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I n s i d e t h e I s l a n d Ey e

S u l l i v a n s I s l a n d I s l e o f P a l m s G o a t I s l a n d D e w e e s I s l a n d
Since May 2005
April 13, 2012 Volume 7 Issue 24 FREE
Dispatch systems continues on page 4
RUN FOR
ADELA PG5
I
f you happened to look up
at the Sullivans Island water
tower in the past couple of
weeks, you probably noticed
some unusual activity going on.
Following an annual inspection
from Utility Services, Inc, it was
determined that the water tower
was in need of a new coat of paint.
About every fve to seven years,
the tower needs some repairs and
a paint job, said Greg Gress,
manager of the Sullivans Island
Water and Sewer department.
The last repainting of the tower
was conducted in 2004, and the
new application of sky blue paint
was scheduled to be completed by
the end of April.
Work, however, has been
temporarily halted as one of the
workers was recently attacked by
a Red-tailed Hawk. "I'm told he's
okay, but Utility Services, Inc. is
not allowing their workers on the
tower until the hawk goes away,"
said Gress. Utility Services has
contacted Jim Elliot with the
Center for the Birds of Prey to
see what can be done in order to
complete the water tower painting.
In the meantime, residents will be
seeing the tank in its unfnished
condition for a little while longer.
Feathers Ruffed Over
Water Tower
PINEWOOD
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sle of Palms police and fre departments
are preparing to mobilize their
localized dispatch operations before
merging next year into a new countywide
call system.
The citys fre department this month
will receive from the county eight
mobile data terminals, or heavy-duty
laptops for vehicles, alongside software
programs designed to accelerate on-the-
go dispatching. The police department,
already using the mobile devices, also
will receive additional software to smooth
out reporting procedures.
The computers will reduce back-and-
forth dispatching calls, says Isle of Palms
Fire Chief Ann Graham.
I think its going to be a very useful
tool, predicts Chief Graham, whose
department, among other public safety
departments countywide, has attended
over the past months county-organized
preparatory classes on how to operate the
new systems. It will really cut down our
radio traffc signifcantly.
Isle of Palms Police Chief Tom
Buckhannon says the new software,
which will keep dispatchers abreast
of incidents by regularly storing and
transmitting reports and patrol locations,
will open up silent dispatching to the
police force.
It looks like this will be more effcient
to use, says Chief Buckhannon, citing
recommendations from police chiefs in
other jurisdictions who use the patrolling
software. Being linked into the system,
youre getting more info and youre not
tying up the dispatcher on the other
end of the phone. To me, thats a huge
beneft.
The Port of Charleston last year
received a federal security grant to expand
municipalities dispatch capabilities - a
part of the countys continued plan to
Dispatch Systems
BY JACOB FLANNICK
IOP to Ramp Up
TR3 ON IOP
PG10
PHOTO BY SUSAN MIDDAUGH
2 April 13, 2012
CIVIC
SIES continues on page 3
A
t the Sullivans Island Town
Council Meeting on March
20, Council members took
the time to systematically address
a number of concerns that island
residents have expressed about
the developing design of the new
Sullivans Island Elementary
School (SIES). While there has
been extensive coverage of the
issue of school size in area
newspapers and on local TV,
there has been little coverage of
other design issues of interest to
island residents.
What is the impact of a 500
student school on community
utilities?
The Town hired HDR, an
engineering frm, to evaluate the
hydraulics the water fow and
pressure through the water
main that will supply the new
school. HDR found no problem
with meeting the requirements
for the larger school, but did
recommend that the old water
pipes be replaced (along Station
20 between Middle Street and Ion
Ave and along Ion Ave between
Station 20 and Station 22) to
avoid problems with red water
that can occur when water fow
is increased through old cast-iron
pipes. According to Greg Gress,
general manager of the Water and
Sewer Department, the Town has
been systematically replacing all
the old water pipes on Sullivans
Island and will move these pipes
to the top of the replacement list.
The sewer pipes will be replaced
at the same time and the work will
be coordinated with Charleston
County School Districts planned
demolition of the old school
to minimize inconvenience to
residents in the area.
Gress also pointed out that
water use on the island, including
by the students at the old school,
averaged 230,000 gallons per
day (gpd) and an additional 100
students at the new school (each
using 15 gpd) will add less than
1% (1500 gpd) to island water
usage. The island has 740,000
gpd available through its contract
with Charleston Public Works
(CPW). The island sewer system
averaged 477,000 gpd and can
easily process the additional 1500
gpd from 100 additional students
(an increase of less than one-third
of 1 percent). Charleston County
School District will pay for water
and sewer services just like any
other resident or business.
What are the plans for storm
water management?
This concern has been raised
by residents who remember
when SCE&Gs Sand Dunes Club
expelled storm water into the
accreted land (Town property) and
caused swampy front yards for
The open area behind the school will be confgured as two separate play areas, one for
younger children (center) and the other for older grades (far right), according to current
best practice.
A Citizens Perspective
T O WN C O U N C I L A D D R E S S E S S I E S C O N C E R N S
BY SUSAN MIDDAUGH
April 13, 2012
3
Isle of Palms
886-6428
www.iop.net
Tuesday, April 17
Ways and Means Committee
5:45a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wednesday, April 18
Muncipal Court
8:30a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, April 24
City Council Meeting
7p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883-3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com
Friday, April 13
Committee to Streamline
Standing Committees of
Council
8:30a.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Council Budget Workshop
10a.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Tuesday, April 17
Regular Council Meeting
6p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Wednesday, April 18
DRB Meeting
6p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Monday-Wednesday, April 29-25
Jury Trials
7p.m.
Island Club
Wednesday, April 18
Tree Commission
7p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Civic Calendar
Recycle - Wednesday, April 18 - Recycle

CIVIC
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
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managing editor
kristin@luckydognews.com
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senior graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
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jerry@luckydognews.com
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sales manager
614-0901
lori@luckydognews.com
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sales
catherine@luckydognews.com
reporter
Jacob Flannick
resident photographer
Leo Fetter

Contributors
Bob Hooper
Dr. John Nelson
Sarah Diaz
CCPRC
Dr. Katherine Saenger
Connie Darling
Susan Middaugh
NPS
CSO
Judy Drew Fairchild
Dicksie Johnson
Dr. Mickey Barber
Capt. Geoff Bennett
HALOS
Stephen Suggs
Ruth Thornburg

Published by
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivans Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
Future deadline: April 18 for our
April 27 issue
Lucky Dog PubLi shi ng
of sc, LLc
Publisher of the Island Eye News, The
Island Connection and The Folly Current.
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free,
independent newspaper published every two
weeks and is for and about the Isle of Palms,
Sullivans Island, Goat Island and Dewees Island.
Copies are mailed free of charge to every ac-
tive mailbox in our coverage area and are also
available at area businesses and by subscription
to non-islanders. Subscriptions are $39/year
for non-residents.. Contributions of information,
pictures and articles are welcomed and are
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value and cannot be returned except by special
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All advertising rates are listed at:
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SIES continues from page 2
adjacent homeowners. Council
member Mike Perkis stated that
the Charleston County School
District initially asked permission
to place a retention pond outside
of the school lease area and
the Council soundly vetoed
this option. According to Jerry
English, the architect for the
school, the soil percolation tests
indicate excellent absorption of
rain water by the sandy soil of the
school site. Accordingly, the plan
is to manage storm water run-off
using a combination of permeable
pavement in parking areas and
landscaped rain gardens. Rain
gardens are strategically located
areas that are planted with
drought-resistant plants and
designed to absorb rain run-
off. One likely location is in the
center of the bus turn-around
area. Moultrie Middle School
has a successful and scenic rain
garden located between their
parking lot and school building.
All plans for storm water
management have to be approved
by Charleston County, the South
Carolina Department of Health
and Environmental Control and
the Offce of Ocean and Coastal
Resource Management.
