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8
Donald L. Morse
HeavenlyDesigns
in
EarthlyPatterns
Donald L. Morse
Curry Printing & Graphics
Lewiston, Maine
ii
Copyright © 1994 by Donald L. Morse
All Rights Reserved
Revised 2005
iii
Preface
For millennia people have debated the existence of God. Many
religions have appeared and many differing beliefs about God
have come and gone over the years. Even in our time, new reli-
gions and ideas of God appear on the scene, as existing religions
either change with the times or slowly fade into the shadows of
their past glory. Many arguments about God and so called “proofs”
of God’s existence have been bandied about, yet no solid tan-
gible evidence has been offered to verify the existence of the Al-
mighty.
It seems that no matter how many religions form or how many
ideas of God abound, the nagging question still hangs in the deep
recesses of many people’s minds - Does God truly exist?
One would think that with all the many religions and beliefs
that abound in the world, that that question would have been an-
swered eons ago, and yet the question, “Does God exist?” is as
timely today as it ever was.
Why is this? Why is it that the religions have not provided us
with the answer to such an important question? Some would say
that the religions do provide us with an answer and the answer is
faith. However, the concept that encourages only a faith in God
with no tangible evidence to support it encourages also a multi-
plicity in religions. That is exactly what we have in the world
today; many religions having many diverse and even contradic-
tory views, and yet all claiming to represent God. Such a diver-
sity of beliefs while to some may seemingly appear to be a ben-
efit, actually can be very harmful. Many can be taken in by mis-
guided zealots and false teachers and be led not toward but away
from God. What makes the task of verification even more diffi-
cult is that nearly all religions and cults claim to be from God and
represent Him. They all claim to tell the “truth” when in fact
many do not.
iv
Saint Paul in his first letter to the church at Thessalonica ad-
monished the church to “Prove all things; hold fast that which is
good” (I Thess 5:21). That is the purpose of this book to prove,
verify, and settle the issue once and for all time - the matter of
God’s existence.
It is absolutely possible to verify the existence of God, for at
the week of Adam and Eve’s creation, God set aside the seventh
day as His special day. This day, the seventh-day Sabbath, was
so special to Him, in fact, that He made it an integral part of His
calendar pattern code. Because most who teach religion reject
the Sabbath, they are unaware that such a code exists and cut
themselves off from it. Because they have no knowledge of this
code, they cannot offer us tangible evidence of God’s existence.
With a proper recognition of the seventh day as a special day
to God, one can decipher God’s calendar code and verify with
tangible evidence, that God truly exists. That is exactly what this
book does. It verifies, by means of the calendar code, the exist-
ence of God. It confirms the atoning work of Jesus Christ, and it
reveals the seventh-day Sabbath as God’s special day and the
means by which the calendar code was deciphered.
v
Notes
This book is not a complete study of all the significant events
in history, nor could it be. Too many happenings have occurred
in the past to be included in any single volume. Moreover, as
time passes, additional events occur which make history an un-
ending study.
1. The study of chronology is fraught with pitfalls. Trying
to locate the exact date or year of an event which happened two
or more millennia earlier is no small task. Often when one com-
putes a series of regnal years, the accession years of some mon-
archs may be recorded differently from others, thus making diffi-
cult one’s task to locate either the true year of a reign or the com-
bined total of successive reigns. Another problem which arises
is that not all sources agree on a given date or year in which an
event occurred. A third problem is that of tradition. It appears
that tradition, that seemingly reliable source in which we trust, is
often a roadblock to serious research and frequently must first be
removed before one proceeds. In addition to these three prob-
lems, many other hindrances appear in the path of the researcher
during the course of research to make his task a most difficult
one, to say the least.
2. Usually the 40-day periods are computed either as cardi-
nal or ordinal numbers. However, in at least three instances,
namely, Moses’ two visits to the Sinai summit, and the period
from Jesus’ resurrection to His ascension, appear to be spans lo-
cated between two sabbaths (Saturdays).
3. Unless otherwise stated, equinox and new moon dates and
times are calculated for Jerusalem time and are a product of Z2
Computer Solutions, Bend, Oregon.
4. The present-day Jewish calendar descended from the Bible
calendar. In some ways the present-day calendar is the same as
the original - in other ways it is not. Webster’s New International
vi
Dictionary gives a concise explanation of today’s calendar.
“A lunisolar calendar in use among Hebraic peoples,
reckoning from the year 3761 B.C., the date traditionally
given for the Creation. It received its present fixed form
from Hillel II about 360 A.D. The present names of the
months, which are Babylonian-Assyrian in origin, replaced
older ones, as Abib, Bul, etc., at the time of the Babylonian
Exile. Nineteen years constitute a lunar cycle, of which
the 3d, 6th, 8th, 11th, 14th, 17th, and 19th years are leap
years. The year 5682 (A.D. 1921-22) was the first year of
the 300 lunar cycle. The common year is said to be a
defective, regular, or perfect (or abundant) year accord-
ing as it has 353, 354, or 355 days. The leap year has an
intercalary month, and a total of 383 (defective), 384 (regu-
lar), or 385 (perfect, or abundant) days. The calendar is
complicated by various rules providing for the harmoni-
ous arrangement of festivals, etc. (see JEWISH HOLIDAYS),
so that no simple perpetual calendar can be constructed.
The following table gives the months in order, with the
number of days assigned to each. Only three months vary
in length. They are: Heshvan, which has 30 days in per-
fect years; Kislev, which has 30 days in regular and per-
fect years; and Adar, which has 30 days in leap years.
The ecclesiastical year commences with Nisan and the
civil year with Tishri....
MONTHS OF THE JEWISH YEAR
“1 Tishri ...... 30 5 Shebat . 30 7 Nisan ... 30
2 Heshvan .. 29 (r. & d.) 6 Adar .... 29 or 8 Iyar ...... 29
or 30 (p.) 30 (l.) 9 Sivan ... 30
3 Kislev ..... 29 (d.) or Veadar . 29 10 Tammuz29
30 (r. & p.) (occurring only 11 Ab........ 30
4 Tebet ....... 29 in leap years) 12 Elul .... 29"
In the original Lord’s calendar, the beginning of a new month
vii
was determined by observations made of the new moon, but this
is not always now true of the present-day Hebrew calendar. Be-
cause of changes made by Hillel II and others over the centuries,
the beginnings of the months for the present-day calendar were
to be determined by other means. Consequently, the months in
the present-day calendar often begin a day or two later than origi-
nally. These changes have caused a loss of the historical patterns
which were in the original calendar and prevent the locating of
those earlier patterns. In order to return the present-day calendar
to its original Old Testament form, one must delete the alterations
of Hillel II and others and begin the months with the new moons.
Then, and only then, can one locate the Lord’s true calendar code.
The following symbols are used on the charts.
Vernal Equinox (V.E.) and Nisan 1 fall on the same day or
within 24 hours of each other.
Vernal Equinox occurred after sunset.
✽ Vernal Equinox, New Moon and Nisan 1 fall on same day
or within 24 hours of each other.
viii
Acknowledgements
I want to thank my son, David, for the many hours he spent
typing and retyping the manuscript. Mark, also, who spent count-
less hours checking and rechecking the dates, calculations, etc.,
with me, deserves special recognition for his effort. Michael,
Stephen, and Jonathan also deserve recognition for assisting me
when called upon. My wife, Ann, and daughter, Elizabeth Ann,
certainly should be recognized for their patience because of the
many hours I spent away from them in the writing and prepara-
tion of this work.
A special thanks goes to Miss Nathalie Alward, who unself-
ishly took time to read and reread the manuscript, making many
helpful suggestions.
Finally, I would like to thank the Lord, the One who is the
originator and determiner of the calendar code and controller of
all happenings, for guiding me by His Spirit in the writing and
completing of this work.
Donald L. Morse
ix
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Preface ............................................................................. iii
Notes.................................................................................. v
I Wars ................................................................................... 3
II Natural Disasters ............................................................. 28
III The Crucifixion and Resurrection .................................. 45
IV Documents ...................................................................... 64
V Discoveries and Inventions ............................................. 72
VI Explorers ......................................................................... 85
VII Religions ....................................................................... 104
VIII Conclusion .................................................................... 131
Predictions ..................................................................... 139
Chapter Notes ................................................................ 141
Bibliography.................................................................. 154
Sources .......................................................................... 164
Index .............................................................................. 171
HeavenlyDesigns
in
Earthly Patterns
2
3
Chapter I
WARS
Does God exist? Of all the questions with which man has
been confronted, this truly is one of the most baffling and enig-
matic. From the earliest of times man has searched and struggled
to find its answer. Scholars and philosophers have pondered over
it. Even great religions have formed because of it, yet even today
no tangible evidence of a Creator God has been offered. The
question, “Does God exist?” is as perplexing and as challenging
today as it was millennia ago.
Perhaps today it is even more challenging for one to locate
God than in the past. In earlier times what one believed depended
on the culture in which one lived. Today one is surrounded by
countless numbers of religions and beliefs, and it is truly difficult
for one to know where to turn. Should one turn to the ancient
religions of the Far East with their many gods in earth and sky or
look to the Middle East for the God of Eden?
It seems that nearly everyone has an opinion of God, whether
believer or non-believer. The atheist states that there is no God.
The agnostic says that we cannot know of God, yet the polytheist
acknowledges many gods. The pantheist searches for a god in
nature. The Jews and Muslims look heavenward to a monotheis-
tic god, while the Christians acknowledge a triune God.
With the proliferation of these many beliefs and opinions,
one would think that by now one way or the other the issue of
God’s existence would be settled. But it is not. Many today, as
have many throughout history, still ask, “Does God exist?” The
no-God concept which has deceived and confused many into be-
lieving that no heavenly Ruler exists is not a recent movement. It
did not begin in the nineteenth century with atheism and develop
into Communism with its many adherents. The idea that there is
4
no God is not new. The Psalmist, nearly four thousand years ago,
exclaimed, “The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God.” (Ps.
14:1)
The question, “Does God exist?” is a legitimate one and de-
mands an answer. If God exists, then we should know of it. If,
on the other hand, He does not, we should know of that also. It is
absurd for one to spend a lifetime worshiping and trusting in a
non-existent God just as it is a folly for one to live a lifetime
ignoring God if in fact He exists.
At one time in history such confusion over the existence of
God did not exist. Adam and Eve knew their Maker well, for He
often visited their Edenic homeland and conversed with them
(Gen. 3:8-19). It was not until after their sin and fall from favor
that the Lord ended His garden visitations, and man’s loss of
knowledge of God began to appear. To fill the void left by this
lack of knowledge, man began to develop his own ideas of God,
which became the foundation for the earliest religions. As centu-
ries melted into millennia, additional ideas of God were formed
and incorporated into these evolving religions.
To prevent mankind from being totally misled and misguided
by these man-made religions and to prevent a further erosion of
man’s belief in Him, the Lord at selected times in history sent
forth men, such as Noah, Abraham, and Moses as guiding bea-
cons of truth. Moreover, the Lord Himself became incarnate in
the form of Jesus Christ to share additional truths with mankind.
Unfortunately, however, the truths have not been well received.
Many prefer to follow their own beliefs and ideas of God rather
than accept instruction from the Lord. Thus, we find today, as
has been so true in the past, many ideas, concepts, and beliefs of
God but very little truth of God. It is no wonder that many still
ask, “Does God exist?”
Since the religions of the world cannot answer clearly and
satisfactorily the nagging question, “Does God exist?” can any
source do so? Yes, a source does exist which not only contains
5
God’s words but also gives us information which makes it pos-
sible for us to see clearly God’s working in history even to the
present day. That source is the Bible.
To begin our quest to locate this revealing information of God,
we must turn in the Bible to the creation story in the book of
Genesis. At the end of the creation week, something special hap-
pened which has largely been ignored by the world. That special
happening was the Lord’s blessing and sanctifying of the seventh
day and selecting that day to be a holy day or Sabbath. He made
the seventh day special because it was the day on which He rested
from His creative work. The Bible relates this as follows:
And on the seventh day God ended his work which he
had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his
work which he had made. And God blessed the seventh
day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested
from all his work which God created and made.
1
By consecrating the Sabbath, the Lord has granted to that day
a special recognition which the other days of the week do not
have. This recognition sets the Sabbath apart for a unique pur-
pose. That purpose is to reveal God in history. Thus, if substan-
tive evidence of God’s involvement in history is to be located, it
will be found by means of the Sabbath and not by any other means.
Because many have rejected the Sabbath as a day special to the
Lord, they have rejected this unique revelation from God and
thus have failed to find evidence of Him within the historical
context.
Many, many years after the consecrating of the Sabbath at the
end of the creation week, the Lord again made use of that day as
a means of revelation. This special use of the Sabbath happened
shortly after the Exodus had occurred. The Israelites, while wan-
dering in their journey through the wilderness, lacked adequate
food for their sustenance. To prevent the Israelites from perish-
ing in the wilds, the Lord provided daily a special food called
6
manna. This food was to be gathered early each morning with a
double portion taken on the sixth day of the week. A part of this
double portion was to be held over for the seventh day, or Sab-
bath, for no food would be provided on that day. By withholding
the manna from the Sabbath, the Lord was revealing to Israel His
special recognition of that day.
Another significant happening with the Sabbath at that time
was the including of that day in the Ten Commandments. The
Bible relates the Sabbath commandment as follows:
Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days
shalt thou labour and do all thy work: but the seventh day
is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do
any work, thou nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manser-
vant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger
that is within thy gates: For in six days the LORD made
heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested
the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath
day and hallowed it.
2
The fact that the Sabbath was included in the Ten Command-
ments is additional evidence of the Lord’s special recognition of
that day. In the Sabbath commandment the Lord again makes
reference to the creation week and the special blessing He had
bestowed on the Sabbath at that time. If the Sabbath had meant
nothing to the Lord after the creation week, no evidence would
have appeared in support of the Sabbath. Because evidence did
appear by means of the withheld manna and the Sabbath com-
mandment, it is apparent that the Lord recognized that day in a
special way.
Sometime later, after the giving of the Law, the Lord again
comments about the Sabbath to the nation of Israel. He not only
asserts that they should observe the Sabbath but that they also
recognize it as a sign between them.
7
Wherefore the children of Israel shall keep the sab-
bath, to observe the sabbath throughout their generations
for a perpetual covenant. It is a sign between me and the
children of Israel forever: for in six days the LORD made
heaven and earth, and on the seventh day he rested, and
was refreshed.
3
The weight of evidence makes clear that the Sabbath has a
special meaning to the Lord, and He does not give the other six
days that recognition. Because the Sabbath has been set apart by
Him in this fashion, additional evidence of this Sabbath recogni-
tion can be found. That is why we find on constructing the Bible
calendar for the years of the prophet Ezekiel’s first two major
visions (Ezek. 1:1-28; 8:1), we discover that those visions oc-
curred on Sabbath days, something that is also true of a signifi-
cant vision that occurred several years later (Ezek. 40:1).
These three Sabbaths on which these visions occurred are a
beginning for deciphering the calendar code. From them we not
only can construct the full calendar years for the years of the vi-
sions but also locate the actual historical years in which the vi-
sions occurred. Usually it is difficult if not impossible to locate
accurately a year of an Old Testament happening because often a
happening or event occurs in a single year. That is not so here,
however, for the Lord has provided for us three separate happen-
ings that have occurred in three separate years. For each of these
three Sabbath happenings we can extend the calendar back to the
beginning of the year in order to find the day of the week on
which Nisan 1, the New Year’s Day occurred. We do this to
locate the New Year’s Day pattern for these three years. Now the
Bible record indicates that Nisan 1 for the year of the first vision
occurred on a Thursday, that for the second a Monday, and that
for the third another Thursday, which gives a Thursday-Monday-
Thursday pattern for the years of the visions.
With the knowledge of these patterns and the knowledge that
8
the Bible calendar is luni-solar, it is possible to locate these years
with tables of equinoxes and moons recently produced by as-
tronomers and scholars. Using these tables, we find that Ezekiel's
first vision, and we are considering, here only his significant vi-
sions, occurred in 593 B.C.
593 B.C.
This calendar for 593 B.C. shows us that the New Year’s Day,
Nisan 1, and the day of the vision, Tamuz 5, fell on a Thursday
and Saturday (Sabbath day) respectively just as the Scriptures
had indicated.
The following year, 592 B.C., the year of his second vision,
also supports the Scriptures, for Nisan 1 occurred on a Monday
and the day of the vision, Elul 5, was a Sabbath.
VERNAL EQUINOX: MARCH 27 NISAN 1: MARCH 30
1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 31

JAh 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N
FE8 T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T
1 Z
NAß w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F

X

hI8Ah
3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 1 Z
APß 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8

YIAß
3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 1 Z 3 4
NAY N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w

8IVAh
6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 1 Z 3 4
Jüh T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F

TANüZ
6
JüL 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N

Aüû T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T
8EP F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8
û0T 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T
hûV w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T

ûE0 F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8
9
592 B.C.
In Ezekiel's vision of 573 B.C., Nisan 1 occurred again on a
Thursday, and Nisan 10, the day of the vision, was a Sabbath.
573 B.C.
VERNAL EQUINOX: MARCH 27 NISAN 1: MARCH 19
1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 31

JAh N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w
FE8 T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w
1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13
NAß T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8

hI8Ah x
14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13
APß 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N

YIAß
14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16
NAY T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T

8IVAh
16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16
Jüh F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8

TANüZ
16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17
JüL 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T

A8
1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B
Aüû w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F

ELüL
19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9
8EP 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8
û0T N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w
hûV T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F

ûE0 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N
VERNAL EQUINOX: MARCH 27 NISAN 1: MARCH 19
1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30 31

JAh w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F
FE8 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8
1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10
NAß 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T

hI8Ah x

APß w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T


NAY F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8


Jüh N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T


JüL w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F


Aüû 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N


8EP T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w

û0T T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8
hûV 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N

