Jr, 386
Park Avenue South, 13th floor, New York, 10016. (212-679-
1164) (Fax: 212-679-1421).
M 842 ONEONTA/COOPERSTOWN/SIDNEY/DELHI/
COBLESKILL/WALTON-William Pierce, 1504 Burnt Hill
Road, West Fulton, 12194. (518-827-8428). Bus. Agt.: William
Pierce.
TWU 858 ROCHESTER-Kathleen Olson, 21 Wimbledon
Rd., Rochester, 14617. (585-338-7915). Bus. Agt.: Anne Bowes.
ATPAM 18032 NEW YORK-Nick Kaledin, 62 West 45th
Street, Suite 901, New York, 10036. (212-719-3666) (Fax:
212-302-1585). Bus. Agt.: Gerry Parnell.
USA 829 NEW YORK REGIONAL OFFICE-Carl
Baldasso, 29 West 38th Street, 15th flr., New York, NY 10018.
(212-581-0300) (Fax: 212-977-2011) Bus. Agt.: Cecilia
Friedrichs.
NORTH CAROLINA
M 278 ASHEVILLE-Roger I. Briant, P.O. Box 2071,
Asheville, 28802. (828-545-0641) Bus. Agt.: Michael D.
Rhodes.
M 322 CHARLOTTE/GREENVILLE-Randy Raynard, 6101
Idlewild Road, Suite 322, Charlotte, 28212. (704-537-8329)
(Fax: 704-367-9436) Bus. Agt.: Bruce T. Grier (704-367-9435).
M 417 DURHAM/CHAPEL HILL/RALEIGH-Amy
O’Donnell, P.O. Box 28152, Raleigh, 27611. (919-422-0866)
(Fax: 919-477-5833) Bus. Agt.: Rob McIntire.
SM 491 STATES OF NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLI-
NA/SAVANNAH, GA-Andrew Oyaas, 1707 Castle Hayne
Road, Wilmington, NC 28401. (910-343-9408) (Fax:
910-343-9448) Bus. Agt.: Jason Rosin.
M 574 GREENSBORO/BURLINGTON/HIGH POINT-
Neil Welch, Jr., P.O. Box 8575, Greensboro, 27419. (336-451-
0390) (Fax: 336-638-3625) Bus. Agt.: Bill Daves, 4025 Lamond
Drive, Winston-Salem, 27101. (336-852-0660).
M 635 WI NSTON- SALEM/ LEXI NGTON/
THOMASVILLE-Henry Grillo, P.O. Box 15338,
Winston-Salem, 27113-0338. (336-399-7382) Bus. Agt.:
Patrick O’Kelly.
ADG 800 SOUTHEAST OFFICE (See also
California, Illinois and New York)-John D.
Kretschmer, 605 Fitzgerald Dr., Wilmington, NC 28405. (910-
443-3838).
NORTH DAKOTA
M 510 FARGO, ND/MOOREHEAD, MN-James Torok,
702 7th Street, North, Fargo, ND 58102. (701-235-3840) Bus.
Agt.: James Torok.
OHIO
S 005 CINCINNATI/HAMILTON/FAIRFIELD/
SPRINGDALE/OXFORD-Kevin G. Eviston, 35 E. 7th Street,
Suite 501, Cincinnati, 45202. (513-721-1302) (Fax:
513-721-0023) Bus. Agt.: Thomas Guidugli.
S 012 COLUMBUS/NEWARK/MARYSVILLE/
DELAWARE-Joe McCutcheon, 566 E. Rich Street, Columbus,
43215. (614-221-3753) (Fax: 614-221-0078) Bus. Agt.: Richard
Shack, 2581 East Fifth Avenue, Columbus, OH 43219.
S 024 TOLEDO/LIMA/MARION/BOWLING
GREEN/TIFFIN/FINDLAY-Sandra Cassaubon, 435 S.
Hawley Street, Toledo, 43609. (419-244-6320) (Fax: 419-244-
6325). Bus. Agt.: John Palsa.
S 027 CLEVELAND/ASHTABULA/LORAIN/ELYRIA/
SANDUSKY/ERIE COUNTY-Michael Lehane, 1422 Euclid
Avenue, Suite 721, Cleveland, 44115-1902 (216-621-9537)
(Fax: 216-621-3518) Bus. Agt.: Dave Vacca.
S 048 AKRON/CANTON/MASSILLON/ALLIANCE/
MANSFIELD-Helen Louie, 678 North Main Street, Akron,
44310. (330-374-0480) (Fax: 330-376-2721) Bus. Agt.: Helen
Louie.
M 064 STEUBENVILLE, OH/WHEELING, WV-Tony
Assaro, P.O. Box 292, Wheeling, WV 26003-0041. Bus. Agt.:
Frank Scarnechia (304-639-2516) (Fax: 304-242-6134).
S 066 DAYTON/SPRINGFIELD/DARKE/MIAMI AND
CHAMPAIGN COUNTIES-Keith J. Thomas, P.O. Box 75,
Dayton, 45401. (937-415-0066) (Fax: 937-415-0067) Bus. Agt.:
Kennith G. Rice.
S 101 NILES/WARREN/YOUNGSTOWN-David Rees,
P.O. Box 362, Youngstown, 44501. (330-747-9305) Bus. Agt.:
John Osborne.
MPP,O&VT 160 CLEVELAND/ASHTABULA/
LORAIN/ELYRIA/SANDUSKY/ERIE COUNTY-John
Galinac, 8358 Munson Road, Suite 104, Mentor, 44060. (440-
255-3160) (Fax: 440-255-3119) Bus. Agt.: John Galinac.
SM 209 STATE OF OHIO-Jonathan Andrews, 1422 Euclid
Avenue, Suite 721, Cleveland, 44115-1902. (216-621-9537)
(Fax: 216-621-3518) Bus. Agt.: Kenneth McCahan.
M 369 I RONTON, OH/HUNTI NGTON, WV/
ASHLAND, KY-Judy M Chapman, P.O. Box 192, Huntington,
WV 25707. Bus. Agt.: Chestle St. Clair (304-733-0880).
TWU 747 COLUMBUS-Julia Johnson, 4791 Summit Road,
SW, Pataskala, 43062. (740-927-1696) Bus. Agt.: C. Wayne
Cossin, 1954 Indianola Ave., Columbus, 43201 (614-298-8071).
T&T 756 CLEVELAND-Glenn Barry, 17157 Rabbit Run Dr.,
Strongsville, 44136. (440-238-7711) (Fax: 440-238-6963) Bus.
Agt.: Thomas Patton.
TWU 864 CINCINNATI-Jean Mueller, 2643 Highland
Avenue, Cincinnati, 45219. (513-861-5300) (Fax:
513-861-5301) Bus. Agt.: Peter A. Diamond.
TWU 883 CLEVELAND-Diane Burke, 4689 Georgette Ave.,
N. Olmsted, 44070. (440-734-4883) (Fax: 440-734-3588) Bus.
Agt.: Diane Burke.
