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APRIL 18-24, 2012
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Harvest Fair
Help plan fall event at
upcoming meeting. PAGE 4
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Special to The Sun
Group to perform La Mancha
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Man of La Mancha, a bold
and passionate musical adapted
by Dale Wasserman and based on
the classic book Don Quixote,
will be performed at the Off-
Broadstreet Dessert Theatre in
Hopewell through May 12.
Man of La Mancha is an out-
landish, yet humorous musical
that details the tribulations of
Miguel de Cervantes, a questing
knight and writer thrown into a
dungeon and forced to protect his
precious manuscript from fellow
prisoners.
To do so, Cervantes entertains
his unlawful audience by telling
tales of the adventures of his
hero and cavalier, Don Quixote de
La Mancha. While detailing his
stories, Cervantes encourages his
fellow captives to play the charac-
ters within his story.
The hilarious adventures of
this knight unfold in a series of
lusty scenes accompanied by
rousing musical numbers, as
Quixote, accompanied by his
faithful servant, Sancho Panza,
pursues his deluded dream of
chivalry, co-producer, Julie
Thick said.
Thick, who owns and runs Off-
Broadstreet with her husband,
Robert, last produced Man of La
Mancha in 1986, shortly after
opening the theater.
Robert, the director, has previ-
ously directed and acted in this
show many times. He is also co-
producing and playing the role of
Cervantes squire, Sancho Panza.
Man of La Mancha is one of
my favorite shows, he said. It
incorporates all of the aspects of
Board
presents
2012-13
budget
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
At the Hopewell Township
committee meeting on April 9,
the board of education present-
ed its 2012-2013 budget and as-
sured the committee of contin-
uing efforts to improve and sus-
tain the consistency of educa-
tional conditions throughout
the townships schools.
Although student enroll-
ment is decreasing each year,
the board incorporated quality
educational improvements in
the upcoming budget appropri-
ations, according to Tom
Smith, superintendent of
schools.
We are working and contin-
uing on improving our curricu-
lum and making it as rigorous
as possible, Smith said. We
are exposing children to real-
life examples.
To continue on the path for
academic excellence in
Hopewell, the board will con-
tinue to revise all curriculum
accordingly, expand student-
support programs, infuse nec-
essary technology into the cur-
riculum and improve consis-
tency among the elementary
schools.
We will continue to excel at
what we do, Smith said.
The proposed budget main-
tains current levels of pro-
At rehearsal, from left,
Barry Abramowitz
(Quixote), Robert Thick
(Sancho), Christy Milliken
(The House Keeper) and
Austin Begley (Anselmo),
portray the story of
Don Quixote in Man of La
Mancha.
please see MAN, page 13 please see PROPOSED, page 12
APRIL 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
VOICES' SPRING FUNDRAISER
Come and enjoy VOICES Cabaret Singers,
pianist Phil Orr and NY jazz trumpeter
Bill Ash, at this special fundraising event
to benefit VOICES Chorale.
$45/person and includes wine tasting,
appetizers, coffee and desserts.
Handicapped accessible
Sunday, April 22, 2012 4:30pm
Hopewell Valley Vineyards
46 Yard Road Pennington, NJ 08534
Proceeds to support the VOICES community
outreach programs for seniors and children.
Tickets & information: www.VOCESChorale.org or 609-637-9383.
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
New Lower-Cost FHA
Saver Reverse Mortgages
Now Available At
We know that seniors are cost conscious and now you can save thousands of
dollars with an FHA Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) Saver
Reverse Mortgage.
Come in or call and get the facts.
The HECM Saver virtually eliminates the initial mortgage insurance
premiumsaving you thousands
We now have a fixed rate HECM Saver that eliminates the origination fee!
Why pay more? Come in and check out the HECM Savers
and save twice with our lowest cost reverse mortgage!
BRIEFS
AARP Safe Driver
Program being offered
The AARP Driver Safety Pro-
gram is the nations first and
largest classroom refresher
course designed especially for
drivers 50 and older. Participants
learn defensive techniques, new
traffic laws and rules of the road.
Through interacting with one an-
other, they find out how to safely
adjust their driving to compen-
sate for age-related changes in vi-
sion, hearing and reaction time.
Participants must have a valid NJ
drivers license. Graduates re-
ceive a certificate of completion
that entitles them to a reduction
for their auto insurance premi-
ums in New Jersey.