What does SCDOT say about
increased traffc with the new
school?
South Carolina Department
of Transportation (SCDOT)
engineers reviewed the SIES plans
for traffc fow and considered
the traffc implications of 100
additional students. SCDOT
concluded that no further studies,
such as traffc counts, were
required. DOT did plan right-of-
way improvements (removal or
relocation of several trees) for the
intersection of Atlantic Ave. and
Station 21 to increase visibility
and clearance for turning school
buses.
Will there be adequate space
for playgrounds?
The new SIES will cover a
greater percentage of the school
site than the old school and there
is concern that there will not be
enough playground space. The
play space is not necessarily
less, taking into consideration
the areas available for student
activities beneath the building.
For example, there will be a nicely
shaded tricycle track beneath the
kindergarten classrooms. The
open area behind the school will
be confgured as two separate
play areas, one for younger
children (center) and the other for
older grades (far right), according
to current best practice.
A related play issue is that the
schools round support columns
(underneath the school) were
changed to square columns
for esthetic reasons. This led
to a concern that the corners
of square columns could be a
hazard for playing children. A
good compromise has been
reached, thanks to a suggestion
by island resident Wayne Stelljes
and Council member Hartley
Cooper. The frst row of columns,
along the front of the school the
public face will be the esthetic
square columns. The rest will be
round, with the advantages of
being less expensive, more wind
resistant, and safer for mobile
children.
Letter to the Editor...
Alice In Sullivans Land
Dear Editor,
I couldnt help but think
of my favorite book, Alice in
Wonderland, when reading
Jacob Flannicks piece in
your last edition, Sullivans
Island Votes Down Lawsuit.
It wasnt Flannicks sound
reporting that made me
recall this famous novel;
it was some of the unreal,
rather bizarre, notions
offered by Town Councilman
Jerry Kaynard regarding the
proposed SI mega-school and
the referendum that made
me think I had slid down the
rabbit hole.
First, the fact is the
proposed mega-school is
a 500 student school; not
the for (approximately) 420
students as Kaynard stated.
And, the mega-school will
have 500 students. The School
District has ensured that
by designating it a magnet
school with plans to bring
in county- wide students to
fll the seats. This is despite
the fact there are over 200
empty seats at two close-by
elementary schools.
Second, State law does not
only require municipalities
to consider referendum
requests as Mr. Kaynard
stated. The wording in State
law leaves no room for leeway
and is very specifc with the
term shall, made very clear,
and its not shall consider!
One can torture the wording
of State Code Section 5-17-
30 any way one wants, but
only in Wonderland would
the provisions of this law
be determined as merely
something for Council to
consider.
We continue our trip
through Wonderland with
the Towns initial rejection of
Letter continues on page 4
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
4 April 13, 2012
the referendum on the grounds
it is a zoning issue. Oddly,
Council themselves ensured it
was not a zoning issue by taking
steps to handle the thorny issue
by using a contract-lease for the
property. This approach had
the advantage of expediency,
but also of avoiding those pesky
Town Boards and Commissions
that could be troublesome.
Of course, those proceedings
would be open to the public.
Instead, Council decided they
could give the School Board
what they wanted by a contract-
lease procedure with the added
bonus of being able to deliberate
behind closed doors in Executive
Session since it was contractual
in nature.
So now, Council would
seemingly have us believe we
cannot have a referendum
since the lease-contract cannot
be broken. There doesnt even
appear to be any chagrin over
the fact Council was presented a
certifed petition for referendum
BEFORE they approved the
contract-lease.
Alice, welcome to Sullivans
Land where 500 means 420;
shall means consider; and,
zoning means contract-lease,
except when it doesnt. Terms
like neighborhood compatibility;
residential atmosphere; mass,
scale, proportionality, so
often used on this island,
mean nothing. And, sadly, the
absolute right to petition for a
referendum is at the discretion
of the Town Council, the actions
of which you are petitioning in
the frst place.
John Winchester
Brooks St, Sullivans Island
Letter continues from page 3
D
uring the March meeting of the Isle of Palms City Council,
resident Diane Oltorik was happy to announce that the
Isle of Palms Loan Closet is now offcially open.
The Loan Closet is now fully supplied and in operation, said
Oltorik, who thanked Fire Chief Ann Graham for generously
donating the 40 x 60 inch space at the Public Safety building
where the 12 medical assistance devices are stored.
While the Loan Closet currently contains crutches, wheelchairs,
potty chairs, and walkers, Oltorik noted that she is still looking
for a clean and functional walker with a seat.
This has been a long journey since last July and Im pleased
to report that its open. Thank you so much for your support,
said Oltorik.
The IOP Loan Closet is available to residents and visitors alike,
and items may be borrowed by calling Diane Oltorik at 342-1401.
IOP Loan Closet
Offcially Open
create a nexus of call systems,
says Jim Lake, director of the
countys Consolidated 911 Center
in North Charleston.
It will allow agencies to share
data across the board, Lake
says. Well be able to fnd them
on the maps, and well be able to
send someone out much quicker
to them.
For the county, it makes the
dispatch system more effcient,
he adds. And its in sharing
that data and info that makes
us stronger in our public safety
efforts.
Both Isle of Palms fre and
police departments, among other
county recipients obligated to pay
a 25 percent share of the grant,
allotted a combined $20,000 of
the 2011-2012 budget to offset
county expenses toward installing
the systems, according to Lake.
Contributions, he says, will defray
roughly $250,000 allocated by
the county for software licensing
and computer programming,
among other applications.
The police department, in
order to pay the share, tapped
into funds set aside annually to
replace squad car computers,
according to Chief Buckhannon.
City Councilman Marty Bettelli,
chairman of the Public Safety
Committee, says the City always
is willing to strike cost-effective
deals to expand its public safety
services.
Anytime we can get matching
funds and the equipment that we
need, he says, were going to
take advantage of it.
The mobile systems should turn
up in city police and fre vehicles
by October, after county offcials
wrap up software licensing and
legal requirements, says Lake.
Chief Graham says her crew
will learn gradually to harness
the system. But the roving
devices, she predicts, eventually
will speed up the tempo of police
and fre response times.
Were going to ease into em,
she says. Its going to be a long-
term beneft.
Dispatch systems continues from cover
T
he Gibbes Museum of
Art announces an Art
of Healing themed
Community Day on Saturday,
April 21, with complimentary
admission and free activities from
10 a.m. 1 p.m. Community
Days, sponsored by Roper St.
Francis Healthcare, are held
quarterly to offer visitors the
opportunity to experience the
Gibbes dynamic programming
free of charge. This Community
Day will be focused on the healing
powers of art, and children can
participate in a variety of art
and health-related activities
including the creation of get well
cards. Musical performances
will include Blessed Sacrament
School in the Rotunda at 10:30
a.m. and Old Fashioned Notions
at 12 noon on the front steps.
Visitors can enjoy the fnal
weekend of the special exhibitions
The Art of Alfred Hutty: Woodstock
to Charleston in the Main Gallery
and Jill Hooper: Contemporary
Realist in the Rotunda Galleries.
Both special exhibitions are on
view through Sunday, April 22.
Community Day
at the Gibbes
BY GIBBES, ETC.
B
orn
Nov. 11
to a lab
mix momma
and a traveling
salesman with
questionable
lineage, Red
Cormack - formerly named Del Rio at Pet Helpers - is still trying to
fgure out which kibble he wants to stick with but is currently enjoying
Eagle Packs puppy food. His favorite treat is an old pair of fip fops
or anything left unattended on my coffee table. He also prefers pigs
ears and Milk Bones. Obviously hes an avid fsherman, but he also
enjoys lazy afternoons at the dog park on IOP with all his lady friends.
Do you have a Lucky Dog? If so, send a little info about him
or her along with a favorite photo to info@luckydognews.com.