TWU 886 DAYTON-Sharleen Rafferty, P.O. Box 124,
Dayton, 45401-0124. Bus. Agt.: Cynthia Closser.
OKLAHOMA
S 112 OKLAHOMA CITY-Tina Saxton, 511 Couch Drive,
Oklahoma City, 73102. (405-231-0025) (Fax: 405-231-0056)
Bus. Agt.: Stephen Rysted.
S 354 TULSA/PONCA CITY-Paul Clear, P.O. Box 354,
Tulsa, 74101. (918-496-7722) (Fax: 918-496-7725) Bus. Agt.:
Steve Brown.
M 387 LAWTON/OKLAHOMA CITY-Homer L. Hawkins,
4226 SE Ford Road, Lawton, 73501. (580-355-1599) Bus. Agt.:
Barry Leday, 35 NW 28th, Lawton, OK 73505. (580-248-0830).
TWU 904 TULSA-Lloyd Roberts, P.O. Box 563, Tulsa, 74101.
(918-369-9041) (Fax: 918-369-9041) Bus. Agt.: Marcia
Holland (918-369-3687).
OREGON
M 028 PORTLAND/SALEM-Pat Chard, 4949 S.E. 26th
Ave., Portland, 97202. (503-295-2828) (Fax: 503-230-7044)
Bus. Agt.: Chris Bateman.
SM 488 PACIFIC NORTHWEST-Linda Bloom, 5105 SW
45th Avenue, Portland, OR 97221. (503-232-1523) (Fax:
503-232-9552) Bus. Agt.: (Oregon) Charles A. Carlsen;
(Washington) Robert Riggs.
M 675 EUGENE/CORVALLIS/BEND-Virginia Sands, P.O.
Box 12217, Eugene, 97440. (541-344-6306) Bus. Agt.: Rocky
Haffner.
TBR&SE 793 PACIFIC NORTHWEST-Dave Bishop, P.O.
Box 94282, Seattle, WA., 98124. (877-680-4853). Bus. Agt.:
Todd Gordon.
PACIFIC NORTHWEST
SM 488 PACIFIC NORTHWEST-Linda Bloom, 5105 SW
45th Avenue, Portland, OR 97221. (503-232-1523) (Fax:
503-232-9552) Bus. Agt.: (Oregon) Charles A. Carlsen;
(Washington) Robert Riggs.
TBR&SE 793 PACIFIC NORTHWEST-Dave Bishop, P.O.
Box 94282, Seattle, WA., 98124. (877-680-4853). Bus. Agt.:
Todd Gordon.
PENNSYLVANIA
S 003 PITTSBURGH/NEW CASTLE-Shawn W. Foyle,
P.O. Box 352, Pittsburgh, 15230. (412-281-4568) (Fax:
412-281-4571) Bus. Agt.: Robert J. Brown.
S 008 PHILADELPHIA, PA/CAMDEN/MERCER
COUNTY, NJ-Andrew Nolan, 2237 Hartranft Street,
Philadelphia, 19145. (215-952-2106) (Fax: 215-952-2109).
Bus. Agt.: Michael Barnes.
SM 052 STATES OF NEW YORK/ NEW JERSEY/
CONNECTICUT/NORTHERN DE. /GREATER PA.-
William McGavin, 326 W. 48th Street, New York, NY 10036.
(212-399-0980) (Fax: 212-315-1073) Bus Mgr.: John Ford;
Bus. Reps.: John Fundus and Raymond Fortune.
S 082 WILKES BARRE-Michael Marancik, P.O. Box 545,
Wilkes-Barre, 18703 (570-824-1665). Bus. Agt.: Joseph K.
Jacobs, Jr. (570-824-4260).
S 097 READING-David Sterner, P.O. Box 7511, Reading,
19603-7511. Bus. Agt.: Russell Hoffman (484-955-3009).
S 098 HARRISBURG/HERSHEY/CARLISLE-F. Joseph
Spackman, P.O. Box 266, Hershey, 17033-0266. (717-991-4411)
Bus. Agt.: Chester Ross.
S 113 ERIE-Sonia Ferrante, P.O. Box 557, Erie, 16512.
(814-882-7763) Bus. Agt.: Kenneth Marchant.
M 152 HAZELTON-Nicholas St. Mary, 403 Lori Drive,
Beaver Meadows, 18216. (570-459-1602) (Fax: 570-453-0887)
Bus. Agt.: Nicholas J. St. Mary.
S 200 ALLENTOWN/EASTON/STROUDSBURG/
BETHLEHEM-Frank Iafrate, P.O. Box 1723, Bethlehem,
18016. (610-867-0658) (Fax: 610-867-0658) Bus. Agt.: Eric
Wills.
M 218 POT TS VI LLE/ MAHANOY CI T Y/
SHENANDOAH/LANSFORD/SHAMOKIN-Robert Van
Horn, 107 Village Road, Orwigsburg, 17961. (570-366-0629)
Bus. Agt.: Robert Spiess, 17 Rose Avenue, Port Carbon, 17965.
(570-622-5720).
M 2 6 6 W A R R E N C O U N T Y , P A /
JAMESTOWN/CHAUTAUQUA, NY-Eric Bolling, 3673
Pleasant Avenue, Jamestown, NY 14701. (716-664-9448) Bus.
Agt.: Gordon R Pugh (716-761-6944).
NEW ENGLAND AREA
SM 481 NEW ENGLAND AREA-James MacDonald, 10
Tower Office Park, Suite 218, Woburn, MA 01801. (781-376-
0074) (Fax: 781-376-0078) Bus. Agt.: Chris O’Donnell.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
M 195 LOWELL, MA./NEW HAMPSHIRE-Elizabeth
Cleveland, P.O. Box 514, Mt. Vernon, NH 03057 (603-566-
2510). Bus. Agt.: Joyce Cardoza (603-654-4097) (Fax: 603-
654-4098).
SM 481 NEW ENGLAND AREA-James MacDonald, 10
Tower Office Park, Suite 218, Woburn, MA 01801. (781-376-
0074) (Fax: 781-376-0078) Bus. Agt.: Chris O’Donnell.
S 919 HANOVER/LEBANON, NH/BURLINGTON,
VT-Leslie Day, P.O. Box 951, Burlington, 05402-0951 (802-
865-0570). Bus. Agt.: Craig Mowery (802-355-4541).
NEW JERSEY
S 008 CAMDEN/MERCER COUNTY, NJ/
PHILADELPHIA, PA-Andrew Nolan, 2237 Hartranft Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19145. (215-952-2106) (Fax: 215-952-2109)
Bus. Agt.: Michael Barnes.
S 021 NEWARK-Jacky Riotto, 2933 Vauxhall Rd., Millburn
Mall, Vauxhall, 07088. (973-379-9265) (Fax: 908-964-0243)
Bus. Agt.: Stanley Gutowski.