ûE0 T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T
10
These calendar records verify the accuracy of the Holy Scrip-
tures and reveal the Lord's involvement in the historical context.
Of especial interest is the fact that the Lord has not limited
His involvement in history to just Old Testament times. Once we
have deciphered the calendar code by means of the Sabbath, we
can find evidence of His involvement in all of history, even in
our time. For example, one of the major historical happenings in
the twentieth century was World War I, and yet unbelievable as it
sounds, the Lord had connected the beginning of that war to the
date of Ezekiel’s first vision.
Now the event that precipitated the world into World War I
was the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to
the throne of the Austria-Hungary empire. In June, 1914 the Arch-
duke with his wife, Sophie, Dutchess of Hohenberg, paid a visit
to Sarajevo, the capital of the Austrian province of Bosnia. It
was on June 28 that they motored down the Appel Quay, which
paralleled the Miliaca river. Large crowds lined the Appel Quay
to watch the royal motorcade. As the car carrying the royal couple
crossed a bridge, someone in the crowd hurled a grenade at the
Archduke’s automobile. It missed its mark and exploded near
several spectators injuring a number of them.
4
After the explosion, the motorcade hurriedly departed for the
Town Hall. Although the festivities had been dampened by the
attack, the speeches were given and the program completed about
noon.
Again, the motorcade moved out. As it proceeded along the
Appel Quay, Gavrilo Princip, one of seven assassins located at
strategic positions on the Appel Quay, who had vowed to kill the
Archduke, watched the oncoming procession with burning ha-
tred in his eyes. As the procession drew abreast of him, he bolted
past police and cavalry guards and leaped upon the running board
of the royal touring car. He yanked a Browning automatic from
his pocket and fired directly at the royal couple. One bullet pierced
the Archduke’s jugular vein, and another struck Sophie. The rest
11
of the fusillade went wild. Police and cavalrymen leaped for the
killer and beat him with their fists until he was nearly senseless.
Before they could handcuff him and remove him from the scene
of his ghastly deed, the Archduke and Dutchess were already
dead.
5
Princip later died of tuberculosis in an Austrian prison. But
the shots he fired were the spark that set off the explosion of
World War I.
The date of the assassination, June 28, corresponded with
Tamuz 5 in the Lord’s calendar. This can clearly be seen in the
1914 calendar.
A.D. 1914
Tamuz 5, the date of the Archduke’s assassination, was the
identical date on which the Lord appeared to the prophet Ezekiel
in 593 B.C. By means of these identical dates, the Lord is reveal-
ing to us His continuing involvement in major world affairs. Al-
though the Old Testament period is replete with examples show-
ing the Lord’s involvement in the affairs of that time, His in-
volvement is not limited to that time period. He is as involved
today in the affairs of the world as He ever was. That is why the
Archduke’s assassination occurred on a special date, Tamuz 5,
and not on just any chance calendar date.
Another date in World War I that also reveals the Lord’s in-
fluence in history was April 6, 1917. On April 6, the Congress of
the United States declared war on Germany. In A.D. 30, Nisan
17, Jesus’ resurrection day, occurred on April 8, but since the
vernal equinox of today occurs two days earlier than in A.D. 30,
the date today which most nearly corresponds to the anniversary
1 Z 3 4 6 6 7 B 9 10 11 1Z 13 14 16 16 17 1B 19 Z0 Z1 ZZ Z3 Z4 Z6 Z6 Z7 ZB Z9 30
1 Z 3 4 6
JühE N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T w T F 8 8 N T
TANüZ
12
date of the Resurrection is April 6. It is obviously of some sig-
nificance that the United States Congress should declare war on
the Central Powers on the anniversary of Jesus’ resurrection.
World War II also contained significant patterns, for in the
year 1939, the year the war began, the new moon for the New
Year’s Day (Nisan 1) occurred within twenty-four hours of the
vernal equinox. This identical pattern occurred in A.D. 30, the
year of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection. In addition to this
pattern World War II also contained a year having an identical
New Year’s Day with a year in World War I. That year was 1941,
the year the United States entered the war. In that year the New
Year’s Day (Nisan 1) fell on a Friday just as happened in 1914,
the year signaling the beginning of World War I.
Another war associated with a Friday New Year’s Day pat-
tern was the Manchurian War of 1931. Louis L. Snyder in his
book, The War, tells of the attack as follows:
In early September 1931 came the first of the China
“incidents.” Several Chinese bandits exploded a small
bomb on the tracks of the Japanese-controlled South
Manchurian Railway. The damage was small. . . .
But this was enough for Tokyo’s hotheads. This was
“banditry” and it would be settled by force. On Septem-
ber 18, 1931, without consulting the legal Reijiro
Wakasuki cabinet, Japanese forces struck, and quickly
captured Mukden with its barracks of 10,000 Chinese
soldiers. . . .
Meanwhile, the Japanese went ahead with the con-
quest of all Manchuria, which they completed in January
1932. Then the Nipponese forces turned southward to
strike at the heart of the Chinese dragon. Here they were
opposed by the Chinese Nineteenth Route Army, which
took orders from the radical Leftist government at Can-
ton, not from the Nationalists at Nanking. A five-week
13
battle cost 23,000 lives, 20,000 of them Chinese.
The soil of China was drenched in blood. Infuriated
by Chinese resistance, the Japanese destroyed and pillaged
the countryside, slaughtered prisoners of war, raped
women and killed children. It was an exercise in cruelty
that shocked the world.
6
Some scholars consider the Manchurian War to be the true
beginning of World War II. Whether this is true or not is not
important here. What is significant is that the war began in a year
in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Friday.
The Friday New Year’s Day pattern is evidently one of sev-
eral year patterns that the Lord associates with significant wars.
Another pattern that emerges to a position of some promi-
nence as we extend our research to other wars in history is the
Saturday (Sabbath) New Year’s Day pattern. The China-Japan
War that began in 1937 began in a year having a Saturday New
Year’s Day.
Snyder describes the beginning of this war in the following
excerpt.
On July 7, 1937, the curtain was rung up again in
China, this time at the Marco Polo bridge near the village
of Lukouchiao, 20 miles west of Peiping. The Japanese
commander in the area reported that the Chinese had at-
tacked his troops first. “We came to teach the Chinese a
lesson. They are getting too bold.”
The Japanese war minister agreed: “China must be
chastised for her insincerity.” The cabinet of Prince
Fumimaro Konoye, the Japanese premier, urged caution.
But it was too late.
Japanese troops streamed into North China. One af-
ter another the leading cities of China were overrun:
Nanking (December 1937), the great port of Canton (Oc-
14
tober 1938), and Hankow (October 1938). The Chinese,
led by organized Chinese resistance had virtually ceased.
7
About 1900 years prior to these twentieth century wars, the
Lord, shortly before His death in A.D. 30, foretold of an impend-
ing destruction of Jerusalem and the temple. This destruction
occurred in the fortieth year after His crucifixion. In A.D. 66 the
Jews rebelled against Rome in hopes of establishing their own
nation. Josephus, who lived at the time of this rebellion tells us
that King Agrippa
. . .attempted to persuade the multitude to obey Florus,
until Caesar should send one to succeed him; but they
were hereby more provoked, and cast reproaches upon
the king, and got him excluded out of the city; nay, some
of the seditious had the impudence to throw stones at him.
So when the king saw that the violence of those that were
for innovations was not to be restrained, and being very
angry at the contumelies he had received, he sent their
rulers, together with their men of power, to Florus, to
Cesarea, that he might appoint whom he thought fit to
collect the tribute in the country, while he retired into his
own kingdom.
And at this time it was that some of those that princi-
pally excited the people to go to war made an assault upon
a certain fortress called Masada. They took it by treach-
ery, and slew the Romans that were there, and put others
of their own party to keep it. At the same time Eleazar,
the son of Ananias the high priest, a very bold youth, who
was at that time governor of the temple, persuaded those
that officiated in the Divine service to receive no gift or
sacrifice for any foreigner. And this was the true begin-
ning of our war with the Romans;. . .
8
15
New Year’s Day in the year A.D. 66, the year the rebellion
started, fell on a Saturday, exactly as happened in the year 1937.
Four years later in A.D. 70, Titus attacked Jerusalem and de-
stroyed both the city and the temple. Once again a calendar pat-
tern appears, for in A.D. 70 the New Year’s Day again fell on a
Saturday. Josephus describes this destruction in the following
manner:
. . .two of the legions had completed their banks on the
eighth day of the month Lous (Ab). Whereupon Titus
gave orders that the battering rams should be brought,
and set over against the western edifice of the inner temple;
for before these were brought, the firmest of all the other
engines had battered the wall for six days together with-
out ceasing, without making any impression upon it; but
the vast largeness and strong connexion of the stones were
superior to that engine, and to the other battering rams
also. Other Romans did indeed undermine the founda-
tions of the northern gate, and after a world of pains re-
moved the outermost stones, yet was the gate still upheld
by inner stones, and stood still unhurt; till the workmen,
despairing of all such attempts by engines and crows,
brought their ladders to the cloisters. Now the Jews did
not interrupt them in so doing but when they were gotten
up, they fell upon them, and fought with them; some of
them they thrust down, and threw them backwards head-
long; others of them they met and slew; they also beat
many of those that went down the ladders again, and slew
them with their swords before they could bring their
shields to protect them; nay, some of the ladders they threw
down from above when they were full of armed men; a
great slaughter was made of the Jews also at the same
time, while those that bear the ensigns fought hard for
them, as deeming it a terrible thing, and what would tend
16
to their great shame, if they permitted them to be stolen
away.
9
After this slaughter and unsuccessful advance, the Romans
withdrew and debated how best they might penetrate the walls.
They finally decided to set fire to the large wooden gates and
wait until these portals were either sufficiently weakened or burned
through, so that the soldiers might force their way in. While wait-
ing for this conflagration to subside, the Romans consolidated
their position by advancing and encamping near the walls and
also clearing the road of large stones and rubble. These actions
made it possible for a lightning advance by the legion before the
Jews could make adequate preparations to defend themselves.
By the end of the second day all was in readiness, and the Ro-
mans battered their way through the fire-weakened gates. Many
of the Jews stood their ground and fought bravely to the end.
Other Jews who had battled for several hours and who had no
replacements retired to the inner court of the temple to gain a
much-needed rest. On hearing of this, Titus, the Roman com-
mander, resolved to storm the temple early the next day with his
entire army.
But as for that house, God had, for certain, long ago
doomed it to the fire; and now that fatal day was come,
according to the revolution of ages, it was the tenth day
of the month Lous, (Ab,) upon which it was formerly burnt
by the king of Babylon; although these flames took their
rise from the Jews themselves, and were occasioned by
them; for upon Titus’s retiring, the seditious lay still for a
little while, and then attacked the Romans again, when
those that guarded the holy house fought with those that
quenched the fire that was burning the inner (court of the)
temple; but these Romans put the Jews to flight, and pro-
ceeded as far as the holy house itself. At which time one
17
of the soldiers, without staying for any orders, and with-
out any concern or dread upon him at so great an under-
taking, and being hurried on by a certain divine fury,
snatched somewhat out of the materials that were on fire,
and being lifted up by another soldier, he set fire to a golden
window, through which there was a passage to the rooms
that were round about the holy house, on the north side of
it. As the flames went upward, the Jews made a great
clamour, such as so mighty an affliction required, and ran
together to prevent it; and now they spared not their lives
any longer, nor suffered any thing to restrain their force,
since that holy house was perishing, for whose sake it
was that they kept such a guard about it.
10
Thus was the temple destroyed and with it many historic
records burned.
About four hundred years prior to this temple destruction, a
series of battles by Alexander the Great also reveals the Lord's
involvement. Alexander's father, Philip II, was assassinated in
336 B.C. at which time Alexander ascended to the throne. Be-
cause he was only twenty years old at the time of his accession
and was considered by many but a youth, Alexander quickly ex-
ecuted his enemies and rivals in order to consolidate his power.
New Year’s Day in 336 B.C., the year of Alexander’s accession
to power, fell on a Friday. Because the Lord chose Alexander to be a
great military leader, this calendar pattern, of course, would be con-
sistent with those associated with the great wars of history.
In 335 B.C., a year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a
Tuesday, Alexander advanced into Thrace. From here, he crossed
the Danube and put to flight a coalitian of Illyrians who had in-
vaded Macedonia.
In 334 B.C., a year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a
Saturday, Alexander set out to conquer the Persians. It was in
this year that the well-known battle of Granicus occurred. Al-
18
though Alexander’s army was much smaller than that of his Per-
sian opponents, he quickly set them to flight.
In the 331, B.C., a year beginning with a Sunday New Year’s
Day, the battle of Gaugamela was fought. Many historians con-
sider this to be not only the most important battle of Alexander’s
career, but also the greatest battle of the ancient world. Ben-
jamin Wheeler, in his book Alexander the Great, gives us an in-
sight of this battle.
On the morning of October 1 (331 B.C.) the two armies
stood arrayed against each other. The Macedonian force
numbered about forty thousand infantry and seven thou-
sand cavalry. It sufficed only to oppose the centre of the
enemy’s line. Far out beyond either wing, ominously men-
acing the flanks, this line extended. Not by force of num-
bers, however, nor by weight of masses was this battle to
be won, but by dispositon of troops and direction of the
thrust. . . .
To protect his line from being surrounded, Alexander
set a reserve column in the rear of each flank, so that by
facing about it could meet an attack on the flank or rear.
He prepared as usual to open his attack by a charge of the
picked cavalry, the hetairoi, against the left of the enemy’s
centre. The question was one of finding precisely the point
to strike, and he watched his opportunity with the eye of a
hawk until the point developed. He began by a sidewise
movement of his line to the right. The Persians followed
suit, shifting toward the left and keeping their left wing
still far beyond his right. . . .
The shifting of the Persian line to the left had opened
a gap in their front. Alexander saw his opportunity at a
glance. Massing his attacking force, a part of the pha-
lanx, headed by the hetairoi cavalry, by a quick manoeu-
vre, into a flying wedge, he turned sharply with an ob-
19
lique movement to the left, smote at the opening, and burst
into the midst of the very centre of the host, straight to-
ward the spot where the Shah was posted... The Shah,
whose charioteer was pierced by a spear, turned and fled
for his life. The first rank reeled back upon the second,
which in the sudden panic gave it no support, but was
instantly in confusion and directly in flight. The whole
centre and the left, struck by the cavalry of the right wing,
melted away. . . . A few moments of standstill, then came
the break and turn, and before Alexander had reached the
scene the Persian right had joined the rest of the vast army
in furious, confused, disgraceful flight. . . .
11
The young Alexander succeeded not only because of his mili-
tary ability but also because the Lord determined that he should
succeed. The calendar patterns within which Alexander made
his conquests are the evidence which support this fact. Alexander,
himself, believed that a Divine Being was assisting him.
There was, finally, evidence that God was on their
side, for He had put it into Darius’s mind to move his
forces to a place where his vast multitude would be use-
less, whereas the Macedonian phalanx had room enough
to display its full power.
12
Eight hundred and sixty years after Alexander’s rout of the
Persians at Gaugamela, another young general, Belisarius, was
also engaged in battle with a Persian army. Belisarius was twenty-
five years old at the time, and this was to be his first major con-
frontation. Earlier he had been honored by having had bestowed
on him by the Emperor Justinian I, the title: General of the East,
and it was imperative that he win this battle in order to be worthy
of such a designation.
20
The Emperor Justinian I now conferred upon
Belisarius the title of General of the East. Thereupon
Belisarius assembled an army of twenty-five thousand men
at Daras, consisting of Romans and allies, the latter being
mainly Massagetae. He was soon confronted by a Per-
sian army of forty thousand men under Perozes the Mihran,
who sent an insolent message to Belisarius, asking him to
have his bath prepared for the morrow, as he would need
that kind of refreshment after taking Daras. .
The Persian reinforcement arrived the next morning;
and after some exchange of messages with Belisarius,
Perozes placed his infantry in the center and his cavalry
upon each wing, as the Romans had also done, and ar-
ranged his infantry so that one-half should from time to
time relieve the other half, after which he assailed the
Romans with a shower of darts and arrows. The Romans
replied with their missile weapons; but the Persians had
the advantage of numbers, and were protected by huge
wattled shields, while they were also more accustomed to
this style of warfare than the Romans. The Romans con-
tinued their resistance; and when the missile weapons on
both sides became exhausted, and a closer fight began
along the entire line with swords and spears, the Romans
fought to more advantage. . . .
Then the Persian corps of the Immortals and other
troops furiously charged the Roman right and forced it to
a hasty retreat, but the pursuing Persian column was cut
in two by an impetuous charge of the barbarian cavalry in
the Roman army, thus deciding the battle in favor of the
Romans. Those Persians who advanced farthest were
completely surrounded and slain. The fall of the stan-
dard-bearer of Baresmanes, the commander of the Per-
sian left, increased the general confusion; and the Persian
column vainly attempted an orderly retreat. The Romans
21
attacked it in front and on both flanks, and a frightful car-
nage ensued. Baresmanes was slain by Sunicas, the
Massa-Goth; whereupon the entire Persian army broke
and fled, leaving five thousand dead, among whom were
many of the Immortals.
13
New Year’s Day in the year A.D. 530, the year of this battle,
fell on a Saturday.
After the Nika revolt in 532, Justinian began to extend the
boundaries of his empire westward. Some scholars feel that he
had visions of restoring Rome to her ancient glory. Others dis-
pute this by saying that he wanted simply to conquer the Vandals
in Africa. Be that as it may, Belisarius again assembled his troops
and in June 533,
. . .when the stone piers of the Hagia Sophia were rising
within the scaffolding, the Patriach and the Emperor went
in procession down to the shore at the tip of the palace
point. Icons were carried behind them above waving
myrtle branches. Marching choirs joined their voices in
the refrain, . . .
Then the robed Patriach Epiphanius gave his blessing
to the war galley moored close in shore. When the men
on the galley shouted response and ran up the square sail,
the upper part of the sail was seen to be painted scarlet.
Atop the short mast a great lantern was secured. This
vessel, carrying Count Belisarius and his staff and navi-
gators, would guide the convoy of ships to Africa. The
scarlet-tipped sail would mark it in daylight, the mast-
head light in darkness.
14
After departing from Constantinople with great fanfare, the
fleet anchored briefly off Sicily and finally reached Africa in the
beginning of September. Because Gelimer, the Vandal King, had
22
not prepared for this assault, the landing of the troops went unop-
posed. With such good fortune bestowed on him, Belisarius
wasted no time in assembling his troops. He marched rapidly
towards Carthage and on September 13, defeated Gelimer. The
next day he entered Carthage and partook of the feast that had
been prepared for the Vandal King.
Two years after this conquest, Belisarius was sent forth to
take over the island of Sicily from the Goths. His fleet was well
outfitted for the trip, and his troops were in high spirits.
Again Belisarius had been given overriding authority
as Autocrater. And the councilors had weighed the risks
with him. “Land where you landed before,” they told him,
“as if some accident made you put in to Sicily. There the
Goths will suspect nothing. Occupy the island if you can
do so without trouble. If you run into trouble, forget it,
and go on to Africa. . . .”
Belisarius carried out his part perfectly. Landing again
at Catana, he sent detachments of his soldiers sight-see-
ing, and in doing so they seized the weapons of the scat-
tered Gothic outposts. He took over Syracuse from its
surprised commander. . . .
With zest the diligent Procopius relates how Belisarius
paraded into Syracuse on the last day of his year as Con-
sul. He rode in with a silver organ sounding, tossing gold
coins to the inhabitants. It was a bloodless and resound-
ing victory.
15
In 536 Belisarius stormed Naples and in 536-37 he took Rome.
The conquests of Belisarius in the years 533-537 occurred in
a similar patterns as other wars.
Many centuries after the battles of Belisarius had faded into
history, one of the smallest yet most significant wars in history
began. This was the American Revolutionary War. For many
23
years the new American settlements, which were scattered along
the East Coast, were friendly with their mother country. How-
ever, over a period of time a series of acts developed by the Brit-
ish were imposed on the new colonists. At first these acts were
a mere annoyance, but as one act followed another in rapid-fire
succession, the colonists’ smoldering concepts of revolution
turned into flames of war.
The first important act was the British decision in 1763 to
keep a standing army in North America. The colonists were not
consulted about this move.
To make matters worse, in October of 1763, the British drew up
a proclamation which recognized the Indians as the sole owners of
the colonists’ land. This was bitterly opposed by many colonists.
Several other acts legislated by the British, which were cer-
tain to increase tension were the Navigation Acts, the Revenue or
Sugar Acts, the Quartering and Stamp Acts, and the Townshend
Acts.
In 1770 the Boston Massacre occurred, and in 1773 the Tea
Act was passed. It was because of this latter act that the well-
known Boston Tea Party was formed.
By 1774 when the Intolerable or Coercive Acts were passed
the die was cast and war was inevitable. It was not long before a
move could be made which would precipitate the revolution. This
move came as a result of a decision drafted by the British Cabi-
net and sent to Lt. Gen. Thomas Gage, Commander in Chief in
North America. On Apr. 14, 1775, Gage received orders to use
force in Massachusetts.
The date, April 14, 1775, is a significant date in history be-
cause in the year 1775 that date and Nisan 14 coincided. In the
year A.D. 30, Nisan 14 was the date on which the Lord Himself
was crucified, and seventeen centuries later on the anniversary of
that date, General Gage received his marching orders! This con-
sistency in dates reveals with a certainty the Lord’s involvement
in the American Revolution.
24
In addition to this evidence showing the Lord’s involvement
in the revolution, the following day, April 15, coincided with Nisan
15, the Passover Feast Day. The Passover Feast Day was one of
the holy convocation days that the Lord set apart in the year of
the Exodus. It was on this day in 1775 that the Patriot leaders in
Boston learned of General Gage’s preparations and took steps to
counter them. New Year’s Day in 1775 was wholly consistent
with the New Year’s Days for the years in which other major
wars began, for New Year’s Day in 1775 fell on a Saturday.
The dust had barely settled from the American Revolution
before another revolution began, this time in the Old World. Over
the years in western Europe subtle changes were occurring which
contributed to the removal of the feudal regimes. Nowhere was
this more apparent than in France. As the eighteenth century was
drawing to a close, a rapidly expanding unrest was building among
the people of France. This increasing unrest exploded into a great
revolution.
Several factors contributed to this violent upheaval. One was
the fact that France had the largest population in Europe and could
not feed it adequately. Two, the peasants were tired of support-
ing the old feudal system. Three, the peasants observing the suc-
cesses of the American colonists against the British Empire were
encouraged to revolt and bring down their own system of gov-
ernment.
The American Revolution had been costly to the French, and
in 1787 the king’s treasury was empty. An assembly was con-
vened under the direction of the Controller General in hopes that
additional taxes could be levied. The plan failed, however, and
eventually led to a revolt of the so called “aristocratic bodies.”
During the spring and summer of 1788 there was unrest in many
cities of France, including Paris and Grenoble.
The Lord was involved in the beginning of the French Revo-
lution. New Year’s Day in the year 1788 fell on a Sunday, and in
1789, when the people of Paris stormed the Bastille, New Year’s
25
Day fell on a Friday.
It was not long after the French Revolution had begun that
the British and Americans were again battling one another. This
was in the War of 1812, which was declared by the United States
in June of that year. Significantly, New Year’s Day in 1812 fell
on a Saturday.
After the War of 1812 had ended, peace reigned for nearly a half
century before the American Civil War erupted. On February 8,
1861, seven southern states set up the Confederate States of America.
Consistent with other significant wars, this action was taken in a
year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Friday.
Throughout all of history major wars have occurred in spe-
cial patterns in the Lord’s calendar. These wars have been asso-
ciated with special patterns because the Lord has intended that
they do so. Although the Lord has considered a variety of pat-
terns in determining war beginnings, it appears from a study of
His calendar that He favors one pattern in particular. That is the
Friday-Saturday pattern. A sampling of wars reveals this pattern
in both the Old and New Testament periods.
Wars & Battles
Year Event V.E. Nisan 1
B.C. 334 Battle of Granicus Mon. Sat.
(May/June) March 26 March 17
B.C. 333 Battle of Issus (Autumn) Tue. Fri.
March 25 April 4
A.D. 66 Jewish War began Sat. Sat.
March 22 March 15
A.D. 70 Temple Destroyed Thu. Sat.
March 22 March 31
A.D. 476 Odoacer proclaimed king Fri. Fri.
(Aug. 23) March 19 March 12
26
Wars & Battles (cont.)
Year Event V.E. Nisan 1
A.D. 489 Theodoric conquered Sun. Sun.
Odoacer. March 19 March 19
A.D. 527 Justinian became sole Fri. Fri.
emperor (Aug. 1) March 19 March 19
A.D. 535 Belisarius subdues Italy Mon. Tue.
March 19 March 20
A.D. 1775 American Revolutionary Mon. Sat.
War began March 20 April 1
A.D. 1812 War of 1812 Fri. Sat.
March 20 March 14
Of this sampling of wars, several began with a Friday or Sat-
urday pattern. The two years that did not do so, A.D. 489 and
A.D. 535 contained a different pattern, one in which the vernal
equinox, new moon, and New Year's Day in each year occurred
within 24 hours. In both instances the Lord was involved in ma-
jor events in history. In the book of Jeremiah the Lord Himself
tells us of His involvement in these events. “Lo, I will bring a
nation upon you from far, O house of Israel, saith the Lord: . . .”
16
Again, He says, “Hear O earth: behold, I will bring evil upon this
people, even the fruit of their thoughts, because they have not
hearkened unto my words, nor to my law, but rejected it.”
17
The special and consistent patterns in the Lord’s calendar in
which the major wars have occurred throughout history are clearly
the evidence of the Lord’s involvement in the affairs of the world.
From this we can deduce that the Lord has been and is involved
in significant world events.
The fact that the Lord has been involved in major wars, how-
ever, does not necessarily mean that major wars must always oc-
cur. In the book of Leviticus the Lord promises that the nations
and peoples who obey Him shall dwell in peace.