PHOTO BY RAY BRUCE
April 13, 2012
5
DAILY
I
ts not just our
imagination that
spring has come
a month early this
year. The water
temperature in
Charleston Harbor
is at temperatures
usually recorded
at the end of April.
The Turtle Team received the
following communication from the
Department of Natural Resources
regarding water temperatures
and the potential for early turtle
nests:
According to the Customs
House monitoring station, water
temperature [in Charleston
Harbor] hit 20C (68F) on March
23, went down some, and is
now back at 20.1C. Harbor
temperature historically reaches
20.0C on about April 24, so
we seem to be about 26 days
or more ahead of schedule
unprecedented in my experience.
We heard a Cobia was caught
yesterday. I expect turtles are in
the coastal waters and shrimp/
crabs/horseshoe crabs, etc. will
be spawning early. The peeler
crab fshery has already gotten
started.
Some of our spring birds on
Dewees Island are returning.
Purple Martins have been
visiting the mansion at the ferry
dock, robins were carousing on
Old House Lane, and a Black-
Necked Stilt was seen in the
impoundment. In addition, our
mosquitoes managed to survive
the winter and have made their
presence known.
PHOTO BY JAMIE ROOD
Shell Shocked
H I G H E R T H A N AV E R A G E WAT E R T E MP S
MAY B R I N G E A R L I E R T U R T L E N E S T S
BY JUDY DREW FAIRCHILD
M
embers of the Charleston
community will come
together on April 14 for
the third annual Run for Adela
5K Race, hosted by family and
friends of Adela Cook. Proceeds
from the race will be donated to
Camp Happy Days, a year round
program for kids with cancer,
specifcally to fund the Adelas
Annual Extreme Teen Water
Weekend.
This 5K foot race is held in
memory of Adela Holmes Cook, a
Bishop England senior who passed
away in 2009 in an accident in
the Bahamas. Over 800 runners
participated in the 2011 event,
raising over $40,000 for Camp
Happy Days. Adela was an avid
runner and true Lowcountry
girl, who could always be found
enjoying the beach, playing on
the boat, or going for a run in her
cherished hometown. She was
looking forward to attending the
University of South Carolina, her
number one choice.
This is the one and only offcial
5K race ever to be held on the
beach at Sullivans Island. All
events will begin at 8:30 a.m. at
Station 16. Prizes will be given to
the top runners in each age group,
male and female. Participants can
register online at www.active.com
keyword: Adela. Registration is $30.
For more information, contact
Dicksie Johnson at 442-1022 or
email sidicksie@aol.com.
3
rd
Annual
Run for Adela
BY DICKSIE JOHNSON
PHOTO PROVIDED BY RUN FOR ADELA
April 13, 2012 7
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
DAILY
I
cant in good conscience
build a house that isnt
green, says Steven
Kendrick, Sullivans Island
resident and owner of Structures
Building Company.
Ever since he frst learned
about Building Science the early
name for eco-friendly building
Kendrick has never been able
to build anything less than an
energy effcient, durable, tight
home with excellent air quality.
Once you learn theres a better
way to build something, you cant
build it any other way, he says.
And with this philosophy, he
founded his company in 1999.
Starting with the I'On subdivision
in Mount Pleasant, Kendricks
company, Structures Building
Company, began constructing
homes based on the overarching
concept of creating a tight house
envelope.
With a lot of homes, moisture
management is a big issue. Cold
air ducts condensate in hot,
humid crawlspaces creating
damp environments both below
a building and in the attic.
Additionally, moisture can fnd
its way behind siding and if
space hasnt been created for the
moisture to escape, it can collect
there and cause mold, mildew
and rot. Adhering to Building
Science principles, Kendrick
designs homes that seal the
crawlspaces and attic, as well
as allow for a physical drainage
plan behind siding. Roof lines are
sealed with spray foam insulation
in such a way that allows owners
to downsize their air conditioning
units a beneft which not only
costs less and saves energy, but
also affords owners with a fully
functional crawlspace and attic.
Because of the tight construction
and insulation, however, the
homes cant just breathe
through cracks and crevices.
Instead, Kendricks homes
are outftted with mechanical
ventilation that brings fresh air
in from outdoors, dehumidifes it,
and then circulates it throughout
the home.
Other items that Kendrick
considers a standard in all of his
homes are tankless water heaters
and energy-effcient windows and
doors, as well as high effciency
air conditioning systems. On
request, he also installs low fow
water fxtures and energy effcient
lighting, as well as connections
that allow for easy solar power
installation later on.
The durability aspect of
Building Science is really
important to me and to me, it all
falls under green, says Kendrick.
Structures Building Company
is currently working on a major
renovation on the Front Beach on
Isle of Palms, as well as building
new homes in Mount Pleasants
Old Village, I'On, and Daniel
Island.
For more information about
Structures Building Company and
what options are available both in
construction and renovation, visit
www.structures.net or call 856-6901.
Structures Building Company is
located at 1415 Stuart Engals
Blvd., Mount Pleasant.
Build it Right, Build it Green
BY KRISTIN HACKLER
Structures Building Company founder
Steven Kendrick
8 April 13, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.SC
O
ur pets love us unconditionally, so let's give back to our best
friends by bringing them out to experience a day of fun! Pets
and their owners are invited to join Charleston County Park
and Recreation Commission (CCPRC) for a weekend of exhibits,
demonstrations, experts, entertainment, and more at Charleston's
premier pet festival, Pet Fest, Saturday and Sunday, April 14 and
April 15, at Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park.
Pet Fest provides an opportunity for local pet organizations and
businesses to showcase their causes, products and services in a fun,
pet-friendly environment. Plus, pets and their people are invited to
meet CCPRC's new Top Dog Mascot, who will be offcially introduced
on stage Saturday.
2011 CCPRC Top Dog Mascot Dusty and Vice Mascot Calhoun
will pass on the honor to the new 2012 Top Dog, Jax, and the 2012
Vice Top Dog, Winston. Jax, a rescued chocolate Lab, has an amazing
survival story that many members of the Lowcountry community are
familiar with. Last summer, Jax was injured severely after being hit
by a car and left for dead on Johns Island. After an intense seven-
hour surgery (donated by Dr. Merrill Irvin of West Ashley Veterinary
Clinic) and a long search for his owner, sweet and gentle Jax was put
up for adoption by the Charleston Animal Society. He was eventually
adopted by new owners and underwent intense physical therapy to
be able to walk on his shattered leg and hip again. This past winter,
Jax had recovered enough to visit James Island County Park with his
new owners to play and socialize. And Winston, an English Bulldog,
is an incredibly friendly, outgoing character of a canine that can make
anyone laugh. Join us as we crown Jax and Winston as CCPRC's
2012 dog mascots.
Admission to the festival is $5 per day. The frst 500 visiting dogs
each day will get treats at the gate. Parking is limited. Children 12
and under, Gold Pass Holders, and leashed pets are free. For more
information, call 795-4386 or visit www.ccprc.com/petfest.
Meet Top Dogs at Pet Fest 2012
PALMETTO I SLANDS COUNTY PARK APRI L 14- 15
PROVIDED BY CHARLESTON COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION
C
harles Pinckney National
Historic Site presents
Colonial Day from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Friday, April 20, and
National Junior Ranger Day on
Saturday, April 21, from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Held during National
Park Week, these free events
celebrate both outdoor activities
and American heritage.
Colonial Day features craftsmen
in period dress demonstrating
rice pounding, indigo dyeing, iron
smithing, and brick masonry. The
Carolina Ladies Aide Society will
demonstrate domestic arts such
as spinning, weaving, and quilting. Visitors can participate in a game of
historic cricket. Also included are musket drills, sweetgrass basket sewing,
African drumming, Gullah story-telling, and dramatic presentations on
Eliza Lucas Pinckney and Founding Father Charles Pinckney.