SM 052 STATES OF NEW JERSEY/ NEW
YORK/CONNECTICUT/NORTHERN DE. /GREATER
PA.-William McGavin, 326 W. 48th Street, New York, NY
10036. (212-399-0980) (Fax: 212-315-1073) Bus Mgr.: John
Ford; Bus. Reps.: John Fundus and Raymond Fortune.
S 059 JERSEY CITY-Richard Drum, P.O. Box 3122,
Secaucus, 07096. (973-769-6187) Bus Agt.: Richard Drum.
M 077 ATLANTIC CITY/VINELAND-Thomas M.
Bambrick, Jr., P.O. Box 228, Linwood, 08221. (609-317-0958)
(Fax: 609-909-9591) Bus. Agt.: Eric Berry.
SS,PC,CC&PA 161 NEW YORK/ NEW JER-
SEY/CONNECTICUT-Beverly Billin, 630 9th Avenue, #1103,
New York, NY 10036. (212-977-9655) (Fax: 212-977-9609)
Bus. Agt.: Colleen Donahue.
M 534 MIDDLESEX/MERCER/UNION COUN-
TIES/OCEAN COUNTY/ASBURY PARK/LONG
BRANCH-Vincent Meli, P.O. Box 722, New Brunswick, 08903.
(732-565-9200) (Fax: 732-565-9300) Bus. Agt.: Craig Werner
(732-539-4560).
M 536 RED BANK/FREEHOLD-Edward Baklarz, 231
Atlantic St., #70, Keyport, 07735. (732-264-5678) Bus. Agt.:
Charles Cox.
M 632 NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY-Judy Feltus, 205
Robin Road, Suite 202, Paramus, 07652. (201-262-4182) (Fax:
201-262-4138) Bus. Agts.: (Stage) Joe Villani; (Proj.) Patrick
Riley.
TWU 799 CAMDEN, NJ/PHILADELPHIA, PA- Susan
Calaciura,, 200 Plymouth Place, Merchantville, NJ 08109. (215-
643-1282) (Fax: 856-488-6368) Bus. Agt.: Elisa Murphy, 901
Llanfair Road, Lower Gwynedd, PA 19002.
CHE 917 ATLANTIC CITY-Gilda Passarella, 4119 Atlantic
Avenue, Atlantic City, 08401. (609-345-0550) (Fax:
609-345-4554) Bus. Agt.: Darrell Stark.
NEW MEXICO
M 153 LAS CRUCES, NM/EL PASO, TX-Ignacio Flores,
3349 Dungarvan Drive, El Paso, 79925. (915-594-8250) (Fax:
915-886-4900) Bus. Agt.: Scott White.
M 423 ALBUQUERQUE/ROSWELL/SANTA FE-Brian
Shaffer, P.O. Box 81376, Albuquerque, 87198. (505-250-0994)
(Fax: 505-255-1970) Bus. Agt.: Brian Shaffer.
SM 480 STATE OF NEW MEXICO-D.L. Herbert De Wing,
1418 Cerrillos Rd., Santa Fe, 87505. (505-986-9512) (Fax:
505-986-9513) Bus. Agt.: Jon Hendry.
TWU 869 ALBUQUERQUE-Darlene Jones, 369 Playful
Meadows, Rio Rancho, 87144. (505-681-0601) Bus. Agt.: Ann
Schreiber (505-247-8474).
NEW YORK
S 001 NEW YORK/WESTCHESTER-PUTNAM
COUNTIES-Robert Score, 320 W. 46th Street, New York,
10036. (212-333-2500) (Fax: 212-586-2437) Bus. Agts.:
(Theatre) Mickey Fox and Kevin McGarty; (TV) Edward J.
McMahon, III and Robert C. Nimmo.
S 004 BROOKLYN and QUEENS-Terence K. Ryan, 2917
Glenwood Road, Brooklyn, 11210. (718-252-8777) (Fax:
718-421-5605) Bus. Agt.: Lewis Resnick.
S 009 SYRACUSE/ROME/ONEIDA/UTICA-Linda Mack,
P.O. Box 617, Syracuse, 13201-0617 (315-625-4131). Bus. Agt.:
Keith Russell.
S 010 BUFFALO-Charles Gill, 700 Main Street, Suite 200,
Buffalo 14202 (716-822-2770) (Fax: 716-634-5529). Bus. Agt.:
Gary Syracuse, Jr., 266 Sterling Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216
(716-822-2770).
S 014 ALBANY/SCHENECTADY/AMSTERDAM-Gail E.
Farley, P.O. Box 11-074, Albany, 12211. (518-427-1580) (Fax:
518-477-6677) Bus. Agt.: James Anziano.
S 025 ROCHESTER-Michael J. Ventrella, 140 Metro Park,
Suite 4, Rochester, 14623. (585-427-8974) Bus. Agt.: Thomas
F. Mason.
M 029 TROY-Richard M. Regnier, Sr., Rd#5-363 Currybush
Road, Schenectady, 12306. (518-377-9080) (Fax: 518-372-
3176) Bus. Agt.: Richard M. Regnier, Sr.
SM 052 STATES OF NEW YORK/ NEW JER-
SEY/CONNECTICUT/NORTHERN DE. /GREATER
PA.-William McGavin, 326 W. 48th Street, New York, NY
10036. (212-399-0980) (Fax: 212-315-1073) Bus Mgr.: John
Ford; Bus. Reps.: John Fundus and Raymond Fortune.
S 054 BINGHAMTON-Daniel Sonnen, 1405 Livingston
Place, Vestal, 13850. (607-777-2531) Bus. Agt.: William
Carroll, P.O. Box 271, Binghamton, 13905. (607-427-6336).
TBSE 100 NEW YORK-Rich Rahner, 191 Monell Avenue,
Islip, 11751 (203-876-8566) Bus. Agt.: Greg Calvin.
M 121 NIAGARA FALLS/BUFFALO-John Scardino Jr.,
47 Coburg Street, Buffalo, 14216. (716-834-6372) (Fax: 716-
836-3084) Bus. Agt.: John Scardino, Jr.
SS,PC,CC&PA 161 NEW YORK/ NEW JER-
SEY/CONNECTICUT-Beverly Billin, 630 9th Avenue, #1103,
New York, NY 10036. (212-977-9655) (Fax: 212-977-9609)
Bus. Agt.: Colleen Donahue.
M 266 JAMESTOWN/CHAUTAUQUA, NY/WARREN
COUNTY, PA-Eric Bolling, 3673 Pleasant Avenue,
Jamestown, NY 14701. (716-664-9448) Bus. Agt.: Gordon R.
Pugh (716-761-6944).
M 289 ELMIRA/HORNELL/WATKINS/ITHACA/
CORNING/CORTLAND/BINGHAMTON-Florence Lovell,
P.O. Box 1147, Elmira, 14902. Bus. Agt.: David Bailey, 713
Riverside Ave., Elmira, 14904. (607-733-7159) (Fax: 607-733-
7159).