This course is being offered at
the Hopewell Valley Senior Cen-
ter on Wednesdays, April 25 and
May 2, from 1 to 4 p.m. Partici-
pants must attend both days to
complete course. The course is
$12 for AARP members and $14
for non-members. AARP &
YMCA membership is not re-
quired. Call the Hopewell Valley
YMCA at (609) 737-3048 to register.
The Hopewell Valley Senior Cen-
ter is located at 395 Reading St. in
Pennington.
Learn about joint
replacement on April 18
Learn more about how joint re-
placement can reduce pain and
restore mobility with Dr. Mark
Pressman, of Capital Health, on
Wednesday, April 18, from 10:30 to
11:30 a.m. at the Hopewell Valley
Senior Center. The center is locat-
ed at 395 Reading St., in Penning-
ton. No registration is required.
For more information, contact
senior services at (609) 737-0605,
ext. 692, or email Abigail Waugh
at awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 18-24, 2012
Hours: Thurs & Fri 7-4:30pm Sat 7-4pm
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Approximately 60 New
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Order your pavillions
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Cleaning Special on Uggs
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Not valid with other offers.
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CALL 609-737-3373
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Shoe Repair
SmaII Rug CIeaning
Up to 6' x 9'
POLICE REPORT
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
On April 1 at 10:58 p.m., Officer
Christopher Vaccarino observed
a car traveling at 50 mph in a 25
mph zone along Harbourton
Rocktown Road. Vaccarino
stopped the car and spoke with
the driver, a 57 year-old man, who
was found to have an outstanding
arrest warrant out of New
Brunswick. The man was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. He was charged with speed-
ing and driving while suspended,
which will be heard in municipal
court. He was later released after
posting bail on the outstanding
warrant.
On April 2 at 10:43 a.m., Officer
Sara Erwin responded to the
Stony Brook Elementary School
please see POLICE, page 5
Have you ever attended the an-
nual Hopewell Harvest Fair?
From the pony rides to the pet-
ting zoo, to the local food vendors
and the games, every year, the fair
is a wonderful, memorable day of
old-fashioned, community fun!
And, it would not be possible
without the enthusiasm and ener-
gy of all of our volunteers.
The planners are beginning to
plan the 2012 fair, and you are in-
vited to get involved in the plan-
ning process this year. Do you
have ideas for the event to share?
Are you looking for a community-
service opportunity? Do you
think you might like to chair a
committee? Are you looking to
make new friends in the Hopewell
Valley?
Even if you think you might
just like to volunteer for an hour
or two during the fair, we hope
youll come out for a fun, inform-
ative, one-hour meeting on
Wednesday, April 25, at 7 p.m. at
the train station.
If you have questions, please
email volunteer@hopewellhar-
vestfair.org or call Julie, the
chairwoman for the Hopewell
Harvest Fair Planning Commit-
tee at (609) 915-5789.
Help plan Harvest Fair
at April 25 meeting
APRIL 18-24, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
BLACKWELL MEMORIAL HOME
Continuos Family Service since 1881
Elizabeth Blackwell Davis,
Director/Manager NJ Lic. #2475
21 North Main Street
Pennington, NJ
609-737-2900
Handicapped Accessible
609-466-8886 www.vallerieeuropeanspa.com
10% Off Mother's Day Gift Certificates
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Professional Tree Care & Arborist Services
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
Servicing Your Community For Over 20 Years
609-730-8199
www.arborbarbertree.com
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
A portion of
our proceeds
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rescue!
Certified Arborist
Corrective Pruning
Tree Removal
Cabling & Bracing
Stump Grinding
Cat Rescue
POLICE REPORT
for the report of trespassing.
Four boys two 15 year-olds and
two 16 year-olds had entered the
locked school building while the
school was closed for spring re-
cess. The juveniles were placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. The four were charged with
criminal trespass and were later
released into their parents cus-
tody. Their cases will be heard in
family court.
On March 4 at 12:07 a.m., Sgt.
William Springer stopped a car
on Interstate 95 after observing it
traveling at 83 mph in a 65 mph
zone. While speaking with the
driver, a 30-year-old Baltimore
man, Springer smelled the odor of
raw marijuana coming from the
car. A further investigation found
the passenger, a 33-year-old man,
in possession of a metal grinder
containing marijuana.
