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The State of Corporate Social Media

Written by

Nick Johnson
Founder, Useful Social Media @gnjohnson www.usefulsocialmedia.com

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The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

Table of contents
Page

Forward Methodology What do corporate social media teams look like? Who owns corporate social media? What does your social media department do? Budgets for corporate social media Social Media Metrics and Measurement Working with external service providers

3 4 9 16 21 26 29 40

The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

Foreword

Since December 2009, Useful Social Media have been lucky enough to witness first-hand the explosion in corporate social media adoption.
The growth of social media, and its consequent invasion of initially, at least corporate marketing departments, has signalled a fundamental shift in how corporations communicate with their stakeholders. For so long, the relationship was one of loudspeaker to mute crowd. A company bought TV advertising, billboards, and radio slots to declare how wonderful and worthy of money their product or service was. Consumers were expected to listen, not respond.

No longer.
The advent of social media has opened the lines of communication between producer and consumer. Marketing is no longer a one-way street. Now everyone is talking to everyone else. Producers to consumers. Consumers to producers. Consumers to consumers (about producers). And now things are starting to spread. The incubation chamber of social media is hatching a real revolution in corporate-consumer relations. Companies and consumers are both starting to ask: Why stop at marketing? Companies are realising social media can be leveraged for so much more than getting marketing messages across. And equally, consumers are realising than simply listening/ responding to marketing messages is a missed opportunity, and does not leverage the full power that social media has given them. Customer service. Product development. Employee engagement. Crisis response. Social is beginning to be incorporated into every aspect of business. In this briefing we will look at the hard statistics that represent this revolution. We will look at social media resourcing (financial and human), we will look at key social objectives and goals, well look at ROI and other metrics, key networks, and plans for the future. If you work on social media for big brands or make it your business to understand how these big brands approach social then this 50 page document contains key stats, facts, analysis and trends that will ensure you take full advantage of this revolutionary shift in the relationship between businesses and their consumers. Read on, Nick

Nick Johnson Founder Useful Social Media

[chart heading] What is the key focus of your role?

The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

What job )tles do our respondents have?


[chart heading] What is the key focus of your role?
What is the key focus of your role?

Social

13% What job )tles do our respondents have? 31%


Social 13% 31% 21%

Marke3ng

Communi 21%
Marke3ng Communica3ons Community

Communi Brand Digital Media Web

3% 15%
3% 15% 4% 2% 2% 9%

9% 4% 2% 2%

Brand Digital Media Web None of the above

None of t

unsurprising communications. This incorporate social most companies tend to incorporate before most companies tend to is unsurprising media into marketing/communications teams, social media into marketing/communications teams, before looking (or being forced to look) at looking (or being forced to look) atrespondents suggest other departments. Interestingly, 13% of implementation within their role predominantly focuses on social suggesting a implementation within other departments. the popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that of discrete social media departments. Interestingly, 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses on social suggesting a growth in the popularity Interestingly, media-specific roles, and that of discrete social media departments. on social of both social 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses [chart heading] Howin the popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that of suggesting a growth senior are you? [chart heading] Howsocial media departments. discrete senior are you?
How senior are you?

The most popular job title in our survey respondents was, as last year, marketing/communications. unsurprising most companies tend to incorporate social media into marketing/communications te The most title in at survey respondents was, as last year, lookingjob title popular job to look) our implementationmarketing/communications. marketing/ The most popular (or being forced respondents was, as last year, within other departments. is in our survey This

Seniority of respondents
9% 4%

Seniority of respondents
9%
CMO, President)

C-suite (chief, CEO, CIO, IO, 4% C-suite (chief, CEO, CCMO, President)
Vice-President (VP, VVice-President (VP, Vice) ice)

39%

39%

18%

18% Director (dir/head)


Manager (mgr)