27
If ye walk in my statutes, and keep my commandments,
and do them; Then I will give you rain in due season, and
the land shall yield her increase, and the trees of the field
shall yield their fruit. And your threshing shall reach unto
the vintage, and the vintage shall reach unto the sowing
time: and ye shall eat your bread to the full, and dwell in
your land safely. And I will give peace in the land, and ye
shall lie down, and none shall make you afraid: . . .
18
28
Chapter II
NATURAL DISASTERS
Of all the natural disasters with which mankind must con-
tend, none can be more frightening than the earthquake. The
hurricane and cyclone signal their approach by their whistling
winds. Even the fast-moving tornado with its silhouetted black
funnel screams a warning for all to seek safety. This is not often
so with the earthquake, for the earthquake often gives no warn-
ing and frequently strikes its death blow in the still of night.
Many scientists have worked long hours trying to locate the
cause of earthquakes. Some seismologists theorize that changes
in the earth’s magnetic field may cause the tectonic plates to shift.
Others believe that the gravitational pull of the moon on the earth’s
surface may contribute to a shifting of these plates. Others feel
that the continental drift builds up tremendous pressures deep
within the crust causing the edge of one plate to slip past another
which may cause a violent shaking at the earth’s surface.
Other phenomena that seem to precede tremor or quake ac-
tivity are the electrical conductivity of the earth’s surface rocks,
an increase in radon in deep well water, and increased water pres-
sure within the earth.
The Chinese have noted that shortly before a large earthquake
strikes, dogs tend to whine and bark, and farm animals show un-
usual behavior patterns. Is it possible that sounds and vibrations
that are imperceptible to humans are being sensed by these ani-
mals and account for their strange behavior? Milk maids, when
drawing water from a well have noted a marked change in the
level of the well water shortly before a large tremor or quake.
Frank W. Lane in The Elements Rage relates that “Millennia
ago the ancients, who knew nothing of scientific investigation,
developed a number of theories to account for earthquakes. The
Algonquin Indians believed that a great tortoise supported the
29
earth and that when the earth shook he was shuffling his feet.
The Mongolians believed that earthquakes were caused by a pig.
Early Japanese believed that quakings in the earth were caused
by a spider. Later Japanese theorists thought a giant catfish was
responsible for the quaking.”
1
A quite different view of earthquakes was held by those who
lived in the Middle East. They believed in a Creator God and
attributed major earthquakes and other disasters to Him. Sup-
port for such an idea came about because of the Great Flood of
Noah’s day and the later destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah.
2
The belief in Divine retribution was reinforced centuries af-
ter these happenings when Moses, the leader of the Exodus, was
challenged by a band of rebels led by Korah, a Levite. The Scrip-
tures tell us that the Lord caused a violent earthquake to split
open a part of their wilderness habitat and swallow the malcon-
tents.
And the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed them
up, and their houses, and all the men that appertained
unto Korah, and all their goods. They, and all that apper-
tained to them, went down alive into the pit, and the earth
closed upon them: and they perished from among the
congregation.
3
The earthquake was not always used by the Lord to de-
stroy people’s lives and property. Sometimes the earthquake was
a display of His mighty power when something of especial sig-
nificance to Him was taking place here on earth. When He de-
scended to the peak of Mount Sinai to give His law, the Ten Com-
mandments, to the world, the mount shook violently.
And mount Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because
the LORD descended upon it in fire: and the smoke thereof
ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount
quaked greatly.
4
30
Another momentous event to the Almighty was the death of
His Son, Jesus Christ, on the cross. The Scriptures record that at
the very moment of Jesus’ death “...the veil of the temple was
rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake,
and the rocks rent; . . .”
5
Again at Jesus’ resurrection, “...there was a great earthquake:
for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven, and came and
rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it.”
6
Has the Lord truly played a role in the earthquakes that over-
threw the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah and for the earth’s quak-
ing at Sinai and Golgotha? If so, has His involvement been lim-
ited to only those long ago quakes, or has He been involved in
quakes of recent times?
An answer to these questions can be gleaned from a study of
several large earthquakes beginning with the mighty Alaska quake.
The Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964 was the most power-
ful American earthquake ever recorded. It began at 5:36 p.m. and
lasted about four minutes. During this period of time, as the earth
heaved and rolled, giant fissures formed, landslides occurred and
the water in the bays and harbors violently sloshed about. A gi-
ant earthslide destroying seventy-five or more houses occurred
in Anchorage’s Turnagin Heights. In many of these homes, fami-
lies had just begun their evening meal when they felt the steep
bluff give way and their homes slipping and sliding toward the
sea.
Probably the most poignant response to the battering from
the earthquake was given by a 16-year-old girl. She and her mother
rushed from their home, and as the ground heaved under them,
she broke into a mumbled prayer: “Lord, that’s enough now.
Please stop it.”
7
Evidently the girl was correct in attributing this
earthquake to the Lord, for the earthquake occurred near sunset
on March 27 (Nisan 13), which, at Jerusalem time was Nisan 14,
the day of Jesus crucifixion.
Another earthquake that apparently did not happen by chance
31
but occurred because the Lord intended it to happen was the Chihli,
China quake of September 27, 1290.
8
In that year in the Lord’s
calendar, three significant alignments occurred. One, the new
moon that began the Bible calendar for that year occurred within
twenty-four hours of the vernal equinox. Two, the New Year’s
Day itself fell on the day of the equinox, and three, the date of the
earthquake, September 27, coincided with Tisri 22, the last day
of the Feast of Tabernacles.
9
One of the most written about earthquakes in the United States
is the great San Francisco quake. No alarm clocks were needed
on that fateful April morning in 1906. At precisely 5:13 a.m. on
April 18, sleeping San Franciscans were jolted awake by a mighty
shock which announced the arrival of the big one. For six min-
utes San Francisco rocked and swayed as wave after wave of
seismic shocks assaulted the city. Countless explosions rent the
air and flames spread rapidly as gas lines burst and kerosene lamps
toppled onto hot woodstoves. Screams and groans from trapped
and injured victims pierced the dawn. No military assault in those
days could have destroyed a city so quickly. What had been just
a few moments before a peaceful haven quickly became a hell on
earth.
April 18, the date of this quake was Nisan 24 in the Lord's
calendar. It was on Nisan 24 that the prophet Daniel received a
vision in 536 B.C.
This monstrous earthquake in San Francisco was followed in
the same year by another huge quake in Valparaiso, Chile.
10
The
Chile quake which happened on August 16 was responsible for
the loss of 20,000 lives. A significant aspect of these two quakes
is that they took place 120 days apart. The number120 is alluded
to in Genesis 6:3 where the Lord says that “his (mankind’s) days
shall be an hundred and twenty years.” The number 120 also
contains three consecutive 40-day periods.
The 40-day periods are frequently set apart by the Lord and
appear often in His Word. The Lord caused the rain for the Great
32
Flood to last a full 40 days and nights (Gen. 7:17). He retained
Moses on the summit of Mount Sinai for a period of 40 days and
40 nights (Ex. 24:18). An angel commanded the prophet Elijah
to journey to Mount Horeb to receive a message from the Lord.
That journey took 40 days (1Ki. 19:8), and Jesus’ temptation in
the wilderness lasted 40 days (Matt. 4:2).
In addition to being locked into these 40-day periods, the San
Francisco earthquake was also tied in to another special number,
the number 153, for the earthquake occurred on the 153rd day
before September 18. September 18 was the day of the new moon
for Tisri 1. Tisri 1 was the New Year’s Day for the civil calendar
year. In an earlier incident in the Lord’s use of this same number,
the Lord in 592 B.C. made a second appearance to the prophet
Ezekiel. This appearance occurred on the 153rd day after Nisan
1.
11
This number also appears in the Gospel of John in a story
relating to Jesus’ meeting with His disciples at the Sea of Galilee.
John relates that sometime after the Lord had risen, His dis-
ciples discovered that their provisions were nearly depleted.
12
Because of this, they went to the Sea of Galilee and entering into
a boat cast forth their nets. They fished throughout the night but
did not catch anything. As the soft light of dawn lightened the
sky, they saw Jesus standing on the shore, but, perhaps because
of the distance, they did not recognize Him. Shortly, Jesus called
to them inquiring about the size of their catch. They informed
Him that they had not caught any fish. On hearing this, Jesus
commanded them to cast the net from the other side of the vessel,
which they did. Almost instantly the net was filled to the break-
ing point. Later, after drawing the net to the shore and emptying
it, they found that it held 153 fish.
13
In all three instances, Ezekiel’s vision, the netting of the fish,
and the San Francisco quake, the Lord used the number 153 as a
means to reveal His power over nature. In the book of Ezekiel,
He demonstrated His power in the heavens by a miraculous ap-
pearance to that prophet on the 153rd day after Nisan 1. In John,
33
He revealed His power over the sea by determining that 153 fish
should be netted by His disciples as He stood on the shore after
His resurrection, and in the San Francisco earthquake He dis-
played His power over the land by causing that quake to occur on
the 153rd day prior to Tisri 1. These three happenings cannot be
attributed to mere coincidences, for they not only were unrelated
but also were many centuries apart.
Another earthquake that reveals signs of the Lord’s involvement
was the great Japan earthquake of September 1, 1923.
14
This mon-
strous quake of magnitude 8.3 wiped out at the very least the lives of
100,000 people and quite possibly double that number. The quake
struck at noon and rocked the city for about six minutes. During this
period of violent shaking, gas lines burst setting ablaze in a matter of
minutes the city of Tokyo.
Simultaneously with the first shock many buildings collapsed
killing and trapping startled and frightened inhabitants. Because
in many homes the noon meals were being prepared over open
flames, the collapsing tinder-dry bamboo structures contributed
greatly to the spread of the inferno. The scorching flames not
only produced gale force winds which raged across the city, but
also consumed much of the oxygen, suffocating large numbers
who could not escape.
The intense heat drove many to seek refuge in Tokyo Bay, but
this safe haven was short-lived. The quake had triggered a tsu-
nami which rose its ugly head and swept the struggling survivors
back over the land from which they had escaped. Many were
killed instantly when the wave slammed them into trees and struc-
tures in its path.
This disastrous rampage of the elements cannot be solely at-
tributed to nature. Obviously, nature played a role here, but this
role was one that was subservient to the will of the Creator. The
Lord decreed that this earthquake should occur in a significant
pattern in His calendar, and it did so, for it occurred on the 153rd
day after the Passover Feast Day.
34
The Passover Feast Day commands a role in yet another ma-
jor earthquake; the Peruvian quake of May 31, 1970. That quake
devastated parts of Peru on the seventieth day after the Passover
Feast Day. The number seventy often stands out in the Scrip-
tures. In the book of Jeremiah, the Lord informs Jeremiah that
He intends to punish Judah for a seventy-year period. “And this
whole land shall be a desolation, and an astonishment; and these
nations shall serve the king of Babylon seventy years.”
15
In the book of Daniel this number represents a time period
which contains clues denoting when the Messiah should appear.
“Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy
holy city, to finish the transgression, . . . and to anoint the most
Holy.”
16
It is no coincidence that the Peru earthquake struck on the
seventieth day after the Passover Feast Day. It happened on that
day because the Lord intended that it do so.
Early news reports indicated that hundreds and perhaps thou-
sands died in the quake. Huaras, a city of 22,000, 175 miles
north of Lima, reported 140 dead. Ninety percent of the homes
and commercial buildings were destroyed in the quake and the
accompanying aftershocks.
On June 3, the public health ministry said floods triggered by
Peru’s devastating earthquake may have killed more than 17,000
persons in the Andes city of Yungay.
Final estimates indicate that the death toll was nearly 67,000.
It was certainly a destructive quake.
Another large and violent earthquake that destroyed much
property and took many lives was the great Lisbon, Portugal quake.
This earthquake struck on November 1, 1755, which was All
Saints Day. Because it was a special holy day, the churches were
filled to capacity. About the midst of the services came the first
shock, hurling timbers, beams, roof trusses, and walls onto the
worshipers. Many were trapped and mangled while others were
killed outright. Over three-fourths of the buildings in the city
35
were destroyed, causing tens of thousands of lives to be lost. A
second shock a short while later destroyed many additional build-
ings and killed thousands more.
To escape the rapidly spreading flames, many fled to the quay
area of the River Tagus. This was no safe haven, for shortly after
they had arrived a seismic sea wave forty or more feet in height
rolled over the quay killing additional thousands.
Although the Richter Scale was not in use at that time, scien-
tists speculate that the Lisbon quake was of magnitude 8 or greater.
The shock waves from this quake spread over an area of a
million or more square miles. They were felt as far south as the
West Indies and as far west as the New England states.
Because the Lisbon earthquake was followed by a dark day
in 1780 and a meteor shower in 1833, some feel that it was to
this quake that the book of Revelation was referring in the sixth
chapter.
And I beheld when he had opened the sixth seal, and,
lo, there was a great earthquake; and the sun became black
as sackcloth of hair, and the moon became as blood; And
the stars of heaven fell unto the earth, even as a fig tree
casteth her untimely figs, when she is shaken of a mighty
wind.
17
The Lisbon earthquake occurred 80 days, two 40-day peri-
ods, after Elul. 5. Elul 5 was the anniversary date of Ezekiel's
second vision in 592 B.C.
In addition to earthquakes, other forms of disasters have also
occurred on significant Bible calendar dates. In the year 1932,
for example, a series of more than twenty violent tornadoes swept
through Alabama, destroying property and taking many lives. This
series of deadly tornadoes began on March 21, which in 1932
was the date Nisan 14, which was the anniversary date of Jesus’
crucifixion. Moreover, the tornadoes continued into the next day,
Nisan 15, as well, which was the date of the Passover Feast Day.
36
These tornadoes were extremely powerful and wreaked much
havoc. Radio and press reports indicated that much of Northport
was destroyed. National guardsmen patrolled the ruins and no
one was allowed to enter without a permit. Rescuers worked
long into the night to extricate trapped victims. Often superhu-
man effort was required to lift the heavy timbers from the in-
jured. It was of utmost importance to work with speed, yet the
workers were forced to work agonizingly slowly lest in remov-
ing a weight, a much heavier structure should shift a few inches
and crush those trapped. Whenever possible, tow trucks or even
automobiles assisted in lifting or skidding heavy framework aside.
Electricians worked feverishly to restore electrical services, and
temporary telephone lines were draped over tree limbs or large
bushes. Other workers joined firemen in controlling fires. Uni-
versity students cut classes to assist in helping the injured and to
return the area to some form of normalcy.
The fact that these tornadoes were associated with meaning-
ful dates in the Lord’s calendar would appear to indicate that the
Lord Himself played a role in their development. The book of
Nahum tells us that “. . .the Lord hath his way in the whirlwind
and in the storm, . . .”
18
In April 1936, four years after the Alabama tornadoes, an-
other series of tornadoes ripped through the South. These storms
slammed into Tupelo, Mississippi, and Gainesville, Georgia. A
most significant fact is that these tornadoes struck on Nisan 14,
the anniversary date of Jesus’ crucifixion.
Again, many deaths and considerable damage were the result
of the deadly twisters which slashed through these cities. Re-
portedly, the storm first struck LaCrosse, Arkansas, then rolled
east into Tupelo, in northeast Mississippi. In Tupelo, many fires
ignited and burned intensely, being force-fed by the many twisted
and broken gas lines. These fires seriously hampered rescue work-
ers. No one will ever know the number of trapped victims who
could have been saved but succumbed to the flames.
37
Only a few hours after the Tupelo disaster, a vicious tornado
snaked its way through Gainesville, Georgia. Gainesville’s busi-
ness district was devastated by the tornado and accompanying
fires which trapped workers just after they had reported for duty.
City fireman G. M. Loggins estimated from 80 to 100 per-
sons were killed, at least 700 injured and damage in excess of
$5,000,000.
To make matters worse, on April 7, the devastated area was
threatened by rain-swollen rivers.
One of the most destructive American tornadoes of all time oc-
curred in the spring of the year 1925. At about 1 p.m. on March 18,
this storm formed and blasted its way through southeast Missouri. It
continued on a rampage through Illinois and into Indiana.
The toll of this great tristate tornado was: 689 people
killed, 1,980 injured, and property losses of some 17 mil-
lion dollars. Some 3,000 houses were destroyed or dam-
aged and four small towns practically wiped out.
19
Its forward speed was reported to be nearly 60 miles per hour.
This high forward speed would account for the tornado catching
so many people unprepared. Like a fast-moving freight train, it
had entered and departed a town before the inhabitants could per-
ceive what had happened. Many, of course, never knew what
had struck them.
Billye and Walter Brown in their book Hurricanes and Tor-
nadoes relate that more than 150 of 200 city blocks were de-
stroyed in Murphysboro, Illinois, in a matter of minutes. Two
hundred and thirty-four people were killed and another 800 in-
jured. Eleven huge steam locomotives were flipped onto their
sides in the railroad yard.
20
Forty years after this monster had completed its deadly work,
a series of more than three dozen tornadoes ripped through the
midwest. It was impossible to keep an accurate record of the
38
number of twisters that actually formed. Some sources list a low
of thirty-seven, while others record that as many as forty-five
appeared.
It was on Palm Sunday, April 11, 1965, that the frightful at-
tack began. After attending church, many homeowners took ad-
vantage of the balmy, spring-like weather to wash windows and
install screens. Others prepared back yard plots for spring plant-
ing. Boating enthusiasts struck out for nearby lakes and ponds
for relaxation. Friendly neighbors gossiped over white picket
fences as children wobbled unsteadily on their bikes on nearby
streets. As the day wore on, ominous black clouds formed over-
head and short powerful wind gusts rattled windows and shook
wood-frame houses. Powerful lightning bolts blasted earthward
accompanied by loud claps of thunder. Suddenly, at about 1:20
p.m. the first funnel dipped down near Dubuque, Iowa. It raced
across open farmland zigzagging here and there striking farm af-
ter farm. It smashed barns and houses alike snapping timbers
and beams as if they were matchsticks. Many farm animals were
destroyed by this onslaught.
About two hours after the first attack, several twisters formed
to the east in Illinois. They raced through Rockford, Dixon, and
Algonquin. At Crystal Lake, the hardest hit Illinois town, a tor-
nado ripped through the Fox River Valley uprooting trees, snap-
ping off electric light poles and smashing houses.
From Illinois the tornado system bore down on Indiana. By
now many in Indiana had seen and heard news reports on televi-
sion and radio of the devastation in Illinois. When they saw the
sky darken, many tossed their luggage into their cars, packed in
their families and headed south. But it was too late for some.
The twisters bore down on the slower moving vehicles and blew
several off the highways. Other vehicles were lifted and thrown
aside injuring or killing the occupants. Neither homes, factories,
filling stations nor churches were spared.
After charging through Indiana, the mass of twisters split up;
39
one group assaulting northern Ohio and the other battering Michi-
gan. In a brief ten-hour period, more than 250 people were killed,
thousands were injured, and countless numbers were left home-
less. Property damage estimates ranged as high as $200,000,000.
These three dozen or more tornadoes slashed through the
midwest in a special year. Nisan 1, in 1965 fell on April 3, which
in the Gregorian or new style calendar is the anniversary of Jesus'
crucifixion. In the Julian calendar of Jesus' day the crucifixion
date was April 5, but since the equinox occurs two days earlier in
the new style calendar of today, then April 3 is the date which
now represents the anniversary of Jesus' crucifixion.
Another type of storm equally as destructive as the tornado,
and at times even more destructive than the twister, is the hurri-
cane. The tornado usually cuts a narrow path of destruction, of-
ten less than a hundred yards wide. Usually its forward travel is
limited to a few miles or less, though there have been some no-
table exceptions to this. The hurricane, in contrast to the tor-
nado, often travels hundreds of miles in distance and devastates
an area of fifty or more miles in width. Moreover, the hurricane
in coastal areas can cause extensive flooding and be accompa-
nied by giant sea waves.
A death-dealing hurricane of exactly this type pounded
Galveston, Texas, unmercifully in the year 1900.
Galveston is an island located off the Texas coast. It is twenty-
eight miles long and about three miles across at its widest point.
In 1900, the year the hurricane struck, the highest point of land
on the entire island was not more than fifteen feet above sea level.
In many places the land elevation was five feet or less above the
high water mark. These extremely low elevations made the is-
land vulnerable to much flooding and damage should a heavy
storm hit.
The city of Galveston was located on the northeast end of the
island. Many of the buildings were low, one-story structures hav-
ing slate roofs. This heavier roofing material replaced light-weight
40
wooden shingles following a fire which years earlier had raced
through the city.
The inhabitants of Galveston felt secure on their island in
1900. Seasonal storms would come and go, and they appeared to
pose no threat. Often during the height of a storm hundreds would
stroll to the beaches to watch and listen to the pounding of the
surf. Barefooted children would frolic on the wet-packed sand
often racing a wave as it rushed shoreward.
The month of September, 1900 was ushered in with several
pleasant, balmy days. It was ideal weather for swimming and
picnicking, and scores headed for the beaches before the cold,
rainy weather of fall settled upon them. Families from the main-
land hitched up their wagons, rode to the beaches, and joined in
the pleasantries.
Few Galvestonians paid much attention to the hurricane off
to the east until Saturday, September 8. On arising that morning
the islanders could see ominous black clouds bearing down on
them and hear the angry pounding of surf in the distance. As the
day wore on the wind gusts increased in intensity and a heavy
downpour soaked those who dared venture outside.
By early evening hurricane winds were approaching one hun-
dred miles an hour, and angry surging waters were swirling into
homes. Frightened and screaming throngs of people struggled to
escape the horror. But there appeared to be no escape. All bridges
to the mainland had either been washed out or flooded.
To make the raging storm even more terrifying, if that were
possible, dusk melted into darkness and brilliant stabs of light-
ning accompanied by booming thunder illuminated the dreadful
scene. Wind-driven torrential rain added to the misery.
The hurricane turned the island into bedlam. By mid-evening
the storm surge sent a succession of giant waves across the is-
land. These waves swept entire families into the gulf. These
people were never to be seen or heard of again. Others were
badly mutilated as they were repeatedly slammed into trees and
41
buildings. In the darkness, boards, planks, and timbers became
deadly weapons as they were flung by wind and wave into many
who were trying to escape the storm’s fury.
In the city of Galveston there appeared to be no escaping death.
As the wind approached hurricane strength, it ripped the slate
tiles from the roofs and spun them through the air like rotating
knives cutting down all in their paths. Several people had either
legs or arms slashed by these lethal weapons. Several others were
nearly decapitated. Because of the darkness and the driving rain,
it was impossible to see these missiles coming.
While the benumbed residents struggled to keep from being
struck by these death-dealing tiles, monstrous waves rushed shore-
ward and crashed upon the hapless victims. It seemed that the
storm was determined to destroy them.
Meanwhile, Isaac Cline, head meteorologist at the Galveston
weather station, and Joseph his brother, made a number of trips
during the day to the bay and then to the gulf to observe condi-
tions in those areas. At 3:30 P.M., Cline records that gulf waters
had overflowed half the city. By that hour all telegraph wires
were down and only one phone line was operating. Joseph re-
turned to the weather station, and Isaac went home for lunch,
having been on duty since 5:00 A.M. He found the water waist
deep around his residence. Because his house was on a slightly
higher elevation than those of his neighbors, many of his neigh-
bors took refuge in the Cline homestead.
At about 7:30 P.M., Cline looked through the open doorway
at the raging water swirling about his home, when all of a sudden
a four-foot surge of water nearly engulfed him. He realized at
that moment that many on Galveston Island would never live to
see the light of day.
Later in the evening other huge waves carrying all sorts of
broken timbers and debris rolled across the island and slammed
into his house. Before this onslaught the house disintegrated and
its inhabitants were dumped into the angry waters. Cline, clutch-
42
ing tightly his wife and child managed in the blackness of the
night to grasp onto a part of a wall. Throughout much of the
night they stayed together, but in the early hours of the morning,
a large timber carried on the crest of a huge wave struck his wife
and knocked her from the make-shift raft. For a brief time, Cline
himself was knocked unconscious by it as well, but on reviving
he discovered that he still clutched the child tightly. During the
horror of the night hours that followed he clung to the baby tor-
mented by the belief that they were being swept out into the gulf.
As dawn filtered through the blackness of night and the storm
began to abate, Cline found his make-shift raft settling down on a
strip of high ground near the center of the island. What was more
unbelievable was that his brother and his two daughters grounded
but a short distance away.
He later found his wife’s body, but he never knew whether
she died from being struck by the timber or had drowned.
Once the storm had ended, the grim task of clean-up began.
Thousands of tons of debris were strewn about the island. Inter-
mingled with the debris were the remains of thousands of the
dead. Many bodies were mutilated beyond recognition. As dazed
survivors searched for their loved ones, work crews loaded wag-
ons with the grisly remains and dumped them miles out into the
gulf. To speed up the process of removing the dead and to pre-
vent an occurrence of the plague hundreds of bodies were stacked
one upon the other and set afire. The stench from these burning
funeral pyres overspread much of the gulf coastal area.
This powerful storm, which battered Galveston on Septem-
ber 8-9, 1900, did so 153 days after Nisan 9-10. Nisan 9 was the
date on which the Lord entered the town of Bethany in prepara-
tion for His triumphal entry into the Holy City, and Nisan 10 was
the actual date on which the triumphal entry occurred.
Nearly sixty-nine years after the Galveston disaster, another
powerful hurricane whalloped the gulf-coastal region. This was
hurricane Camille, which slammed into the Mississippi coast on
43
the night of August 17, 1969.
Camille charged inland with its center just west of the city of
Gulfport. Shrieking winds with gusts of up to 200 miles an hour
devastated coastal and inland regions. Trees and light poles were
snapped off as easily as one might break a wooden toothpick. All
electric power was lost and roads became impassable because of
downed wires. Those who chose to ride out the storm in their
homes and not flee inland before the storm’s arrival were sub-
jected to an indescribable night of terror.
The homes in the coastal region, as in the Galveston storm,
received a double punch. What the winds could not destroy the
tidal surge could. And it did.
In Pass Christian, twenty-three people lost their lives because
they rejected two different warnings from police to leave the
Richelieu Apartment house. They chose to stay and hold a hurri-
cane party. It was their last party. Sometime during that night of
terror, a giant wave or series of waves slid over the seawall and
destroyed the apartment complex. All lives were lost.
As the storm moved inland, the hurricane winds abated,
though the torrential rain continued. Much flooding occurred in
the Virginias because of this.
Richard M. DeAngelis of the Environmental Data Service
and Elmer R. Nelson of the United States Weather Bureau wrote
the following summary of Camille.
Hurricane Camille ranks high as one of the most de-