MPP,O,VT, & AC 306 NEW YORK-Hugo F. Capra, 545
West 45th St., 2nd flr., New York, 10036. (212-956-1306) (Fax:
212-956-9306) Bus. Agts.: (Proj.) Barry Garfman; (Stage)
Miriam Pollock.
M 3 1 1 MI D D L E T O WN/ N E WB U R G H/
KINGSTON-Franklin DenDanto, P.O. Box 192, Washingtonville,
10992. (845-692-4358) (Fax: 845-692-0020) Bus. Agt.:
Michael R. Brennan, 6 Virginia Street, Middletown, NY 10941
(845-692-4358).
O 324 ALBANY-Stanley Blakeman, 171 East Side Drive,
Ballston Lake, 12019 (518-399-2085). Bus. Agt.: John K. Hill.
S 340 NASSAU/SUFFOLK COUNTIES OF LONG
ISLAND-Michael Brogden, P.O. Box 160, Jericho, 11753. (516-
457-6778) (Fax: 212-391-8320) Bus. Agt.: Brian J. Frankel.
M 353 PORT JERVIS/SULLIVAN COUNTY-John B.
Senter, III, P.O. Box 1432, Monticello, 12701. (212-677-5711)
Bus. Agt.: John B. Senter, III.
M 499 POUGHKEEPSIE-Michael Finamore, P.O. Box 499,
Narrowsburg, 12764. (914-489-2439)(Fax: 845-331-7461)
Bus. Agt.: Sandi Bohle, 180 Downs Street, Kingston, NY 12401
(914-489-2439).
M 524 GLENS FALLS/SARATOGA-Bob Medve, 12 Sunset
Drive, Queensbury, 12804. (518-745-5954) (Fax: 518-745-
5954) Bus. Agt.: Edward Smith (518-623-4427) (Fax: 518-623-
4427).
M 592 SARATOGA SPRINGS-James Farnan, 47 County
Route 76, Stillwater, 12170. (518-727-3735). Bus. Agt.: Rick
Daus.
ICG 600 INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS
GUILD-(See also California, Florida and Illinois) Alan Gitlin;
National Executive Director, Bruce Doering; Eastern Region
Director, Chaim Kantor, 80 Eighth Ave., 14th Fl., New York, NY
10011. (212-647-7300) (Fax: 212-647-7317).
MPP, O&VT 640 NASSAU/SUFFOLK COUNTIES OF
LONG ISLAND-Timothy King, 600 Johnson Avenue, Suite C-
5, Bohemia, 11716. (631-750-6588) (Fax: 631-750-6589) Bus.
Agt.: Robert B. Gottschalk, Jr.
M 645 ROCKLAND COUNTY-Ronald Jacobsen, 12 Kim
Marie Place, Newburgh, 12550. (914-772-8186) Bus. Agt.:
Brian McGarity, 85 South William Street, Pearl River, NY 10965
(718-813-2025).
MPEG 700 MOTION PICTURE EDITORS GUILD
(see also California)-Diane Adler; Exec. Dir.:Ron Kutak,
7715 Sunset Blvd., #200, Los Angeles, CA 90046. (323-876-
4770) (Fax: 323-876-0861) Asst. Exec. Dir.: Paul Moore, 145
Hudson Street, Suite 201, New York, NY 10013. (212-302-0700)
(Fax: 212-302-1091).
LF/VT 702 NEW YORK-William Andrews, 542 Eastbrook
Road, Ridgewood, NJ 07450. (212-869-5540) (Fax:
212-302-1091) Bus. Agt.: Joseph Truglio (201-447-0753).
M 749 MALONE-Michael S. Brashaw, 601 Ford Street,
Ogdensburg, 13669. (315-393-2873) (Fax: 315-393-2880) Bus.
Agt.: Samuel Rapin.
T&T 751 NEW YORK-Lawrence Paone, 1430 Broadway,
8th floor, New York, 10018. (212-302-7300) (Fax:
212-944-8687) Bus. Rep.: Lawrence Paone.
TWU 764 NEW YORK AND VICINITY-Rochelle
Friedman, 545 West 45th Street, 2nd flr., New York, 10036.
(212-957-3500) (Fax: 212-957-3232) Bus. Agts.: (Legit) Bart
Daudelin; (Film) Frank Gallagher.
TWU 783 BUFFALO-Patricia J. Marchewka, 124
Brentwood Drive, So. Cheektowaga, 14227-3271. (716-812-
0783) Bus. Agt.: Mary Jo Witherell, 27 Warburton Pl., Buffalo
14223.
T&T 788 ROCHESTER-Floyd R. Schilstra, 1142 Bay Road,
Webster, 14580 (585-787-2934). Bus. Agt.: John Giffen.
TBSE 794 NEW YORK-Ryan Priest, P.O. Box 154, Lenox
Hill Station, New York, 10021. (646-596-3539) .Bus. Agt.:
Timothy Daughtry.
Fourth Quarter 2010 45 44 Official Bulletin
VIRGINIA
S 022 NORTHERN VIRGINIA/WASHINGTON DC
SUBURBS, MD/WASHINGTON, DC-John Page, 1810
Hamlin Street, NE, Washington, DC 20018. (202-269-0212)
(Fax: 202-635-0192) Bus. Agt.: John Brasseux.
M 055 ROANOKE/SALEM/DANVILLE/LYNCHBURG/
BLACKSBURG/RADFORD/ STAUNTON-Russell Prusak,
P.O. Box 12424, Roanoke, 24025. (540-362-5164) (Fax: 540-
853-5845). Bus. Agt.: James A. Nelson (540-353-1013).
S 0 8 7 R I C H M O N D / P E T E R S B U R G /
CHARLOTTESVILLE/EMPORIA-Robert D. Walton, P.O.
Box 100, Sandston 23150. Bus. Agt.: John Fulwider (804-564-
6698) (Fax: 804-746-1601).
M 264 NE WPORT NE WS/ HAMPTON/
WILLIAMSBURG-Trustees: Int’l Representatives: Mark
Kiracofe and Scott Harbinson, P.O. Box 9124, Hampton, 23670.
(757-838-9045) (Fax: 757-838-1066).
S 285 NORFOLK/CHESAPEAKE/PORTSMOUTH/
VIRGINIA BEACH-Cristina Evans, 5307 E. Virginia Beach
Blvd., Suite 128, Norfolk, 23502. Bus. Agt.: Dale Lee Evans
(757-237-5058).
SM&BT 487 MID-ATLANTIC AREA-Carol Everson,
2031 Clipper Park Road, Suite 105, Baltimore, MD 21211
(410-685-4141) (Fax: 410-685-3939) Bus. Agt.: Rosemarie
Levy.
M 591 WINCHESTER, VA/HAGERSTOWN, MD/
F REDERI CK, MD/ WAYNESBORO, PA/
MARTINSBURG, WV-Michael E. Clem, 10300 Moxley
Road, Damascus, MD 20872. (202-210-5200).Bus. Agt.: John
Nichols.
