Data Structures and Algorithms

Objectives

In this session, you will learn to:
Implement a graph Apply graphs to solve programming problems

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Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Representing a Graph

To implement a graph, you need to first represent the given information in the form of a graph. The two most commonly used ways of representing a graph are as follows:
Adjacency Matrix Adjacency List

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Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Adjacency Matrix

Consider the following graph:

Adjacency Matrix Representation
v1
v1 v2 v3 v4 0 0 0 1

v2
1 0 0 0

v3
0 1 0 1

v4
0 0 0 0

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Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Adjacency List

Consider the following graph:

Adjacency List Representation

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Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Traversing a Graph

Traversing a graph means visiting all the vertices in a graph. You can traverse a graph with the help of the following two methods:
Depth First Search (DFS) Breadth First Search (BFS)

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS

Algorithm: DFS(v)
1. Push the starting vertex, v into the stack. 2. Repeat until the stack becomes empty:
a. Pop a vertex from the stack. b. Visit the popped vertex. c. Push all the unvisited vertices adjacent to the popped vertex into the stack.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Push the starting vertex, v1 into the stack

v1

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v1 from the stack Visit v1 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v1 into the stack

v1

Visited: v1
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v1 from the stack Visit v1 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v1 into the stack

v2 v4

Visited:
v1
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v2 from the stack Visit v2 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v2 into the stack

v2 v4

Visited: v1 v2
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v2 from the stack Visit v2 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v2 into the stack

v6
v3 v4

Visited: v1 v2
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v6 from the stack Visit v6 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v6 into the stack

v6
v3 v4

There are no unvisited vertices adjacent to v6

Visited: v1 v2 v6
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v3 from the stack Visit v3 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v3 into the stack

v3 v4

Visited: v1 v2 v6 v3
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v3 from the stack Visit v3 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v3 into the stack

v5 v4

Visited: v1 v2 v6 v3
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v5 from the stack Visit v5 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v5 into the stack

v5 v4

There are no unvisited vertices adjacent to v5

Visited: v1 v2 v6 v3 v5
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Pop a vertex, v4 from the stack Visit v4 Push all unvisited vertices adjacent to v4 into the stack

v4

There are no unvisited vertices adjacent to v4

Visited: v1 v2 v6 v3 v5 v4
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

The stack is now empty Therefore, traversal is complete

Visited: v1 v2 v6 v3 v5 v4
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)

Although the preceding algorithm provides a simple and convenient method to traverse a graph, the algorithm will not work correctly if the graph is not connected. In such a case, you will not be able to traverse all the vertices from one single starting vertex.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
DFS (Contd.)
1. Repeat step 2 for each vertex, v in the graph 2. If v is not visited:
a. Call DFS(v)

To solve this problem, you need to execute the preceding algorithm repeatedly for all unvisited vertices in the graph.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS

Algorithm: BFS(v)
1. Visit the starting vertex, v and insert it into a queue. 2. Repeat step 3 until the queue becomes empty. 3. Delete the front vertex from the queue, visit all its unvisited adjacent vertices, and insert them into the queue.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Visit v1 Insert v1 into the queue

v1

v1
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v1 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v1 and insert them in the queue

v1

Visited: v1
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v1 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v1 and insert them in the queue

v2

v4

v1 v2 v4
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v2 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v2 and insert them in the queue

v2

v4

v1 v2 v4
Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v2 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v2 and insert them in the queue

v4

v3

v6

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v4 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v4 and insert them in the queue

v4

v3

v6

v5

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6 v5
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v3 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v3 and insert them in the queue

v3

v6

v5

v3 does not have any unvisited adjacent vertices

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6 v5
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v6 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v6 and insert them in the queue

v6

v5

v3 does not have any unvisited adjacent vertices

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6 v5
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v6 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v6 and insert them in the queue

v5

v6 does not have any unvisited adjacent vertices

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6 v5
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v5 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v5 and insert them in the queue

v5

v6 does not have any unvisited adjacent vertices

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6 v5
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Remove a vertex v5 from the queue Visit all unvisited vertices adjacent to v5 and insert them in the queue

v5 does not have any unvisited adjacent vertices

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6 v5
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

The queue is now empty Therefore, traversal is complete

v5 does not have any unvisited adjacent vertices

v1 v2 v4 v3
Ver. 1.0

v6 v5
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)

Although the preceding algorithm provides a simple and convenient method to traverse a graph, the algorithm will not work correctly if the graph is not connected. In such a case, you will not be able to traverse all the vertices from one single starting vertex.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
BFS (Contd.)
1. Repeat step 2 for each vertex, v in the graph 2. If v is not visited:
a. Call BFS(v)

To solve this problem, you need to execute the preceding algorithm repeatedly for all unvisited vertices in the graph.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Activity: Implementing a Graph by Using Adjacency Matrix Representation

Problem Statement:
You have to represent a set of cities and the distances between them in the form of a graph. Write a program to represent the graph in the form of an adjacency matrix.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Applications of Graphs

Many problems can be easily solved by reducing them in the form of a graph Graph theory has been instrumental in analyzing and solving problems in areas as diverse as computer network design, urban planning, finding shortest paths and molecular biology.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem

The shortest path problem can be solved by applying the Dijkstra’s algorithm on a graph The Dijkstra’s algorithm is based on the greedy approach The steps in the Dijkstra’s algorithm are as follows:
1. Choose vertex v corresponding to the smallest distance recorded in the DISTANCE array such that v is not already in FINAL. 2. Add v to FINAL. 3. Repeat for each vertex w in the graph that is not in FINAL:
a. If the path from v1 to w via v is shorter than the previously recorded distance from v1 to w (If ((DISTANCE[v] + weight of edge(v,w)) < DISTANCE[w])):
i. Set DISTANCE[w]=DISTANCE[v] + weight of edge(v,w).