structive killer storms ever to hit the U.S. Total damage
has been estimated at $1.42 billion with 258 deaths and
68 additional persons missing. . .
21
This killer hurricane pummeled Pass Christian on Elul 5. This
date was the anniversary date of the prophet Ezekiel’s second
vision. Interestingly enough, the Lord tells Ezekiel in that vision
that “Therefore will I also deal in fury: mine eye shall not spare,
44
neither will I have pity: and though they cry in mine ears with a
loud voice, yet will I not hear them.”
22
Is it possible that this Old Testament warning to Israel on
Elul 5 also applied to the Gulf Coast when Camille smashed into
that area on the identical date?
45
Chapter III
THE CRUCIFIXION AND
RESURRECTION
The Lord works within selected calendar patterns when con-
trolling the major events in history. He works in this fashion
because He is a highly intelligent and organized being. He does
not permit the events and happenings here on earth and in the
universe to occur by chance or in a slipshod manner. He plans
carefully and executes His will accordingly. The book of Gen-
esis reveals that the Creation itself was composed of a series of
consistent sequential steps, each step occurring at a higher level
than the preceding and culminating in the creation of the pro-
genitors of mankind, who were made in the very image of the
Eternal Himself.
1
A second reason for the Lord’s working within these calen-
dar patterns is to make it possible for us here on earth to under-
stand more fully His deep involvement in the affairs of mankind.
The Lord’s calendar enlightens one’s understanding of events in
history. It is one thing to consider that World War II began be-
cause of a sequence of events that made it possible for a mad-
man, Hitler, to become a leader who desired to conquer the world.
It is wholly another concept to understand that the sequence of
events that led up to Hitler’s ascendancy and the beginning of
World War II were happenings determined not by chance or acci-
dent but by the Almighty Himself.
In keeping within the consistency of His calendar patterns
the Lord made it a point in His earthly visitation nearly two mil-
lennia ago not to depart from the patterns He had founded in the
beginning but to function within them. That is why He rode tri-
umphantly into Jerusalem in A.D. 30 on the identical date on
which the Paschal Lambs were set aside in Old Testament times.
46
That date was Nisan 10 and is supported fully in the triumphal
entry passages in the Gospel of John.
Then Jesus six days before the passover came to
Bethany, . . . On the next day much people that were come
to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to
Jerusalem, Took branches of palm trees, and went forth
to meet him, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed is the King of
Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord.
2
Each year on Nisan 14, the chosen lambs were slaughtered,
and in A.D. 30 on that same date, Jesus died on the cross. Be-
cause Jesus, through His perfect and sinless life, represented the
most complete and absolute sacrifice possible, it was entirely fit-
ting that His triumphal entry on Nisan 10 and His crucifixion on
Nisan 14 should have occurred on these very significant dates.
Because of recent rapid advances in technology and knowl-
edge in general, it is now possible for us, with the aid of the
calendar patterns, to locate the precise date of the crucifixion
though nearly two millennia have passed. This is not as incred-
ible as it sounds. Many years ago the Arizona Indians may have
stumbled upon dinosaur skeletons, and if they considered them
at all, they probably assumed they were the remains of oversized
bison. Today, of course, paleontologists know better. These ex-
perts not only can distinguish the differences between a bison’s
skeleton and a dinosaur’s skeleton, but can often reassemble these
skeletons with little difficulty.
Realizing that the Lord’s calendar is a luni-solar calendar, we
in the twenty-first century are indeed fortunate to have at our
disposal the most complete and up-to-date series of calculations
of the phases of the moon ever produced. In the year 1973, Dr.
Herman Goldstine of the advanced study at Princeton, with the
assistance of an IBM 360 computer, printed a set of tables giving
the dates of all new and full moons from 1001 B.C. through A.D.
47
1651. His book, which is titled New and Full Moons 1001 B.C.
to A.D. 1651, is an exeptionally accurate record of these moon
phases for that period.
To complement Dr. Goldstine’s book, Dr. Owen Gingerich
and Barbara L. Welther of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for
Astrophysics in 1983 published a book titled Planetary, Lunar,
and Solar Positions New and Full Moons A.D. 1650 - 1805. This
book continues the calculations from the point at which Dr.
Goldstine’s work ended and lists the new moons to the beginning
of the nineteenth century.
The United States Naval Observatory completes the task with
circulars Nos. 112 and 119. Circular 112 gives phases of the
moon from the year A.D. 1800 through the year 1959. Circular
119 continues these phases from A.D. 1960 through 2003.
One of the most recent and extensive records listing the new
and full moons is that produced by Z2 Computer Solutions of
Bend, Oregon. This is a software program for IBM PC/AT com-
patible computers, which covers a range of 12,000 years from
4001 B.C. to A.D. 8000.
For centuries many have tried to pinpoint the true date and
year of Jesus’ crucifixion but have failed. They have failed for a
number of reasons. One reason for failure is that they have tried
to locate the crucifixion year by using the Jewish calendar of to-
day. This will not work. The Jewish calendar, though originally
the true Bible calendar, does not now fulfill that role. As time
has passed alterations have been made in that calendar by Hillel
II and others that destroy its reliability for locating the times and
dates of ancient happenings. Because of these alterations, the
present-day Jewish calendar instead of beginning with the new
moon as in the distant past now often begins two to three days
after the occurring of the new moon. If we are to truly locate the
true crucifixion year, we must use the original Old Testament
calendar and not one that was altered centuries later.
In Jesus’ day certain rules and procedures were adhered to in
48
the constructing of the Bible calendar. The Bible calendar was a
luni-solar calendar which means that its very structure was deter-
mined by the movements of the sun and moon. It was lunar in
that each month began with the new moon. The determining of
the new moon and the establishing of the first day of the month
was performed by members of the Sanhedrin, the Jewish coun-
cil. Late in the old month, the Sanhedrin sent forth expert ob-
servers to hill or mountain tops to watch the waning of the old
moon until they could sight the thin crescent of the new moon in
the twilight sky. On observing the new moon, these observers
returned quickly to Jerusalem and reported to the council the hour
at which they had first located the crescent. The Sanhedrin was
then able to locate the first day of the new month and proclaim it
by fire-signals sent from mountain tops.
On the thirtieth day of the month a council would meet
to receive the testimony of witnesses that they had seen
the new moon. If two trustworthy witnesses had made
deposition to that effect on that day, the council proclaimed
a new month to begin on that day, that is, the day on which
the testimony was given became the first day of the new
month instead of the thirtieth day of the old month. If no
witnesses appeared, however, the new moon was consid-
ered as beginning on the day following the thirtieth. Once
the council had proclaimed the new month, announce-
ment was made far and wide by means of fire-signals to
inform the communities outside of Jerusalem.
3
At times inclement weather prevented visual observation of
the moon. When this happened, the council determined that the
lengths of the months should alternate between twenty-nine and
thirty days.
From before the destruction of the temple certain rules
were in existence. The new moon can not occur before a
49
lapse of 29 1/2 days and 2/3 of an hour. If the moon could
not be exactly determined, one month was to have 30 days
and the next 29. The full months were not to be less than
4 nor more than 8, so that the year could not be less than
352 days nor more than 356.
4
The Bible calendar is solar as well as lunar. Because this is
so, there is one last rule to be considered prior to establishing a
true and accurate first-century calendar. Cyrus Adler, a noted
Jewish historian, explains how the Bible calendar is controlled
by the position of the sun.
If the month of Nisan arrived and the sun was at such
a distance from the vernal equinox that it could not reach
it by the 16th of the month, then this month was not called
Nisan, but Adar Sheni (second).
5
What is meant here is that if winter fell as late into the month
of Nisan as the 16th day, then that month became a leap-year
month for the present year, and the new year would not begin
until the following new moon.
In addition to the error of using today’s Jewish calendar in
place of the Bible calendar, another reason accounting for the
fact why many fail to locate the true crucifixion year is their at-
tempt to locate that year with absolutely no knowledge of God’s
calendar patterns. A clear understanding and knowledge of how
these patterns are used by the Lord in history is essential if one is
to locate accurately the many significant years, including the cru-
cifixion year, contained within the pattern code. Nothing but
failure can come from ignoring that code. That, perhaps more
than any other reason, accounts for why the true crucifixion year
has not up to this point been found.
A third reason to account for the crucifixion year not being
located is that far too many rely on tradition in place of the Bible
50
and calendar records. Tradition tells us that Jesus was crucified
on Good Friday and that He rose on Easter Sunday. However,
this belief is not on as solid a footing as some seem to think.
Nearly a century ago, the evangelist, R. A. Torrey, in 1907, pub-
lished a booklet titled Difficulties in the Bible. In discussing the
day of crucifixion, even without the help of the latest astronomi-
cal and calendrical data, Dr. Torrey, by means of the Scriptures
only, discovered that the crucifixion day was not a Friday but a
Wednesday. He relates:
There is absolutely nothing in favor of Friday cruci-
fixion, but everything in the Scripture is perfectly harmo-
nized by Wednesday crucifixion. It is remarkable how
many prophetical and typical passages of the Old Testa-
ment are fulfilled and how many seeming discrepancies
in the Gospel narratives are straightened out when we once
come to understand that Jesus died on Wednesday and
not on Friday.
6
With the aid of a list of vernal equinoxes and new moons
calculated for Jerusalem time, it is now possible to locate the
year of Jesus' crucifixion.
Year Vernal Equinox Nisan 1 Nisan 14
A.D. 28 Monday Tuesday Monday
A.D. 29 Tuesday Sunday Saturday
A.D. 30 Thursday Thursday Wednesday
A.D. 31 Friday Tuesday Monday
A.D. 32 Saturday Sunday Saturday
A.D 33 Sunday Friday Thursday
It is of interest to note that in no year did Nisan 14, the Cruci-
fixion day, fall on a Friday. This shows that there was no Friday
crucifixion, and that there could not have been one because the
*
51
Bible calendar as determined by these accurate astronomical com-
putations reveals the impossibility of such an occurrence. If a
Friday crucifixion had truly occurred, then support for such a
happening would have appeared in the foregoing tables. The fact
that no supporting evidence appears here clearly explains why
scholars have been unable to locate the crucifixion year. They
have been so certain that the crucifixion had occurred on a Friday
that they have refused to believe that it could not have done so.
As a consequence, they have been on a fruitless search hunting
for that which never took place.
The tables reveal that the crucifixion of Jesus, instead of oc-
curring on a Friday, actually occurred on a Wednesday as Dr.
Torrey and others have suggested. A Wednesday crucifixion is
consistent with the Scripture record and supports fully the events
that transpired during the crucifixion week. The Wednesday of
the crucifixion was Nisan 14 in A.D. 30. The Julian calendar
date for the crucifixion was April 5.
Because Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection were so mean-
ingful to God, God made certain that those events could only
happen in a special year. The year A.D. 30 was that special year,
for the vernal equinox and the new moon that determined the
beginning of the year for God’s calendar occurred in the same
night - the night of March 22-23. Moreover, the New Year’s Day
also began with that date. Thus we discover that both the year
and month of the crucifixion began with a new moon that oc-
curred within twenty-four hours of the equinox. This pattern
which does not happen on a yearly basis clearly reveals the in-
volvement of the Almighty in determining the dating of the cru-
cifixion.
Once the date of Jesus’ crucifixion is located it is an easy task
to find the correct date of the resurrection, for Jesus Himself in
one of His discourses indicated that He would be locked in death’s
grip for a three-day and three-night period.
52
But he answered and said unto them, An evil and adul-
terous generation seeketh after a sign; and there shall no
sign be given to it, but the sign of the prophet Jonas: For
as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s
belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three
nights in the heart of the earth.
7
This three -day and three-night period to which the Lord
referred equalled seventy-two hours. It fitted precisely into
the calendar of the year A.D. 30. On Wednesday, April 5, the
Lord was crucified. Late that day after His death, His body
was removed from the cross and placed in the tomb. Three
days and three nights later on Saturday, April 8, Jesus rose.
Early the next morning (Sunday) the women visited the tomb
and found it empty.
Now upon the first day of the week, very early in the
morning, they came unto the sepulchre, bringing the spices
which they had prepared, and certain others with them.
And they found the stone rolled away from the sepulchre.
And they entered in, and found not the body of the Lord
Jesus.
8
Tradition would have us believe that the Lord was crucified
on Good Friday and resurrected on Easter Sunday. This idea,
however, appears to contradict the Lord’s statement that He would
be in the grave for a period comprised of three days and three
nights, for it is not possible for one to compute a literal three-day
and three-night or seventy-two-hour period from a late Friday
crucifixion to an early Sunday resurrection. At the very best this
span would cover about thirty-six hours. In explaining this dis-
crepancy some scholars say that the Lord did not actually intend
to convey to His listeners a seventy-two-hour period when He
used the expression of “three days and three nights” but He was
53
actually referring to a much shorter length of time. These schol-
ars consider this passage to be a synecdoche -- a figure of speech
in which a part is representative of the whole. That is to say, they
consider that a part of a day represents a whole day. They do this
because they are aware that the Jews in Jesus’ day sometimes did
treat periods of time in this manner. The weakness in this argu-
ment is that time spans were not always treated as a figure of
speech. It was not unusual for a three-day and three-night period
to be treated as a literal seventy-two hour span.
Another argument that weakens the idea that Jesus may have
been expressing a synecdoche is His referral to Jonah’s three day
and three night entombment in the huge fish. “ . . . Jonas was
three days and three nights in the whale’s belly;...”
9
It is apparent here that Jesus accepted as literal the Old Testa-
ment account of Jonah 1:17, that Jonah was in the fish’s or whale’s
belly a full three-day and three-night period. There is nothing in
this passage to indicate otherwise. The Jewish historian, Josephus,
who lived about the time of Jesus, also supported this time span
when writing of Jonah’s entombment. “It is also related that Jonah
was swallowed down by a whale, and that when he had been
there three days, and as many nights, he was vomited out upon
the Euxine sea, . . . ”
10
If in fact Jonah’s account is literal, and Jesus, as Lord, knew
it to be so, then by referring to Jonah’s account, Jesus was ex-
pressly conveying to us that the three-day and three-night period
of His own entombment should be understood in a literal sense
as well.
Additional Bible passages which have been misunderstood
are those relating to a third-day resurrection. Examples of these
passages are Matt. 16:21 “. . . and be raised again the third day,”
Matt. 20:19, “. . . and the third day he shall rise again,” and Mark
9:31 which records that “. . . he shall rise the third day.”
Those who accept the Sunday resurrection interpretation be-
lieve that Jesus died and His body was placed in a tomb on a
54
Friday, commonly referred to as the first day, that His body lay in
a sepulchre on a Saturday, the second day, and that He rose on a
Sunday, the third day. Because the expression “the third day”
aligns itself with a Sunday in this interpretation, it is therefore
concluded that Sunday must have been the day on which the Res-
urrection occurred. The weakness in this interpretation is that
these third-day passages apply equally as well to the idea of a
Wednesday crucifixion -- Saturday resurrection. For example, if
Jesus’ body were placed in the tomb late Wednesday just prior to
sunset, then Wednesday night and Thursday would have been the
first night and first day of the entombment, Thursday night and
Friday would have been the second night and second day, and
Friday night and Saturday would have been the third night and
third day. Thus, a Saturday resurrection is completely harmoni-
ous with a third-day resurrection.
The Bible strongly supports a Wednesday crucifixion. It is
only by misreading or misinterpreting a passage that we might
arrive at a conclusion differing from this. It is said that Jesus was
crucified on a Friday because it was “. . .the day before the sab-
bath.”
11
It is reasoned that since the Jews observed the Sabbath
every Saturday beginning at Friday sunset, then Friday must have
been the day of crucifixion. What was not realized was that the
Jews observed several sabbaths throughout the year in addition
to the Saturday Sabbaths. These additional sabbaths, called con-
vocations differed from the Saturday Sabbath. The Saturday Sab-
baths were a weekly institution. The convocation sabbaths were
yearly institutions and fell on specific dates within the months
and each year on different days of the week. One such day as this
was the Passover sabbath which yearly occurred on Nisan 15,
and was also called the first day of the feast of unleavened bread.
And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the
feast of unleavened bread unto the Lord: seven days ye
must eat unleavened bread. In the first day ye shall have
55
an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work therein.
12
Since the Passover sabbath fell on a different weekday each
year and since the Jews also observed on a weekly basis the sev-
enth-day Sabbath, which always fell on a Saturday, the seventh
day of the week, it was not uncommon for two sabbaths to fall
within one week -- one sabbath being the yearly convocation or
Passover sabbath and the other the seventh-day Sabbath. This
actually happened during the crucifixion week, for in that week
fell both the Passover sabbath and the seventh-day Sabbath. In
addition to this, two preparation days also fell within that week.
One was the preparation for the weekly Sabbath which always
fell on a Friday. The other was the preparation for the Passover.
This day could fall on any weekday, the day being determined by
the calendar each year.
Now the Bible is very clear on which preparation day the
Crucifixion occurred. It specifically states that it was on the prepa-
ration for the Passover. Nowhere does it say that it was the prepa-
ration for the seventh-day Sabbath.
And it was the preparation of the passover, and about
the sixth hour: and he saith unto the Jews, Behold your
King! But they cried out, Away with him, away with him,
crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your
King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but
Caesar. Then delivered he him therefore unto them to be
crucified. And they took Jesus, and led him away.
13
The Passover sabbath, Nisan 15, in A.D. 30, the crucifixion
year, fell on Thursday, April 6. The preparation day, Nisan 14,
for that yearly sabbath was Wednesday, April 5. Thus, the cruci-
fixion date can be precisely pinpointed by both the Bible and
calendar records.
Jesus could not have been crucified on Friday, April 7, for that
56
was the preparation for the weekly Sabbath. The Bible clearly refers
to the yearly preparation day when it says: “And it was the prepara-
tion of the passover, . . . ” Moreover, Friday, April 7, was Nisan 16,
the anniversary of the wave sheaf offering, and there is no evidence
to support the idea that Jesus was crucified on that date.
Another reason the evidence weighs in favor of a Wednesday
instead of a Friday crucifixion is that the year of the Wednesday
crucifixion fits properly into the calendar puzzle while a Friday
crucifixion year does not. A Wednesday crucifixion year has a
Thursday New Year’s Day. A Friday crucifixion year has a Satur-
day New Year’s Day. A Thursday New Year’s Day pattern is
representative of years having a special or religious significance
to the Lord, such as the Exodus, the Jordan crossing and the birth
of Jesus. A Saturday New Year’s Day pattern, on the other hand,
is not related to these types of happenings.
On studying column A below one can see how well the Thurs-
day New Year’s Day for A.D. 30, the year of the Wednesday cru-
cifixion, fits into place. From the Exodus to the forming of the
Jewish state in 1948, one can see a consistent Thursday New
Year’s Day pattern.
Column B, on the other hand, shows how misplaced a Saturday
New Year’s Day, a New Year’s Day representing a Friday crucifix-
ion year, is in a Thursday calendar pattern code. It is incompatible
with the Thursday pattern and does not belong with it.
Year Event New Year’s New Year’s
Day Day
A B
B.C.1486 The Exodus Thursday Thursday
B.C.1446 The Jordan crossing Thursday Thursday
B.C.1006 Temple foundation laid Thursday Thursday
B.C. 986 Temple dedication Thursday Thursday
B.C. 759 Isaiah's vision Thursday Thursday
57
Year Event New Year’s New Year’s
Day Day
A B
B.C. 5 Birth of Jesus Thursday Thursday
A.D. 30 Crucifixion, Resurrection Thursday Saturday
and Ascension of Jesus
A.D.1776 Declaration of Independence Thursday Thursday
A.D.1948 Jewish nation established Thursday Thursday
If eons ago God had planned a Friday crucifixion for Jesus,
then the New Year's days in the above chart would all be Satur-
days and not Thursdays. Because they are Thursdays and not Sat-
urdays verifies that Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday and not
on a Friday.
This clearly explains why those who hold to the traditional view
of a Friday crucifixion have never been able to locate the year of the
Lord’s crucifixion. They have been trying to force a year which
begins with a Saturday into a Thursday pattern and it simply cannot
be done. Only a year having a Thursday New Year’s Day can be
inserted into a Thursday New Year’s Day pattern.
Another passage that might be worthwhile to consider so as
to remove any doubts in the reader’s mind as to the true day of
crucifixion is Mark 16:9. “Now when Jesus was risen early the
first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out
of whom he had cast seven devils.”
Through a quick reading of this passage it is possible to con-
clude that Jesus rose on the first day of the week. However, we
*
58
must remember that in the original Greek, commas were not used,
and the comma following the word “week” was placed there by
translators who were in favor of a Sunday resurrection. This prac-
tice is not an uncommon one with Bible translators, for in some
of the latest translations the word “Sabbath” is referred to as Sat-
urday in the New Testament regardless of whether it is a yearly or
weekly Sabbath. In several cases this is an incorrect use of the
word Sabbath and can easily mislead those who are unaware of
such a practice. Because the King James translators believed in a
Sunday resurrection, it seemed reasonable to them to place a
comma after the word “week” in Mark 16:9. Actually it would
be better to read this passage with all commas removed so that
the ambiguity of this passage may be seen. When we read this
passage without commas, we have a choice of either hesitating
after the word “risen” or the word “week.” If we hesitate after
“week,” we get the impression He rose on the first day of the
week. On the other hand, if we hesitate after “risen,” we find that
sometime after He had risen, the time being indefinite, He ap-
peared to Mary Magdalene early on the first day of the week.
This second interpretation will support the fact that Jesus rose
late Saturday and several hours later met Mary early on the first
day of the week. Because a double meaning can be gotten from
this passage, it cannot be used as a support for either the Saturday
or Sunday resurrection interpretations.
Another factor to be considered here is that Mark 16:9 and
the remainder of the chapter are not included in the two oldest
manuscripts. Because of this, many scholars believe that these
passages are not a part of the original inspired Scriptures. With
this questionable authenticity in addition to the double meaning
contained within it, Mark 16:9 is of little value to the Bible scholar.
Once all the facts have been gathered and compiled, it can clearly
be seen that there is absolutely nothing, neither scriptually nor his-
torically, to support the traditional view that the Lord was crucified
on a Friday and resurrected on a Sunday. Both the Scriptures and the
59
historical record as revealed by the Lord’s calendar support the idea
of a Wednesday crucifixion and Saturday resurrection.
For centuries it has been taught that the assembling on Sun-
day for worship is a commemorative event in honor of Jesus’
Sunday resurrection. Since the facts now reveal that the Resur-
rection did not occur on that day but on a Saturday, then would it
not appear reasonable for one to worship on Saturdays instead of
Sundays if one intended to commemorate the true day of resur-
rection? Saturday meetings would honor the Lord in two ways.
They would not only honor the true day of His resurrection, but
also would honor the original weekly Sabbath of the Ten Com-
mandments.
It is unfortunate that the truth of the Saturday (Sabbath) res-
urrection was lost so soon after the Lord’s Ascension, for it causes
one to wonder whether additional truths may have been lost dur-
ing the course of church history. There are a number of reasons
to account for the loss of the Saturday (Sabbath) resurrection so
early in Christian history. Although some of the reasons we will
never know, it is clear that certain factors contributed to the loss.
One is the fact that the gospel writers, instead of recording the
events as they happened while fresh in their minds, apparently
waited for years to chronicle these events. Possibly these writers
were so busy at the beginning of the emerging church that they
simply did not have or could not take the time to compile a writ-
ten record of what actually happened as it occurred. By the time
they recorded the happenings related to Jesus’ life and ministry
thirty or more years later, many important details may have been
omitted. Thus, at a most important time in the early church, the
years directly after the Ascension, the church was left without a
written record and had to depend on word of mouth and hearsay.
Another factor that contributed to the loss of the true resur-
rection day can be attributed to the lack of eyewitnesses to the
Resurrection event. As best can be determined, no one other than
the angel who rolled the stone from the tomb entrance actually
60
saw Jesus return to life. The soldiers, who were guarding the
tomb, apparently became unconscious before this happened. The
Scriptures say they “ . . . became as dead men.”
14
The women who followed Jesus certainly did not see His Sab-
bath resurrection, for the Scriptures disclose that they “. . . rested
the sabbath day according to the commandment.”
15
After the Sab-
bath had ended, they visited the tomb. This was on the first day
of the week. They soon discovered that Jesus was missing and
relayed this information to His disciples. The disciples appar-
ently had not seen the resurrection either, for they disbelieved the
women’s story.
It was Mary Magdalene, and Joanna, and Mary the
mother of James, and other women that were with them,
which told these things unto the apostles. And their words
seemed to them as idle tales, and they believed them not.
Then arose Peter, and ran unto the sepulchre; and stoop-
ing down, he beheld the linen clothes laid by themselves,
and departed, wondering in himself at that which was
come to pass.
16
Because it appears that no one observed Jesus’ Saturday res-
urrection other than the angel, and because much activity by Jesus’
followers occurred on the following day, the first day of the week,
it evidently was assumed by many in the early church that the
Lord rose on the first day and not on the seventh day of the week.
A third factor which contributed to the loss of the true cruci-
fixion and resurrection days was the fact that it was not possible
to verify these happenings even a few years after they had oc-
curred. The knowledge did not exist on how to calculate accu-
rately the lunations into the past. Moreover, any records that may
have been available showing earlier significant calendar dates
had been destroyed in the great temple fire as a result of Titus’
attack on the Holy City in A.D. 70. Because of the loss of these
61
temple records and the lack of knowledge on how to proceed in
thorough scholarly research, the true dates of the Lord’s crucifix-
ion and resurrection were soon lost to history. Tradition, then,
with much of it based on hearsay, soon determined that which
should be accepted as fact concerning these happenings. As a
consequence, by the time of Constantine, early in the fourth cen-
tury, errors relating to the days and dates of Jesus’ crucifixion
and resurrection were well entrenched within the church.
Because all these factors contributed to the loss of the true
crucifixion and resurrection days, the early church soon became
divided as to when these events may have taken place. An espe-
cially sharp division arose between Christians of Jewish and Gen-
tile descent. The Encyclopaedia Britannica relates:
But though the observance of the Paschal Festival at a
very early period became the rule in the Christian church,
a difference as to the time of its observance speedily sprang
up between Christians of Jewish and Gentile descent,
which led to a long-continued and bitter controversy, and
an unhappy severance of Christian union. No rule as to
