You are on page 1of 4

Written by Connor Hughes 

‘At the beginning of the 21st Century there are more reasons than ever to be an environmental 
pessimist.’ Critically evaluate this statement. 

Why are there more reasons than ever to be an environmental pessimist?  

General facts 

At the beginning of the 20th century the prevalent belief towards the relationship between human and 
environment was very optimistic. More coal was being discovered, and useless swamps and forests 
would be converted to farmland for cropping (Meyer and Turner 2002). However by the late 20th 
century, pessimistic views dominated. This was largely due to the ‘shock tactics’ used by the media 
when presenting scientific data to the public about the impacts of our activities on the environment. 
Environmental disasters like oils spills, nuclear fallout and climate change are front page worthy and are 
great sellers. But the pessimism also came from academics, like Kennedy in Preparing for the 21st 
Century, who concluded that the problems are grave and is not hopeful of institutions taking the 
necessary steps to overcome the issues.  

Now at the beginning of the 21st Century, it is widely accepted that environmental changes are 
happening faster than any time in the past and human activity is mainly responsible. These changes, 
often local, are happening on global scales that are affecting global environmental systems, such as the 
atmosphere and oceans. Though environmental change is hard to measure, and scientific data vary, 
some things are certainly agreed. Firstly, human activity is now more responsible than natural cycles for 
driving environmental change. Secondly, changes are happening faster than any time in the past and 
thirdly, the changes are becoming more complex (Meyers and Turner 2002).  

All that said, the extent to which one is pessimistic depends not on the actual human induced 
environmental changes that are happening, but on how you believe nature will react and the 
socioeconomic and health impacts to human nature. Douglas (1992) proposed 4 ‘nature myths’ that 
depict the different views out there. The ’communards’ are pessimists who view nature as fragile and 
reacting sharply to even minor changes. On the other hand, the ‘entrepreneurial expansionists’ more 
optimistic and view nature as robust and able to handle the human induced changes. Therefore each 
individual will read the changes differently. 

So what are these changes that are causing all the pessimism? What are the big issues? Despite claims 
of ‘decoupling’ economic growth from resource exploitation in the ‘new economy’, we are still largely 
dependent on depleting renewables, such as fisheries, forests and water resources. The cornucopian 
view that the markets will ensure infinite supply of resources does not seem to work in relation to these 
resources and this has led to a lot of pessimism. Water consumption has increased dramatically and 
ground water deficit is 160 billion cubic metres (Brown et al 2000). Parts of Africa and Asia are already 
experiencing water shortages (UNEP 1999) and this has direct effects on agricultural output. If trends 
continue, IBID predicts that 2 out of 3 people will experience water shortages by 2025.  
The new economic power houses of India and China with their massive populations are adding extra 
strain on the world’s limited resources. Wood consumption has increased 64% since 1961 and in asia 
demand has rapidly increased but reserves are already short. In the 1990s alone, Indonesia cut down 
12% of its tropical rain forest. Over fishing and water pollution has resulted in a decrease of around 60% 
of the world’s ocean fisheries and demand continues to increase (Ibid). If these trends continue, the 
future looks grim. 

Simon 1995 in the State of Humanity draws his optimism from the fact that over time non renewable 
resources have become more abundant and less expensive despite the massive increase in population 
witnessed during a large part of the 20th Century. But in his naïve optimism, he fails to recognise the 
detrimental impacts consumption of these resources is having on the environment. Kasperson et al 
1993, in Project on Critical Environment Zones identified 9 regions where changes were unusually severe 
and threatened local livelihoods and the list is increasing. The use of pesticides, chemicals and heavy 
irrigation during the Green Revolution increased output but also polluted rivers, killed beneficial insects 
and poisoned farmers (IFPRI).  

Climate change is a major global problem and many have little faith in institutions and organisations to 
deal with it. The causes and consequences are exceedingly complex and rooted in the very structure of 
our society. The costs are massive and the short sighted nature of our political system makes solving the 
issue more difficult. In light of the new financial crisis, dealing with climate change will most likely be set 
aside, as politicians and the public concern themselves with their financial woes (UNIPCC 2008). Carbon 
trading certificates have dropped in price to allow companies to focus on overcoming immediate 
economic problems.  

To sum up, we have seen that recently the media has played a major role in bringing environmental 
problem to the surface, mostly focussing on how human activity causes environmental changes. Looking 
at the socioeconomic consequences of environmental change, there are many reasons to be pessimistic, 
mainly due to the fact that environmental problems are becoming more global and complex. Depletion 
of primary resources is a major concern to an ever increasing population, and our use of non renewable 
resources is polluting the very systems that support life on our planet. Another major source of 
pessimism is the lack of faith in our institutions and organisations to deal with such global and costly 
problems.  

In what terms do you define environmental pessimism? In socioeconomic terms, in terms of changes to 
the environment,  

The big issues 

Change 

1. Climate change 
2. Impacts of resource use on environment (loss of biodiversity, acid rain,  
3. Depletion of primary resources (forest, fisheries, aquifers)  
4.  

Intro 

List the reasons for pessimism and then criticise them 

Conclude with my opinion 

The extent of your pessimis 

Optimists  
Lomborg, The Skeptical Environmentalist: Measuring the Real State of the World 
Simon, 1995 The State of Humanity 
 

Pessimists 
Ehrlich 1968 The population bomb 
Ehrlich 1990 The population explosion 
Meadows et al, 1972 Limits to growth 
 

Reasons to be a pessimist  Counter argument 
Climate change may cost between 1 and 8 trillion  Difficult to calculate what extent 
(UNIPCC)  change is natural, many results are 
contested, little quality control 
Carbon trading 
 
Financial crisis may slow down efforts to curb climate   
change 
Oil prices have risen but not much substitution going   
on 
Resource scarcity   
It doesn’t matter so much whether or not the   
environmental situation is getting better or worse, 
what matters is the fact that we cannot continue to 
exploit worlds resources 
Deforestation   
Depletion of fish stocks   
Current economic practices means it’s cheaper to   
pollute 
Much debate about the how certain scientific   
prediction are – no consensus makes it difficult to take 
action 
General view has changed from optimistic during early   
20th century – the green revolution – to pessimistic in 
the latter part of the century 
Coping with env change is humankinds major problem   
Recently human activity has been greater at driving   
env change than natural forces, and these changes are 
becoming more complex 
• World forested area decrease 20% 
• Man made sulphur (from FFs)= natural flows 
• Man made nitrogen (fertilisers) > natural flows 
• CO2 increase 31%, double the env capacity 
• CH4 increase more than 100% 
• Synthetic organic chemicals are released that do 
not exist in nature