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AMERICANS FOR

CAMPAIGN REFORM
FACT SHEET

Wall
$200 Street Money in Politics
Millions

$180

Wall$160
Street Tops Campaign Finance Charts Figure 1: Total PAC and individual contributions from
finance, real estate, and insurance industries, 1990-2008
• $140
Individuals and PACs in finance, insurance, and real
estate have contributed over $2 billion to federal $350
$120

Millions
campaigns since 1990, the largest sector by a factor of two
Series1
Individuals
Wall Street contributions increased five-fold from $60
• $100 $300
million in 1990 to $311 million in 2008 Series2
PACs
$80
• Members of the U.S. House and Senate received an $250

average
$60 $142,663 and $1,042,663, respectively, in Wall
$200
Street contributions as of July 28, 2008 Series2
Series1
$40 $150
Both $20
Parties Profit from Wall Street Funds
$100
• Wall Street donors consistently favored the political party
$0 $50
in power with higher contributions in eight out of ten
elections1990 1992
between 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008
1990-2008
$200 $0
• Republicans received 55% of total Wall Street funds from
Millions

1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008
1990-2008, compared with 44% for Democrats
$180
• The top twenty recipients of Wall Street contributions
include
$160 Senators and Representatives regarded as among Figure 2: Partisan breakdown of contributions from
the most liberal and the most conservative Members in finance, insurance, and real estate industries, 1990-2008
$140
Congress
$200
Millions

$120 $180
Wall $100
Street Donors Favor Incumbents $160
Series1
Democrats

• Incumbent Members of Congress received three-quarters


Series2
Republicans
$140
$80
(74%) of the $225 million in Wall Street contributions in $120
2008,
$60consistent with recent trends Series1
$100
• With the exception of two House challengers in highly Series2
$40
contested campaigns, every one of the top forty Wall $80
Street-backed candidates running for Congress in 2008 $60
$20
was an incumbent, as of July 28, 2008 $40
$0 $20
Wall Street1990
Targets
1992Regulatory
1994 1996 1998 Committees
2000 2002 2004 2006 2008
$0
• Wall Street contributions to House and Senate candidates 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008
in 2008 were heavily concentrated on members of the
relevant banking, commerce, and tax committees Figure 3: Top ten Wall Street contributors, 2008
responsible for industry regulation
• Nine of the top ten House recipients of Wall Street
contributions in 200808 served on the Financial Services Rank Organization Amount
(6) or Ways and Means (3) committees 1 Goldman Sachs $4,287,701
• Top-ten members of the relevant House committees
2 Citigroup Inc $3,438,497
received an average $1.5 million from Wall Street in 2008,
ten times the overall average in the House 3 JPMorgan Chase & Co $3,029,568
• The top ten Senate recipients of Wall Street contributions 4 Morgan Stanley $2,842,517
in 2008 were either candidates for President or members 5 National Assn of Realtors $2,525,300
of the Commerce, Banking, Finance, and Budget
6 UBS AG $2,256,060
committees, or in Senate leadership; average contributions
received was $14.3 million, incl. presidential candidates 7 American Bankers Assn $2,029,088
8 Lehman Brothers $1,921,167
Source: Center for Responsive Politics analysis of campaign finance 9 Merrill Lynch $1,824,505
disclosures filed with the Federal Election Commission, 1990-2008 10 Bank of America $1,800,504

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