the date of the Easter festivals having been laid down by
authority, Christians were left to follow their own instincts.
These were naturally different in the Jewish and Gentile
churches. the point at issue really was the date of the
termination of the Paschal fast. With the Jewish Chris-
tians, whose leading thought would be the death of Christ
as the true Paschal Lamb, this fast would end at the same
time as that of the Jews, on the 14th day of the moon, at
evening, and the Easter festival would immediately fol-
low, entirely irrespective of the day of the week. With the
Gentile Christians, on the other hand, unfettered by Jew-
ish traditions, the first day of the week would be identi-
fied with the Resurrection festival, and the preceding Fri-
day would be kept as the commemoration of the Cruci-
62
fixion, irrespective of the day of the month, the fast con-
tinuing with increasing strictness till the midnight of Sat-
urday.
17
The dissentions and heated arguments in the early church over
the days and dates of the crucifixion and resurrection are simply
more evidence showing the early loss of the true times of these
events. As time progressed the idea of an Easter Sunday resur-
rection began to be accepted, though the early Christians did have
considerable difficulty in settling on which Sunday Easter should
be observed each year.
We learn from St. Ambrose (Epist. 23) that in 387 the churches
of Gaul kept Easter on March 21, while the churches of Italy
postponed it to April 18, and those of Egypt a week later still, to
April 25; and it appears from an epistle of Leo the Great (Epist.
64 Ad Marcian.) that in 455 there was eight days’ difference be-
tween the Roman and Alexandrine Easter.
18
It was not until the seventh century that the Easter dispute
was finally settled in England.
The record from history reveals that the early church was not
on as sure footing concerning the dates of the Crucifixion and
Resurrection as the church today would like us to believe. As a
matter of fact, the church today is not certain of these dates ei-
ther. That is why no church, whether from the past or present
day, has yet been able to locate the true dates of these momentous
events.
The Lord’s calendar code, on the other hand, has enabled us
to remove the shroud of hoary tradition and finally reveals to us
the true days and dates of the Crucifixion and Resurrection. This
code has given us a means by which we can observe the Cruci-
fixion, Resurrection, and other events in a new perspective. This
new perspective should be of especial benefit to the church, for it
gives the church the opportunity to cleanse itself of past errors
and rededicate itself to the truths which the Lord so desires for it.
63
If this is done, the church then, as one mighty and pure spiritual
force, could move forward in fulfilling its lofty purpose of serv-
ing both God and man, and the Great Commission of Matthew
28, instead of being something that should be completed, will
become that which has been completed.
Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them
in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy
Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I
have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even
unto the end of the world. Amen.
19
64
Chapter IV
DOCUMENTS
The Lord’s involvement in major happenings in history can
be seen in many areas. His involvement is not limited merely to
major wars and natural disasters. A study of the dates associated
with the writing or implementing of several significant documents
in history makes clear this fact.
On June 15, 1215, at Runnymede, King John, with an assem-
blage of barons observing, placed his seal upon a set of proposals
called the Articles of the Barons. These Articles soon came to be
known as the Magna Carta or the Great Charter. The Magna
Carta granted to the barons and merchants and eventually to the
populace rights and liberties of which they had been deprived.
John did not of his own volition choose to sign the Great
Charter. It was in the face of open rebellion by his barons that he
was forced to do so.
The benefit of this magnificent document was that it not only
placed King John but also all succeeding English kings under the
law of the land and granted to the populace certain freedoms and
rights that they never before had. Moreover, from the Magna
Carta evolved the many freedoms that the Democracies of west-
ern civilization now enjoy.
The dating of the approval of the Articles of the Barons re-
veals to us a new type of calendar pattern. In 1215, June 15 fell
on Tamuz 16, a date of no particular significance. We find, though,
that when we transfer the Bible calendar year for the year 1215 to
the year 30, the year of the Lord’s crucifixion, and realign the
months to that year, we then discover that the Articles were ap-
proved on the anniversary date of the prophet Ezekiel’s first vi-
sion!
The signing of the Magna Carta did not end the struggle be-
tween John and the barons. Actually neither side fully intended
65
to abide by the Articles completely. Nevertheless, after John died
in 1216, other English kings in the years that followed agreed to
the terms of the charter. It eventually came to be recognized as
part of the fundamental law of England.
As English emigrants colonized America, they carried with
them these ideals of freedom which were embodied in the En-
glish law. Because they cherished and believed in these ideals,
many of these ideals eventually became part of the framework of
the Constitution of the United States.
Early colonists in the New World enjoyed an air of freedom
never before felt. Perhaps this feeling came when they first con-
ceived the idea of leaving their homeland for a new world over
the horizon. Perhaps it came during their long voyage across the
vast Atlantic, or as they trudged the muddy roads and streets of
Boston, or Philadelphia. They may not have known when the
idea of freedom first bathed their souls, but they knew that it had
done so, and they had no intention of losing it.
The British Parliament under King George III having not lived
in the New World, had no perception of the colonists’ feelings.
The colonists were their subjects, so they thought, and they were
to obey all laws enacted, and pay all taxes levied. The demands
of the Parliament were most annoying to the colonists. In order
to make clear to the mother country their position on these mat-
ters, a delegation of colonial leaders was selected, and they met
in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774 in the First Continental
Congress.
The date September 5, 1774, the date of the First Assembly,
was the 153rd day after Nisan 24. Nisan 24 was the anniversary
date on which an angel communicated with the prophet Daniel
(Dan 10:4-14).
Because Britain ignored the resolutions drawn up by the co-
lonial leaders, matters soon worsened. By the following spring
fighting had erupted between the colonials and English troops at
both Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. Congress acted
66
swiftly, and voted to organize an army and navy. George Wash-
ington was appointed Commander in Chief.
At first, many colonials hoped that the war would cause Brit-
ain to reverse its stand on what appeared to them to be unaccept-
able policies. But as the war continued, the idea of complete
independence from Britain began to be nurtured in their hearts.
One who best exemplified this change in thought was Richard
Henry Lee of Virginia. At first he felt that a policy of economic
pressure was the best means of retaliating against the British.
However, by 1776 he began to think in terms of complete inde-
pendence and introduced a resolution:
. . . these united colonies are, and of right ought to be, free
and independent states; that they are absolved from all
allegiance to the British Crown; and that all political con-
nection between them and the State of Great Britain is,
and ought to be, totally dissolved.
1
The date June 7, 1776, the date Lee introduced this resolu-
tion in Congress, is significant, for that was the 70th day (ordinal
count) after Nisan 10, the anniversary date of Jesus’ triumphal
entry into Jerusalem.
Three days later on June 10, Congress voted to name a com-
mittee to write a declaration of independence. Included on this
committee were Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson.
Jefferson was asked by the other committee members to draw up
a first draft of the document. He completed this task in about two
weeks.
Early in July, the Congress approved the Lee resolution, and
then began to debate Jefferson’s draft. The delegates removed a
few passages and made minor changes in its style, but other than
that, the document was kept intact. On July 4, the 40th day after
Pentecost, the Congress adopted the final draft of the Declara-
tion of Independence.
67
Following the adoption of the Declaration, the new nation
entered for the next half-dozen years a very critical and unstable
period, for it lacked a strong central government. The Articles of
Confederation were the cause of this weakness. Under these ar-
ticles the states retained most of the assigned powers. The Con-
gress had the powers of conducting war, issuing money, and car-
rying on foreign relations, but lacked the powers of drafting troops
or regulating trade. The states, on the other hand, were guaran-
teed sovereignity and independence and were given all powers
not specifically granted to Congress.
Under this arrangement the central government was
. . . always dependent on the willingness of the states to
accept its measures, and in many cases they refused to do
so. Many states ignored or annulled the acts of Congress.
Without the power to tax, the government was in con-
stant financial difficulty. Lacking the power to regulate
foreign commerce it could not establish a uniform com-
mercial policy for the country.
2
It was becoming apparent to many that a stronger central gov-
ernment was needed if the new nation was to succeed. Conse-
quently, at a meeting of delegates at Annapolis in 1786, Alexander
Hamilton recommended that Congress call a convention of spe-
cial delegates from all the states to meet in Philadelphia in the
spring of the following year.
The convention was supposed to begin on May 14, 1787, but
few of the fifty-five delegates had arrived by that date. Eleven
days later it formally opened in Independence Hall.
From the beginning the delegates had intended to revise the
Articles of Confederation. However, after struggling for weeks
and making no apparent progress in the revisions, they set the
articles aside. They then set about writing a completely new con-
stitution. Often as the summer drew on with little or no progress
68
being made, they despaired of ever completing the task. But know-
ing full well that the future of the tiny nation depended on them,
they persevered and slowly began to make headway. Step by
step and little by little the bits and pieces began to come together
until finally on September 17 the Constitution was finished. That
very day thirty-nine signatures were affixed to the document that
was to become the Constitution of the United States.
It is significant to note that the New Year's days for the years
1776 and 1787 occurred within twenty-four hours of the vernal
equinoxes in their respective years.
In the following year, 1788, New Hampshire was the ninth
state to ratify the Constitution putting it into effect on June 21, a
day within 24 hours of the summer solstice and a Sabbath day.
Also, June 21 was the 40th-day (ordinal count) after Sivan 7 (May
13) the day of Pentecost. Moreover, by placing an overlay of A.D.
30, Jesus', crucifixion year, on 1788, we find that Tamuz 5, on
the overlay, falls on June 21.
Once the signing and ratifying of the Constitution had been
completed, the leaders of government could then devote their time
to solving other pressing matters. One problem that concerned
them dealt with the storing of produce and other goods at New
Orleans. At that time, the western boundary of the United States
ended at the Mississippi River, while the southern boundary ex-
tended to the thirty-first parallel north latitude. Florida and the
Louisiana Territory belonged to Spain. Farmers who lived west
of the Appalachian Mountains shipped much of their produce
down the Mississippi to the Port of New Orleans. Because this
port came under Spanish jurisdiction, many knew that the Span-
ish could close this port if they so desired. To prevent that from
happening a treaty between the two nations was signed in 1795
which gave the Americans the right to store for shipment duty-
free goods at New Orleans.
This plan worked well until the year 1800. In that year Spain
returned a part of her New World possessions to France by the
69
secret Treaty of San Ildefonso. This was land which France had
ceded to Spain at the end of the Seven Years’ War. This action
alarmed Thomas Jefferson, who was then President, for he feared
that if the French acquired New Orleans they might close the
Mississippi River entirely to the Americans. This action not only
could destroy westward expansion but also lead to another war.
Because of this, he instructed Robert Livingston, Minister to
France, to make an attempt to persuade France to transfer the
Floridas, especially West Florida, to the United States.
The negotiations between the two nations extended into the
spring of 1803. By then the Americans had adopted the strategy
of trying to purchase the land from France. Napolean, who was
feeling a financial pinch because of his military expenditures,
finally agreed to accept the Americans’ offer. With a declaration
of despair he stated, “I renounce Louisiana . . . It is not only New
Orleans that I cede; it is the whole colony without reserve . . .”
3
The Americans truly received a bargain which would not be fully
appreciated by them for many years.
The Louisiana Purchase Treaty was signed in a Thursday New
Year's Day year.
A recent significant event that occurred in a Thursday New
Year's Day year was the founding of the nation of Israel. In May
1948, the Jews in Palestine announced the forming of a new, in-
dependent state.
On May 14, 1948, the day preceding the end of Brit-
ish rule, the People’s Council convened in the Tel Aviv
museum and approved the Proclamation of Independence,
which declared the establishment of the State of Israel....
At midnight, a few hours later, the last British high com-
missioner, Sir Alan Cunningham, left Haifa on board a
British destroyer. The Mandate was over.
4
The Associated Press in May 1948 wrote:
The Jewish state will be proclaimed sovereign at mid-
70
night Friday, the 13-man “cabinet” decided early today.
The British have announced they will terminate their
mandate at 12:01 a.m. Saturday.
The “cabinet” made its decision after a nine-hour dis-
cussion behind closed doors. Religious dignitaries had
granted the political leaders exemption from the Ortho-
dox law which prohibits even writing on the Jewish sab-
bath. The sabbath begins at sundown Friday and ends at
sundown Saturday.
5
The British mandate ended Friday at midnight. This was a
Sabbath. In the Lord’s calendar it was the date, Sivan 7. This
date is significant because it was on Sivan 7, 1486 B.C., also a
Sabbath, that the Lord made His Sinai visitation and gave to the
world His law, the Ten Commandments. In A.D. 30, the Lord
again set apart Sivan 7 for a special purpose, for on that date,
which was also a Sabbath, the Holy Spirit descended from heaven.
And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they
were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there
came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind,
and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And
there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire
and it sat upon each of them. And they were all filled
with the Holy Ghost, and began to speak with other
tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance. And there were
dwelling at Jerusalem Jews, devout men, out of every
nation under heaven. Now when this was noised abroad,
the multitude came together, and were confounded, be-
cause that every man heard them speak in his own lan-
guage.
6
The establishment of the State of Israel was no accident in
history. The fact that it was established on the anniversary of the
71
date of the giving of the law and the gift of the Holy Spirit is
absolute evidence of the Lord’s involvement in the forming of
that nation.
As we delve deeper into the events in history and study his-
tory in the light of God’s calendar code, we continually discover
evidence of the Lord’s involvement in the significant affairs of
the world. This is as it should be, for the Scriptures clearly attest
to the sovereignty of the Almighty.
By the word of the LORD were the heavens made; and
all the host of them by the breath of his mouth. He
gathereth the waters of the sea together as an heap: he
layeth up the depth in storehouses. Let all the earth fear
the LORD: Let all the inhabitants of the world stand in
awe of him. For he spake, and it was done; he commanded,
and it stood fast.
7
The calendar code is the result of the Lord’s involvement
in worldly affairs and a confirmation of the truths contained in
the Holy Scriptures.
Thine, O LORD, is the greatness, and the power, and
the glory, and the victory, and the majesty: for all that is
in the heaven and in the earth is thine; thine is the king-
dom, O LORD, and thou art exalted as head above all. Both
riches and honour come of thee, and thou reignest over
all; and in thine hand is power and might;...
8
72
Chapter V
DISCOVERIES AND INVENTIONS
Sometimes great happenings in history take place with very
little fanfare. It is not until years later that the importance of an
event can be fully appreciated. One such event was the success-
ful drilling for oil in Titusville, Pennsylvania by Edwin Drake in
1859.
For millennia man had used oil, but not in the quantities that
would be required by today's world. In early times, man skimmed
crude oil from oil pools that had seeped to the surface from under-
ground springs. This collected oil, or pitch, was then forced into the
cracks and seams of boats and larger vessels to make them water-
tight. Possibly, the patriarch Noah, the builder of the ark, used large
quantities of this residue, for he was to “. . . pitch it within and with-
out with pitch.”
1
As far back as 1000 B.C. the Chinese, while drill-
ing for salt, found natural gas and used it for fuel. The Egyptians
coated their mummies with oil during the process of embalming,
and a millennium later King Nebuchadnezzar used pitch to pave the
streets of Babylon.
American Indians discovered that oil was useful both as a
fuel and medicine hundreds of years before the white man came.
They not only scooped petroleum from surface pools, but also
dug wells searching for oil that was not accessible to them. The
remains of these wells can be found in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and
Kentucky.
By the mid 1800’s kerosene became available as a fuel. As
improvements occurred in the kerosene lamp and more homes
used it for lighting, the demand for kerosene increased rapidly.
Because of the improved lighting provided by this new lamp,
people no longer were confined to dimly-lit rooms and flickering
candles and were much more able to enjoy the evening hours.
About the time of the invention of the oil lamp, George Bissell,
73
a businessman from New Haven, Connecticut, became interested
in developing oil as a fuel. He joined with a partner, Jonathan
Eveleth of New York City, and formed the Pennsylvania Rock
Company. They hired a man named Edwin Drake to go to Penn-
sylvania to oversee the oil procuring operation. Drake soon dis-
covered that the method of collecting oil by hand was much too
slow and laborious. He set about to improve the collecting of oil
by having the men dig a well by pick and shovel in a manner
similar to that of an 18th century farmer digging for water. This
method also proved unsatisfactory.
After considerable experimentation and failure, Drake finally
conceived of drilling a well using a six-horse-power steam en-
gine. This engine was to operate a drill which had been placed
within an iron pipe or casing. The casing was to keep the earth
from caving in as the drill pierced deeper and deeper into the
earth and to let the oil rise to the surface once the drill bit had
been removed. This plan worked well, for Drake had devised a
much easier and faster means for procuring oil. Soon others, in
other parts of the nation, not wanting to be bypassed by the com-
ing oil boom, set up their own drill rigs for oil production.
The development of the oil well could not have happened at a
more opportune time. Whale oil and animal fats were adequate
for lubricating the axles of slow-moving horse drawn buggies
and wagons of the day but were entirely unsatisfactory for the
speedy railroad trains. The trains’ high speed axles required a
high-quality, long-lasting lubricant that would withstand the heat
generated by long, hot, dusty trips. Almost paralleling the dis-
covery of a new well was the laying of another hundred miles of
track which caused an increased demand for the lubricant.
In the early 1860’s the U.S. government proposed that a trans-
continental railroad bed be laid. It was to extend from Omaha,
Nebraska to Sacramento, California. A roadbed was also to be
completed between Chicago and Omaha. To entice developers
to accept such a difficult project, the government offered gener-
74
ous land grants and loans ranging from $16,000 to $48,000 a
mile. It was agreed, finally, that two companies would lay the
roadbed. The Central Pacific was to push eastward from Sacra-
mento and the Union Pacific was to strike westward from Omaha.
Both companies faced a gigantic task. The Central Pacific
had to cross the jagged Sierra Nevada Mountains in Eastern Cali-
fornia. The Union Pacific had to cross the rugged Rockies. All
supplies had to be transported long distances. To increase their
workforce, the Central Pacific hired thousands of Chinese labor-
ers, while the Union Pacific hired thousands of European immi-
grants. As each railroad worked toward the other, the work be-
came a contest to see which could lay the most track in the short-
est time.
As May 10, the date of the rail-joining approached, excite-
ment throughout the nation increased. Parties, the pealing of
church bells, and cannon salutes were a part of the celebrations
planned for the great day.
At Promontory Point, Utah, the place chosen where the last
spike was to be driven, gaily-decked trains rumbled in from the
east and the west. Throngs of spectators and dignitaries poured
from the cars to observe the driving of the Golden Spike which
would link the nation from coast to coast.
When the moment arrived for the driving of the last spike,
major telegraph lines were opened to record the momentous event.
The signal to announce the commencement of the hammer blows
was three dots. At 2:47 P.M., Washington time, the word “Done”
flashed across the wires signaling that the spikes had been driven
and the nation linked by rails of iron.
May 10 in 1869, fell on Yiar 28, which was the 70th day
(ordinal count) before Ab 10. Ab 10 was the anniversary date of
the burning of the first temple by Nebuzaradan.
75
During the years that Edwin Drake was attempting to im-
prove on oil recovery methods and the railroads were struggling
to link the East and West, Thomas Edison, a young genius, was
beginning to make a name for himself.
Edison was born in Milan, Ohio, on February 11, 1847. He
was the seventh and last child of Samuel and Nancy Edison. Even
as a young child Edison revealed evidence of his exceptionally
inquisitive mind. He constantly asked questions at home, and on
entering school, he so annoyed a teacher by his incessant ques-
tioning that the teacher called him “addled.” His mother, an-
gered by this comment, removed him from school after only three
months of formal schooling. Being a former teacher herself, she
began to instruct him at home. He advanced rapidly under her
tutelage because she made his lessons fun and exciting and en-
couraged him to be inquisitive and to search for answers to diffi-
cult and perplexing questions. When he was nine years old, she
bought him a chemistry book. Because he did not trust the author’s
findings, young Thomas, slowly and laboriously performed ev-
ery experiment to verify the author’s results.
When he was twelve years old, Edison got a job on the Grand
Trunk Railway selling newspapers for the Detroit Free Press.
The newspaper business was especially profitable because the
Civil War was in progress. Within a very short time he made
enough money from his sales to be able to purchase his own small
printing press. Edison’s paper was the first paper to be printed
on a moving train.
In his free time on the train Edison enjoyed experimenting
with chemicals. This got him into trouble, for one day a stick of
phosphorus burst into flames and caught the baggage car on fire.
An angry conductor threw him and his equipment off the train at
the next stop.
In 1868, Edison filed papers for his first invention, an electric
vote-recording machine. This machine tallied the votes of legis-
lators on a big board. Having expended most of his energies on
76
the perfecting of the machine and very little on the salability of it,
he was quite annoyed to discover that no one wanted it. From
that day on, he vowed never to create another invention that was
not needed.
The following year he moved from Boston to New York.
Arriving nearly penniless, he visited the Laws’ Gold Indicator
Company. The indicator was a machine that transmitted changes
in gold prices to subscribers. One day soon after Edison’s ar-
rival, the central transmitter broke down. Quickly spotting the
trouble, Edison had the machine repaired and operating within
two hours. Laws immediately gave him a job.
Edison made a number of improvements on the stock ticker, so
many in fact that in late 1870 he was paid the sum of $40,000. With
this money he set up a small business manufacturing tickers.
By 1876 he had tired of manufacturing and moved to Menlo
Park, N. J., where he established a factory for the producing of
his many inventions. It was at Menlo Park that he began his
serious study of the incandescent lamp.
Edison differed from other experimenters in the field of elec-
tric lighting in that he believed that the bulb filament should be
made of a high-resistant, hair like structure instead of thick, rod-
like devices. He reasoned that a thin filament would not only
burn brighter but also require much less elecricity to illuminate
it. He performed thousands of experiments and searched the world
over before discovering that a thin, carbonized thread worked
successfully. In October 1879 he succeeded in making a lamp
burn for more than 40 hours.
October 19, the date of the beginning of Edison's successful
experiment was the 40th day after Elul 24, the anniversary date
on which the Jews worked to restore the temple in 520 B.C.
During the same period that Edison’s laboratory was hum-
ming with activity, exciting discoveries were also being made in
the world’s many scientific laboratories. Sometimes the discov-
eries would outpace the disseminating of this newly-acquired
77
knowledge throughout the scientific community and a duplicat-
ing of effort would occur.
One of the more significant discoveries of the late 19th cen-
tury was that of X-rays by the German physicist, Wilhelm Roent-
gen. In 1895 while experimenting with a Crookes Tube (an evacu-
ated glass tube through which an electric current was passed) he
noticed a strange fluorescence on a barium screen that happened
to be near. After further investigation he deduced that powerful
invisible rays were being beamed from the tube when the current
was flowing. These rays he called X-rays.
Additional experimentation revealed to him that the rays
would pass through some substances easily, such as flesh, but
were stopped by others, such as bone or metal. With this knowl-
edge, Roentgen found that he could photograph bone structures
with the rays.
For his outstanding discovery, Roentgen received many hon-
ors, including the first Nobel Peace prize in physics.
Roentgen’s X-rays fascinated the scientific community. In
addition to frequently repeating Roentgen’s experiments, scien-
tists also began a search for other substances that might have
fluorscent characteristics. One scientist in particular who was
stimulated to pursue research in this area was Henri Becquerel, a
French physicist.
Becquerel, through a series of experiments, discovered that
uranium ore affected photographic plates in the same manner as
X- rays. The discovery of these invisible rays given off by the
uranium ore spurred him to test other substances to see if they,
too, gave off radiation. He found that all substances which con-
tained uranium radiated rays.
Two scientists who were excited by Becquerel’s experiments
were Pierre and Marie Curie. In order to understand more thor-
oughly Becquerel’s findings, they duplicated many of his experi-
ments. They then concentrated their efforts on pitchblende, the
ore from which uranium is obtained. They found that this ore
78
produced a larger amount of radioactivity than would be expected
from it. To locate the source of these rays they slowly and pains-
takingly analyzed a large quantity of that ore. From this they
finally isolated small amounts of two highly radioactive new
chemical elements, and named them radium and polonium. For
this work they received, along with Becquerel, the 1903 Nobel
prize for physics.
From the discovery of X-rays by Roentgen, and the experi-
ments of Becquerel and the Curies, European physicists were be-
ginning to gain an insight into the structure of the atom.
One physicist of that period who contributed greatly to our
present-day knowledge of the atom was Ernest Rutherford. He
was born in New Zealand in 1871. By 1893 he had taken his
M.A. degree in mathematics and physics. In 1895 Rutherford
won the coveted 1851 exhibition scholarship for study at Cam-
bridge University in England.
Shortly after his arrival in England, he began serious research
at the Cavendish laboratory. At first, his younger colleagues in
the laboratory ignored him, but he soon won their respect as well
as that of Sir J. J. Thomson, the director. Rutherford’s earliest
product was a detector for electromagnetic waves. Shortly after
its completion, J. J., as Professor Thomson was affectionately
known, asked Rutherford to join him in the study of X-rays. Sa-
rah Riedman tells us in her book Men and Women Behind the
Atom:
A number of important results came out of these ex-
periments: they found that the longer the column of gas
that was exposed to X-rays, the greater its conductivity--
an effect opposite to that seen in a copper wire; X-rayed
gases lost their conductivity when blown through porous
plugs; the gas could take up only a certain amount of
current, and once saturated, regardless of how high the
voltage, it could not take up any more current.
79
These effects fitted into the theory that the X-rays pro-
duced a definite quantity of positive and negative ions in
the gas. . . .
Using the same methods, Rutherford next became in-
terested in other forms of radiation, the type Becquerel
had observed emanating from uranium salts. He found
that uranium radiations ionized gases in the same way as
X-rays.
2
Later, when working at McGill University in Montreal, Ru-
therford made even more startling findings. During tests on the