M 699 BRISTOL, VA/JOHNSON CITY/KINGSPORT,
TN-Joseph Washburn, P.O. Box 442, Unicoi, TN 37692. (423-
741-7434) Bus. Agt.: Shelby Gene Coffey (423-741-8353).
WASHINGTON
S 015 SEATTLE/EVERETT/OLYMPIA/ANACORTES/
MARYSVILLE/TACOMA/ BREMERTON/ BELLING-
HAM/MT. VERNON/SEDRO WOOLEY/PORT ANGE-
LES/ BURLINGTON/ CONCRETE/ STANWOOD/
LONGVIEW-Noel Clayton, 2800 1st Avenue, Room 231,
Seattle, 98121. (206-441-1515) (Fax: 206-448-5325) Bus.
Agt.: Paul Bigman.
M 093 SPOKANE, WA/WALLACE KELLOGG, ID-Jill
Scott, P.O. Box 1266, Spokane, WA 99210. Bus. Agt.: Jacel
Evans. Bus. Rep.: Pat Devereau (509-999-5073) (Fax: 208-
623-6496).
SM 488 PACIFIC NORTHWEST-Linda Bloom, 5105 SW
45th Avenue, Portland, OR 97221. (503-232-1523) (Fax:
503-232-9552) Bus. Agt.: (Oregon) Charles A. Carlsen
(503-232-1523); (Washington) Robert Riggs.
TBR&SE 793 PACIFIC NORTHWEST-Dave Bishop, P.O.
Box 94282, Seattle, WA., 98124. (877-680-4853). Bus. Agt.:
Todd Gordon.
TWU 887 SEATTLE-Rita M. Brown, 2800 1st Avenue,
#229, Seattle, 98121. (206-443-9354) (Fax: 206-448-5325)
Bus. Agt.: Delia Mulholland.
WEST VIRGINIA
M 064 WHEELING, WV/STEUBENVILLE, OH-Tony
Assaro, P.O. Box 292, Wheeling, WV 26003-0041. Bus. Agt.:
Frank Scarnechia (304-639-2516) (Fax: 304-242-6134).
S 271 CHARLESTON-Craig Colhoun, P.O. Box 75323,
Charleston, 25375. (304-561-7910) (Fax: 304-357-7556). Bus.
Agt.: Brock Comer.
M 369 HUNTINGTON, WV/ASHLAND, KY/
IRONTON, OH-Judy M. Chapman, P.O. Box 192, Huntington,
WV 25707. Bus. Agt.: Chestle St. Clair (304-733-0880).
M 578 NORTH CENTRAL WEST VIRGINIA-R.A.
Nethken, P.O. Box 293, Morgantown, WV 26507. Bus. Agt.:
William Delbridge (703-868-3154) (Fax: 304-293-3550).
M 591 WINCHESTER, VA/HAGERSTOWN, MD/
F R E DE R I C K, MD/ WAYNE S B OR O, PA/
MARTINSBURG, WV-Michael E. Clem, 10300 Moxley
Road, Damascus, MD 20872. (202-210-5200). Bus. Agt.: John
Nichols.
WISCONSIN
S 018 MILWAUKEE/WAUKESHA-James Luljak, 230 W.
Wells St., Ste. 405, Milwaukee, 53203. (414-272-3540) (Fax:
414-272-3592) Bus. Agt.: Peter Misko.
M 141 LaCROSSE-Trygve Zielke, N 2528 Baker Road, La
Crosse, 54601. (608-787-7667) (Fax: 608-787-0610) Bus. Agt.:
William Timm.
M 251 MADISON/COLUMBIA/SAUK COUNTY-
Brooks McGrath, 1602 South Park Street, #224, Madison,
53715. (608-616-0251) (Fax: 608-251-6023) Bus. Agts.:
(Stage) Chris Gauthier; (Oper.) Tim Romano.
M 470 OSHKOSH/FOND DU LAC/GREEN
BAY/WISCONSIN RAPIDS/ MARSHFIELD/
WAUSAU-Richard Comfort, P.O. Box 3351, Oshkosh, 54911.
(866-426-4707) Bus. Agt.: Stephen Dedow.
TWU 777 MILWAUKEE-William Balfanz, 3619 N. 86th
Street, Milwaukee, 53222-2816. (414-462-6214). Bus. Agt.:
Beverly Jaeger, W346 N5708 North Lake Drive, Oconomowoc,
53066 (262-567-1863) (Fax: 262-567-1863).
WYOMING
S 229 CHEYENNE/LARAMIE, WY/FORT COLLINS,
CO-Dan Schoonover, P.O. Box 677, Fort Collins, CO 80522.
Bus. Agt.: David Denman (970-226-2292) (Fax: 970-490-
2292).
M 426 CASPER-Robert H. Wilson, P.O. Box 353, Casper,
82602-0353. (307-234-3970) Bus. Agt.: Gary R. Vassos.
Local Secretaries
and Business Agents
of the Special
Department Locals
(Unless otherwise specified, street address or post office box
number listed is in city shown in bold-face type after local
number.)
Reference Letters:
AAE Amusement Area Employees
AE Arena Employees
AFE Arena Facility Employees
AMTS Admissions, Mutual Ticket Sellers
B Back Room, Film Exchange Employees
BPTS Ball Park Ticket Sellers
F Front Office, Film Exchange Employees
MT Mail Telephone Order Clerks
T Theatre Employees - Special Departments
TSA Ticket Sales Agents
CALIFORNIA
T B18 SAN FRANCISCO-Christine Costello, 965 Mission
St., Suite 207, San Francisco, 94103. (415-974-0860) (Fax:
415-974-0852) Bus. Agt.: Christine Costello.
T B32 SAN JOSE-SANTA CLARA COUNTY-Carol Jossi,
P.O. Box 2832, Santa Clara, 95055. Bus. Agt.: Nancy Williams.
T B66 SACRAMENTO-Doris Goodwin, P.O. Box 19063,
Sacramento, 95819. (916-486-4809) (Fax: 916-482-8178) Bus.
Agt.: Richard Allen.
AAE B192 HOLLYWOOD-Frank Treppa, 10999 Riverside
Dr., #301, N. Hollywood, 91602. (818-509-9192) (Fax: 818-
509-9873.
CALIFORNIA SPECIAL BRANCH-Michael Miller, Jr.,
10045 Riverside Drive, Toluca Lake, 91602. (818-980-3499)
(Fax: 818-980-3496).
CANADA
T B173 TORONTO/HAMILTON-Lloyd Ricketts, 8 Lowry
Square, Scarborough, Ontario M1B 1N6 (416-724-9067). Bus.
Agt.: Chastity Brooker, 187 Park Street, South, Apt. 15E,
Hamilton, ON L8P 3E9.
T B848 GLACE BAY, NS-David Bailey, 28 Norwood Street,
Glace Bay, NS, B1A 3M5. (902-849-4957) Bus. Agt.: Patricia
Pace, 26 Pitt St., Glace Bay, NS, B1A 2B7.