The passenger was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. He was charged with the pos-
session of marijuana (under 50
grams) and possession of drug
paraphernalia. The man was
later released, and his case will be
heard in municipal court. The
driver was charged with speed-
ing, which will also be heard in
municipal court.
On April 5 at 1:38 p.m., Officer
John Ferner responded to Hart
Avenue on a report of criminal
mischief. Sometime between
March 21 and April 5, someone
damaged two windowpanes and a
screen with plastic pellets. An es-
timate of the damage was un-
available.
On April 6 at 8:04 a.m., Officer
Alexis Mirra stopped a car along
Federal City Road after a comput-
er check revealed that the regis-
tered owner had an outstanding
warrant out of Trenton. Mirra
spoke with the driver, a 31 year-
old man, who was placed under
arrest.
He was transported to police
headquarters for processing
where he was charged with the
failure to produce credentials,
which will be heard in municipal
court.
The man was later released
after posting bail on the outstand-
ing warrant.
POLICE
Continued from page 4
Send us your
Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@hopewellsun.com. Fax
us at (856) 427-0934. Call the
editor at (609) 751-0245.
letters to the editor
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 18-24, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Ed Lynes
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Joe Eisele
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
M
oments after Rick Santorum
threw in the towel in his bid
to win the GOP presidential
nomination, the back and forth be-
tween President Obama and Mitt Rom-
ney began.
The Associated Press said the
Obama camp already is referring to
another Johnson-Goldwater cam-
paign. The Romney folks say the presi-
dent is trying to divide the country.
Obviously, these are critical issues
that are on the mind of every voter
(note sarcasm).
The bad news: We still have about
seven more months before Election
Day.
The good news: We have the
Olympics this summer to distract us
for a couple of weeks.
Maybe were being too pessimistic.
Maybe, this year, there will be a seri-
ous and thoughtful debate of the is-
sues, with both candidates presenting
their vision and ideas for the nation in
a respectful tone.
Or, maybe we get the 2012 versions
of Willie Horton, the Swift boat con-
troversy or a nuclear war scare (see
the aforementioned Johnson-Goldwa-
ter campaign). Hopefully, they wont
go all the way back to, say, 1828, when
allegations of murder and kidnapping
were bandied about.
The problem is that negative politi-
cal advertising works. It works well.
Ask Santorum and Newt Gingrich.
For whatever reason, voters respond
to personal attacks against candidates.
The more vicious, the better, it seems.
If it didnt work, the candidates would
stop doing it.
So thats the challenge for voters
this election year: If we want the can-
didates to act responsibly, discuss the
issues and generally treat voters with
the respect we deserve, we have to de-
mand it. If we want more of the same,
just continue to respond to the nega-
tive campaign ads.
Wed like to think that the candi-
dates will take the high road this year.
But were not holding our breath.
Seven months of this? Ugh
Petty shots between the president and his GOP challenger have begun
Go negative? It works
For all of the complaining about the
negativity and personal attacks in
political ads, the bottom line is that
they work. Voters respond to them.
Until that changes, expect more of
the same again this year.
Citizens For Tax Choice says
vote no on May 8
Soon, residents of Hopewell Township
will vote on ballot questions as to whether
they should approve or reject a $4.1 million
bond ordinance that would reserve 267,000
gallons of daily sewerage capacity for the
southern part of Hopewell. In an effort to
continue informing residents why they
should vote no on May 8, our organiza-
tion will respond to some common ques-
tions weve been recently asked.
Will my taxes go up if I vote yes for
the ordinance?
They will increase since the ordinance
requires township taxpayers to pay to re-
serve the sewerage capacity. Approval of
the bond ordinance will increase township
debt by about 4 percent from the current
$102 million to $106 million.
At 3 percent interest on a 30-year bond,
township residents will pay more than $2
million over the next decade in principal
and interest payments to pay for the re-
serve capacity.
We believe the actual users, especially
commercial users, should pay to reserve
the sewerage capacity not the taxpayers.
The township committee should roll up its
sleeves and adopt an ordinance that is
user-funded.
Will voting against the bond ordi-
nance result in health problems in the
southern part of the township?
During the months preceding the adop-
tion of the ordinance, the vast majority of
residents in the neighborhoods where the
sewers were being proposed vigorously ob-
jected to the high cost to tie into the sewers
(more than $40,000 per household). Be-
cause of these protests, the township com-
mittee agreed to not require these neigh-
borhoods to tie into the sewer system.