Director (dir/head) Manager (mgr) Execu3ve (adm, assistant, ocer

26% 4%

26% 4%

Execu3ve (adm, assistant, ocer

Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter of our respondents were of a Manager level. Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter of Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter of our respo our respondents were of a Manager level. When compared with 2011, the first interesting shift becomes apparent. In 2011, only 33% of our respondents were of a Manager level. were Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that number has swelled to an impressive 49%. This When compared with are beginning to treat social media as more apparent. their core could back an assertion that companies2011, the first interesting shift becomesimportant toIn 2011, only When compared with 2011,were first interestingor more senior. apparent. this year only 33% of our r goals, and that 33% of our respondents climbing the corporate ladder.becomes However, In 2011, that direct exposure to social is the Director-level, shift

were Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that number has swelled to an impressive 5 could back an assertion that companies are beginning to treat social media as more important to th goals, and that direct exposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.

The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

[chart title] In what part of the world are you located? In what part of the world are you located?

number has swelled to an impressive 49%. This could back an assertion that companies are beginning to treat social media as more important to their core goals, and that direct exposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.

As is visible from the above, the respondents to this survey were truly global though a majority come from majority come from the USA and Canada. the USA and Canada.

As is visible from the above, the respondents to this survey were truly global though a

Whilst this reflects our own operations, it is often it is often the corporate social corporate Whilst this reflects our own area ofarea of operations, assumed thatassumed that the media adoption rate is more advanced than in Europe. Thisadvanced than in to lend credence to that argument though social media adoption rate is more chart would appear Europe. This chart would appear to other subsequent graphs and charts will though to determine the viability of this statement. lend credence to that argument be used other subsequent graphs and charts will be used
[chart title] Do you work for a corporate (client side) or for a service provider (agency-side) [Moving forward for all general charts those which werent produced in Word/Excel, like the one next can you just use the title on the chart itself as the [chart title], and remove the title text from the chart image?

to determine the viability of this statement.

The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

[CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?


[CHAPTER] What What do corporate [chart heading] Howdo corporate social mediawork exclusively on social media at your company? social media many members of staff teams look like? [for these charts made in excel and word can you please reduce the size of the chart title to very heading] How many members of staff work size consistency, and that we use the same and left teams look like? be[chart small Whatdo justified? Can you alsoensureexclusively on social media at your company? [CHAPTER] corporate social media can you like? [for these charts made in excel and wordteams look please reduce the size of the chart title to

order each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order USA be very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the same and Europe on one line, and then B2Cstaff work exclusively on social media at sizedcompany? [chart heading] How CORPORATE of and B2B on the next line similar your to below] order each time (ie many members as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order USA [for Europe on made in excel and word can you pleasenext line similarthe How many members of and work exclusively on on the reduce the size of sized to below] and these chartsone line, staff then B2C and B2Bsocial media at your company? chart title to
be very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the same order each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order USA and Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line similar sized to below]

Results from corporate-only prac))oners Results Corporate only practitioners from corporate-only prac))oners
Results from corporate-only prac))oners 5%
5%

9% 9%

5%

18% 18%
18%

9%

44% 44%
44%

24% 24%
24%

Zero Zero One Zero One Two - Three One Two - Three Four - Six Two - Three - Six Four 6+ Four - Six 6+
6+

EUROPEAN EUROPEAN Corporates Corporates

EUROPEAN Corporates 8% Zero 4% 8% Zero 4% 8% Zero 4% One One One 17% Two - Three 17% 17% Two - Three 50% Two - Three 50% 21% 50% 21% Four -- Six 21% Four Four - Six Six