Junior Ranger Day is focused on childrens activities where
youngsters can learn about colonial times, enjoy the outdoors and
earn a special Junior Ranger badge. Activity stations include historic
cricket, lawn hoops, nature-trail bingo, dyeing handkerchiefs with
indigo, dress-up chests, and other period games.
All programs are free and the park charges no admission. For more
information, call 881-5516 or visit us on the web at www.nps.gov/
chpi. Large groups should please call ahead for reservations. Charles
Pinckney National Historic Site is located at 1254 Long Point Road in
Mount Pleasant.
PHOTO BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
A colonial recreationist demonstrates how
to spin clean wool into yarn.
Going Colonial
CHARLES PI NCKNEY NATI ONAL HI STORI C SI TE
PRESENTS COLONI AL DAY AND JUNI OR RANGER DAY
BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
April 13, 2012 9
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.SC
PETS
E
arth Day is upon us and
recycling is at the forefront
of conversation. I am happy
to announce that Bees Ferry
Veterinary Hospital has begun a
robust recycling program. It took
a while for Charleston County to
include our street on their pick-
up route, but now that they do,
we are taking full advantage.
We are also applying for Bicycle
Friendly Business status from the
League of American Bicyclists.
The Bicycle Friendly Business
program recognizes employers
efforts to encourage a more bicycle
friendly atmosphere for employees
and customers, even if they are
four legged.
I was feeling pretty good about
Bees Ferrys efforts to help protect
our environment until I was
reminded by authors Robert and
Brenda Vale that my very patients
can be bad for the environment.
In their book Time to Eat the Dog?
The Real Guide to Sustainable
Living, the Vales suggest that our
carnivorous pets soil our water
supply, use tons of plastics that
end up in landflls, and our pets
meat-based diet requires a lot of
land to provide their foods.
So what can we do to help
reduce our pets carbon paw print?
First and foremost, adopt a needy
pet. In other words, get a recycled
dog! This doesnt mean you cant
have the breed of your dreams, it
just means you have to search a
little bit longer to fnd your perfect
match.
Next, be sure to have your pet
spayed or neutered. Unwanted
puppies and kittens burden our
society and the environment by
their sheer numbers.
And then there is the
inconvenient truth that dogs and
cats poop, and their excrement
is not good for our soil or water
supply. Thus, we need to pick
up our dogs feces. I use the
newspaper bags for this purpose,
but if you dont use recycled
plastic bags to pick up poop,
Id recommend that you buy
biodegradable bags.
Now to the subject of what to
feed your pet. Although there are
some fairly balanced vegetarian
pet foods out there, as a
veterinarian, I do not recommend
vegetarian diets. Instead of
asking your carnivorous pet to
go vegetarian, it might be better
to use organic foods. There are
plenty on the market now. Keep
in mind that packaging is a huge
stress on our landflls. Try to buy
foods in bulk and store them in
your own re-usable Tupperware
containers to keep them fresh.
You also can make your dogs
food with fresh organic products.
Ask your veterinarian for help
with a recipe if you choose to
do this. Make sure the mixture
is balanced with the proper
vitamins and minerals. Poultry
and rabbit farming have a lower
environmental impact than beef,
so chicken or rabbit diets are a
little greener than beef or pork
based foods. You can defnitely
make your own pet treats. Fun
recipes abound on the internet.
Those plastic toys, litter boxes,
and brushes all end up in our
landflls. Try to buy sustainable
toys like Loofah pet toys by Olive
Green Dog Company or Cosmos
Balls by Orbee-Tuff.
We all want to keep our lawn
and gardens free from chemicals,
insecticides, herbicides, and
pesticides. You can help with
this effort by keeping your pet
on a veterinary approved fea
prevention year around. This can
help you avoid the need for strong
chemicals in the house and the
yard.
There are literally hundreds of
ways you can turn your pet green.
There is a great blog out there
called raiseagreendog.com that
can help you come up with fresh
new ways to own a dog without
overly stressing the environment.
Katherine A. Saenger, DVM is
one of fve veterinarians at Bees
Ferry Veterinary Hospital, an
AAHA certifed practice located at
3422 Shelby Ray Court in West
Ashley, Charleston. For more
information, visit www.bfvh.net or
call 769-6784.
Leave a Green Paw Print
BY DR. KATHERINE A. SAENGER
10 April 13, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
T
his Sunday, April 22, dont
miss out on a chance to
hear two time Grammy
nominee Tim Reynolds and his
electric funk trio, TR3, at the
Windjammer on the Isle of Palms.
With a musical career
spanning more than thirty-fve
years, guitarist, sonic innovator,
and two time Grammy nominee
Tim Reynolds is known for his
masterful command of melody and
timing and for his uncanny ability
to improvise on any instrument
he touches. Having explored most
musical styles, from rock, jazz
and blues to classical and reggae,
Reynolds wide-ranging musical
versatility is evident each time he
picks up his electric or acoustic
guitar. Technically brilliant, yet
emotionally honest, Reynolds
music is inspired and authentic.
It was in the mid 1980s
in Charlottesville, VA,
when Reynolds founded his
breakthrough electric power trio,
TR3 (Tim Reynolds Trio), known
for their fusion of funk, rock, and
jazz. He toured with TR3 during
the 1980s and 1990s, using a
rotating cast of musicians. It
was at this time he befriended
Dave Matthews and their ongoing
musical collaboration began.
Tim eventually decided to
relocate to Santa Fe, NM,
and pursue a solo career. His
musical progression continued
throughout his many years on
the road as a solo guitar wizard,
playing for packed houses and to
crowds who quickly determined
that Reynolds is one of the
most talented and thoughtful
musicians on the circuit today.
After a number of years in New
Mexico, Reynolds relocated to the
Outer Banks of North Carolina in
2007.
After a chance meeting with two
talented musicians, bass player
Mick Vaughn and drummer Dan
Martier, a few rehearsals later
and several stealth appearances
throughout North Carolina,
Reynolds decided to resurrect
the electric TR3 and theyve been
touring ever since. TR3 released
their frst double live CD, From
SPACE and Beyond in June
2011. In 2009, their frst studio
CD Radiance was nominated
for Home Grown Music Networks
Album of the Year. Electric, funky,
operatic, edgytheir show is a
mix of updated Reynolds classics
to wild covers of everything from
James Brown, Led Zeppelin, King
Crimson and Focus to TR3s
ever-evolving catalogue of new
material.
TR3 will play at the
Windjammer, 1008 Ocean
Boulevard, on Sunday, April 22.
Doors open at 8 p.m. and show
starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $15
and the show is open to ages 21+.
For more information, visit www.
the-windjammer.com or call 886-
8948. For more information about
TR3, visit www.timreynolds.com.
MUSIC
Windjammer Welcomes
the Funk
T I M R E Y N O L D S T R I O ( T R 3 ) T O P L AY AT
T H E WI N D J A MME R A P R I L 2 2
PROVIDED
PHOTO BY CHRIS BICKFORD
April 13, 2012 11
I
t can never be said that
Sullivans Island lacks in
talented residents, and this
Thursday, April 26, the public is
welcome to view the exceptional
work of island artists Anne Darby
Parker, Lynne Hamontree, Susie
Callahan, and Everett White at
the Charleston Artist Collective
spring show.
While the Collective is
mainly based online, founder
Allison Williamson holds shows
periodically throughout the
Charleston area. This show will
take place at the Footlight Players
building, located at 20 Queen
Street in downtown Charleston,
and works will follow the shows
theme of Local Color.
We are committed to making
art a part of daily life and to be
a catalyst for greater collection,
exhibition, and appreciation of
original art, says Williamson.
Started in August of 2010,
the Charleston Artists Collective
is an online gallery where local
artists can grow their potential
while offering collectors access
to original, affordable art. The
website features new themed
collections every month and
ffteen percent of monthly sales are
donated to local area non-profts.