element thorium, he and a young chemist, Frederick Soddy, ob-
served that the radioactive emanations discharging from the tho-
rium appeared to disintegrate and become lost. While observing
this happening, Rutherford and Soddy also noticed that the re-
mainder of the thorium recovered its original properties at the
identical rate it was discharging the radioactive particles. As
Riedman relates: “This discovery, that radioactivity consists of
the spontaneous transformation of atoms, was the first major re-
sult of Rutherford’s research.”
3
From these and other tests, it began to dawn on Rutherford
that within the tiny atom was locked an enormous amount of en-
ergy. Rutherford wrote:
There is no reason to assume that this enormous store of
energy is possessed by the radio-elements alone. It seems
probable that atomic energy in general is of a similar, high
order of magnitude, although the absence of change pre-
vents its existence being manifested. . . .
4
In the spring of 1907, Rutherford returned to England, ac-
cepting a vacancy at the University of Manchester. With the help
of fifteen assistants in a well-equipped laboratory, he intensified
his study of atoms. One of his goals was to compute the number
80
of alpha particles given off each second by a single gram of ra-
dium. With Dr. Hans Geiger assisting, Rutherford devised a se-
ries of tests to make such an accomplishment possible. The re-
sults were astounding, for they found that one gram of radium
ejected thirty-four billion alpha particles every second. As
Riedman relates:
This experiment, by which Rutherford, for the first
time, detected a single atom was one of the great land-
marks in the history of physics. It was another leap in the
direction of establishing modern atomic theory.
5
By his many experiments Rutherford was able to deduce that
the atom was composed of a central core or nucleus of protons
around which revolved a proportionate number of electrons. He
eventually succeeded in splitting an atom of nitrogen by bom-
barding it with alpha particles and separating the protons from its
nucleus. It can truly be said that Ernest Rutherford is one of the
great immortals of atomic physics.
In the thirties a number of discoveries were made which gave
scientists additional knowledge of the atom’s structure. In 1931
Harold Urey discovered deuterium, a heavy isotope of hydrogen.
The following year James Chadwick discovered the neutron. Four
years later Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman bombarded uranium
with neutrons and produced two separate elements, barium and
krypton. In the spring of 1939 after studying the results of the
Hahn and Strassman experiments, two Austrian physicists, Lise
Meitner and Otto Frisch concluded that Hahn and Strassman had
actually produced a fission reaction.
Word soon spread throughout the scientific community of the
Meitner-Frisch hypothesis which led quickly to confirmatory ex-
periments in many of the world’s leading laboratories.
The scientists’ achievement in producing fission was another
step toward releasing the enormous power contained in the atom.
81
Because World War II was imminent, a number of scientists who
feared that this power might be developed by unfriendly nations
approached the U. S. government in the spring of 1939 in an
attempt to get federal support for further research.
Their first attempt to acquire aid was unsuccessful. How-
ever, President Franklin D. Roosevelt on receiving a letter from
Albert Einstein promptly appointed an advisory committee on
uranium. Shortly thereafter an initial allotment of government
funds ($6,000) was made for the purchase of uranium oxide.
As work progressed, government aid and interest in the project
sharply increased. By December 2, 1942, leading scientists,
headed by physicist Enrico Fermi, produced the world’s first man-
made chain reaction. This achievement made possible the devel-
opment of the atomic bomb.
December 2, 1942, the date of this great happening, fell in
the Lord’s calendar on Kislev 24. It was on this date millennia
ago, that the prophet Haggai spoke for the Lord.
6
Once a chain reaction had been achieved, work began in ear-
nest on atomic bomb development. The U. S. government poured
enormous sums of money into the project. Large engineering
and chemical firms such as Stone and Webster, Inc., and E. I.
duPont de Nemours & Company became involved in construc-
tion and plutonium production. The United States Army Corps
of Engineers joined the project to help in the construction of full-
scale plants for the production of fissionable materials. Both
Canadian and British scientists worked jointly with the Ameri-
cans to produce the super bomb. The development of the bomb
was truly an all out effort by free peoples to produce a weapon
that would quickly bring to an end the largest war in history.
Working around the clock, relays of scientists, engineers, and
laborers finally completed the task, for on July 16, 1945, occurred
the first atomic bomb blast in history. Brigadier General Thomas
F. Farrell, an eyewitness, describes the instant of explosion.
The lighting effects beggar description. The whole
82
country was lighted by a searing light with the intensity
many times that of the midday sun. It was golden, purple,
violet, gray and blue. It lighted every peak, crevasse and
ridge of the near-by mountain range with a clarity and
beauty that cannot be described but must be seen to be
imagined. It was that beauty the great poets dream about
but describe most poorly and inadequately.
Thirty seconds after the explosion came first the air
blast pressing hard against the people and things, to be
followed almost immediately by the strong, sustained,
awesome roar which warned of doomsday and made us
feel that we puny things were blasphemous to dare tamper
with the forces heretofore reserved to the Almighty. Words
are inadequate tools for the job of acquainting those not
present with the physical, mental and psychological ef-
fects. It had to be witnessed to be realized.
7
As the first searing rays of blazing light assaulted their eyes,
the scientists felt a surge of pride tempered by the chilling fear
that they may have unwittingly made available a means by which
the human race could annihilate itself.
In that blinding instant thoughts of fragments from the Hindu
epic, Bhagavad-Gita flashed into J. Robert Oppenheimer’s mind.
If the radiance of a thousand suns
Were to burst at once into the sky,
That would be like the splendor
of the Mighty One . . .
I am become Death,
The shatterer of worlds.
This monstrous explosion occurred in a Thursday New
Year's Day year — a year identical to A.D. 30, Jesus' crucifix-
ion year.
83
July 16, the date of the explosion was the 80th day (two
40-day periods) after Yiar 14. It was on Yiar 14, in the second
month that the Paschal Lambs were slain for those who were
unable to participate in the Passover of Nisan.
Seven years after the atomic bombing of Japan and the end of
World War II, scientists succeeded in exploding the world’s first
thermonuclear device. This enormous blast occurred in the Cen-
tral Pacific on November 1, 1952. This was the brightest light
ever seen on earth. If spacemen had been walking on the moon at
that time, they could have observed the flash. The intense heat
generated turned millions of gallons of water into steam and re-
moved the island of Elugelab forever.
President Truman in his last State of the Union message in
January, 1953 warned mankind of the terrible results if such power
were ever unleashed.
From now on, he said, man moves into a new era of
destructive power, capable of creating explosions of a new
order of magnitude, . . .
The war of the future would be one in which man
could extinguish millions of lives at one blow, demolish
the great cities of the world, wipe out the cultural achieve-
ments of the past--and destroy the very structure of a
civilization that has been slowly and painfully built up
through hundreds of generations.
November 1, 1952, the date of this awsome blast is signifi-
cant, for it is the 153rd day prior to April 3, 1953, the anniversary
date of Jesus’ crucifixion.
Nine months after this historic happening the Russians ex-
ploded their first megaton class thermonuclear weapon. This oc-
curred on August 12, 1953, another significant date in history.
This date, August 12, was the 120th day (ordinal count), or three
40-day periods after Yiar 1. It was on Yiar 1 millennia ago that
84
the Lord spoke to Moses and commanded him to count the Isra-
elites who were able to bear arms.
And the LORD spake unto Moses in the wilderness of
Sinai, in the tabernacle of the congregation, on the first
day of the second month, in the second year after they
were come out of the land of Egypt, saying, Take ye the
sum of all the congregation of the children of Israel, after
their families, by the house of their fathers, with the num-
ber of their names, every male by their polls; From twenty
years old and upward, all that are able to go forth to war
in Israel: thou and Aaron shall number them by their
armies.
8
Many today question whether the development of thermo-
nuclear weapons is a step forward for humankind. It is under-
standable why they so reason, for they realize that a bad judg-
ment or miscalculation on the part of a nation that possesses such
weapons could bring to an end the world as we now know it.
85
Chapter VI
EXPLORERS
Thousands of years ago, when men went in search of new
lands, the regions they explored were fairly near their homeland.
As men became more knowledgeable in the art of shipbuilding
and the handling of sailing vessels, they traveled to more distant
lands. Even then, the distances traveled were not great when
compared to those of our day. The maps of Strabo and others of
but two thousand years ago show that the known world covered
but a small portion of the earth’s surface. It has been only within
the past five hundred years that man’s knowledge of the earth’s
land areas has become anywhere near complete.
Although we now know that the Vikings may have visited
parts of the East Coast of North America, it was not until after
Columbus’ voyages that an intense interest in these lands was
shown. Because of the significance of his voyages, Columbus is
recognized as one of the great explorers in history.
Many historians believe that Columbus was born in the late
summer or early autumn of the year 1451 in Genoa. Although
little is known of his youth, it is believed that he often frequented
the nearby quay and watched the graceful caravels entering and
leaving the harbor. This pleasantry surely contributed to his love
for the sea and his longing to explore distant lands.
His first seafaring adventure came when he was about twenty
years old. He shipped aboard a war galley to battle the Barbary
pirates. On a later voyage he nearly drowned. His ship, the
Bechalla, formed part of a convoy bound for England. As the
convoy swept along the coast of Portugal, it was suddenly at-
tacked by a hostile fleet. Christopher’s vessel caught fire and
sank. Grabbing an oar, he leaped into the blood-stained sea. Using
the oar to stay afloat, he struggled to shore.
86
As a young man, Columbus became interested in the East
Indies trade. The gold, gems, and spices of the Eastern trade
were much desired by the Europeans. Columbus reasoned that
there must be a faster and easier way to acquire these items than
by caravan. The caravans required many months to make the
round trip and could carry very few items compared to what a
ship could carry. Some Portuguese attempted to sail around Af-
rica to reach the Eastern trade, but not Columbus. He was con-
vinced that the shortest route to the Indies was by sailing west-
ward.
Columbus’ task to acquire ships and items for the voyage
seemed to him insurmountable at times. He was rejected more
than once. His rejections came because of what seemed to be
unreasonable demands. He wanted three ships to be fully equipped
and maintained at the king’s expense. He demanded the gover-
norship of any and all lands he might discover. He expected to
have bestowed on him the title “Admiral of the Oceans”. He
demanded a large percentage of the profits that might come be-
cause of his discoveries, and he requested a title of nobility. More-
over, he expected these privileges to be passed on to his sons!
Needless to say, he was rejected by King John II of Portugal in
1482.
Not overwhelmed by this rejection, he later traveled to Spain
and made his requests known to King Ferdinand and Queen
Isabella. It was not until they had conquered the last Moorish
stronghold in Spain early in 1492 that they could seriously con-
template Columbus’ plan. After much discussion, King Ferdinand
and Queen Isabella gave Columbus all that he requested, and he
prepared for his historic voyage.
It was early in the morning of August 3, 1492, when the three
tiny caravels slipped away from Palos, Spain. The fleet headed
directly for the Canary Islands, where the remaining provisions
would be placed aboard. Minor adjustments and repairs were
made at that time. On September 6, the fleet weighed anchor,
87
and on September 9 the last land was sighted.
Columbus headed due west. Once the excitement of depar-
ture had left and the crew had settled into their daily routine, they
had a chance to enjoy their voyage. Often the sea was calm with
gently rolling swells and the weather delightful. An abstract of
the Admiral’s diary written by Bishop Las Casas records that on
September 16 they arrived at the Sargasso Sea; “and thenceforth,
writes the Admiral, they had most temperate breezes, the sweet-
ness of the mornings being most delightful, the weather like an
Andalusian April, and only the song of the nightingale wanting.”
1
The main concern of the crew at this point in time was not
that they were fearful of dropping off the edge of the world, but
that the wind might not reverse itself so as to enable them to
return home. To assuage this fear, Columbus carried two log
books. His secret log book recorded the true distances the ships
traveled each day. The second book contained false figures indi-
cating a shorter distance of travel. By giving the crew the coordi-
nates from this false log, Columbus lulled them into thinking
that the distance traversed was not as great as it truly was.
Weeks passed and no land was sighted. By October 10, all
agreed that if no land appeared within three days they would turn
homeward. At 10:00 p.m. the night of October 11, Columbus
saw a speck of light bobbing in the distance. But it was so distant
and dim that no one could affirm that it came from land. They
sailed onward. About 2:00 a.m., October 12, a lookout sighted
the faint outline of an island in the moonlight and shouted his
discovery to the captain. Columbus ordered the sails reefed and
altered his course to run parallel to the island until daybreak.
In the morning as the sun slid over the horizon, Columbus,
bearing the royal banner of Spain and accompanied by his two
captains and many of the crew, went ashore. After they all had
given thanks to God for a safe passage, Columbus named the
island and took solemn possession of it in the name of Ferdinand
and Isabella. Those members of the crew who had been doubtful
88
of the success of the voyage and had urged the Admiral but a few
days before to return home sought his pardon for the error of
their ways.
2
Christopher Columbus departed on his historic voyage Au-
gust 3, and discovered the New World the night of October 11-
12. He stepped ashore and claimed the land for his sovereigns on
the morning of October 12. The entire voyage from his August 3
departure at Palos to his proclamation on October 12 at San Sal-
vador covered a period of seventy days. Because the seventy-
day period is a significant Bible span, the use of this period in
Columbus’ voyage reveals the Lord’s involvement in that event.
Columbus’ voyages opened the way for the settlement of the
Western Hemisphere. It seemed that ships were shuttling be-
tween the two hemispheres almost daily. Though many settle-
ments were established shortly after his discoveries, none was of
more consequence than the Jamestown settlement of 1607. From
this tiny colony came the United States of America.
It was late in December 1606 that the ships Sarah Constant,
Godspeed, and Discovery weighed anchor and headed down the
Thames River. Stormy weather hindered their passage, and it
was not until March 1607 that they reached the West Indies. Af-
ter replenishing their supplies they sailed northward to Chesa-
peake Bay, discovering land on April 26. After several weeks of
exploring the coastal area and the James River they, on May 13,
located a suitable site for their settlement. Because the water
was deep, they were able to secure their vessels to the trees lining
the shore. Before leaving their vessels, they chose E. M. Wingfield
to be their first president.
3
In the year 1607, the year in which the Jamestown explorers
discovered and named Cape Henry, the date, Yiar 10, fell on April
26. The date, Yiar 10, in Bible times was the date on which the
paschal lamb was to be chosen for those unable to observe the
Passover in the month of Nisan.
May 13, the arrival date at the site which was named
89
Jamestown, was the 40th day after Nisan 17. Nisan 17 in that
year was the anniversary date of the Lord’s resurrection.
About two and a half centuries after Jamestown was settled,
the well-known Arctic explorer, Robert Peary was born. It was
on May 6, 1856, that his birth occurred at Cresson, Pennsylvania.
When Peary was three years old his father died, and he and his
mother moved to Maine, her native state. During his school years
he was an avid reader and especially enjoyed books on Arctic
exploration.
On graduating from high school, he majored in engineering
at Bowdoin College. After graduation, he became a draftsman
for a period of time before working as a civil engineer for the
United States Navy. As time passed, his interest in polar explora-
tion, instead of waning, became more intense.
In 1886 with a companion, Christian Maigaard, he journeyed
inland from Disko Bay over the Greenland ice sheet. This trek
was difficult. One cause for its difficulty was that it was Peary’s
first attempt at cold-weather exploration. He was an amateur
who was entering unexplored territory for the first time. Though
he had designed lightweight sledges, they still needed to be hauled
by him and his companion. He had made no provision for dog
teams on that trip. To make matters worse, the explorers were
forced to work these sledges with their loads up to a 2000-foot
elevation in order to arrive only at the top edge of the ice-cap.
This task by itself took nearly four days.
After arriving at the top of the ice plateau, Peary and his com-
panion began to push inland. Though the ascent at the top of the
plateau was not as steep as the earlier climb, it was still difficult
to make headway. Moreover, a strong headwind hampered their
efforts. Often heavy sleet, rain, or snow would bring their explo-
ration to a standstill. Peary describes one such storm as follows:
At six p.m., the clouds growing blacker and blacker
every moment, and every indication pointing to a pro-
90
tracted storm, I decided to take the instruments and go
back to the tent and await more favourable weather. At
the level of the brink of the ice-tongue overlooking the
ragged descent through the crevasses, and gulches to the
ice-foot, rain had fallen, instead of snow, and the edges of
the crevasses, the sides of the gullies, and the hard blue
pinnacles were like oiled steel, utterly impracticable. We
could do nothing but climb over the crest of the mountain
dam and down the cliffs to the valley. Here we forded the
glacier river, and at midnight reached the tent, the rain
falling in sheets, the wind dashing first up and then down
the valley, threatening every moment to level the tent, and
the glacier river a roaring torrent. Truly, the Inland Ice
had given us a savage welcome, but we were not yet done
with it.
4
During another storm he relates:
When we resumed our march on the 15th, the wind
had settled down to a south-easterly gale loaded with
snow; and against this we advanced with goggles on,
hoods pulled up, and heads down, keeping our course by
the wind, until the sinking of the sledges in the soft snow,
and the continual clogging of our snow-shoes, compelled
us to stop and wait the cessation of the storm at an eleva-
tion of 7525 feet. Too tired and sleepy from our struggle
with the storm to build a hut, even had the loose snow
rendered it possible, we lay down behind our sledges and
fell asleep.
When I awoke we were completely snowed under, and
here we lay for forty-eight hours, with the wind and snow
driving in one incessant, sullen roar across the drift above
us.
5
On this first reconnaissance Peary and Maigaard managed to
91
explore inland about 100 miles. They were prevented from ex-
ploring farther because of a diminishing food supply. Fortunately,
the return trip was much less arduous. Peary took advantage of
the now steady tail wind by rigging sails onto the sledges. With
this boost Peary discovered that he could skim along at a fast
pace for hours on end.
Peary returned from this trip with copious notes and photos.
His objectives had been fulfilled, and his first-hand experience
of Arctic exploration prepared him for his later expeditions.
Between 1891 and 1897, he returned several times to the Arctic
region for further explorations. These trips with the help of sci-
entific instruments greatly broadened our knowledge of Arctic
conditions.
In 1898 Peary announced his intention of sledging to the North
Pole. During the next four years, to prepare for this difficult trip,
he directed a number of exploratory probes from bases at Etah in
Inglefield Land and Fort Conger on Ellesmere Island. As his
knowledge and expertise in Arctic exploration increased, an or-
ganized plan of assault of the polar region began to develop in
his mind. He would need a specially made ship--one that could
withstand the crushing and grinding forces of the ever-changing
ice floes. Also required would be relays of dog teams led by
hardy souls who could withstand the rigors of the north to break
trail and set up camps far ahead of the main assault force. Once
these forward teams had completed their tasks, they were to back-
track to the ship and await the return of Commander Peary after
he had reached the pole.
The ship, Roosevelt, which was built to Peary’s specifica-
tions was designed specifically for use in the Arctic region. It
was a small vessel, 184 feet long, of shallow draft which could
maneuver around constantly changing ice fields or floes. The
sides of the vessel were of steel-sheathed heavy oak and curved
outwards and upwards from the keel, giving a bowl-shaped ap-
pearance below the water line. The purpose of this odd shape
92
was to prevent the ship from being crushed. The force generated
by two large ice fields when shoved together by wind and tide
can build up to thousands of tons of pressure. When trapped
between two such merging ice fields, the Roosevelt, instead of
being crushed, was forced upward and ended up resting on the
combined ice floes.
The Roosevelt encountered the crushing force of most ice
fields with comparative ease. However, one encounter with ex-
tra thick ice closing in on his vessel had even Commander Peary
concerned about the ship’s ability to last. The commander was
standing on the bridge and in the following account describes his
observations.
About 10 p.m. of the 16th, as I was on the bridge tak-
ing a look about before turning in, a large floe moving on
the flood-tide pivoted around the point of Sheridan and
crashed into the smaller ice about the ship, driving it bodily
before it. At the first shock the Roosevelt reeled and shook
a bit, then heeled slightly toward the crowding ice and
turned it under the starboard bilge. . . .This continued until
a corner of the floe itself, some portions of which were
higher than the rail, came full against the Roosevelt’s star-
board side amidships, with no intervening cushion of
smaller ice and held the ship mercilessly between its own
blue side and the unyielding face of the ice-foot. Its slow
resistless motion was frightful yet fascinating; thousands
of tons of smaller ice which the big floe drove before it,
the Roosevelt had easily and gracefully turned under her
sloping bilges, but the edge of the big floe rose to the
plank sheer and a few yards back from its edge, was an
old pressure ridge which rose higher than the bridge deck.
This was the crucial moment. For a minute or so, which
seemed an age, the pressure was terrific. The Roosevelt’s
ribs and interior bracing cracked like the discharge of mus-
93
ketry; the deck amidships bulged up several inches, while
the main rigging hung slack and the masts and rigging
shook as in a violent gale. Then with a mighty tremor
and a sound which reminded me of an athlete intaking his
breath for a supreme effort, the ship shook herself free
and jumped upward till her propeller showed above wa-
ter. The big floe snapped against the edge of the ice-foot
forward and aft and under us, crumpling up its edge and
driving it in-shore some yards, then came to rest, . . .”
6
In 1905, Peary on his ship Roosevelt steamed to Cape
Sheridan, Ellesmere Island. After wintering on the ice-locked
vessel, Peary spearheaded a drive northward attaining 87
o
06' north
latitude. A diminishing food supply, constantly changing ice con-
ditions, and adverse weather forced him to turn back at this point.
He returned to the ship bitterly disappointed at his failure to reach
the pole.
After returning home and enjoying a brief respite, the com-
mander prepared once again to make one final journey north in
an attempt to reach the pole. He modified his earlier plans so that
on this next trip his sledges would be in the vicinity of the pole
earlier in the year. His purpose in arriving sooner was to provide
as much ice as possible between him and his goal. He had dis-
covered on his previous explorations that as the polar days length-
ened, the sun not only made slush traps three and four feet deep
but also melted the thinnest ice thus forming serpentine channels
or leads. It was impossible to traverse these leads by sledge and
much time was lost skirting them.
In July, 1908, the Roosevelt slipped out of her berth at the
foot of East Twenty-Fourth Street, New York, and to the encour-
aging cheers of thousands of spectators headed north. The staunch
vessel steamed to Sydney, Cape Breton. At Sydney, Peary loaded
the vessel with coal and completed his roster of supplies.
On July 17, the pioneers departed Sydney and not long there-
94
after began battling ice floes to Ellesmere Island. By early Sep-
tember they had achieved their goal and had moored at Cape
Sheridan.
Much of the winter was spent in preparing for the difficult
march to the pole in the spring. Supplies needed to be unloaded
from the Roosevelt, and storage buildings on shore had to be built.
Thousands of pounds of supplies needed to be transported to
Cape Columbia, the point from which Peary would strike out for
the pole. Rather than send each dog team the full distance to the
cape, Peary used a shuttle system:
The plan was to establish stations along the route, instead
of sending each party through Cape Columbia and back.
The first party was to go to Cape Belknap, about twelve
miles from the ship, deposit their supplies, and return the
same day. The second party was to go to Cape Richardson,
about twenty miles away, deposit their supplies, return
part way and pick up the supplies at Cape Belknap, tak-
ing them forward to Cape Richardson. The next station
was Porter Bay, the next at Sail Harbor, the next at Cape
Colan, and the final station at Cape Columbia itself. Par-
ties would thus be going back and forth the whole time,
the trail would constantly be kept open, and hunting could
be done along the way.
7
By late winter all was in readiness for the polar dash. The
long winter night was ending, the supplies were cached, and the
dog teams were chafing to return to work.
On February 28, the commander sent forth the vanguard team
of Bartlett and Borup to cut a trail for the main body of the expe-
dition. They also were assigned the task of building igloos at
designated points along the path to be used as way stations by
Peary and his crew.
Early the next morning before daylight, the commander arose.
95
He first peered out through the tiny peep-hole in the igloo to ob-
serve the weather conditions. It was clear, for he could see the
stars shimmering against the black sky. But it was biting cold,
for the mercury hung at -50
o
, and the wind whistled in strong
gusts about the camp. It was no day to challenge the elements.
To Peary, though, the toughened old explorer who had become
inured to such weather, it was but another work day. He directed
the loading of the sledges and as the first traces of light appeared,
he signaled the lead team to head north. The trip was very slow
and difficult. The ice was not smooth and level as ice usually is
when frozen on lakes. Because of heavy winds and constantly
changing polar tidal currents, huge ice fields, often stretching
many miles in length would collide and create monstrous pres-
sure ridges. These jagged ice ridges would shove upwards as
high as fifty feet. When several of these ridges were encountered
in a day, fifteen-hour work days were required in order for the
party to reach the next camp.
Day after day Peary shoved onward, until by April 1 he was
within one hundred and fifty miles from the roof of the world.
Bartlett, the trail breaker, turned back at this point. The remain-
ing skeleton crew, which was to make the final dash to the pole,
was composed of Peary, Matthew Henson, and four Eskimos.
After making final adjustments to their sledges and resting briefly,
this tiny crew made the final spurt to the pole arriving there in the
morning of April 6, 1909. Peary records this historic moment in
his diary. “The Pole at last. The prize of three centuries. My
dream and goal for twenty years. Mine at last! I cannot bring
myself to realize it. It seems all so simple and commonplace.”
8
Commander Peary probably would have been somewhat sur-
prised had he learned that after twenty-three years of heartache,
frostbite, and struggle, he had arrived at his destination on the
anniversary date of Jesus’ resurrection. Peary, no doubt, felt that
he had achieved his goal wholly by his own struggles. Little did
he realize that the Lord had been involved in his achievement
96
and had already determined the date on which he should arrive at
the pole.
Forty-nine years after Peary’s successful assault on the Pole,
another epochal trip to that region was achieved. This second
trip was made in 1958 by Commander William Anderson, U.S.N.,
and the crew of the nuclear submarine Nautilus. Though this
later trip was no less dangerous than Commander Peary’s trek, it
was much more comfortable.
While gliding through frigid Arctic waters beneath a huge ice
field, the Nautilus maintained an inner temperature of about 70
o
F.
The greatest danger of the Nautilus trip was the possibility that a
malfunction could occur and trap the ship and its crew beneath
the impenetrable ice pack.
In late July 1958, the Nautilus slipped silently from Pearl Har-
bor and headed for the Aleutian Islands. By July 26 it was plow-
ing through the channel between Yunaska and Herbert Islands in
the Aleutian chain. From here it set a course to pass just west of
St. Lawrence Island to enter the Bering Strait. According to Com-