EUROPEAN Corporates

USA Corporates

USA Corporates USA Corporates USA Corporates


10% 5%

10% 5% 10%

5%

18% 18% 18%

40% 40%

40%

Zero One

Zero Zero One One Two - Three Four - Six

27% 27%

27%

Two Two - Three - Three


Four - SFour - Six ix

6+ 6+ 6+
B2C Corporates

B2C orporates B2C CCorporates B2C orporates


Zero Zero 31% One

B2B Corporates

7% 7% 7%

11% 11% 11%

B2B Corporates B2B Corporates B2B Corporates


Zero One

Zero

2% 5% 5% 2% 2% 5% 17%

31% 31% 22% 22% 22% 29% 29% 29%

Two - Three Four - Six

One One

17% 17%
24% 52%

Zero Zero One One


Two - T hree Two - Three Four - S Six Four -ix

Two Three Two -- Three

24% 52% 24% 52%

Two - Three Four - Six

Four Six Four -- Six

In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty typical team would beourabout one or two people working exclusively on social media. of 2011 report, the average In In comparisonsame. A 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. A A comparison with our typical team would be ofsocial media or two people working exclusively same. much the with about one team has remained pretty much the typical team would be ofabout one or two people working exclusively on social media. typical teamwhen you break aboutone or two people workingfour or moreon social media. can begin to on social media. However, would be of out the higher figures ie team with exclusively practitioners, one
However, when you break out the higher figures ie media. In 2011,whenbreak out the the higher figures ie with four or more more practitioners, However, when that figure was 22%. higher figures ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toto team team with four or practitioners, one can begin However, you you break out identify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on social identify a can begin to identify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 four or more people working exclusively on social trend. oneIn 2011, 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have companies say they have four or more media. that figure was 22%. media. In 2011, that figure was 22%. social media. In 2011, that figure was 22%. people working exclusively on
identify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on social

In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. A

The initial reading of this would imply a lack of progress indeed, a reversal in social adoption within business. However, there is an alternative view.

The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

The Hub and Spoke model of social media is often declared to be (see Solis) a more advanced step on the social media journey. In this model, companies build up a small team of social media practitioners (the hub), who influence, direct and assist individuals within other departments around the business (spokes). The spokes are there to execute social media policy which is often set by the hub. Before this, companies tended to have a less strategic structure building up a larger group of practitioners in one department who are there to do everything. We see the reduction in team size as a move towards a hub and spoke model reducing the number of people who work exclusively on social media to a core team of one or two, and then giving social responsibilities to others within the organisation as part of their core responsibilities.

Breaking down the data to investigate other trends


Once we break down this data to focus exclusively on the differences between European and US corporations, it becomes apparent that differences exist. One can conclude that US-based companies are more likely to have more people working exclusively on social media than their European counterparts. Only 50% of Europeans have anyone working full-time on social, while the figure is 60% for US companies. This implies a continuation of last years trend of Europeans lagging behind US corporations in social media adoption though its worth pointing out that the gap seems to have narrowed. When you look at the split between B2C and B2B businesses, the difference is far more obvious. While only 48% of B2B companies have anyone working on social media full-time, a huge 69% of B2C companies do. As well as that, a full 40% of these B2C companies have two or more people working on social, compared to 24% of B2B companies.

Recently, Useful Social Media produced an article highlighting the top 5 companies working with social media today. Every featured company was drawn from the B2C world. Perhaps this lack of staffing goes some way to explain the poor showing for B2Bs.

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The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

What key performance indicators do you use?

What KPIs do you use?

20.0% 18.0% 16.0% 14.0% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0%

When one looks at the key performance indicators that brands use to track impact, When one looks at the key performance indicators that brands use to track impact, it becomes clear why it becomes clear why there social such confusion over social media impact tracking. there is still such confusion overis stillmedia impact tracking.
First place goes to web traffic, which is frankly too simplistic atoo simplisticmany meaningful things about First place goes to web traffic, which is frankly measure to say a measure to say many social media impact and about social media impactan important worrying that itsocial media impact meaningful things it is worrying that it retains such and it is place in corporate retains such an assessment. place in corporate social media impact assessment. important An increase in followers of social accounts (second place) is a marginally more useful metric, but has its limits, An increase in followers of social accounts (second place) is a marginally more useful too. One could have 1,000,000 followers, but if all are either irrelevant to a brands product, or have no metric, but has its limits, too. One could have 1,000,000 followers, but if all are either engagement with said brand, there is little benefit. It is only when we get down to third place that we find a truly social metric engagement. For engagement to benefit. be languishing in third place after several years of corporate social media activity is deeply disturbing.

irrelevant to a brands product, or have no engagement with said brand, there is little It is only when we get down to third place that we find a truly social metric engagement.