Since opening, the Collective
has supported organizations
such as the Carolina Youth
Development Center, Operation
Home, Lowcountry Orphan
Relief, Lowcountry Open Land
Trust, Share our Suzy, Camp
Happy Days, Rural Missions, and
Carolina Studios, among others.
Charities are changed on a bi-
monthly basis and to date, the
Collective has raised more than
$20,000 for local charities.
Along with Sullivans Island
artists, the show will also feature
works by Mary Hoffman, Ann
Keane, Dee Schenck Rhodes,
Zach Collins, and Whitney Kreb.
The Collective Artists will be
present during the show, and
attendees will be able to meet
and chat with them about their
works.
To learn more about the
Charleston Artists Collective and
to view the works for sale, visit
www.charelstonartistcollective.
org. A tally of the amount raised
for this months charity appears in
the top corner of the site. Please
note that all paintings are sold
unframed.
Giving Back
C H A R L E S T O N A R T I S T C O L L E C T I V E S H O W
F E AT U R E S F O U R I S L A N D R E S I D E N T S
Growing Art and
Boathouse III by Susie Callahan
Fish Style Life by Lynne Hamontree
April 27 April 13 Is l and Eye Cal endar
Friday, april 13
Charleston Horticultural Society
presents Plantasia
Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and
Saturday, 8 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Wragg Square, 342 Meeting
Street. For more info, call
579-9922 or visit www.
charlestonhorticulturalsociety.org.
BOSU Training at IOP Rec Center
Enhance endurance and
strengthen your body through a
variety of challenging and exciting
moves. Classes led by Jeromy
Miller. 10:30 11:30am, every
Wed. & Fri. $64/$69. $10 walk in
fee.#24 28th Ave. For more info,
call 886-8294 or visit www.iop.net.
Saturday, april 14
North Charleston Earth
Day Festival
11 to 5 p.m. at Riverfront Park on
the former Naval Base in North
Charleston. For more info, visit
recycle.charlestoncounty.org or call
720-7111.
3
rd
Annual Run for Adela
Join in this family-friendly 5K on
Sullivans Island beach starting
at Station 16. Race begins at 8:30
a.m. Tickets: $30. To register, visit
www.active.com. For more info,
visit www.run4adela.com.
Our Gang Comedy Festival
Rated: G, 59 minutes. 10:30 a.m.
Open to all ages. Edgar Allan Poe
Library, 1921 Ion Ave., Sullivans
Island. For more info, call at 883-
3914.
CSO presents: The Music of
John Williams
7:30 p.m. at the Gaillard
Auditorium, 77 Calhoun Street.
Tickets: start at $25. Order at
www.CharlestonSymphony.org, by
calling 723-7528, or at the Gaillard
Auditorium Box Offce.
Pet Fest at Palmetto Islands
County Park
11 a.m. 5 p.m. Saturday &
Sunday. For more info, visit www.
ccprc.com/petfest. Admission: $5
(ages 13 & up). Free for ages 12
and under, Gold Pass Holders, and
pets.
Sunday, april 15
Capers Island EcoRun
Isle of Palms Marina at 80 41st
Ave. 10:30 am - 1:30 pm. $45 to
register. Active.com or register or
email CapersECOrun@gmail.com
for more info.
CSO Chamber Music: Flute,
Oboe, & Strings
4 p.m., Presbyterian Church,
302 Hibben St., Mt. Pleasant.
Tickets: $15/$10 Students and
may be purchased at www.
CharlestonSymphony.org, by
calling 723-7528, or at the door
one hour prior to the show.
CSO Brass Quintet Plays Blues,
Dixieland, & Spirituals
4 p.m. St. Benedict Catholic
Church, 950 Darrell Creek Trail,
Mt. Pleasant. Tickets: $15/$10
Students and may be purchased at
www.CharlestonSymphony.org, by
calling 723-7528, or at the door
one hour prior to the show.
Monday, april 16
Family story time at Poe
Library with Ms. Patti
Reading begins at 11 a.m. Arts &
Crafts after story time with Mac.
Edgar Allan Poe Library, 1921 Ion
Ave., Sullivans Island. For more
info, call at 883-3914.
tueSday, april 17
Charleston Academy of
Music at MUSC
Featuring young musicians from
CAM including the Kidzymphony
Orchestra. Starting at 12:15 at
the Hollings Cancer Center, 86
Jonathan Lucas Street, downtown
Charleston. For more info, visit
www.charlestonmusic.org, email
cam746@yahoo.com, or call 805-
7794.
Family story time at Poe
Library with Mac
Reading begins at 10:30 a.m. Arts
& Crafts after story time. Edgar
Allan Poe Library, 1921 Ion Ave.,
Sullivans Island. For more info,
call at 883-3914.
WedneSday, april 18
BOSU Training at IOP Rec Center
See Friday, April 13.
Wild Dunes Swim Team
registration
6 8 p.m. at the Windjammer, Isle
of Palms. Practice begins May 7
at the Wild Dunes pool. For more
info, visit www.wilddunesdolphins.
com.
thurSday, april 19
Music at Home Team: Give
Thanks Band and Father Dale
Drop by Home Team Barbeque
every Thursday for live music
9 p.m. to midnight. $5 cover.
For more info, visit www.
hometeambbq.com or call 883-
3131. 2209 Middle Street,
Sullivans Island.
Gibbes on the Street:
Renovation Celebration
8 10:30 p.m. Meeting Street
between Cumberland and Queen,
downtown. Tickets: $100 for
museum members and $135 for
non-members. Purchase at www.
gibbesmuseum.org/events or call
722-2706 x22.
Popcorn Theater at Poe:
The Big Year
Rated: PG, 100 minutes. 4:30 p.m.
Open to all ages. Edgar Allan Poe
Library, 1921 I'on Ave., Sullivan's
Island. For more info, call at 883-3914.
Isle of Palms Garden Club
James Parker, owner of Pleasant
Landscape, will be discussing
landscaping with native plants.
Social begins at 6:30 p.m. and the
meeting begins at 7 p.m. For more
info, call Janice Ashley at 882-
9016. Exchange Club, 202 Palm
Blvd.
Friday, april 20
Colonial Day at Charles
Pinckney National Historic Site
Featuring craftsmen in period
dress demonstrating rice-
pounding, indigo dying, iron
smithing and brick masonry, as
well as spinning, weaving, and
quilting. 10 a.m. 2 p.m. For more
info, call 881-5516 or visit www.
nps.gov/chpi.
22
nd
Annual East Coast Canoe
& Kayak Festival
This April 20 to 22, enjoy the
history, fun, and technique of
canoeing, kayaking and Stand Up
Paddleboarding (SUP) at James
Island County Park. 871 Riverland
Drive. For more info, call 795-
4386 or visit our website at www.
ccprc.com/ecckf.
BOSU Training at IOP Rec Center
See Friday, April 13.
Saturday, april 21
Community Day at the Gibbes
Free from 10 a.m. 1 p.m. 135
Meeting Street. For more info, visit
www.gibbesmuseum.org.
Beach Lovers Book Club at the Poe
Join our monthly book club of
men and women to express your
opinion on this thought provoking
novel Let the Great World Spin by
Colum McCann. 10:30 a.m. Edgar
Allan Poe Library, 1921 Ion Ave.,
Sullivans Island. For more info,
call at 883-3914.
Junior Ranger Day at Charles
Pinckney National Historic Site
Focusing on childrens activities
centered around learning about
colonial times.10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 881-
5516 or visit www.nps.gov/chpi.
Sidewalk Chalk Drawing at the Poe
Bring your imagination and
creativity to design art drawings
on the sidewalk cistern outside the
library. Colorful chalks provided.
A prize will be awarded for the
most creative drawing. 10:30 -
12 p.m. Open to all ages. Edgar
Allan Poe Library, 1921 Ion Ave.,
Sullivan's Island. For more info,
call at 883-3914.