If there was a significant health prob-
lem in these neighborhoods, it did not fac-
tor into the township committees decision
to not compel them from hooking into the
system. Further, we do not see an outpour-
ing of residents from these neighborhoods
urging voters to approve the referendum.
Will approving the ordinance result
in unplanned development?
As discussed above, the township com-
mittee did not require the neighborhoods
to tie into the sewer system. However, the
majority of the township committee voted
to reserve the full 267,000 gallons of reserve
sewerage capacity. Since these neighbor-
hoods were originally planned to use about
half of the 267,000 gallons, the majority of
the township committee less Vanessa
Sandom essentially caused a surplus of
orphaned reserve capacity. This surplus
is enough to meet the needs of nearly 500
new homes.
We believe developers will be eyeing this
surplus, and the ordinance should thus be
rejected.
An improved ordinance that properly
accounts for the amount of reserve capaci-
ty should now be developed and adopted.
An improved and promptly implemented
ordinance will also eliminate any potential
for the builders remedy that some crit-
ics fear.
We hope our responses to your questions
assist you in determining which way to
vote on May 8. It is obvious to our organiza-
tion the voters should send a clear message
to the township Committee to get to work
on a new ordinance that resolves the above
issues.
Say no to a new tax on May 8.
Robert Kecskes, chairman
Citizens For Tax Choice
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
(NAPS) A great way to add
curb appeal to your home is to
start at the top with the most
style-appropriate roof.
Besides protecting your home
from the elements, the right roof
should complement your exterior
design scheme.
Not sure what kind of roof
suits your home? Here are a few
suggestions from the experts at
GAF:
French Country: For these
homes, the ex tensive use of stone
and other masonry products in-
corporates various accent colors.
Therefore, many different types
of shingles and colors look good
with this type of home. Camelot
Lifetime Designer Shingles, with
their slate-like design, add anoth-
er dimension of style to the roof
while still maintaining the in-
tegrity of the overall architec-
ture. For an affordable luxury op-
tion, consider Camelot II, which
has the same type of look as
Camelot but at a lower cost. The
sleek lines of Slateline shingles
also work well with the French
Country style.
Georgian: GAFs slate-look
shingles, such as Camelot, or the
sculpted tabs of Country Man-
sion shingles are recommended.
Typically, a more muted gray or
black design best matches the red
brick fronts.
Colonial: Colonial-style homes
have a very square and more sym-
metrical look to them, so the
slate-look family of shingles is
the best fit. Grand Slate and
Slateline shingles provide the
look of slate at a very affordable
price.
Tudor: With their steep-
pitched roofs, Tudor homes are
great for showing off an elegant
roof style. They tend to have
muted tones on the front facade
accented with brown or gray
cross-gables. Camelot and Slate-
line shingles are both good choic-
es for Tudor-style homes.
Craftsman: The Craftsman
style looks great with wood
shake-look shingles in earth
tones, such as gray, green or
brown.
Good bets are Timberline
shingles, a popular wood-shake
look, or Grand Sequoia and
Grand Canyon shingles, which
have a rugged wood-shake and ul-
tradimensional look.
Mediterranean and Italianate:
These ornate architectural
homes are typically sided with
stucco. Roof color choices are
warmer browns and terra-cotta
hues, as well as some dark grays.
The slate/tile look of Camelot
shingles in San Gabriel comple-
ments this architectural style
well.
Grand Sequoia and Grand
Canyon shingles, with their
warm color palettes, also make a
good match.
Ranch houses: Ranch-style
homes are characterized by their
one-story design with very low-
pitched roofs and spread-out floor
plans. Grand Sequoia shingles
provide a distinct dimensional
look to the roof, while Grand
Canyon shingles offer an ultradi-
mensional version of the premi-
um wood-shake option. Timber-
line is also a good choice.
For more information, consult
the Roof Wizard tab at
www.gaf.com.
Roof design should match home
Add curb appeal by starting at the top of your house
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Spruce up your
bathroom
(NAPS)While the real estate
market remains a challenge for
those looking to sell, some simple
staging and remodeling tips can
help make your home more at-
tractive to prospective buyers.