mander Anderson, the Nautilus had made a record run from Ho-
nolulu to the Strait, for it had covered 2,900 miles in just over six
days.
After traversing the Strait, the submarine cut through the
Chukchi Sea and worked its way along the ice pack in the Arctic
Ocean to a point just east of Point Barrow, Alaska. Anderson
was searching for the Barrow Sea Valley, a deep-water channel
leading to the North Pole.
After several disappointing probes along the ice pack, the Sea
Valley Gateway was found. Commander Anderson relates:
Just north of Point Franklin, Alaska, we established
our position by quick radar sweeps. They showed that
we had rounded the corner of the pack and were, at last,
aimed directly toward the Barrow Sea Valley, our deep-
water gateway to the western Arctic Basin.
9
97
A few hours later, they arrived at deep water and swung the
bow of the Nautilus northward, along the Sea Valley, and sent the
submarine down well below the ice pack. Once in the channel a
final course correction was made and speed increased to 18 knots.
The submarine, according to Anderson, performed flawlessly
under the ice pack and on August 3 at 11:15 P.M. Eastern Day-
light Saving Time, the submerged Nautilus cut through the North
Geographic Pole.
Two days later the Nautilus exited the ice pack north east of
Greenland and completed the first transpolar voyage in history.
This transpolar voyage was an historic happening, and it ap-
pears in the Lord’s calendar as such. In that calendar the date of
the Pole crossing was Ab 19 (August 4, Jerusalem time). This
date was the one hundred twentieth day after April 6, the anniver-
sary date of Jesus’ resurrection. What makes these dates espe-
cially important is that Commander Peary arrived at the North
Pole on April 6, and the Nautilus many years after Peary’s achieve-
ment arrived at the Pole on the one hundred twentieth day or
three forty-day periods after that identical date. In other words,
both achievements, that of Peary’s and that of Anderson’s, were
tied directly to the same date, the anniversary date of Jesus’ res-
urrection!
Although Commander Anderson’s transpolar voyage was an
historic achievement, that voyage did not long hold the public’s
attention, for nearly a year earlier that attention had been arrested
by the launching of the Sputnik satellite. Though undersea ex-
ploration was significant, it could not match the ushering in of
the Space Age. This truly captivated the public. Of course, it had
not always been this way, for thirty years earlier many people
scoffed at the idea of moonwalks and orbiting satellites. Robert
Goddard, the father of American rocketry, received much ridi-
cule for his vision of interplanetary travel, so much so that he
became very close-mouthed and secretive about his experiments.
When questioned about his plan to send a rocket to the moon, he
98
would evade the issue by stating that he was only interested in
probing the earth’s upper atmosphere.
Ignoring the ridicule, Goddard pressed on in his work, and by
World War I had developed several types of military rockets that
could be launched successfully from a lightweight hand launcher.
After the Armistice was signed he returned with vigor to the de-
signing of rockets for lunar exploration and probing deep space.
In this, he progressed slowly but steadily and on March 16, 1926,
he successfully launched the first liquid fueled rocket. In his
diary, Goddard jotted the following brief but pertinent informa-
tion about the flight:
March 16, Went to Auburn with Mr. Sachs in a.m.
E and Mr. Roope came out at 1 p.m. Tried rocket at
2:30. It rose 41 ft. & went 184 ft., in 2.5 secs, after the
lower half of nozzle had burned off. Brought materi-
als to lab. . . .
10
Robert Goddard’s liquid-fueled rocket was the forerunner of
the mighty rockets which carried the astronauts to the moon. It
also is the grandfather of the many rockets that now frequently
shuttle men and women to and from earth orbits. Because of
this, Goddard’s flight of March 16 was an important flight in the
annals of history.
The date of March 16, 1926 was a special date because it was
the 70th day before May 25. May 25 in the new-style calendar is
the anniversary date of Pentecost which occurred on May 27,
A.D. 30. Dr. Goddard's successful flight took place at 2:30 P.M.
at Auburn, Massachusetts. For Bible calendar calculation, the
flight occurred after sunset Jerusalem time, indicating that the
70-day (ordinal) count begin with March 17.
Less than a score of years after Goddard launched his first
liquid-fueled rocket, the German war machine blasted its first
operational V-1 rocket to England in June of 1944.
99
The following account mentions these deadly missiles attack-
ing London.
...Hitler opened a new age in air warfare. On June 13, he
sent the first flying bombs over London. The Germans
called their new secret weapon the Vergeltungswaffe
(Vengence Weapon), or V-1. The British called it the buzz
bomb.
11
In 1944, June 13 was the 80th day after Nisan 1, the New
Year's Day.
Nearly three months after this attack, the Germans struck Paris
with a much larger rocket, the V-2, on September 6. This date,
September 6, was the 153rd day after April 6, the anniversary
date of Jesus' resurrection. Two days later, September 8, the 153rd
day after Nisan 15, was the beginning of many missile attacks on
London with V-2 rockets.
After World War II ended, interest in rocket development in-
creased greatly. The military in many of the free nations had
been much impressed by the speed of delivery, precision and de-
structive power of the V-2 missile. The major powers recog-
nized that a new weapon had been developed, and they intended
as quickly as possible to adapt it to their arsenals. Billions of
dollars were fed into missile development and soon the world
was introduced to a new vocabulary. The Bomarc, Golem, Hawk,
and Nike-Ajax were but a few of the many types of missiles be-
ing developed. Soon IRBM (Intermediate Range Ballistic Mis-
sile) and ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) became house-
hold words.
As development of the ICBM progressed, scientists realized
that the orbiting of earth satellites was not a dream to be fulfilled
a generation later but a happening that was already within their
grasp. The world was awakened to this fact in October 1957
when the Soviet Union announced its successful launching of the
Sputnik I satellite. This launching was followed in rapid-fire suc-
100
cession by the orbiting of Sputnik II in November and the United
States’ Explorer I satellite early in 1958. Man had not gingerly
entered the unexplored regions of space. He had boldly charged
into the unknown.
On April 12, 1961, the Soviet Union rocketed the first hu-
man, Yuri Gagarin, into an earth orbit. Soviet news reported that
the five-ton Vostok space craft was launched at 9:07 a.m. (Mos-
cow time). At 9:22 a.m., Gagarin radioed that the flight was pro-
ceeding normally and that he was feeling well. At 10:55 a.m.,
Major Gagarin safely landed in a pre-arranged area of the U.S.S.R.
April 12, 1961, the date of the historic launching and return
to earth of the first human in space, is a special date in history.
The late Dr. Werner Von Braun, a German rocketry pioneer and
director of the United States’ Marshall space flight center when
speaking of Gagarin’s achievement said that “This date will be
long remembered in history, equaling or excelling many of the
other momentous steps in world progress.” It would appear that
the Lord was involved in determining the date of Major Gagarin’s
flight, for April 12 was the 70th day before the summer solstice.
The following month on May 5 the American astronaut Alan
Shepard was also rocketed into space in the Mercury space ship,
Freedom 7. Shepard’s flight, unlike Gagarin’s, was sub orbital
lasting only fifteen minutes. Though Shepard’s flight was not as
impressive as that of the Soviet cosmonaut’s, it nevertheless was
another step in man’s space venture.
It is of interest to note that even in Shepard’s brief jaunt into
space, the Lord’s involvement can be seen. In 1961, May 5 cor-
responded to the date Yiar 20, in the Lord’s calendar. Yiar 20 is
the anniversary date of the Lord’s removing of the cloud from the
tabernacle (Num. 10:11) and His guiding the Israelites through
the Sinai wilderness. Yiar 20 is also the 40th day after Nisan 10,
the anniversary day of Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem.
Seven years after these epochal flights, mankind was again
on the threshold of a great space adventure. This time, though,
101
the journey was not a simple orbital path around the earth but a
trail-blazing path to the moon. The year was 1968, and the Apollo
8 astronauts Frank Borman, James A. Lovell, Jr., and William A.
Anders were assigned the task to chart a path to the moon, orbit it
several times and successfully return to earth. They were to be
the first humans to give up earth’s gravity for that of another ob-
ject.
Apollo 8 was a forerunner for the Apollo 11 moon landing. It
would be a critical test of the rocket and all its components. Mil-
lions of manhours and billions of dollars had been spent prepar-
ing for the great moon journey and Apollo 8 was a critical test
and a rehearsal of all the maneuvers required for such a mission.
The mammoth rocket stood poised on the launch pad early
the morning of December 21. As a shaft of light from the rising
sun danced on the frosted skin of the space vehicle, tiny rain-
bows slowly and gracefully performed a quadrille down the giant’s
glistening side. At precisely 7:51 a.m. tongues of brilliant flame
blasted from the monster’s tail. Sound waves in an ever increas-
ing crescendo of ear-splitting noise rumbled across the flatlands
and beat upon the eardrums of the onlookers. For an instant the
bird stood poised, then leaped upwards on a blinding tail of flame
to boost its precious cargo to a frontier yet unexplored.
After completing nearly two orbits, the spacecraft struck out
for the moon from a point over the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii.
At the time the area was in predawn darkness. Many people arose
early to watch the firing of the Saturn third-stage rocket.
“You’re on your way,” Chris Kraft, director of flight opera-
tions radioed. “You’re really on your way now.”
“Roger, we look good here,” Borman, the commander told
the control center.
The rocket lifted off its launch pad on December 21, 1968, at
7:51 a.m. Eastern Standard Time. About six hours later at 2:00
P.M., the winter solstice occurred.
The Lord’s calendar is closely tied in with the seasons of the
102
year because of its dependence upon the vernal equinox, the first
day of spring, to keep the calendar in its proper alignment. Thus,
it was no coincidence that this rocket began its historic flight on
the day of the winter solstice.
The astronauts themselves in keeping with the solemnity of
the occasion, acknowledged the power and greatness of the Al-
mighty by reading excerpts from His holy book, the Bible. On
Christmas eve while the camera scanned a cratered, desolate moon
close up, Anders read the first words from the book of Genesis:
“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the
earth was without form, and void; the darkness was upon the face
of the deep. . . .” Lovell continued with verse 5, “And God called
the light Day, and the darkness he called Night.” Frank Borman
ended the presentation with verse 10, “And God called the dry
land earth; and the gathering together of the waters called he Seas:
and God saw that it was good.”
Seven months after this trail-blazing moon flight, Neil
Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin, Jr., and Michael Collins, blasted out
of an earth orbit for man’s first moonwalk. The giant Apollo 11
lifted off launch pad 39A at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on July 16,
1969, at 8:32 a.m. (E.S.T.). In the Lord’s calendar this was Ab 2.
July 16 was the 70th day after Yiar 20 (cardinal count), and the
120th day after Nisan 1 (ordinal count).
Four days later on the night of July 20-21, astronaut Armstrong
stepped onto the moon. This was Ab 7, the anniversary of the
date on which King Nebuchadnezzar’s troops arrived at the gates
of Jerusalem in preparation for the destroying of the great city.
“And in the fifth month, on the seventh day of the month,
. . . came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, a servant of
the King of Babylon, unto Jerusalem: . . .”
12
On July 22, after the lunar lander had returned to the com-
mand ship, Columbia, the Columbia’s engines were fired in or-
der to send the astronauts homeward.
103
On July 24, the astronauts returned safely to earth. This was
Ab 10, the anniversary date of the destruction of Jerusalem and
of the first (Solomon’s) temple.
Now in the fifth month, in the tenth day of the month,
. . . came Nebuzaradan, captain of the guard, . . . into
Jerusalem, And burned the house of the Lord, and the
king’s house; and all the houses of Jerusalem, . . .
13
According to Josephus, it was also on Ab 10, though many
years after the destruction of this first temple, that the second
temple was destroyed.
14
In addition to this, the prophet Ezekiel received a vision from
the Lord on this date.
And it came to pass in the seventh year, in the fifth
month, the tenth day of the month, that certain of the el-
ders of Israel came to enquire of the LORD, and sat before
me. Then came the word of the LORD unto me, . . .
15
As in so many of the other major events in history, the daring
moonwalk adventure also happened on special dates in the Lord’s
calendar. This consistency in special dates again reveals the Lord’s
continued involvement in the affairs of mankind.
104
Chapter VII
RELIGIONS
Through the revelations of the calendar patterns we have seen
the involvement of God in several major events in history. By
means of special patterns and dates and the exercising of His will
on world events, the Lord has made clear to us His interest in and
His control over earthly affairs. Because He has chosen the Bible
calendar as the means of revealing His presence and the Bible as
the source of His words, we should look then to the Bible as our
main source of knowledge of this Divine Being.
Not all religions have this divine spark of inspiration which
can only come from the Creator. Some religions, such as Bud-
dhism and Hinduism, evolved merely from the ideas or ideals of
men living millennia ago.
Buddhism
Buddhism, tradition tells us, was founded about the sixth cen-
tury B.C. by a young man named Siddhartha Gautama. Siddhartha
was born in northeastern India near the town of Kapilavastu in
what is now Nepal. His father, Suddhodana, was a ruling noble
of the Gautama clan. This position enabled him to acquire much
wealth, and it was into this life of luxury and splendor that
Siddhartha was born. Later in life, when reflecting on his youth
Siddhartha related that he had three palaces, one for the winter
season, one for the summer and one for the season of rains. He
wore the finest of silk clothing and palace attendants daily ad-
ministered to his needs. While yet a young man he married a
neighboring princess named Yasodhara, who bore him a son
whom they called Rahula.
Suddhodana’s goal by surrounding his son with luxuries and
luxurious living was to protect Siddhartha from the evils of the
105
world. Despite his father’s plan this was not to be the case, for
venturing forth in his chariot Siddhartha observed an old man, a
sick man, a decomposing corpse and an ascetic. He returned to
his palace greatly troubled by the misery that lay around him. As
time passed, he became more and more agitated over what he
had seen, whereupon he resolved to search out the meaning of
life.
One night in his twenty-ninth year he slipped quietly from his
palace leaving both wife and son and plunged into the forest.
Siddhartha resolved to live the life of an ascetic as a monk. For
six long years he subsisted on a starvation diet searching for en-
lightenment. At one point “He ate so little, one bean a day during
one of his fasts, that ‘when I thought I would touch the skin of my
stomach, I actually took hold of my spine.’”
1
He often practiced
holding his breath for long periods and also not bathing until the
dirt grew so thick upon his body “that it fell off of its own ac-
cord.”
2
Siddhartha nearly died from being an ascetic, yet he re-
ceived no enlightenment.
After this experience, he withdrew from practicing asceticism
and chose a more moderate lifestyle. He recognized that the ex-
tremes of asceticism on the one hand and indulgence on the other
were not the paths to the enlightenment for which he was seek-
ing. As Huston Smith in The Religions of Man relates “Having
turned his back on mortification, Gautama devoted the final phase
of his quest to a combination of rigorous thought and mystic con-
centration along the lines of raja yoga.”
3
One evening, according to legend, while Siddhartha was sit-
ting under a fig tree (bo tree) in concentrated meditation, a wave
of knowledge permeated his being and illuminated his mind with
the enlightenment he had sought. His discovery was that human
suffering came from craving due to ignorance, and that the path
to its removal came from right living and mental discipline. “Thus
he became Buddha, or the Enlightened One.”
It appears that Siddhartha’s enlightenment evolved from his
106
past experiences with life. He had lived both a life of luxury and
deprivation and had found no solace in either. He then adopted a
more moderate lifestyle and deduced that this was the path hu-
mans should take to alleviate pain and suffering. This was a path
devoted to self-reliance and self-improvement. No outside help
or supernatural force was involved. Kenneth Morgan in The Path
of the Buddha relates:
All through the Buddha’s teaching, repeated stress is
laid on self-reliance and resolution. Buddhism makes man
stand on his own feet, it arouses his self-confidence and
energy. The Buddha again and again reminded his fol-
lowers that there is no one, either in heaven or on earth,
who can help them or free them from the result of their
past evil deeds. . . .
4
The Buddha’s teaching that “no one, either in heaven or on
earth” could free humans from their past evil deeds is very differ-
ent from the words of the Lord as revealed in the Bible. From the
beginning of Genesis through the book of Revelation, runs an
unbroken thread of truth describing how sinful humans cannot
by themselves remove their sins and escape the Great Judgment
which will occur at an appointed future date. For mankind, the
only means of escape from this great day of retribution has been
provided not by humans, but by the Lord Himself when He gave
His life as a sacrifice on the cross.
Because the Buddha rejected the supernatural, he shut out the
very source which could have enlightened him the most. Conse-
quently, his conclusions and goals for mankind are not in har-
mony with those of the Eternal. Since the Lord is the Creator and
most fully understands life, it is to Him humans should turn and
not just to self introspection if they are to learn the true meaning
and purpose of life.
107
Hinduism
Hinduism is a religion from which Buddha received inspira-
tion and is today a major religion of India. The Hindu religion is
a very old religion, for traces of present-day Hindu forms of wor-
ship have been found in the religion of the Harappan civilization
which four thousand years ago inhabited the Indus River valley.
Recent excavations have unearthed a large bath in Mohenjo-Daro
which may have been used for spiritual as well as physical cleans-
ing. Even today Hindus believe in the purifying power of water
and consider bathing a means of purifying the soul. Large num-
bers of pilgrims flock daily to bathe in the nearby rivers and
streams and especially so in their most sacred river, the Ganges,
for spiritual cleansing.
Other excavations have unearthed a large number of seals.
Engraved in the seals, along with Indus writing are figures of
animals and gods. Perhaps these seals were used during reli-
gious exercises, for a few of the figures resemble the gods wor-
shiped in India today.
Around 1500 B.C. migrating bands of light-skinned Aryans
arrived in India. These warlike tribesmen struggled through high
Himalayan mountain passes to reach the Indus River valley. Over
the years as their numbers increased and they spread throughout
the valley, they overpowered the earlier dwellers and usurped the
land for their own use. Some dwellers managed to escape the
onslaught and fled southward.
Unlike the earlier valley dwellers, the Aryans were not city
dwellers. They preferred to live in tiny villages near the banks of
the Indus River. The rich soil deposited by the Indus provided
them with adequate farm and pasture lands. Nevertheless, fre-
quent clashes over land rights occurred between neighboring vil-
lages. It was not until many, many years had passed that the
Aryans could live peacefully with their neighbors.
From the very beginning the Aryans considered themselves
better than the native people they found living in India. In spite
108
of this, these early invaders often intermarried with the natives
and even adopted some of the superior aspects of their urban cul-
ture. Later, in order to maintain their racial and cultural identity
while being greatly outnumbered, the Aryans developed a caste
system prohibiting such intermarriage. Jean Bothwell in The Story
of India says that the idea of the caste system “originated with the
Hindu priests, who, historians think, had become alarmed about
the races intermingling. They thought that by dividing the people
into classes and making laws to prevent marriage between them,
it would keep the races apart.”
5
In the beginning four major castes were formed. The highest
caste, the Brahmans, was made up of priests and scholars. They
were supposed to establish and preserve the ideals of the nation.
The next caste in line, the Kshatriyas, was composed of rulers
and warriors. Merchants and farmers belonged to the third order,
the Vaisyas. The lowest order, the Sudras, was made up of un-
skilled workers. All others who did not belong to any of these
groups were called Pariahs, or outcasts.
In India today the separation of the castes is not as clearly
defined as it once was. The struggle of Mahatma Gandhi to
achieve for India independence from Britain and his goal to
weaken the distinct divisions in the caste system contributed con-
siderably to the reduction of the discriminatory nature of that sys-
tem. In 1950 and 1955 laws were passed granting full social
status to outcastes and making discrimination against them a pun-
ishable offense.
One reason the caste system may have lasted so long is the
Hindu belief in reincarnation, or rebirth. Hindus believe that when
a person dies, he or she is born again as another living creature.
If a person lives properly and faithfully carries out all duties in
this present lifetime, then he may be reborn in a higher form. A
beggar may be reborn as a farmer, a farmer may be reborn as a
merchant, and so on. Thus, a Hindu of low caste by faithfully
fulfilling his duties has the hope of moving to a higher level in
109
the next life. There is always the possibility, of course, that if a
person fails to fulfill that which is expected of him in this life-
time, he may be reborn in a lower form, possibly as an animal or
insect.
Hindus also believe that if a person over many lifetimes lives
properly and continually moves upward after each rebirth, he fi-
nally will reach the ultimate level called Nirvana. Nirvana is a
state of bliss or happiness free from all earthly cares and prob-
lems.
Hindus believe in a supreme spirit called the Brahman. Be-
low this supreme spirit or being are a trio of gods: Brahma, the
creator, Vishnu, the preserver, and Shiva, the destroyer. Brahma
as a creator is not as important to the Hindu of today as to the
Hindus of long ago. Perhaps his diminished importance comes
from the fact that the creation occurred eons ago and this act has
little effect on the twentieth-century Hindu. Vishnu, on the other
hand, as more of a god of compassion and love is still regarded as
an important deity. Hindus believe that one of Vishnu’s attributes
is his ability to become incarnate in order to overcome evil in the
world. According to legend, he has already experienced nine
chief incarnations.
Shiva (Siva), the third deity in the triad of Hindu gods is a
more remote figure than Vishnu. Unlike Vishnu, he apparently
does not incarnate himself for the salvation of the world, but only
to appear occasionally in visions to his more devout worshipers.
Hindu mythology records that he lives on Mount Kailas in the
Himalayas where he meditates while sitting on a tiger’s skin. To
the Shavites, Hindus who worship him, he is recognized as a
very powerful god who maintains order in both the world and
universe.
In addition to the great gods, Hindus worship many lesser
gods. Some scholars suggest that the number of gods honored
may approach a million or more. It is incredible that any religion
would need as many gods. The truth of the matter is that Hindu-
110
ism, like Buddhism, is a man-made religion. If the Spirit of the
Almighty had been the inspiration behind the Hindu scriptures,
then those scriptures would have contained the Sabbath and the
calendar code. Because they do not contain that code those scrip-
tures can neither verify the existence of the Almighty, nor verify
the existence of the pantheon of gods that Hindus worship. Since
the Bible is the only source that contains that revelatory code of
the Almighty, then it is to that source Hindus should turn if they
desire to be in contact with the true creator of heaven and earth.
Confucianism
While Hinduism was evolving in India, changes were also
occurring in the Far East, in China. In the year 551 B.C. a great
Chinese philosopher was born. His name was Ch’iu K’ung. As
Ch’iu K’ung grew into manhood, he became a great teacher and
was called K’ung-Fu-Tze which means the philosopher. Master
Kung as he was also called is known to millions as Confucius.
Very little is known of Confucius’ ancestry. We may glean
from legends that his father’s name was Shuh-Liang (Heih) whose
family name was K’ung. Shuh-Liang Heih lived in the state of
Lu and was a military man renowned for his feats of strength and
daring. When he was in his seventies he married a much younger
woman who became the mother of Confucius.
When Confucius was three years old, his father died, which
left mother and child nearly destitute. Though it was a strain on
the young mother to rear him with limited resources, she suc-
ceeded and trained him well, for at age fifteen he set his mind on
learning. He loved music, singing, and studying the sacred and
classic books. In later years in reflecting on different periods
during his life he relates the following:
At fifteen years I longed for wisdom. At thirty my
mind was fixed in the pursuit of it. At forty I saw clearly
certain principles. At fifty I understood the rule given by
111
heaven. At sixty everything I heard I easily understood.
At seventy the desires of my heart no longer transgressed
the law.
6
When Confucius was nineteen years old, he married and set
up a home of his own. In order to provide for his family, he
worked at a local granary. He was a dependable worker and was
soon promoted to the position of superintendent of parks and herds
in the district of Tsow.
Although his daily duties kept him very busy, he still man-
aged to set aside time to visit the capital. It was here that he
acquired much knowledge from the ancient texts. He especially
enjoyed studying books on history and government. It was these
books in particular that helped him develop ideas on how people
and governments should get along.
When Confucius was twenty-four his mother died. He was
so moved by her death that he gave up his job and went into
mourning for three years. During this period, he continued his
studies in the sacred books. He became so absorbed in these
books that by the time the mourning period had ended, he had
decided not to return to his government position but to begin
teaching.
As time passed, word of his knowledge and wisdom spread
far and wide. People of all walks of life visited him. Some came
for the sake of curiosity; others hoping to gain some new insight
into life. He willingly accepted whoever attended his presenta-
tions, but he preferred those who sincerely wished to learn. “When
I have presented,” he said, “one corner of a subject, and the pupil
cannot of himself make out the other three, I do not repeat my
lesson.”
7
Over the years, Confucius attracted a large group of disciples.
Most of them were devoted followers and attended to his every
need. After his death a number of them labored to compile his
sayings so they would not be forever lost. It was mainly due to
112
their efforts that an accurate record of his teachings were passed
on.
Off and on, Confucius served under a number of rulers in
minor government positions. Though he would like to have ob-
tained a high government office, for he believed he could have
made a significant change if he had but three years in office, he
was not given one. Why this is so, we do not know. Perhaps the
rulers felt that he lacked the flexibility needed for one of high
standing.
Although to many, Confucius may appear to have been overly
austere when passing judgment on his generation, conditions dur-
ing that period may have warranted just such a condemnation.
China in his day was composed of various feudal states which
were constantly at war. The result was constant misrule and mis-
ery to the masses of the people. Rising taxes, forced labor, and
starvation were partners in oppressing and destroying the popu-
lace.
Confucius was deeply distressed by this misery and dedicated
his life to alleviate the sufferings of the people. He believed that
a fundamental change in the government must occur; a reform
that would make its objective not the pleasure of the rulers but
happiness for their subjects. He pressed for a reduction of taxes,
a lessening of severe punishments, and an avoidance of war.
Confucius had hoped that he would be given a high govern-
ment position so that he could put his ideas into practice. How-
ever, as years passed, and he began to realize that such would not
happen, he talked more earnestly to younger men about his prin-
ciples in order to prepare them for positions of authority. A num-
ber of these pupils who eventually received important positions
did well because they were more compromising than their teacher.
Thus, the principles they had learned from him had little practi-
cal effect in his day.
Confucius did not desire to concentrate on developing new
ideas. His aim was to impart knowledge from the ancient texts,
113
for he believed that these texts contained many of the answers for
solving the problems in society. His goal was to search through
these texts, locate that which was most pertinent, and dissemi-
nate that knowledge during his discourses.
Confucius urged humans to live by high standards and to shun
evil. It mattered little what their place was in society. If all would
live according to the laws of heaven and earth, peace and happi-
ness would reign throughout the land.
Confucius regarded the human race as one large family. One
of his disciples echoed this theme when he said that “...within the
four seas all men are brothers.” Sincerity and reciprocity, then,
should be the guiding principles by which all should live. In
effect, the truly virtuous man who desires to establish himself