Park Foundation Party on the Mound
Tickets include dinner, beverages,
and music by Nashville
Songwriters in the Round. This
years event takes place on the
Mound above Stith Park. Tickets:
$100 at the Co-op on Sullivans
Island or from a board member.
6:30 p.m. with the Songwriters in
the Round performing at 8 p.m.
Sunday, april 22
Happy Earth Day!
Family Fun on the Creek
A family-friendly event from 12-5
pm at the Lighthouse on Shem
Creek. Ticket: $10/adults, $5/
children 5-12. For more info, visit
www.charlestonhalos.org/events.
php, or call 953-3715.
Mt. Pleasant Old Village Home,
Garden & Art Tour
Visit ten historic homes in
the Old Village while enjoying
food tastings. Local art will be
displayed in Edwards Park. 1
5 p.m. Tickets are $45. www.
lowcountryredcross.org, 764-2323
x 386, or at Abide A While Garden
Center, the Black Swan, and
Gwynns in Mount Pleasant.

Monday, april 23
Family story time at Poe Library
with Ms. Patti
Reading begins at 11 a.m. Arts &
Crafts after story time with Mac.
Edgar Allan Poe Library, 1921 Ion
Ave., Sullivans Island. For more
info, call at 883-3914.
tueSday, april 24
Family story time at Poe Library
with Mac
Reading begins at 10:30 a.m. Arts
& Crafts after story time. Edgar
Allan Poe Library, 1921 Ion Ave.,
Sullivans Island. For more info,
call at 883-3914.
CSO Chamber Music: Mixed
Ensembles
7:30 p.m. City Gallery at
Waterfront Park, 34 Prioleau
St., Charleston. Tickets: $25
may be purchased at www.
CharlestonSymphony.org, by
calling 723-7528, or at the door
one hour prior to the show.
WedneSday, april 25
BOSU Training at IOP Rec Center
See Friday, April 13.
thurSday, april 26
Music at Home Team: Dynamic Duo
Drop by Home Team Barbeque
every Thursday for live music
9 p.m. to midnight. Free show.
For more info, visit www.
hometeambbq.com or call 883-
3131. 2209 Middle Street,
Sullivans Island.
CSO Chamber Music: Mixed
Ensembles
7 p.m. Providence Baptist Church,
294 Seven Farms Drive, Daniel
Island. Tickets: $15/$10 Students
and may be purchased at www.
CharlestonSymphony.org, by
calling 723-7528, or at the door
one hour prior to the show.
Popcorn Theater at Poe: J. Edgar
Rated: R, 137 minutes. Adults.
5:30 p.m. Edgar Allan Poe Library,
1921 Ion Ave., Sullivan's Island.
For more info, call at 883-3914.
Naturalist Training Sampler at
Palmetto Islands
Pre-registration required. 9 a.m.-
12 p.m. Course # 27263. Age: 16
& up. Fee: $12. For more info, call
795-4386 or visit ccprc.com.
Friday, april 27
BOSU Training at IOP Rec Center
See Friday, April 13.
Beginner Sailing - Basic Sailing
Level I
April 27-29. Pre-registration
required. 5:30p.m.-8 p.m. (Fri) &
9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. (Sun). Course
# 27278. Meet at County Park
headquarters on James Island.
Fee: $132. For more info, call 795-
4386 or visit ccprc.com.
14 April 13, 2012
I
f there was a contest for Best
Beach Butt, where would you
rank? In my practice, we focus
so much on being healthy on the
inside that improvement on the
outside seems like a bonus. But
patients often ask questions like
What can I do about cellulite?
and What should I eat to make
my skin look younger? Theres
no magic pill, but there are things
we can change about our exercise
habits and diet to improve muscle
tone and have a more youthful
appearance.
Lets start with what causes
cellulite, or that cottage cheese-
like puckering some of us have
on our upper thighs and rear.
Even very thin people get cellulite
and its most common in women.
Why? Estrogen. Womens
hormones are easily infuenced
by food and medication such as
birth control pills or hormone
replacement therapy, and our
bodies organize fat in connective
tissue just underneath the skins
surface. Estrogen overload
can make fat cells change their
structure and appearance, hence
cellulite. A simple blood test can
tell you if you have too much
estrogen.
Additionally, a lack of essential
fatty acids in our diet can change
our skins appearance. Eating the
wrong types of fats - trans fats
and processed oils - can disrupt
metabolism while good fats,
such as omega 3s (found in fsh
oil) and tropical oils (coconut,
avocado, olive), improve cellular
structure including collagen-,
the glue that holds the body
together. Collagen and elastin
give your body tissues form and
provide frmness and strength.
This is great for our bones, lungs,
tendons, and blood vessels, but
they also help reduce the collagen
degradation that happens over
time with aging. Swapping out
bad fats for good can actually
stimulate production of collagen
in skin cells, which improves
skins appearance and can
reduce cellulite.
When patients ask for a
quick fx to get beach ready,
we typically advise eliminating
refned sugar and processed
food, and recommend that they
start eating clean, meaning
that they should eat food in its
most natural form without high-
fructose corn syrup, chemicals,
or other substances used in food
processing. A high sugar intake
can actually damage collagen and
elastin, which affects us inside
and out.
We recommend a low glycemic
index eating program, simply
one which favors the use of foods
with a relatively low glycemic
index. Carbohydrates that break
down slowly, releasing glucose
gradually into the blood stream,
have low glycemic indices. This
category includes foods such as
broccoli, spinach, caulifower,
hemp, or sprouted grain bread,
and high fber fruits including
apples and pears. A low glycemic
index diet lowers fasting insulin
levels which promotes the ability
to burn stored fat and improve
body composition. Without
lowering fasting insulin, weight
loss is almost impossible no
matter how much exercise you
do or how much you restrict
your caloric intake. Fiber acts
like a scrub brush for the
body, improving circulation and
improving your skins appearance
from the inside out.
Additionally, lowering insulin
and glucose levels reduces the
damage to cellular proteins
caused by glycosylation or the
binding of excess sugar to cellular
proteins as measured by HgA1c.
Glycation of
proteins, or
the sticking
of sugar
to protein
molecules,
is thought to
be one of the
mechanisms
of aging.
Its also
important
to hydrate. I cannot emphasize
enough how important water
intake is for internal and external
health. Drink lots of water in the
morning to make up for fuid
loss at night, and make drinking
water a habit throughout the
day. The best way to monitor
fuid intake is to watch the color
of your urine, which should be
light rather than dark.
Finally, exercises that target
specifc areas of the body can frm
muscles in those areas, giving
skin a smoother appearance.
If you already have a workout
plan, consider adding a few extra
sets of squats, walking lunges,
and jump squats. And if you
dont have a workout plan, get
one! Cardio and weight-bearing
exercises are a cornerstone of
our healthy living program and
an important way to maintain
energy and overall health.
Summers right around the
corner-and your beach ready
body can be, too!
Dr. Mickey Barber is an age
management specialist and CEO/
CMO of Cenegenics Carolinas,
helping patients manage the aging
process through a personalized
plan of ftness, nutraceutical
supplementation, a low glycemic
diet and bioidentical hormone
optimization. More information at
www.CenegenicsCarolinas.com.
HEALTH & WELLNESS
In Shape for Summer?
G E T T I N G A B E A C H R E A D Y B O D Y
BY MICKEY BARBER, M.D.
15 April 13, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
W
onderful sunny weather
has continued day after
day making for awesome
fshing conditions. With all this
warm weather, its no surprise
that our fshery is 4 to 6 weeks
ahead of schedule. The water
is teeming with bait and even a
few sharks are already cruising
around. Expect April to be a
fantastic month of fshing.
While redfsh remain in large
schools, they have begun to break
up as the water warms. These
fsh have left survival mode and
become predators again. Over
the last few weeks, redfsh have
been fnicky with artifcial baits.