Bathrooms can sell houses but
not if they are lackluster and out
of date. While it can be easy to
spend five figures on a complete
remodel, there are less expensive
ways to give your bathroom a
fresh new look. For example, a lit-
tle paint, some fresh flowers and
new shower fixtures can take
your bathroom from outdated to
outstanding.
Here are a few tips to help:
If you cant afford to re-
place outdated wallpaper, work
with the colors you already have.
Buy some matching towels or a
new shower curtain to coordinate
the look.
If you can paint, its an easy
weekend project that will bright-
en the space. Go for lighter colors;
white is a classic.
Clear off the counters. This
is especially important in a small-
er bathroom to create the illusion
of more space.
Clean the bathroom thor-
oughly. Make sure everything
sparkles.
Styles change, so if possi-
ble, update your shower fixtures.
Finding fixtures in styles that fit
your decor doesnt have to break
your budget. For example, Speak-
man offers modern and tradition-
al collections.
Add a touch of luxury.
Scented candles, spa accessories
and rolled towels can help create
the sense of a spa.
Add a plant or a bouquet of
flowers for a burst of color.
For more information, visit
www.speakmanshowers.com.
Perennials, Herbs
Tomatoes, Tomatoes, Tomatoes
Secondhand Garden Stuff
Q&A with Barbara J. Bromley
Cooperating Agencies: Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, U.S. Department of
Agriculture, and County Boards of Chosen Freeholders. Rutgers Cooperative Extension
a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural Experimental Station, is an equal opportunity pro-
gram provider and employer. Contact your local Extension Office for information re-
garding special needs or accommodations. Contact the State Extension Directors
Office if you have concerns related to discrimination, 732-932-5000, ext. 584.
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 10AM-2PM
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Mercer Educational Gardens
431A Federal City Road, Pennington, NJ
Caring for
your granite
countertops
(NAPS)Granite countertops
are the most popular option avail-
able when it comes to kitchen or
bathroom remodeling. They look
great, theyre durable, but they
can also cost thousands of dol-
lars.
Granite requires special care
and attention because its a natu-
ral stone. Here are a few tips to
help you protect your investment:
Seal your countertops: Ac-
cording to the Marble Institute of
America, an industry group,
granite countertops should be
sealed so that the stone is more
resistant to dirt and spills. Check
with the manufacturer or retailer
about the best kind of sealer to
use on food preparation areas.
Be careful what you clean
with: Never use ammonia-based
productsor cleaners containing
vinegar, lemon or orangeon
your granite countertops. Avoid
abrasive cleaners such as dry or
soft cleansers. Dont use cleaning
products that contain acid such
as bathroom, grout, or tub and
tile cleaners. Specialty granite
cleaners can be used, but they can
be expensive. Theres a way to
stretch your dollars.
Mind your budget: JAWS
Glass & Hard Surface Cleaner
(www.jawscleans.com) cleans
granite countertops, stainless
steel appliances, glass and even
your flat-screen TV. Its also non-
toxic and costs less than most
other cleaners because each
JAWS product is actually two bot-
tles in one. (The cartridge refill is
attached to the bottle.)
There are also some other
basic preventive measures you
can take to protect your granite
countertops:
Use coasters: Place a coast-
er under all glasses, particularly
those containing alcohol or citrus
juices that can etch or dull the
surface of many stone counter-
tops.
Use trivets or mats: Theyll
protect your granite countertop
from hot dishes and help avoid
scratches.
Granite countertops can really
add spark to a kitchen or bath-
room. Proper care will keep them
looking beautiful.
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(NAPS)Did you know that,
across the country, leaks account
for more than one trillion gallons
of water wasted each year? Thats
enough water annually to supply
Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and
Colorado combined.
Each year, the average Ameri-
can home wastes more than
10,000 gallons of water on easy-to-
fix household leaks. Thats how
much water a family uses to wash
10 months worth of laundry, and
it could be adding 10 percent to
your water bill.
Check your water bill in win-
ter; if a family of four uses more
than 12,000 gallons per month,
you may have a leak.
If your water bill is not meas-
ured in gallons, you can easily
find a conversion calculator on-
line.
Finding and fixing leaks
around the home is as easy as
check, twist and replace.
Check toilets for leaks by put-
ting food coloring in the tank and
waiting a few minutes; if the
color shows up in the bowl before
you flush, you have a leak. The
culprit may be a worn rubber
flapper, which can be easily re-
placed at a hardware store. You
should also check your outdoor
watering system this spring for
damage from freezing tempera-
tures.
