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December 8, 2008 Issue 3

Notes from the Principal Dates to


Mrs. Cherrington Remember
Happy Holidays!!! Dates to
I would like to thank Mrs. Alice Paglia for Remember:
donating the holiday tree this year. Alice and I Dec. 5 - Grades K-2 to
put up the tree in record time, and it was Pentangle
straight!!!! The children enjoyed adding Dec. 10 - Holiday
decorations and lights so it looks festive. I Concert 6:30 PM
hope you will all attend our holiday concert Dec. 15 - Grades 1&2 to
this Wednesday at 6:30. BF&M
The National Assessment of Educational Dec. 22-31 - Holiday
Recess/No Classes
Progress will be given to our students in grade
Jan. 1 - No Classes/New
4. Students will participate in one Years Day
assessment, either Reading or Mathematics. Jan. 2 - No Classes
The assessments take about 90 minutes to complete and will be Jan. 9 - Ski/Skate
administered by NAEP contracted field staff. The testing window is Runners start
January 26- March 6, 2009. I will let you know as soon as I do the exact Jan. 19 - No Classes In-
testing date. Service
Our winter recess is from December 22-January 4. School starts again Jan. 26 - Grades 3 & 4 to
on January 5th. I hope you all have a safe and healthy holiday season and a Pentangle
happy new year.

Don’t
Forget!

Please send a
Congratulations and Thanks to the staff who cup/water
volunteered to make the beautiful Christmas
wreaths and the families that purchased them. bottle with
Over $300 was raised for our community! your child. We
continue to buy
HOLIDAY CONCERT! plastic cups,
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10TH 6:30 but it is getting
Students should be in their classrooms by 6:15 expensive.
The Classes
Kindergarten
Ms. Grim
You can hear a lot of clapping in
Kindergarten. The students are discovering
syllables in words by clapping and we are
clapping many of the words we use
throughout the school day. Another way we
have been learning to listen for syllables is by writing Haiku poems.
The first line has 5 syllables, the second has 7 syllables and the last
line has 5 syllables. As a class we wrote two poems that reflect how
everyone feels about this month. Clap out the lines when you say the poem out
loud. Did we count correctly?
December
Happy Holiday
Christmas Heart Like a Choo-Choo
Big Eyes Eyebrows High
Snow
Snow Angels Snowmen
Cold Fingers Wiggle to Get Warm
It is Snowing Out

First/Second Grade
Mrs. Ashan
The first and second graders have been exercising their imagination in the writing and
publishing of their first narratives. We have been learning about the important parts
of a narrative-character, setting, motivation, problem, and solution. Before we set off
writing our stories, we wrote a narrative together about a blueberry bush name Juicy.
If you thought that was an imaginative main character, you should read the first and
second graders own narratives! On your way past our hallway display, you will be
tempted to stop and read about Thoughtful the Shooting Star, Molly the Excavator,
Doughnut Head the Zombie, India the Lioness, Thidwick the Moose, Nicky the Four-
Wheeler, Mike the Basketball Player, The Number One, Patchy the Pirate, Kelly the
Babysitter, Annie the Fairy, Scary the Monster, Dumb Dumb the Dog, and Adam the
Moose.
The Classes
Mrs. G’s Brainstorming Third and Fourth What BVS is
Graders collecting
The following items can
The last month has been a busy one for our class! be collected at home and
Fourth grade students have completed the book Green delivered to Mrs.
Mountain Hero set in Vermont during the Revolutionary Robinson in the Main
War. This story is based on the life of the Story family Office:
who faced many challenges in their efforts to settle in • Campbell’s Soup
Vermont. Students have learned how difficult life was in Labels
the 1700s. Settlers had to use whatever resources were • Box Tops for
available to them to survive the cold Vermont winter. Education
They also learned how the settlers built their log cabins. • Silver Tabs from
As a culminating activity, the children are building model aluminum cans
log cabins and creating a slideshow to illustrate “the arts And don’t forget to drop
of the settler”. off your 5¢ recyclable
Third Graders have been reading fascinating articles and stories about aluminum cans and
urban wildlife. As residents of a small town, it has been very interesting for glass bottles in front of
the children to learn about life in the city and , surprisingly, the diversity of the school.
wildlife that has adapted to living there! All of the students in
our class will also be performing a reader’s theater piece titled
The Hidden One, a Native American ”Cinderella” legend. We
will present at morning meeting on December 19.

Happenings in the 5th


Grade
By Ava and Kaelee

We have a lot going on in the fifth grade class. We made gingerbread


houses with our buddies. It was very fun and a delicious project. We
also got a new student! His name is Joseph. We welcomed him
enthusiastically and we are happy that he is here. We hope everybody
in the school to gets to know Joseph.
The Classes

Back to Prehistoric Times with the Sixth Graders


By Mr. Symanski

The sixth graders wrapped up their study of Pre-Historic People with their own
cave painting. During the past two months, the students collected information
about this topic through reading assignments, (Social Studies textbook and Boy
of the Painted Cave by Justine Denzel) Internet research, and a video. Armed
with what they learned, they went out to the woods and home to collect
materials to make paint and paint brushes. Back in the classroom they squished
and squashed berries, eggs, seeds, and dirt until they came up with paint. On a
large piece of paper they painted scenes prehistoric people may have
experienced. Later the sixth graders invited the entire school to make
handprints with their homemade paint.
Visit our page on the school’s website (Go to Classrooms, then 6th Grade) to see
a movie documenting their cave painting process. You can also check out a
video that shows how the students used Legos to learn about common multiples,
as was mentioned in last month’s newsletter.
The Essentials

Library News
Researching for trivia in the library is one way to engage students in learning.
The holidays can be a springboard for this activity. Recently, students
discovered that, according to the World Book Encyclopedia, cranberries were
used by Native Americans not only for food, but dyes and medicines as well;
China produces the largest sweet potato crop; and Thanksgiving was first
declared a national holiday by President Abraham Lincoln. In 1941 the fourth
Thursday in November was declared a legal federal holiday. We only used
books as reference materials for these projects, not the Internet.