On some days, paddle tail grubs
as well as jerk shad of any color
failed to elicit a bite.
When redfsh are picky, a
great solution is to throw chunks
of freshly cracked blue crab.
This is simply redfsh candy and
bait that is rarely refused. Just
yesterday, redfsh were hitting
the crab before it even touched
the bottom and in some cases
even as we were retrieving the
bait. I use size 3/0 circle hooks
and put the hook through the
bottom fipper hole once I have
ripped off the legs. Put the rod
in the rod holder and dont pick
it up until the reel is screaming!
The trout bite should really
begin in earnest this April. With
water temperatures so warm,
its hard to believe they wont
become aggressive feeders before
too long. The preferred rig of
live bait under a popping cork
is hard to beat. Live shrimp
is now available and will give
you another option than mud
minnows. Its a good idea to start
carrying your cast net and see if
you can fnd some fnger mullet.
Finger mullet under a cork is
just deadly.
With redfsh being choosy
about artifcial plastic lures, they
have acted the same towards
fies. However, this hasnt
stopped us from having some
great days. Focus on fshing
around low tide when the fsh
are out of the grass and easier
to target. If you do fsh on higher
tides, make sure your fies have
a good weed guard like a piece
of heavy monoflament line. The
copperhead fy in rootbeer color
has been producing well for us
recently.
See you on the water!
Capt. Geoff Bennett operates
Charleston Charter Fishing
providing fy fshing and light
tackle charters. Clients choose
from a full menu of fy rods,
artifcial and live bait fshing
options with charters tailored
to their desires. USCG licensed
and insured, Capt. Bennett is
committed to providing a safe and
enjoyable charter to anglers of all
skill levels and ages. For more
information, call Capt. Bennett
at 324-3332, visit his website at
www.charlestoncharterfshing.
com or email him at captain@
charlestoncharterfshing.com.
April Fishing Report
BY CAPTAIN GEOFF BENNETT
16 April 13, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
COMPUTER CORNER
R
egardless of where you live,
how far your neighbors
are from your house, or
whether you sit back from the
road or are near the road, you
need to have your wireless signal
secured. An unsecured wireless
signal allows someone to use your
internet IP address to access the
internet, search for anything they
want, and look at any sites.
Its fairly easy to set up a
secured wireless signal with
todays wireless routers. Most
have a simple setup that allows
you to pick a secure password,
or in the case of the all-in-one
modem/router from AT&T, it is
preset and printed on the side
of the router. For laptops, iPads,
tablets, and smart phones, you
just need to add the wireless
network and type in the password.
If you have a neighbor that uses
your wireless with your blessings,
give them the password. If you are
doing this, however, make sure
you have set some security on
your own computer so that your
neighbor or a visiting friend -
cannot get into your computer.
One thing to remember about
giving someone a password is
that a secret shared is a secret
exposed.
Some wireless routers set up a
guest account that you can give
to visiting family and friends.
This will allow them to get on the
internet outside of your home
network so they cannot access
your computer fles or printer.
Speaking of printers, most
printers nowadays are wireless
which means you can have the
printer as a standalone device,
not connected to any printer
by a cable. This also allows all
devices on the wireless network
to print to it. If you have an iPad
or iPhone, make sure your new
printer is AirPrint ready and all
Apple products can print to it.
If you are not comfortable with
setting up your wireless router or
wireless printer, a professional
can help you and have you up and
running in no time.
I look forward to some good
questions and helping you out. If
you need immediate assistance,
you can always call me, Rent-
A-Bob, at 822-7794 or email
rentabob@live.com.
Wireless Security
BY BOB HOOPER, A.K.A. RENT-A-BOB
T
his Saturday, April 21, join
the Edgar Allan Poe Library
Book Club for an open
discussion on author
Colum McCanns novel,
Let the Great World
Spin. Centered on the
awe-inspiring event
of 1974, wherein a
mysterious tightrope
walker traversed
the New York
skyline between
the Twin Towers a
full quarter mile
above the ground,
the novel is an
intricate portrait
of this great city
and its people.
The
discussion
will begin at
10:30 a.m. and
snacks and
coffee will be
provided.
The Edgar Allan Poe Library is
located at 1921 IOn Avenue on
Sullivans Island. For more info,
call 883-3914.
Let the Great World Spin
S U L L I VA N ' S B O O K C L U B ' S A P R I L N O V E L
19 April 13, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
MYSTERY PLANT DARGAN'S BIRDS
T
he scientifc name for this
oddball, which comes from
Greek, means hairy fower.
And why not? The six fused petals
making up the corolla are white
and deeply fringed, sometimes
rendering an almost hairy,
flmy look to the entire bloom.
The effect is quite striking. The
fowers tend to be either male or
female, which means producing
either pollen or ovules. The male
and female fowers are found on
the same plant and of course,
this is a basic and characteristic
feature of the very large, diverse
group to which our mystery plant
belongs: the cucumber family.
More specifcally, our oddity is
aligned with gourd-like plants,
forming vigorous, high climbing
vines, grabbing onto things with
their slinky-like tendrils. Gourds
have fowers that are generally
open in the evening or night, often
featuring white petals and some
fragrance, likely attractive to
moths, and the fruits are usually
bitter at maturity. Otherwise,
many non-gourd members of the
family are more akin to squashes,
pumpkins, and zucchini, which
tend to have yellow fowers that
open during the daytime, get
visited by bees, and the fruits of
which are tasty and non-bitter
when mature.
This plant is one species of
several in a genus which is native
to southern Asia and over to
western Australia. It is a tender
annual, not tolerating any frost,
but is actually easy to grow here
in the U.S. when you can fnd
the seeds. Seeds are best started
two or three in a small pot, with
the strongest seedling retained,
and planted in the ground. In
beds and given plenty of sun and
water, it makes a nice summer
screen once it gets going. The
fower in the photo is on a
plant growing in the marvelous
greenhouses at the botanical
garden in Munich, Germany (www.
botanischestaatssammlung.
de), defnitely worth a visit.
The photographer, Boris
Schlumpberger, was a recent
post-doctoral student here at
U.S.C., and he tells me that their
plants actually became a bit
weedy and ended up being a pest.
Grown outdoors in a garden, you
might fgure they behave a bit
better.
Oddly, the common name
for this plant refers not to the
fantastic fower, but to the fruit.
At maturity, the female fower
will produce an elongated,
feshy, cucumber-like structure,
sometimes up to six feet long.
It may be straight, or curvy and
twisted, often resembling a snake.
The fruits contain a red pulp and
in Asia, they are often eaten at
a young stage. This plants have
beautiful fowers and interesting
fruits. Grow some.
John Nelson is the curator of
the Herbarium at the University of
South Carolina, in the Department
of Biological Sciences, Columbia
SC 29208. As a public service,
the Herbarium offers free
plant identifcations. For more
information, visit www.herbarium.
org or call 803-777-8196.
P
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B
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[ A n s w e r : S n a k e g o u r d , T r i c h o s a n t h e s a n g u i n a ]
in the Garden of Eden?
BY DR. JOHN NELSON
Would You Find This Plant
T
he Red-bellied Woodpecker
is found in woodlands
and suburban areas
throughout the eastern half of
the U.S. as far west as Texas
and Nebraska. Males have a
red cap which extends from the
nape of the neck to the bill, while
females have a red nape and a
red spot above their bills. The
name Red-bellied Woodpecker
is almost a misnomer, since the
reddish tinge on the lower belly
isnt always visible in the feld.