After these three metrics, we get a significant drop off before we come to the next set of metrics - which are For engagement to be languishing in third place after several years of corporate social admittedly harder (but still eminently possible) to measure, but immeasurably more useful. Conversion to sales media activity is deeply disturbing. and conversion to leads. For corporate social media impact assessment to improve, the industry must see an increase in the use of these more fitting metrics.

After these three metrics, we get a significant drop off before we come to the next set of metrics - which are admittedly harder (but still eminently possible) to measure, but immeasurably more useful. Conversion to sales and conversion to leads. For corporate [chart title:] What are the most useful metrics for you? social media impact assessment to improve, the industry must see an increase in the use of these more fitting metrics.

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The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

What are the most useful metrics for you?

Which are the most useful metrics for you?

web trac

Ac3vity/Engagement

share of conversa3on vs

Revenue (per follower)

% of ac3ve members

sharing

3me spent on site

Sen3ment

Increase in followers/fans

Conversion to sales

Conversion to leads

# of evangelists

Sa3sfac3on

Reach

Other

Klout

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Frequency of Response

All Corpora3ons US-based corpora3ons European corpora3ons B2C Corpora3ons B2B Corpora3ons

Metric

Looking at those It turnsthat companies find most useful, being used leave a little to be desired out interesting. metrics out that while the metrics the picture becomes more interesting. It turns that while the metrics being used leave asituation isdesired practitioners are aware thatwhich are the practitioners are aware that the little to be unsatisfactory, and understand the situation is unsatisfactory, and understand which are the more biggest and useful metrics. The biggest discrepancies more relevant and useful metrics. The relevant discrepancies between what is being between what is being tracked and what should be tracked are: tracked and what should be tracked are: 1) Activity/Engagement from 14% to 38% - 24% 1. Activity/Engagement from 14% to 38% - 24% 3) Conversion to leads from 6% to 28% - 23% 2. Conversion to sales from 7% to 30% - 22% 2) Conversion to sales from 7% to 30% - 23% 4) Evangelists from 2% to 21% - 19%

Looking at those metrics that companies find most useful, the picture becomes more

3. Conversionvs Inactive from 6% to17% - 22% 5) Active to leads 6% to 23% - 28% 4. Evangelists biggest 2% to 21% - 19% You can see that the from shift is towards far more representative social media metrics. Too often people are relying on standard metrics ill-fitted to social media impact assessment. 5. Active vs Inactive 6% to 23% - 17%
The most popular metrics people want to use moving forward are:

You can see that the biggest shift is towards far more representative social media 1) Too often people are relying on standard metrics ill-fitted to social media impact metrics. Activity 2) Increase in followers assessment. The most popular metrics people want to use moving forward are: 4) Web traffic 1. Activity
5) Conversion to leads 3) Conversion to sales

The presence of increase in followers and web traffic show that there is still a little way to go and perhaps 2. a lack of in followers reflects Increaseconfidence in the alternatives or the increasing oversight of a board who care more about absolute numbers and metrics they understand.

3. Conversion to sales 4. Web traffic

5. Conversion to leads The presence of increase in followers and web traffic show that there is still a little way to go and perhaps reflects a lack of confidence in the alternatives or the increasing 38

The State of Corporate Social Media 2012 www.usefulsocialmedia.com

[chart title] Do you think newboard whoneedmore about absolute numbers and metrics they understand. oversight of a metrics care to be developed to track social media impact?
Do you think new metrics need to be developed to track social media impact?

Corporates only
Corporate only practitioners

21%

Yes No

79%

respondents feel that social media emphatic. 79% o corporate respondents feel track Rather unsurprisingly, the response on this chart is rather metrics currentlyf available are insufficient tothat social media impact. social media metrics currently available are insufficient to track social media impact.

Rather unsurprisingly, the response on this chart is rather emphatic. 79% of corporate

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