T B898 ST. JOHN’S, NL-Todd Leawood, P.O. Box 947, Mt.
Pearl, NL, A1N 2X3. (709-745-8653) (Fax: 709-745-7374) Bus.
Agt.: Todd Leawood.
T B906 CHARLOTTETOWN, PE-Larry Arbing, 145
Richmond St./Conf Ctr Arts, Charlottetown, PE, CIA 1J1.
(902-628-1864) (Fax: 902-566-4648).
COLORADO
T B7 DENVER-Jan Miller, 1475 Curtis St., Denver, 80202.
(303-534-2423) (Fax: 303-534-0216).
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
TSA B868 WASHINGTON-Vevica Tobias, 2500 Virginia
Ave., N.W., #308, Washington, 20037. (202-416-8521) Bus.
Agt.: Antonio Bullock.
FLORIDA
AE AE938 JACKSONVILLE-Charles Bennett, 1000 Water
Street, Jacksonville, 32204 (904-879-1236) Bus. Agt.: David
Moore.
ILLINOIS
T B46 CHICAGO, IL/MILWAUKEE, WI-Steve Altman,
216 S. Jefferson Street, Suite 203, Chicago, 60661. (312-454-
1110) (Fax: 312-454-6110) Bus. Agt.: Anthony M. Spano.
INDIANA
T B194 INDIANAPOLIS-Stephen P. Blair, P.O. Box 7055,
Greenwood, 46142. (317-507-0717) (Fax: 317-888-5252) Bus.
Agt.: Stephen Blair.
MASSACHUSETTS
T B4 BOSTON-Florence Lewis, P.O. Box 120277, Lafayette
Station, Boston, 02112. (617-328-4128)(Fax: 617-868-8194)
Bus. Agt.: Beverly McCormack.
M 283 HANOVER/YORK COUNTY/GETTYSBURG/
LANCASTER COUNTY-Judi S. Miller, 1927 Queenswood
Drive, L-205, York, 17403. (717-846-4314). Bus. Agt.: Charles
Reynolds.
M 329 SCRANTON/PITTSTON-Patricia Martin, 1266
O’Neil Highway, Dunmore, 18512. Bus. Agt.: Don Martin
(570-650-3607).
SM 489 GREATER PITTSBURGH AREA-Cassie Ross
Eccles, P.O. Box 100056, Pittsburgh, 15233. (412-403-4890)
(Fax: 412-820-2621) Bus. Agt.: Charles Eccles.
M 591 WAYNESBORO, PA/HAGERSTOWN,
MD/ FREDERI CK, MD/ WI NCHESTER, VA/
MARTINSBURG, WV-Michael E. Clem, 10300 Moxley
Road, Damascus, MD 20872. (202-210-5200). Bus. Agt.: John
Nichols.
M 627 SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA (excluding
West Alexander)-Pat Gianella, 321 Fingal Street,
Pittsburgh, 15211. (412-431-0264) (Fax: 412-431-0264) Bus.
Agt.: Pat A. Gianella.
M 636 LEWI STOWN/ STATE COLLEGE/
HUNTINGTON/ALTOONA/WILLIAMSPORT/ JOHN-
STOWN/INDIANA/SUNBURY/LEWISBURG/BLOOM
SBURG/SELINSGROVE/INDIANA-Roger Tharp, IV, P.O.
Box 394, State College, 16804. (814-571-4321) Bus. Agt.: Fred
Park, Jr. (814-883-0769).
T&T 752 PHILADELPHIA-Tara Suppa, P.O. Box 70,
Runnemede, NJ 08078. (215-431-5184) Bus. Agt.: Jerry Kelly.
TWU 787 PITTSBURGH-Deborah Termini, 9 Beltzhoover
Ave., Pittsburgh, 15210-1009. (412-728-0503) (Fax: 412-471-
7787) Bus. Agt.: Roza Martinovic.
TWU 799 PHILADELPHIA/CAMDEN, NJ-Susan
Calaciura, 200 Plymouth Place, Merchantville, NJ 08109. (215-
643-1282) (Fax: 856-488-6368) Bus. Agt.: Elisa Murphy, 901
Llanfair Road, Lower Gwynedd, PA 19002.
TBSE 804 PHILADELPHIA-Thomas Baginski, 210 Locust
Street, #6AW, Philadelphia, 19106 (215-922-4594). Bus. Agt.:
Debbie Harris.
TBSE 820 PITTSBURGH-David Ferry, P.O. Box 22365,
Pittsburgh, 15222-0365. (724-733-1236) Bus. Agt.: Marji
Murphy.
T&T 862 PITTSBURGH-Nancy Regan, 655 Penn Avenue,
Pittsburgh, 15222. (412-456-7026) Bus. Agt.: Luke Doyle.
TBSE 902 JOHNSTOWN/ALTOONA-Bob Hess, 49 Old
Hickory Lane, Johnstown, 15905. (814-255-7600) Bus. Agt.:
Joe McGinty.
PUERTO RICO/VIRGIN ISLANDS
M 494 PUERTO RICO/U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS-Mitzy
Ann Ramirez-Suarez, 259 Chile Street, Suite D, San Juan, PR
00918 (787-764-4672) (Fax: 787-765-3459).Bus. Agt.: Luis
Estrella.
RHODE ISLAND
M 023 STATE OF RHODE ISLAND-John Brennan, 90
Printery Street, Providence, 02904. (401-225-2308) Bus. Agt.:
Patrick Ryan, 6 Driftwood Drive, Barrington, RI 02806.
SM 481 NEW ENGLAND AREA-James MacDonald, 10
Tower Office Park, Suite 218, Woburn, MA 01801. (781-376-
0074) (Fax: 781-376-0078) Bus. Agt.: Chris O’Donnell.
TW, MA&HS 830 STATE OF RHODE
ISLAND-Jacqueline Keegan, 10 South Bend Street,
Pawtucket, 02860. (401-489-0886) Bus. Agt.: Frances Howe,
85 Pine Hill Road, North Scitvate, 02857. (401-647-9333).
SOUTH CAROLINA
M 333 CHARLESTON/MYRTLE BEACH-Michael Coffey,
P.O. Box 31921, Charleston, 29417-1921. (843-744-4434) (Fax:
843-744-7336) Bus. Agt.: George Aytes.
M 347 COLUMBIA-Vivian Vandegrift, P.O. Box 8876,
Columbia, 29202 (803-394-1896) (Fax: 866-925-3475) Bus.
Agt.: James Harwell (803-240-0111).
SM 491 STATES OF SOUTH AND NORTH CAROLI-
NA/SAVANNAH, GA-Andrew Oyaas, 1707 Castle Hayne
Road, Wilmington, NC 28401. (910-343-9408) (Fax:
910-343-9448) Bus. Agt.: Jason Rosin.
SOUTH DAKOTA
S 220 SIOUX FALLS-Terry Bader, P.O. Box 2040, Sioux
Falls, 57101. (605-261-2639) Bus. Agt.: Dave Schreck.