Twist the joints connecting
your showerhead and use pipe
tape to ensure a tighter connec-
tion if youve got a leak.
Outdoors, twist the hose con-
nection tightly to the spigot and
replace the hose washer if neces-
sary.
Replace worn gaskets to nip
faucet drips; one drip per second
wastes 3,000 gallons of water per
year! If you need to replace an en-
tire fixture, look for the Wa-
terSense label, which signifies
that a product has been indepen -
dently certified to use less water
and perform well.
For information about finding
and fixing leaks, visit
www.epa.gov/watersense.
Do you know where
your house is
wasting water?
gramming and staffing, which are
subject to reductions based on stu-
dent enrollment; continued cur-
ricular upgrades and modifica-
tions, including the new sixth-
grade honors language arts class;
current levels of athletics, extra
and co-curricular activities; and
planned facility maintenance and
upgrades, since three of the
towns school buildings are over
100 years old and in need of neces-
sary fixtures.
The boards total proposed
budget of $75,927,044 will only be
imposing a 1.8 percent tax in-
crease for residents staying
under the 2 percent state-imposed
cap if voters were to have ap-
proved the budget on April 17.
What does this mean for taxpay-
ers? In Hopewell Borough, the
school tax rate will now be $1.29
per $100 of assessed value of a
home, a 6-cent increase over last
years rate. In Hopewell Township,
the school tax rate will now be
$1.41 per $100 of assessed value of
a home, also a 6-cent increase. In
Pennington, the school tax rate
will now be $1.38 per $100 of as-
sessed value of a home, just a 2-
cent increase over the previous
year. The average assessed value
of homes in the three municipali-
ties was not immediately avail-
able. However, officials suggested
that residents who know their
homes assessed value take that
number, divide it by 100 and mul-
tiply that number by the tax rate
per $100.
This budget also has the lowest
tax levy increase 1.3 percent in
25 years, officials said.
This is, in part, is due to in-
creased state aid and financial
stewardship.
State aid has increased by 85.8
percent, or $1,179,196, from the
2011-2012 budget. Although the
town received $2.5 million in state
aid this year and is technically
seeing an increase in aid, it is still
a decrease from three years ago
when the town received $4.3 mil-
lion, according to Smith.
Our expectation is that the aid
will continue to increase because
thats what weve been told by the
state, Smith said. As that in-
creases, it will go toward tax relief
for the community.
Aside from the boards presen-
tation, another hot topic between
the public and committee had re-
volved around a recent broadcast
of two town employees opinions
on the website, saveourfutureto-
day.info, about the recent referen-
dum involving the purchasing of
sewerage capacity from Ewing-
Lawrence Sewerage Authority.
Dori Anderson, vice chair of
the affordable housing committee,
and William Connolly, a member
of the planning board, posted
videos of themselves on the site
voicing their supportive opinions
on the referendum that is to be
voted on next month.
The concerns were that both
Anderson and Connolly identified
themselves as part of each com-
mittee, but didn't have any spoken
disclaimer stating it was their
own opinions, and not on behalf of
the township or the committees on
which they serve.
Although there are bannered
disclaimers underneath each
video on the website, that they
voiced their own opinions without
accrediting it to themselves was
wrong, according to one resident.
When an individual identifies
him or herself as a member of a
public committee, they are trying
to convey authority, the resident
said. There is no other reason to
identify themselves as a member
of a public committee other than
to hold themselves out as having
the weight of the committee upon
which they serve.
Township Attorney Steven
Goodell said he recently construct-
ed rules to limit campaigning for
or against the referendum. These
rules included that nothing pre-
cludes an individual from stating
an opinion, the township should
not be spending resources to sup-
port one side or the other, the
township committee should not
take a position to support one side
or the other, and if anybody de-
cides they want to speak for or
against the issue, they should
identify themselves as a commit-
tee member and state that theyre
not speaking on behalf of the en-
tire committee, but are instead
speaking for themselves.
Goodell believes the disclaimer
proves that Anderson and Connol-
ly are exclusively speaking on
their own behalf, despite another
resident agreeing it was a way of
using their offices to make a point.