4. If FINAL does not contain all the vertices, go to step 1.
Session 17

Ver. 1.0

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

Suppose you need to find the shortest distance of all the vertices from vertex v1.
4 6

3

Add v1 to the FINAL array.

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v1 0 v1

v2 5

v3 ∞

v4 v5 3 ∞

v6 ∞

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

In the DISTANCE array, vertex v4 has the shortest distance from vertex v1.
4 6

3

Therefore, v4 is added to the FINAL array.

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v1 0 v1

v2 5 v4

v3 ∞

v4 v5 3 ∞

v6 ∞

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v2 = 5 v1 → v4 → v2 = 3 + ∞ = ∞

3

4

6

∞>5 Therefore, no change is made.

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v1 0 v1

v2 5 v4

v3 ∞

v4 v5 3 ∞

v6 ∞

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v3 = ∞ v1 → v4 → v3 = 3 + 2 = 5

3

4

6

5<∞ Therefore, the entry corresponding to v3 in the DISTANCE array is changed to 5. v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4
Session 17

2

3 3

6

v3 ∞ 5

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v4 v5 3 ∞

v6 ∞

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v5 = ∞ v1 → v4 → v5 = 3 + 6 = 9

3

4

6

9<∞ Therefore, the entry corresponding to v5 in the DISTANCE array is changed to 9. v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4
Session 17

2

3 3

6

v3 5

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v4 v5 3 ∞ 9

v6 ∞

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v6 = ∞ v1 → v4 → v6 = 3 + ∞ = ∞

3

4

6

2

3 3

Both the values are equal. Therefore, no change is made. PASS 1 complete v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4
Session 17

6

v3 5

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v4 v5 3 9

v6 ∞

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

3

4

6

From the DISTANCE array, select the vertex with the shortest distance from v1, such that the selected vertex is not in the FINAL array. v2 and v3 have the shortest and the same distance from v1. Let us select v2 and add it to the FINAL array. v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4 v3 5 v2
Session 17

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v4 v5 3 9

v6 ∞

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v3 = 5 v1 → v2 → v3 = 5 + 4 = 9

3

4

6

9>5 Therefore, no change is made.

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v1 0 v1

v2 5 v4

v3 5 v2

v4 v5 3 9

v6 ∞

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v5 = 9 v1 → v2 → v5 = 5 + ∞ = ∞

3

4

6

∞>9 Therefore, no change is made.

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v1 0 v1

v2 5 v4

v3 5 v2

v4 v5 3 9

v6 ∞

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v6 = ∞ v1 → v2 → v6 = 5 + 6 = 11

3

4

6

11 < ∞ Therefore, the entry corresponding to v6 in the DISTANCE array is changed to 11. Pass 2 complete v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4 v3 5 v2
Session 17

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v4 v5 v6 3 9 ∞ 11

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

3

4

6

From the DISTANCE array, select the vertex with the shortest distance from v1, such that the selected vertex is not in the FINAL array. Let us select v3 and add it to the FINAL array.

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v1 0 v1

v2 5 v4

v3 5 v2

v4 v5 v6 3 9 11 v3
Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v5 = 9 v1 → v3 → v5 = 5 + 3 = 8

3

4

6

8<9 Therefore, the entry corresponding to v5 in the DISTANCE array is changed to 8. v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4 v3 5 v2 v4 v5 v6 3 9 8 11 v3
Session 17

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v6 = 11 v1 → v3 → v6 = 5 + 3 = 8

3

4

6

8 < 11 Therefore, the entry corresponding to v6 in the DISTANCE array is changed to 8. Pass 3 complete v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4 v3 5 v2 v4 v5 v6 3 8 11 8 v3
Session 17

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

3

4

6

From the DISTANCE array, select the vertex with the shortest distance from v1, such that the selected vertex is not in the FINAL array. Let us select v5 and add it to the FINAL array.

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

v1 0 v1

v2 5 v4

v3 5 v2

v4 v5 3 8 v3 v5

v6 8

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

v1 → v6 = 8 v1 → v5 → v6 = 8 + ∞ = ∞

3

4

6

∞>8 Therefore, no change is made. Pass 4 complete v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4 v3 5 v2 v4 v5 3 8 v3 v5
Session 17

2

3 3

6

v6 8

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

Data Structures and Algorithms
Solving the Shortest Path Problem (Contd.)
5

3

4

6

Now add the only remaining vertex, v6 to the FINAL array. All vertices have been added to the FINAL array. This means that the DISTANCE array now contains the shortest distances from vertex v1 to all other vertices. v1 0 v1 v2 5 v4 v3 5 v2 v4 v5 3 8 v3 v5 v6 8 v6
Session 17

2

3 3

6

DISTANCE
FINAL
Ver. 1.0

Data Structures and Algorithms
Activity: Solving the Shortest Path Problem

Problem Statement:
In the previous activity, you created a program to represent a set of cities and the distances between them in the form of a graph. Extend the program to include the functionality for finding the shortest path from a given city to all the other cities.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Summary

In this session, you learned that:
The two most commonly used ways of representing a graph are as follows:
Adjacency matrix Adjacency list

Traversing a graph means visiting all the vertices in the graph. In a graph, there is no special vertex designated as the starting vertex. Therefore, traversal of the graph may start from any vertex. You can traverse a graph with the help of the following two methods:
DFS BFS

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

Data Structures and Algorithms
Summary (Contd.)

Graph theory has been instrumental in analyzing and solving problems in areas as diverse as computer network design, urban planning, finding shortest paths and molecular biology.

Ver. 1.0

Session 17

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