M 503 MITCHELL/HURON-Wade R. Strand, 25798 409th
Street, Mitchell, 57301. (605-996-7533) Bus. Agt.: Tony Palli
(605-996-1591).
M 731 RAPID CITY/BLACK HILLS AREA-Gary
Wallace, P.O. Box 2358, Rapid City, 57709 (605-545-2516).
Bus. Agt.: Joe Kern.
TENNESSEE
S 046 NASHVILLE-Deborah McCarley, 211 Donelson Pike,
#202/203, Bldg A, Nashville, 37214-2932. (615-885-1058)
(Fax: 615-885-5165) Bus. Agt.: Michael J. Gilbert.
S 069 MEMPHIS-Allen Byassee, 3340 Poplar Avenue, Suite
129, Memphis, 38111. (901-327-4994)(Fax: 901-327-8626).
Bus. Agt.: Allen Byassee.
S 140 CHATTANOOGA-Robert Wills, P.O. Box 132,
Chattanooga, 37401. (423-645-9251) (Fax: 423-757-5326)
Bus. Agt.: Chris Keene.
S 197 KNOXVI LLE/ MARYVI LLE/ ALCOA/
GATLINBURG-Charles J. Flenniken, P.O. Box 946, Knoxville,
37901. (865-428-6583) Bus. Agt.: Ronald Carrell.
SM 492 STATE OF TENNESSEE/NORTHERN MIS-
SISSIPPI-Theresa Morrow, 4610 Charlotte Pike, Nashville, TN
37209. (615-386-3492) (Fax: 615-460-7492). Bus. Agt.: Robert
Hill.
M 699 JOHNSON CITY/KINGSPORT, TN/BRISTOL,
VA-Joseph Washburn, P.O. Box 442, Unicoi, TN 37692. (423-
741-7434) Bus. Agt.: Shelby Gene Coffey (423-741-8353).
TWU 825 MEMPHIS-Dorothy L. Clark, 1472 Kinilwood,
Memphis, 38134. (901-386-3429) (Fax: 901-382-7832) Bus.
Agt.: Dorothy Clark.
TWU 894 KNOXVILLE-Leslie Percelly, P.O. Box 14653,
Knoxville, 37914. (865-659-9701) (Fax: 865-546-2135) Bus.
Agt.: Roland Harkness.
TWU 915 NASHVILLE-Barbara W. Sullivan, P.O. Box 383,
Hermitage, 37076 (615-883-8023) (Fax: 615-851-6055). Bus.
Agt.: Judy Resha (615-851-6055).
TEXAS
S 051 HOUSTON/GALVESTON-Scott Firth, 3030 North
Freeway, Houston, 77009. (713-697-3999) (Fax:
713-697-0222) Bus. Agt.: Butch Lange.
S 076 SAN ANTONIO-Carl Lenhart, 206 San Pedro, #306,
San Antonio, 78205 (210-223-1428) (Fax: 210-225-6115) Bus.
Agt.: Raymond G. Sewell.
S 126 FORT WORTH/ARLINGTON/DENTON/
GAINESVILLE/GRAPEVINE-Jim Brady, P.O. Box 185178,
Fort Worth, 76181. (817-929-1926) (Fax: 817-284-0968) Bus.
Agt.: Dale Domm.
S 127 DALLAS/GRAND PRAIRIE/MCKINNEY-Senita
Peck, 2710 Live Oak Street, Dallas, 75204. (214-742-4741)
(Fax: 214-747-4792) Bus. Agt.: Carl Labry.
M 153 EL PASO, TX/LAS CRUCES, NM-Ignacio Flores,
3349 Dungarvan Drive, El Paso, 79925. (915-594-8250) (Fax:
915-886-4900) Bus. Agt.: Scott White.
M 183 BEAUMONT/PORT ARTHUR/ORANGE-Marie
Pinner, 681 Ridgewood Drive, Pt. Neches, 77651.
(409-626-1880) (Fax: 409-729-0578) Bus. Agt.: Larry Allen.
M 205 AUSTIN-Bon V. Davis, P.O. Box 142, Austin, 78767.
(512-371-1217) Bus. Agt.: Jon Maloy.
O 330 FORT WORTH/DENTON/GAINESVILLE-
Coleman Bennett, P.O. Box 146, Weatherford, 76086. (817-
598-1517) Bus. Agt.: Coleman Bennett.
M 331 TEMPLE/KILLEEN/BRYAN/WACO-Darrell Dyer,
P.O. Box 424, Killeen, 76540. (254-535-1256) Bus. Agt.:
William Sproul.
M 378 WICHITA FALLS-Richard Lehman, 3188 Rifle
Range Road, Iowa Park, 76367. (940-592-9753) Bus. Agt.:
Richard Lehman.
SM 484 STATE OF TEXAS-Jason Keene, 1514 Ed
Bluestein Blvd., #106, Austin, 78721 (512-385-3466) (Fax:
512-385-3370) Bus. Agt.: Stephen Beasley.
M 604 CORPUS CHRI STI /HARLI NGEN/
McALLEN/BROWNSVILLE-John Jones, P.O. Box 260356,
Corpus Christi, 78426. (361-548-0472) Bus. Agt.: Simon
Zambrano.
TBSE 796 STATE OF TEXAS-Frank Trevino, P.O. Box
70826, Houston, 77270. Bus. Agt.: Andrew Benz.
TWU 803 DALLAS/FORT WORTH-Vicki Ruth Cole-
Perrin, P.O. Box 570574, Dallas, 75357 (817-832-9090). Bus.
Agts.: (Dallas) Patsy F. Neumann (214-352-8418)(Fax: 214-
352-8418); (Fort Worth) Kathy Neel Gentry (817-834-4256)
(Fax: 817-834-4256).
M 865 ODESSA/MIDLAND/LUBBOCK-Lamont Furlow,
9372 W. University Blvd., Odessa, 79764. (432-381-2500) (Fax:
432-530-2223) Bus. Agt.: Lamont Furlow.
TWU 896 HOUSTON-Kathleen Pecha, P.O. Box 130774,
Houston, 77219-0774. (281-686-5548) (Fax: 713-928-6731)
Bus. Agt.: Glinda Anderson.
AMPE 920 DALLAS/FORT WORTH-Paul Thompson,
4841 W. Royal Lane, Irving, 75063 (972-929-1913) (Fax: 972-
929-3651). Bus. Agt.: Marvin Davis.
UTAH
S 099 STATE OF UTAH/BOI SE/NAMPA/
CALDWELL/TWIN FALL/SUN VALLEY, IDAHO-Susan
Foretich, 526 West 800 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84101.
(801-359-0513) (Fax: 801-532-6227) Bus. Agt.: Patrick
Heltman.
EE 838 SALT LAKE CITY, UT/SOUTHERN IDAHO-
Kathy Peck, 230 West 200 South, Suite 2220, Salt Lake City,
UT 84101 (801-320-0701) (Fax: 801-320-0705) Bus. Agt.:
Nancy Trouse.