They excavate their own nest
cavities in snags, large dead
branches, or soft wood. About 50
percent of the time, these cavities
are taken over by the invasive
European Starling. Female Red-
bellied Woodpeckers lay three
to eight eggs, which hatch after
two weeks of incubation. The
young fedge in less than four
weeks. Woodpeckers,
unlike perching birds,
have two forward-facing
toes and two backward-
facing toes, which aid
in climbing and clinging
to trunks of trees while
foraging for insects,
nuts, or berries. Extra
long tongues aid in
extracting invertebrate
prey from cracks and
crevices. In fact, the Red-
bellied Woodpecker has
a tongue which extends
two inches beyond the
tip of its beak!
PHOTO BY SARAH DIAZ
Red-bellied Woodpecker
BY SARAH HARPER DIAZ
21 April 13, 2012
Breach I nl et Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com
Apr 13
Apr 14
Apr 15
Apr 16
Apr 17
Apr 18
Apr 19
Apr 20
Apr 21
Apr 22
Apr 23
Apr 24
Apr 25
Apr 26
2:12am/2:33pm
3:14am/3:36pm
4:14am/4:36pm
5:09am/5:30pm
5:59am/6:19pm
6:44am/7:03pm
7:27am/7:43pm
8:07am/8:21pm
8:45am/8:58pm
9:23am/9:33
9:59am/10:07pm
10:35am/10:41pm
11:11am/11:18pm
11:50am/11:59pm
8:18am/8:35pm
9:18am/9:41pm
10:15am/10:43pm
11:08am/11:39pm
11:55am
12:30am/12:39pm
1:15am/1:20pm
1:58am/1:58pm
2:38am/2:34pm
3:15am/3:09pm
3:52am/3:44pm
4:27am/4:20pm
5:04am/4:58pm
5:42am/5:41pm
S
pring at the Isle of Palms
Exchange Club means
scholarship awards for fve
outstanding high school students
who demonstrate leadership,
community service, and academic
excellence. Each year, students
from the Isle Palms, Sullivans
Island, and Mount Pleasant
compete for the Youth of the
Month, Youth of the Year, and
the Meeks/Sotille Scholarship
awards. In addition to having
achieved academic excellence,
students are asked to write an
essay in which they describe
how they have served their
communities and their plans for
future involvement. This years
essay was entitled All Aboard!
Todays Youth Strengthening
America One Community at a
Time. Members of the Exchange
Club read hundreds of essays and
selected fve winners. Students
were honored and awards were
presented at a recent Isle of Palms
Exchange Club dinner meeting.
Kimberly Anne Varadi took
top awards, winning the Meeks/
Sotille Scholarship, Youth of the
Month, and Youth of the Year. In
her essay, she challenges everyone
to listen to the call of All Aboard
and to get on the train of service
to the community. Kimberly Anne
is the daughter of Paul and Carol
Varadi of the Isle of Palms and is
a senior at Wando High School.
Kimberly Anne plans to attend
either Georgetown University or
Furman University and major in
political science and pre-law.
Jansen Nash, who is the son
of Travis and Allison Nash of
Mount Pleasant, is a senior at
Academic Magnet High School.
Jansen states in his essay
that community service means
doing hard things, and he
challenges teens not to settle for
low expectations. He received
both Youth of the Month and
the Meeks/Sotille Scholarship
awards. Jansen plans to attend
Clemson University and major in
biotechnology or engineering.
Erica Vanderhorst, daughter
of Eric and Zenobia Vanderhorst
of Mount Pleasant, also received
the Youth of the Month and
the Meeks/Sotille Scholarship
awards. Erica says that youth
need to prepare for leadership
by stepping up to the plate for
community service. Erica is a
senior at Wando High School
and in the fall, plans to attend
the Citadel to major in political
science.
M. T. Bourque is the daughter
of David and Carol Bourque. She
is a senior at Wando High School
and plans to go to the College of
Charleston where she will major
in business. M. T. received both
Youth of the Month and Meeks/
Sotille Scholarship awards.
Jillian Campbell, daughter
of Mike and Kathy Campbell,
received Youth of the Month
and Meeks/Sotille Scholarship.
She is a senior at the School of
the Arts and plans to attend the
University of Southern California
or the College of Charleston.
The Isle of Palms Exchange
Club raises funds for these
scholarships and other youth
programs at the Isle of Palms
Oyster Roast held annually.
PHOTO BY RUTH THORNBURG
(l to r) Elizabeth Grantham, Scholarship Committee Chairwoman; Kimberly Anne
Varadi; Erica Vanderhorst; and Jason Nash
Exchange Club Scholars
BY RUTH THORNBURG
DAILY
22 April 13, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
Do you know what this is?
Kids, send your guess for this weeks
Eye Spy to: eyespy@luckydognews.com
Please include your mailing address with
your submission.
The frst person to send in the correct answer for this iss ue will
receive a coupon for a FREE ice cream at Caf Medley on
Sullivan's Island.
Eye Spy
T
he Pack 59 Pinewood Derby was held on February 25
at Jennie Moore Elementary School in Mount Pleasant.
Cub Scout Pack 502 generously provided and manned
the track following their Derby earlier that day.
2012 Pack 59
Pinewood Derby
PHOTOS BY STEPHEN SUGGS
Speed winners (l to r): Rivers Ulmer (4
th
), Jackson Erfani (3
rd
), John Peterseim (2
nd
) and
Mason Suggs (1
st
). Rivers also won 1
st
place in Design for his King Size Hershey Bar car.
F
ive boys from Pack 59 completed their Cub Scout careers
and crossed the bridge to Boy Scout troops on March
10. Each was also awarded the Arrow of Light, the highest
achievement in Cub Scouting. Ceremonies were held atop the
Fort Moultrie Visitors Center. Pictured left to right are Declan
Condon, Ross Hamburger, Rivers Ulmer, Collin Reiheld, Mason
Suggs, and John Peterseim.
Pack 59 is chartered by Stella Maris Catholic Church on
Sullivans Island. For more information about Pack 59, contact
Heather Condon, Committee Chair, at cubscout59@gmail.com
For more information about Cub Scouts and the Boy Scouts of
America, contact William Etheridge at 763-0305 or visit www.
coastalcarolinabsa.org
PHOTO BY STEPHEN SUGGS
Crossing the Bridge
to Boy Scouts
F
amily Fun on the Creek
is a family-friendly
event that will be held
on Sunday, April 22, from
12-5 p.m. at the Lighthouse
on Shem Creek in Mount
Pleasant. The event will
feature live musical performances by popular teen band The 3 Dudes
and the crowd pleasing Best Laid Plan, along with jump castles, a
petting zoo, pony rides, and harbor cruises on the Palmetto Breeze.
Family Fun on the Creek is sponsored by SunTrust Investments,
Motley Rice, Sams Club, Shem Creek Events, the Palmetto Breeze,
and Vickerys.
The idea for the event came from long-time HALOS volunteer Shelly
Nelson of Wild Wings, Inc. I wanted to support HALOS programs that
provide important resource for child abuse victims, said Ms. Nelson.
Creating a happy and safe place for children to have fun with their
families seemed like a good ft with the HALOS mission and vision.
April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month and HALOS
Executive Director Kim Clifton believes that this is the right time to
promote families sharing a special time together. HALOS serves more
than two thousand child victims of abuse and neglect each year. We
hope the event provides an opportunity for families to have fun and
learn ways that they can help child abuse victims in their community.
Ticket prices are $10 for adults and $5 for children 5-12 (under 5
admitted for free), and includes live music, jump castles, and the petting
zoo. Harbor cruises, pony rides, food, and non-alcoholic beverages will
be available for purchase. All proceeds will beneft HALOS, a nonproft
organization that provides resources and special opportunities to
abused and neglected children and their caregivers in the Charleston
area. Tickets can be purchased at www.charlestonhalos.org/events.
php, or by calling 953-3715.
Family Fun
on the Creek
H A L O S H O L D S F A MI L Y F U N D R A I S E R T O
H E L P P R E V E N T C H I L D A B U S E A N D N E G L E C T
PROVIDED BY HALOS