WEDNESDAY APRIL 18
Underage Drinking Town Hall
meeting: Underage Drinking:
What Parents Need to Know at 7
p.m. at Seventh Grade House
Center, Timberlane Middle
School. Topics include causes and
consequences of student drink-
ing, current laws and liability
issues. Students welcome to
attend.
Wandering Afield Book Club: 7 p.m.
at Haddonfield Public Library. An
exploration of American nature
writers. This month, discuss
Desert Solitaire by Edward
Abbey.
Family and Friends CPR: 10 to 11:30
a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Learn to perform CPR on adults
and children over the age of 1 as
well as how to help a choking vic-
tim. Registration mandatory. Call
(609) 737-2610.
eBooks At Your Library: 7 to 8:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Learn how to download eBooks
to your computer, compatible
eReader or compatible mobile
device. Hands-on workshop.
Bring a laptop or eReader to fol-
low along with. Advanced regis-
tration required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. and 7 to
7:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Action rhymes, songs and
felt board activities. Age-appro-
priate craft follows story time.
Parental supervision required.
THURSDAY APRIL 19
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
SATURDAY APRIL 21
Practice SAT Test: 10 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Kaplan College Prep presents this
opportunity to practice for the
real SAT test which will be held in
early May. Registration required.
SUNDAY APRIL 22
Second Annual Big Tree Walk: 2
p.m. at Washington Crossing
State Park. Leisurely walk to
explore the arboretum and
search for state champion trees
in Hopewell Valley. Slow-paced
walk perfect for all ages. Guided
by Hopewell Township Environ-
mental Commission. Meet near
Johnson FerryHouse. Boots rec-
ommended. Rain date is April 28.
Questions, call Nora at (609)
730-8354 or Jim at (609) 818-
1708.
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY APRIL 23
Hopewell Township Committee
regular meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Municipal Building, 201
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road. Open to the public. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time, for agenda or for more
information.
Project Earth Day Kids Open
Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to 5:30 p.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Con-
struct a craft featuring reusing
and recycling! Staff member will
be present to aid with the craft.
TUESDAY APRIL 24
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library.
This group welcomes knitters of
all levels. Join for a cozy evening
of stitching and conversation.
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. All are
welcome to attend and enjoy
challenges of becoming better
writers, defeating writers block
and perfecting the craft. No reg-
istration required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
CALENDAR PAGE 12 APRIL 18-24, 2012
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Proposed budget under 2 percent mandated state cap
APRIL 18-24 THE HOPEWELL SUN 13
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any bulk products. Cannot be com-
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theater that I like drama, come-
dy and music but, the integrity
of the storyline is also main-
tained.
Throughout the musical,
which is intertwined with compo-
sitions and now-famous lyrical
hits including Impossible
Dream, Dulcinea and Little
Bird, Cervantes meets a tavern
wench, Aldonza, who he believes
to be a distressed maiden and
whom he mistakes as his fair lady,
Dulcinea.
Sarah Krauss, a recent NYU
graduate and Hopewell native,
will be playing the role of Aldon-
za, which has been her life-long
dream role.
I saw the show on Broadway
when I was little and fell in love
with it, she said. Aldonza is a
very strong and complex charac-
ter who changes a lot during the
course of the show, so I was really
excited about opportunity to
bring her to life myself.
Barry Abramowitz, a Boston
University graduate and current
Lawrenceville resident, will be
playing the lead role of Miguel de
Cervantes and is thrilled to have
the opportunity to act again at
Off-Broadstreet.
Bob is always striving for
artistic integrity within the
sphere of mounted productions
and this keeps me coming back
and supporting them, he said.
He offered me the role of Don
Quixote a number of months ago
and I was very flattered. It's a very
meaty role, and as we rehearse
and now perform the entire show,
I'm sometimes daunted, but terri-
bly excited and driven to mining
the endless possibilities of ex-
ploring the role.
Aside from the three main
characters, a plethora of local
residents, surrounding town-
ships residents, as well as nearby
Pennsylvania residents, will also
be appearing in the musical.
The show will host one of the
largest casts to ever appear on the
stage of the Off-Broadstreet.
For the next five weeks, Man of
La Mancha performances will be
held on Friday and Saturday
evenings and Sunday afternoons.
On Fridays and Saturdays,
dessert with be served starting at
7 p.m., and the show will start
promptly at 8 p.m. During Sunday
matinees, dessert will be served
at 1:30 p.m., and the show will
start at 2:30 p.m. Admission
ranges from $10 to $31.50, depend-
ing on age, and includes both
dessert and the show.