VERMONT
SM 481 NEW ENGLAND AREA-James MacDonald, 10
Tower Office Park, Suite 218, Woburn, MA 01801. (781-376-
0074) (Fax: 781-376-0078) Bus. Agt.: Chris O’Donnell.
S 919 BURLINGTON, VT/HANOVER/LEBANON,
NH-Leslie Day, P.O. Box 951, Burlington, VT 05402-0951 (802-
865-0570). Bus. Agt.: Craig Mowery (802-355-4541).
46 Official Bulletin
DISTRICT SECRETARIES
District No. 1 (Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington & Alaska)-Delia
Mulholland, 2800 First Avenue, Suite 229, Seattle, WA 98121 (206-478-8877) Web site:
http://www.districtone.com; Email: district.one@twu887.org.
District No. 2 (California, Nevada, Arizona & Hawaii)-Ed Brown, 10061
Riverside Drive, Suite 825, Toluca Lake, CA 91602. (818-303-4351) Web site:
www.iadistrict2.org; Email: ebrown@iadistrict2.org
District No. 3 (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts,
Rhode Island & Connecticut)-James E. Flanders, 152 Old Colony Avenue, South
Boston, MA 02127. (617-268-5595) (Fax: 617-269-6252).
District No. 4 (Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West
Virginia and District of Columbia)-John Page, 1810 Hamlin Street, NE,
Washington, D.C. 20018-2459. (301-943-2908) (Fax: 202-635-0192) Email: iatse-
d4@comcast.net
District No. 5 (Wyoming, Colorado, Utah & New Mexico)-Susan N. Jones,
8159 Ventana Azul Ave., NW, Albuquerque, NM 87114. (505-280-1517).
District No. 6 (Texas, Oklahoma & Arkansas)-Stuart Hale, 4821 Elsby,
Dallas, TX 75209. (214-352-2046) (Fax: 214-747-4792).
District No. 7 (Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina. South
Carolina, Mississippi & Louisiana)-Andrew Oyaas, P.O. Box 472, Tuckasegee, NC
28783 (828-421-8123) (Fax: 828-293-1140). Email: iadistrict7@gmail.com.
District No. 8 (Michigan, Indiana, Ohio & Kentucky)-Rick Madison, 119
West Breckinridge Street, Louisville, KY 40203 (502-587-7936) (Fax: 502-587-3422).
Email: iatse17@bellsouth.net.
District No. 9 (Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Minnesota, North
Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska & Kansas)-Ira Alper, P.O. Box 762,
Rosemont, IL 60018 (847-778-0809) (Fax: 888-799-9973).
District No. 10 (New York, New Jersey)-John K. Hill, 171 East Side Drive,
Ballston Lake, NY 12019 (518-399-2085) (Fax: 518-384-1817). Email:
jhill11@nycap.rr.com
District No. 11 (Ontario, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia,
New Brunswick & Newfoundland)-Cheryl Batulis, 2 Neilor Crescent, Toronto, ON
M9C 1K4 (416-622-8555) (Fax: 416-620-5041) Email: iad11@bellnet.ca
District No. 12 (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta & British
Columbia)-Barny Haines, 202-128 James Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3B ON8 (204-943-
4634) (Fax: 204-943-8394). Email: i.a.d12@allstream.net
District No. 14 (Florida, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands)-Kimberly
Bowles, 5385 Conroy Road, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32811 (407-422-2747) (Fax: 407-843-
9170) Email: kabowles@iatselocal631.com
AFE B935 WORCESTER-Mike McKenzie, 24 Toria Heights
Road, Oxford, 01540 (508-943-3626). Bus. Agt.: Ivar Carlson
(508-248-0845).
MICHIGAN
T B179 DETROIT-Frances Hemler, 26803 Warner, Warren,
48091. (586-481-3479) (Fax: 586-754-6883). Bus. Agt.: John
Nesbitt.
MINNESOTA
T B26 MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL-International Officer-in-
Charge: Timothy Magee, 20017 Van Dyke, Detroit, MI 48234
(313-368-0825) (Fax: 313-368-1151).
MISSOURI
T B2 ST. LOUIS-Robert Horan, 1611 S. Broadway, Suite 108,
St. Louis, 63104 (314-647-6458). Bus. Agt.: Robert Young, 2647
Meadowlane Drive, Granite City, IL 62040. (314-503-3706).
NEW YORK
T B90 ROCHESTER-Rick Welch, 100 Lakecrest Avenue,
Rochester, 14612. (585-415-8585) (Fax: 585-724-7667) Bus.
Agt.: Mike Povio.
MT B751 NEW YORK-Katherine Lowell, P.O. Box 20561,
New York, 10129. (212-239-6226) (Fax: 212-239-5801) Bus.
Agt.: Curtis Bunche.
BPTS F72 NEW YORK-Michael A. Byrnes, 15 Mill Road,
South Farmingdale, 11735 (516-658-1384) (Fax: 516-454-
0188). Bus. Agt.: Michael A. Byrnes.
AFE AE936 ALBANY-Cory Straker, 51 South Pearl Street,
Albany, 12207. (518-487-2267) (Fax: 518-487-2013) Bus. Agt.:
Thomas Mink.
OHIO
T B27 CLEVELAND-Patrick Duffy, 1422 Euclid Avenue,
Suite 721, Cleveland, 44115-1902. (216-621-9537) (Fax: 216-
621-3518) Bus. Agt.: Toni Burns.
T B38 CINCINNATI-Jay Brewer, 252 Stokesay St., Ludlow,
KY 41016. (859-291-3393) Bus. Agt.: Thom Brannock.
T B148 AKRON-Tracey Sommer, 345 South Avenue,
Tallmadge, 44278 (330-634-0884) Bus. Agt.: Omar Banks.
AMTS B754 CINCINNATI-Karla Lang, 3739 Fallen Tree
Way, Amelia, 45254. (513-373-7297) Bus. Agt.: Robert Fields.
OREGON
T B20 PORTLAND-Daniel Lyons, 4949 S.E. 26th Ave.,
Portland, 97202. (503-230-1138) (Fax: 503-230-7044) Bus.
Agt.: Bambi Ooley (503-230-1138).
PENNSYLVANIA
T B29 PHILADELPHIA-Antoinette Enoch, P.O. Box 54508,
Philadelphia, PA 19148. (267-357-5360). Bus. Agt.: Myra
Pettigrew.
TEXAS
T B184 HOUSTON-Gloria Martinez, 3030 North Freeway,
Houston, 77009 (713-697-3999) (Fax: 713-697-0222). Bus.
Agt.: Denise Fabry.
WISCONSIN
T B46 CHICAGO, IL/MILWAUKEE, WI-Steve Altman,
216 S. Jefferson Street, Suite 203, Chicago, 60661. (312-454-
1110) (Fax: 312-454-6110) Bus. Agt.: Anthony M. Spano.
TPR-Ad-0810
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