However, Bridgewater Village School continues to subscribe to the World Book Online. If
you have Internet in your home, your children can use this student resource for schoolwork or
just for fun. The URL is www.worldbookonline.com our username is woodstockhsms and
the password is vermont. There is also an active link to the site on the library page of our
school website, www.bvsvt.org.

One of my favorite Christmas holiday books is an oldie, but a


goodie. Aside from the Santa and gift themes, Rudolph the Red-
Nosed Reindeer is a book with an interesting history as well as a
book that teaches children good values. Written by Robert May
for Montgomery Ward, two million copies of the book were given
away during the Christmas of 1939. I have read that a very good
copy of the 1939 version could bring as much as $300 on eBay.
Many of these paperback copies eventually ended up in the
patriotic piles of WWII paper drives. Due to
these wartime paper shortages, the book was
www.fireworks.com/christmas not released again until 1946. By the end of
/images/Rudolph.jpg that year, a total of six million copies had
been distributed.
(St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, 2002
Gale Group.)
-Eileen Vaughn
The Essentials
Art
Ms. Trimpi
In the art room we have been putting our skills to work! We barely had time to let the paint
dry on our Thanksgiving decorations before we set off into winter land decorating for the
Holiday show. We did a whirlwind of snow paintings and other festive genres in an effort to
"set the stage"! As our winter break is fast upon us we will continue to work on the winter
theme keeping us busy and assisting Santa's elves with their duties. Look for some surprises
under your trees!

Music
Ms. Bender
We've been having a great time in music with lots of good singing as we prepare for the concert. Please
remember that the concert is WEDNESDAY, December 10th at 6:30pm. Students can dress in their
nicest clothes and arrive at their classrooms by 6:15pm. It will be nice to see you all there!
We will not be performing at the Killington Tree Festival this year. The dates were changed from last
year, and I'm not available the week before Christmas. We will try to arrange this again next year, as I
know the students really enjoyed singing at this event.
If you are looking for a good holiday performance to attend, come to the Christmas Revels performance
at the Hopkins Center in Hanover on December 18, 19, 20 or 21. The story is set in medieval France
and includes lots of music and dance and great costumes and set. Lilian Buchangroff, Gwen Groff and I
are all performing, and we'd love to have you attend!
Enjoy your preparations for the holidays, and I'll see you
on December 10th.

¡Hola! From the Spanish classroom!


Señora Elena

In the week prior to Thanksgiving, students in grades 3-6


viewed a slideshow of photographs from Nicaragua. Nicaragua, a small country in Central America, is
the poorest country in the Americas. In class, we looked at things like photos of Nicaragua’s highways
and compared those to highways in the United States. We talked about the benefits of a good highway
system. Other topics included buses, health care, housing, and the way the government treats the
people. In the third and fourth grades, we related modern life in Nicaragua to life in the days of Green
Mountain Heroes.
We also viewed pictures of the Nicaraguan landscape, typical Central American towns, and Spanish
Colonial architecture. The slideshow generated a lot of questions, including everything from how
people bathe to why they have such beautiful churches if the people are so poor.
Ask your children about Nicaragua. Ask them about “Tent
City”, and to describe the highways and buses.
Nursing News…

From
Betty

Positive
Parenting
Tips
from
the
CDC

Part
I

6‐8
Years
Old

Middle
childhood
brings
many
changes
to
a
child's
life.
By
this
time,
children
can
dress

themselves,
catch
a
ball
more
easily
with
only
their
hands,
and
tie
their
shoes.
Developing

independence
from
family
becomes
more
important
now.
Events
such
as
starting
school

bring
children
this
age
into
regular
contact
with
the
larger
world.
Friendships
become
more

and
more
important.
Physical,
social,
and
mental
skills
develop
rapidly
at
this
time.
This
is
a

critical
time
for
children
to
develop
confidence
in
all
areas
of
life,
such
as
through
friends,

schoolwork,
and
sports.

Positive
Parenting
Tips
–
For
6
–
8
years
old


• Show affection for your child. Recognize her accomplishments.


• Help your child develop a sense of responsibility—ask him to help with household
tasks, such as setting the table.
• Talk with your child about school, friends, and things she looks forward to in the future.
• Talk with your child about respecting others. Encourage him to help people in need.
• Help your child set her own achievable goals—she'll learn to take pride in herself and
rely less on approval or reward from others.
• Make clear rules and stick to them, such as how long your child can watch TV or when
he has to go to bed. Be clear about what behavior is okay and what is not okay.
• Help your child learn patience by letting others go first or by finishing a task before
going out to play. Encourage him to think about possible consequences before acting.
• Do fun things together as a family, such as playing games, reading, and going to events
in your community.
• Get involved with your child's school. Meet the teachers and staff to understand the
learning goals and how you and the school can work together to help your child do well.
• Continue reading to your child. As your child learns to read, take turns reading to each
other.
• Use discipline to guide and protect your child, rather than punishment to make her feel
badly about herself.
• Support your child in taking on new challenges. Encourage him to solve problems, such
as a disagreement with another child, on his own.

Part II in issue 4 will cover ages 9-11