To introduce younger audi-
ences to a literary classic, Off-
Broadstreet will be offering a
childrens rate of $10 for ages 12
and younger for the first time
ever in its 27 years of produc-
tions.
It is not a show of razzle-daz-
zle, but an uplifting show full of
heart and passion, Julie Thick
said. It is a musical that every
theatregoer deserves to see at
least once and hopefully more
often.
To learn more about the Man
of La Mancha performances and
reservations, go to www.off-
broadstreet.com or contact the
theater by calling (609) 466-2766.
Off-Broadstreet Dessert The-
atre is located at 5 S. Greenwood
Ave. in Hopewell.
MAN
Continued from page 1
Man of La Mancha on stage
weekends through May 12
14 THE HOPEWELL SUN APRIL 18-24
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Route 518, Skillman - 1/2 mile from Route 206
Minutes from Hopewell, Pennington and Princeton
Three Hopewell Valley Central
High School students Shreya
Rane, Janet DAnna and
Michaela Qvale were the win-
ning team in the high schools an-
nual Conqueror of the Hill ap-
plied physics competition held re-
cently.
The competition, which every
junior physics student is required
to take part in, entails building a
car-type robot out of plywood and
other household materials. The
cars, powered by rubber bands or
mousetraps, must race up a small
plywood hill and perform a series
of tasks for points.
This years tasks included de-
positing a pencil eraser in a cup,
putting a ring on a dowel, retriev-
ing a Velcro ball, and/or knock-
ing a pencil eraser hung on a
thread around a dowel.
Each car, which can be built by
individuals or teams of students,
compete head to head in elimina-
tion rounds. The car with the high-
est number of points advances.
The three student winners,
who are in an honors physics
class, said they spent as much as
20 hours building the robot in ad-
dition to their regular homework
load.
Besides plywood, students use
household materials, such as old
CDs and peanut butter jar caps,
for wheels and other parts of the
car. The competition, which is
held at schools around the state,
is meant to demonstrate how
physics concepts can be applied
to accomplish real-world tasks.
In the first phase of the proj-
ect, which stretches over several
weeks, the students design a vehi-
cle that can accomplish the tasks.
They must then describe the
physics principles involved in its
functioning, according to HVRSD
science supervisor Mary Yeo-
mans.
Those principles include fric-
tion, potential and kinetic energy,
momentum, and Newton's Laws
of Motion (such as the accelera-
tion of an object is directly pro-
portional to the force applied, and
inversely proportional to the
mass.)
It was a lot of work, winner
Shreya Rane said.
Special to The Sun
Winning Conqueror of the Hill were juniors, from left, Shreya Rane,
Janet DAnna and Michaela Qvale.
Juniors win physics competition

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WEST WIXBSBR 09180220
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
APRIL 18-24, 2012 PAGE 15
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
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80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
ChiId Care Roofing
Home Improvement
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for Advertising info.
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Offer expires 4/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
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or siding job
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Not valid with other offers or prior services.
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roofing
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Before or After School
Any help around the home
Call 609-273-9847
Lease for
36 Month
$ *
CONQUEST CASH
CUk NLIGn8CknCCD VCLVC DLALLkS
Closer Than You Think!
*Acquisition fee $695. No security deposit required. Available to qualified customers. Stock #12309. All prices
with tax, tags, registration and documentation fees additional. 36 month, 10,000 mile lease. Expires 4/30/12.
**MSRP $33,775. Total due at signing $3,294. Visit retailer for details.
Volvo builds the cars, we build relationships.
VCLVC CI kINCL1CN
2931 U.S. 1 South
Lawrencev|||e, NI 08648
(609) 882-0600
8kIDGLWA1Lk VCLVC
1028 U.S. 22 Last
Somerv|||e, NI
(908) S26-7700
VCLVC CI LDISCN
842 U.S. 1 North
Ld|son, NI
(732) 248-0S00
VCLVCCCUN1k.CCM

Cwn one of Lhese and


SAVL 51,000
Acura, Audl, 8MW, lnnlu, Lexus,
Mercedes, Ponda, nlssan, 1oyoLa or vW
2
0
1
2
Vo|vo kC60
2012 VCLVC kC6C 3.2 IWD

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