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Kathryn
Banter


ENG
103
SEC
9


November
22,
2008

When
Less
is
More:

An
Analysis




 As
powerful
and
intriguing
the
motion
picture
A
Beautiful
Mind
may
be,
the


movie’s
reviews
at
first
glance
seem
not
to
do
it
justice.


However,
after
one
has


read
one
of
these
short
but
detailed
articles,
one
can
soon
appreciate
the
complexity


and
simplicity
they
have
to
offer.


Not
ever
surpassing
over
two
hundred
and
fifty


words,
it
is
easy
to
get
the
gist
of
the
interesting
movie
from
one
of
these
reviews


without
it
ruining
the
plot
or
the
ending.

When
reading
these
reviews,
it
is
safe
to


say
that
less
is
more
because
they
briefly
give
the
general
picture‐
nothing
less,


nothing
more.



 Despite
the
fact
that
each
of
the
reviews
is
relatively
short,
every
one
has
a


different
aspect
or
view
about
the
movie.

While
one
may
be
describing
the
general


history
behind
the
flick,
another
may
be
flooding
the
reader
with
the
actors’
or


actresses’
seamless
or
not
so
perfect
performance.

All
in
all,
it
mostly
just
depends


on
which
publication
it
is
written
in.



 For
instance,
one
of
the
reviews
analyzed
was
from
the
popular
periodical,


People.

For
this
review,
the
author,
Leah
Rozen,
uses
modern
lingo
and
props
to


describe
the
movie
and
its
actors
and
actresses.

She
also
tries
to
illustrate
how


tricky
it
was
to
make
the
movie
itself,
saying:

“John
Nash
Jr.’s
story
seems
a
natural
for
a
movie,
and
yet
it’s
a
tricky
one.



How
exactly
do
you
show
a
brilliant
mathematician—one
who
was
awarded


a
Nobel
Prize
for
his
economic
theories
in
1994
and
who
still
works
at


Princeton
today—going
mad
and
spending
decades
of
his
life
a
delusional


prisoner
of
schizophrenia?”


In
fact,
the
only
flaw
in
the
whole
movie
according
to
her
was
the
fact
that


Russell
Crowe
had
“difficulty”
with
a
West
Virginian
accent.

Other
than
that,
Rozen


thought
that
the
movie
was
very
beautifully
done.


Nevertheless,
with
different
publications
come
different
opinions.

In
the
ever


popular
periodical,
TIME,
Richard
Schickel
referred
to
the
movie
as
a
“somewhat


fictionalized
but
entirely
absorbing
biopic
about
John
Forbes
Nash
Jr”.

He
continued


praising
it
by
detailing
Ron
Howard’s
terrific
directing,
and
how
he
brilliantly
hides


the
movie’s
slowly
dawning
central
surprise.
In
this
review,
he
also
mentions


Crowe’s
difficulty
with
the
accent,
but
later
praises
him
for
his
compelling


conviction.

Nonetheless,
he
too
rates
the
film
as
moviemaking
at
its
highest,
most


satisfying
level.



Much
like
the
other
two
reviews,
the
Rolling
Stone
continues
to
uphold
the


film’s
popularity.

Throughout
this
very
short
article,
the
author,
Peter
Travers,
hits


on
a
few
names
and
key
highlights
throughout
the
film.

However,
and
most


surprising,
Travers
also
lays
out
his
opinion
about
the
somewhat
sentimental


ending:


“Sadly,
Howard
blands
out
in
the
final
third,
using
old‐age
makeup
and


tear‐jerking
to
turn
a
tough
true
story
into
something
easily
digestible.



Until
then,
you’ll
be
riveted.”


Whatever
the
case
may
be,
one
can
always
bet
that
a
short
review
will


ultimately
hold
the
best
information.


The
similarities
between
the
reviews,
such
as


a
brief
description
and
a
few
opinions,
let
the
reader
become
informed
without


ruining
any
surprises.

A
powerful
and
intriguing
story
always
needs
a
mysterious


review,
and
with
A
Beautiful
Mind‐
less
is
always
more.

Works
Cited


Rozen, Leah. "A Beautiful Mind (Motion Picture)." People Vol. 56 Issue

2612/24/2001 p32. 15 Dec 2008

Schickel, Richard. "A Beautiful Mind (Motion Picture)." Time Vol. 158/159 Issue

28/1 12/31/2001 p140. 15 Dec 2008

Travers, Peter. "A Beautiful Mind ." Rolling Stone RS 887 1/17/2002 15 Dec 2008