should seek to help others as well.
Confucius’ teachings have had a profound effect upon the
history of China. After his death people from all levels of Chi-
nese society came to recognize and live by the ideas and ideals
which he espoused. Two millennia of Chinese history are a tes-
tament to the power of the words of this obscure teacher of Lu.
He truly must be counted as one of the most influential men in
world history.
Judaism
In the very distant past, nearly back to the time of the Flood,
lived Abraham, another of the great men of history. Abraham’s
distinction as a great historical figure arises from his faith and
trust in the Lord. When it comes to these qualities, few in history
can equal this noted patriarch.
Abraham was born in or near the city of Ur in the lower
Mesopotamian valley. His father was Terah and his brothers,
Nahor and Haran. When Abraham was about 70 years of age, the
Lord spoke to him and asked him to depart from his homeland.
The Lord promised that if he would do so, He would make of his
seed great nations and multitudes of people. So Abraham, in
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obedience to the Lord’s request, departed. Journeying with him
were Sarah, his wife, Terah, his father, and Lot, his nephew. Af-
ter a period of time had elapsed they arrived in Charran (Haran)
where they remained until Terah died.
8
After his father’s death in Haran, the call to Abraham was
renewed.
Now the LORD had said unto Abram (Abraham), get
thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from
thy father’s house, unto a land that I will shew thee. And
I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee,
and make thy name great; . . .
9
Abraham and his entourage departed Haran and journeyed
southward to Moreh in Canaan. Here they settled until a severe
famine drove them into grain-rich Egypt. During their stay in
Egypt the Pharaoh desired to have Sarah, because of her beauty,
enter his harem. The Lord, however, prevented this evil by bring-
ing some form of plague upon the Pharaoh and his house. Be-
cause of the plague, the Pharaoh quickly returned Sarah to
Abraham and ordered them out of Egypt.
Back in Canaan, a quarrel broke out between Abraham and
Lot over grazing land. Not wishing to become enemies, they
decided to split up. Lot chose the southern Jordan valley for his
flocks while Abraham moved into the uplands near Hebron.
Abraham was getting on in years and became concerned that
if he died childless, his servant Eliezer of Damascus would in-
herit all his property. But God appeared and repeated His prom-
ise and, in a fiery night vision, disclosed to Abraham what was to
happen to his progeny--four centuries of servitude in an alien
land, and thereafter dominion over Canaan.
10
After abiding ten years in Canaan, and being seventy-five years
old, Sarah despaired of ever providing an heir for Abraham. She
urged him, therefore, to visit Hagar, her handmaiden, a concu-
115
bine, if he desired a child. From this union his son, Ishmael, was
born. Thirteen years later, Sarah herself conceived and Isaac,
one of the special ancestors of the Hebrews, was born.
It was through Isaac that the Lord put Abraham’s faith and
trust to the test. The Lord requested of Abraham that he offer his
son as a sacrificial offering to Him. Abraham did not waver in
this matter. He arose early one morning, gathered wood for the
offering, and with Isaac and two helpers departed for the land of
Moriah. On the third day of their journey, the mountain of sacri-
fice came into view. At this time Abraham asked his servants to
remain at a base camp until he returned. He and Isaac pushed on
up the rugged slope to the place of sacrifice. After building an
altar, Abraham bound his son tightly and placed him on it. He
prepared then to plunge a knife into Isaac’s body. At that mo-
ment the Lord spoke and commanded Abraham not to harm Isaac.
Moreover, the Lord commended Abraham for his great faith and
promised Abraham that bounteous blessings would be given to
him and his descendants.
. . .By myself have I sworn, saith the LORD, for because
thou hast done this thing, and hast not withheld thy son,
thine only son: That in blessing I will bless thee, and in
multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the
heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; and
thy seed shall possess the gate of his enemies; And in thy
seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed; because
thou hast obeyed my voice.
11
Abraham lived many years after this trial and finally died at a
very old age.
The centuries following Abraham’s death witnessed a sig-
nificant increase in the Hebrew population. By the 15th century
B.C. the Hebrews, now called Israelites, numbered into the hun-
dreds of thousands. Because at that time the Israelites lived in
116
Egypt, this rapid population increase alarmed the Egyptians. The
Egyptians could forsee being overrun and conquered by them.
To curb this alarming population growth and to keep the Israel-
ites under control, the Pharaoh commanded that all newborn
Hebrew males be slain. “And Pharaoh charged all his people,
saying, Every son that is born ye shall cast into the river, and
every daughter ye shall save alive.”
12
About this time the child Moses was born. To protect his life
his mother, Jochebed, kept him hidden. When she found that she
could no longer conceal him, she made a small boat or basket of
papyrus and placed the infant in it. She then deposited the tiny
craft among the reeds of the Nile, and left his sister to observe the
result.
Not long thereafter, the daughter of the Pharaoh, accompa-
nied by several young maidens, arrived at the shore to bathe. She
saw the basket and had it brought to her. The cover was removed,
and the cry of the child moved her to compassion. She deter-
mined to keep the infant and rear it as her own. Moses’ sister
being near by was able to recommend as Hebrew nurse the child’s
mother, who was hired by the princess. Later, the princess adopted
Moses and he was brought up as an Egyptian.
When Moses was grown, he went out to the fields to observe
the Hebrew slaves at work. He saw an Egyptian overseer flog-
ging a worker, which moved him to slay the Egyptian and bury
the body. Because others knew of this deed, he feared for his
own life and fled to Midian. There he lived with Jethro, a priest,
and tended Jethro’s flocks. He also married Zipporah, one of
Jethro’s daughters.
In the solitude of this shepherd life, Moses received his call
from the Lord. On one of his travels throughout the pasture, he
led his flock to the back of the desert near Mount Horeb. There,
while watching over the flock, he noticed a most unusual sight.
A bush burned brightly, but was not consumed. He decided to
investigate this phenomenon, but as he neared the bush, a voice,
117
that of the Lord’s, commanded him to halt. The Lord then, after
identifying Himself, addressed Moses directly and commissioned
him to deliver the Israelites from Egyptian bondage and lead them
as a nation into the wilderness of Sinai. At first, Moses balked at
this request but later acquiesed to the Lord’s will.
Moses returned to Egypt with his brother, Aaron, and set about
to deliver the Israelites. The Pharaoh would hear of no such plan
and stood solidly against it. A series of harsh judgments and
plagues from the Lord were finally required to force the Pharaoh
to give in to Moses’ demands. This he did with deep misgivings,
and Moses and the Israelites set forth on a journey to the Prom-
ised Land. Not many days thereafter they arrived at the Red Sea
(Sea of Reeds) , and by means of Divine assistance were able to
cross over on the bed of the sea to the other shore. The Egyp-
tians, meanwhile, who were now in hot pursuit of the Israelites
because of the Pharaoh’s change of heart, attempted to cross on
the sea bed in like manner but were drowned in the tumultuous
waves formed when the huge walls of water came crashing to-
gether. The Israelites were finally freed of the bondage which
they had so long endured.
The Lord’s Word reveals that this noted event happened about
the middle of the first month. “And they departed from Rameses
in the first month, on the fifteenth day of the first month; . . .”
13
On the identical date in the second month, Yiar 15, the
Israelites arrived at an area called the wilderness of Sin.
And they took their journey from Elim, and all the congre-
gation of Israel came unto the wilderness of Sin, which is
between Elim and Sinai, on the fifteenth day of the second
month after their departing out of the land of Egypt. . . .
14
It was here that the Lord spoke to Moses about providing a
special food, manna, for the people. As a test of their obedience
to His law, the Lord promised to provide manna on a daily basis
118
excepting on His holy day, the seventh-day Sabbath. On that day
no manna would appear. That day was to be a sabbath of rest. So
that the people would not lack food on the Sabbath, the Lord
produced a double portion every sixth day. A part of this double
portion was set aside for the Sabbath meals. The Scriptures tell
of this ingathering as follows:
Then said the LORD unto Moses, Behold, I will rain
bread from heaven for you; and the people shall go out
and gather a certain rate every day, that I may prove them,
whether they will walk in my law, or no. And it shall
come to pass, that on the sixth day they shall prepare that
which they bring in; and it shall be twice as much as they
gather daily. . . .
And it came to pass, that on the sixth day they gath-
ered twice as much bread, two omers for one man: and
all the rulers of the congregation came and told Moses. . .
. [The following day] Moses said, Eat that to day; for to
day is a sabbath unto the LORD: to day ye shall not find it
in the field. Six days ye shall gather it; but on the seventh
day, which is the sabbath, in it there shall be none.
15
Not long after the introduction of the manna, the Israelites
again set forth on their journey. They arrived in the vicinity of
Mount Sinai on a Thursday, which was the identical weekday on
which they had departed Rameses in the first month. “In the
third month, when the children of Israel were gone forth out of
the land of Egypt, the same day came they into the wilderness of
Sinai.
”16
On this date of arrival, Thursday, Sivan 5, the Lord spoke to
Moses and commanded him to prepare the Israelites for the third
day following, for upon that day He intended to descend upon the
summit of Mount Sinai.
119
And the LORD said unto Moses, Go unto the people,
and sanctify them to day and to morrow, and let them
wash their clothes, And be ready against the third day:
for the third day the LORD will come down in the sight of
all the people upon mount Sinai.
17
On the morning of Saturday, Sivan 7, a shroud of darkness
enveloped Sinai and brilliant stabs of lightning and deafening
rumbles of thunder were seen and heard. Accompanying this
frightful sight was a long, loud blast from a trumpet. At some
point during these proceedings, the Lord Himself descended to
the summit of the mount. The Scriptures graphically relate these
happenings.
And it came to pass on the third day in the morning, that
there were thunders and lightnings, and a thick cloud upon
the mount, and the voice of the trumpet exceeding loud; so
that all the people that was in the camp trembled. And Moses
brought forth the people out of the camp to meet with God;
and they stood at the nether part of the mount. And mount
Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because the LORD descended
upon it in fire: and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke
of a furnace, and the whole mount quaked greatly. And
when the voice of the trumpet sounded long, and waxed
louder and louder, Moses spake, and God answered him by
a voice. And the LORD came down upon mount Sinai, on the
top of the mount: . . .
18
It was on this glorious occasion that the Lord gave to Israel
and the world, His law, the Ten Commandments. These com-
mandments are as follows:
And God spake all these words, saying, I am the LORD
thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt,
120
out of the house of bondage. Thou shalt have no other
gods before me. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven
image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above,
or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under
the earth: Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor
serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God,
visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto
the third and fourth generation of them that hate me; And
shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and
keep my commandments. Thou shalt not take the name
of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold
him guiltless that taketh his name in vain. Remember the
sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour,
and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the sabbath of
the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou,
nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy
maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within
thy gates: For in six days the LORD made heaven and
earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the sev-
enth day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day,
and hallowed it.
Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may
be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth
thee. Thou shalt not kill. Thou shalt not commit adul-
tery. Thou shalt not steal. Thou shalt not bear false wit-
ness against thy neighbour. Thou shalt not covet thy
neighbour’s house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s
wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox,
nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour’s.
19
It is significant to note that the Lord, in order to impress on
the Israelites the importance of the Sabbath, made it a special
point to recognize and honor it by descending to Sinai and giving
His law to mankind on that special day. Also of significance is
121
that the date of the giving of the law, Sivan 7, later came to be
recognized as the day of Pentecost, a special date in Israel and
later also in the church. Theodore Brash in his book The Judaic
Heritage tells us that “What began with Passover was concluded
at Pentecost by the revelation on Mount Sinai and the giving of
the Ten Commandments. Shavuot is the birthday of the Jewish
religion.”
20
Now after the giving of the law, the Lord remained on the
Sinai summit for a lengthy period. On the following Sabbath,
the fourteenth day of Sivan, He commanded Moses to ascend the
mount. This Moses did, and he remained there forty days.
And the glory of the Lord abode upon mount Sinai, and
the cloud covered it six days: and the seventh day he
called unto Moses out of the midst of the cloud. . . . And
Moses went into the midst of the cloud, and gat him up
into the mount: and Moses was in the mount forty days
and forty nights.
21
During the 40-day period, the Lord wrote the Ten Command-
ments on stone tablets. After the forty days had ended, Moses,
descended the Sinai slopes carrying with him the newly engraved
tablets. Upon arriving at the base of the mountain, he discovered
that the Israelites had transgressed the law by worshiping a golden
calf. He therefore destroyed the tablets and for 40-days entreated
the Lord to spare the Israelites from death.
22
At the end of his 40-day fast, Moses was commanded to pre-
pare two new stone tablets, and on the following morning, he
was to again ascend Mount Sinai.
And the LORD said unto Moses, Hew thee two tables
of stone like unto the first: and I will write upon these
122
tables the words that were in the first tables, which thou
brakest. And be ready in the morning, and come up in the
morning unto mount Sinai, and present thyself there to
me in the top of the mount.
23
The Lord again wrote the Ten Commandments (Decalogue)
while Moses was on the summit; and after 40 days had passed,
Moses descended with the two new tablets.
In the year 1446 B.C., the 40th year after the Exodus, and a
year having a Thursday New Year’s Day, the Lord separated the
waters of the Jordan River, thus making it possible for the Israel-
ites to safely cross on the riverbed to the land of Canaan. This
event happened on Nisan 10. “And the people came up out of
Jordan on the tenth day of the first month, . . .
24
In the year of the
Jordan crossing the date Nisan 10 fell on the Sabbath, the identi-
cal day of the week on which the Decalogue was given.
In the year 1006 B.C., centuries after the Jordan crossing and
another year having a Thursday New Year’s Day, the foundation
of the first temple was laid. The year of this happening was ex-
actly one millennium prior to 6 B.C., the year of the Lord’s con-
ception.
Additional Old Testament happenings occurring in Thursday
New Year's Day years are the year of the temple dedication in
986 B.C., the year of Isaiah's vision in 759 B.C., and king
Hezekiah's rededication of the temple in 725 B.C. What we find
significant about 725 B.C. was that their worship service occurred
on Nisan 17, the identical date and Sabbath on which Jesus rose
from death many centuries later.
As can be seen here, the Lord in Old Testament times has
caused a number of significant events to occur in years having
Thursday New Year’s Days. It is because of this consistent Thurs-
day pattern as well as with a variety of other patterns that we
have been able to decipher the calendar code and acquire a glimpse
123
of the Lord’s involvement within the historical context. From
this, we can say truly that the Bible is the Word of God and is the
only source to which humans should look for spiritual enlighten-
ment.
Islam
Another religion, we are told, which has its roots extending
far back into Old Testament history is Islam. Though its roots
may extend into the distant past, the religion of Islam really be-
gan in the seventh century A.D. with Muhammad.
Muhammad was born about A.D. 570. Of his parents little is
known, for they died while he was a child. He was cared for by
his grandfather and later by an uncle. He was kindly treated, but
shared the hardships of a poor family. He often herded sheep and
gathered wild berries in the desert. It was not until he became a
young man and entered the caravan business that he was able to
provide for himself.
At the age of twenty-five, he was employed by a wealthy
widow, named Khadija. She sent him on several caravan trips to
other regions and soon discovered that he was very dependable
and trustworthy. As time passed they began to show a mutual
interest in each other and eventually married. As they began to
prosper, Muhammad had more time to contemplate on the prob-
lems in the world and ways to solve them. Frequently his thoughts
would turn to religion and the differing faiths in the region.
While sitting in a cave in one of these contemplative moods,
an angel appeared and commanded Muhammad to “recite” the
word of God. Either because he misunderstood the request or
failed to respond with alacrity, the angel grasped him by the throat
and compelled him to speak. Badly shaken by this experience,
he promptly returned home and informed his wife, Khadija, of
the vision. She listened intently as he related his strange encoun-
ter and became convinced that he had truly received a heavenly
revelation. Although her comforting words were an encourage-
124
ment to him, he still had lingering questions and doubts about the
angelic encounter. For a time the doubts concerned him, but as
time passed he was seized by the conviction that he had a mes-
sage to convey and he began preaching.
At the beginning of his ministry, Muhammad gained but few
converts. His cousin, Ali, who later became a leader (caliph) in
the movement, was the first male convert. Abu Bakr, his first
caliph, also accepted his message. It was not until some time had
passed and he had gained fifty or more converts that he began to
speak sharply against the idols of the Kaaba, a cube-shaped shrine
in Mecca. His attack on the sacred idols alarmed the Meccans,
and they began to persecute Muhammad and his followers. A
number of his party fled the city.
In 619 Khadija died. She evidently exercised great control
over Muhammad, for it was not until after her death that he be-
gan the practice of polygamy.
In 620 some visitors from the town of Yathrib, later called
Medina, heard Muhammad preach and twelve of them accepted
his message. The following year seventy-three additional mem-
bers were added to his group. Since most of his converts ap-
peared to be coming from Yathrib, he and his followers decided
to move there in 622. A number of his followers
. . .preceded him to Yathrib, on July 16, 622. He himself,
accompanied by Abu-Bakr, followed, arriving there Sep-
tember 24, 622. Yathrib was hence called Medina (al-
Madinah, the city [of the prophet]). The migration was
termed Hegira (hijrah). It constituted a turning point in
the career of Mohammed, indeed in the history of Islam.
This date, July 16, 622, became the earliest fixed point
in Moslem chronology, and was chosen as the starting
point of the new calendar.
25
Most of the inhabitants of Medina welcomed Muhammed. It
125
was here that he gained a large number of converts and began to
exercise considerable political influence. It was also from here
that he would send out bands of followers to attack caravans and
bring back the spoils. As additional converts embraced Islam the
more able-bodied joined the attackers which increased the force
to a small army.
A significant number of the Medina population were Jews.
At first they were sympathetic with Muhammad’s goals because
they felt that he would be a stabilizing influence in that city of
unrest. Furthermore, what little they had heard of his doctrines
seemed to be compatible with their own beliefs. When they fi-
nally discovered that he not only claimed to have had fresh rev-
elations but also considered himself to be the sole prophet of that
period in history, they turned against him. He later massacred
several hundred of them, for he believed that many were secretly
working with the Meccans in an attempt to overthrow him.
In A.D. 629 Muhammad and the Meccans settled their dis-
putes with a truce. This agreement contained a paragraph grant-
ing to the Muslims the right to enter Mecca and to visit the Kaaba
for a thirty-day period that year.
The truce did not last, however, and the following year, 630,
Muhammad and his forces advanced upon the city and captured
it. Muhammad went immediately to the Kaaba and circled it
seven times. He then entered the structure and touched with his
staff a black stone that is located therein and which, we are told,
is sacred. On exiting the cubicle he led his followers in the noon-
day prayer in the name of Allah. He then commanded that all the
idols in the Kaaba be removed and destroyed. Later he returned
to Medina and lived there.
Two years later, in 632, on Monday, June 8, Muhammad died.
Tradition says that Abu Bakr, the newly elected khalifah
(caliph, successor), said to the sorrowing faithful: ‘If you
are worshipers of Mohammed, know that he is dead. If
126
you are worshipers of God, know that God is living and
does not die.’ Thus Mohammed’s life ended as his preach-
ing had begun, in the absolute devotion, amounting to
self-effacement, of the man to the mission.
26
Most scholars who study the life of Muhammad are in agree-
ment that he was an able military leader and administrator. By
means of a number of effective military thrusts he was able to
acquire large tracts of land and many diverse tribes of people
within a short period of time. He subdued any thoughts of rebel-
lion by treating the conquered tribes fairly and by redirecting their
attention from a plethora of obscure gods to the one god, Allah.
During this period of conquest, Muhammad asserted that he
frequently received visions from the Angel Gabriel. At first he
had concerns about the source of the visions, but after a number
of visitations accepted the visions and the messenger as reliable.
After his death, a number of his followers compiled all of the
angelic sayings into the Koran, which became the sacred scrip-
tures of Islam. Muslims believe that these scriptures are the last
and most revealing of the words of the Almighty and that wher-
ever they disagree with the scriptures of other religions, they su-
percede these other writings.
In some areas the Koran parallels the Judeo-Christian Scrip-
tures, though in places it does not. In the Koran, frequent men-
tion is made of the creation story as well as of Noah, Abraham,
Moses, and Jesus.
Disturbing questions arise concerning the portions of the Ko-
ran that are not in agreement with the Judeo-Christian Scriptures.
The Judeo-Christian Scriptures were written centuries before
Muhammad’s birth and the writing of the Koran. If the Judeo-
Christian Scriptures were originally written under Divine impe-
tus and are representative of the words of the Almighty, then it is
inconceivable that either He or His messenger should appear at a
later time in history and contradict that which had been previ-
127
ously revealed as truth. To do so would not only bring into ques-
tion the integrity and motive of the messenger, but also that of
the Almighty Himself.
One area in which the Koran differs from the Judeo-Chris-
tian Scriptures is in the calendar. The Bible indicates that at the
time of the Exodus the Lord revealed and gave to Isreal His cal-
endar.
And the LORD spake unto Moses and Aaron in the land
of Egypt saying, This month shall be unto you the begin-
ning of months: It shall be the first month of the year to
you.
27
This calendar was a lunisolar calendar. It was lunar in that
each month began with a new moon. It was solar by the fact that
the first month of the year, Nisan (Abib) was linked to the vernal
equinox so that a retrogressing of the months to other seasons
could not happen.
The calendar of the Koran, on the other hand, is lunar only.
Because it is not linked to the vernal equinox, a continual retro-
gressing of the months occurs so that a full cycle of the months
through all the seasons of the year takes place in about thirty-two
and a half years.
It is apparent from these facts that these two calendars are not
the same. Because this is so, we ask, Why are they different?
Has the Lord adopted a new calendar in place of the old? There
certainly is no evidence to support such an idea, for the Lord’s
calendar patterns appear only in the earlier calendar. They do not
appear in the calendar of Islam. For example, the Lord’s calen-
dar shows us a relationship between the date of Ezekiel’s first
vision and the date of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. Can
the Islamic calendar do the same? No, it cannot. The Lord’s
calendar reveals that a millennial span separated the year 1006
B.C., the year beginning the constructing of Solomon’s temple,
128
from 6 B.C., the year of Jesus’ conception. Can the Islamic cal-
endar show us that span? No, it cannot. The Lord’s calendar
reveals that King Hezekiah and the Israelites, after cleansing the
temple, entered that edifice for worship on Nisan 17, which cen-
turies later was the identical date on which Jesus rose from the
grave. Can the Islamic calendar reveal that to us? No, it cannot.
The Lord’s calendar reveals that the Apollo 8 moon venture be-
gan within 7 hours of the winter solstice. Can the calendar of
Islam reveal that to us? No, it cannot.
Many additional facts could be given but are certainly not
needed to support the Bible calendar as the true calendar of the
Almighty. One other fact, though, that must be included and
should be of especial interest to the Muslims as regards the reve-
latory nature of the Bible calendar and the non-revelatory nature
of the Islamic calendar concerns the year A.D. 622, the year of
the Hegira itself. The Hegira, which occurred on July 16, is re-
garded as the beginning of the Muslim era. Many Muslims con-
sider the Hegira to be the most important happening in Muslim
history. Of interest here is that the calendar of the Koran, for the
year 622 reveals no significant pattern, while on the other hand,
the Bible calendar does so. In the year 622 the new moon for
Nisan 1, the New Year’s Day in God’s calendar, occurred within
twenty-four hours of the vernal equinox as also happened in A.D.
30, the year of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection, and in 1939,
the year in which World War II began. The Bible calendar also
reveals for 622 that the Hegira occurred on the 120th day after
the vernal equinox. Now if the calendar of the Koran, is truly the
calendar of the Almighty, then why does it not reveal these con-
sistent patterns to us? Why is it that only by means of the Bible
calendar we can make these discoveries?
Another disturbing question that arises is, why did Muhammad
and his companions, who lived in the seventh century not make
129
note of the vernal equinox - new moon pattern of March 18 in
the year 622 and recognize it as a part of God’s calendar code?
Why would they begin a calendar in July which does not con-
tain God’s calendar code in place of accepting the Lord’s cal-
endar which began with Nisan in March of that year and one
which does contain that code. If they were truly representing
the Lord, they should have recognized God’s calendar code
and have adopted God’s calendar for the Islamic nation.
God's lunisolar calendar begins in the spring season. It was
revealed to Israel at the Exodus and extends from that time to
the present day. It has not been changed, altered or supplanted
by the lunar calendar of the Koran or any other calendar. It is
only through the calendar patterns of God's calendar, and not
by any other calendar, that we can observe His involvement in
history.
Another question of concern that arises here is that con-
cerning the seventh-day Sabbath. Both the Koran and the
Judeo-Christian Scriptures acknowledge that the Almighty in
six days prepared the earth for Adam and Eve’s habitation.
The following day, the seventh day, the Lord rested from His
labors, and because of this rest, He blessed and sanctified that
day.
Why did Muhammad recognize the six days of Creation
but reject or ignore God’s blessing and sanctifying of the Sab-
bath? Because he failed to make this recognition and because
the Sabbath is an integral part of God’s calendar, Muhammad
cast away the very means by which he could have deciphered
God’s calendar code.
Because the Bible calendar brings into focus serious ques-
tions concerning the calendar of the Koran and their understand-
130
ing of the Sabbath, Muslims should make a reassessment of their
beliefs in the light of God’s Word, the Bible. It is, after all, the
calendar of the Bible, and not the calendar of the Koran, that is
revealing God’s involvement in the historical context, and since
this is so, it is to the Bible we must turn if we are to learn of God.
We invite Muslims, as well as those in other religions, to turn to
the words of the Bible and live by them, for it is by God’s sacred
promises in that Holy Book that we have an assurance of our
fellowship with Him now as well as in the life hereafter.
131
Chapter VIII
CONCLUSION
The Lord has chosen to reveal His involvement in history
by the use of special dates and selected patterns in His calendar.
By exercising His control over the major events in history and
making them occur on special dates and in selected patterns, the
Lord makes clear to us not only His interest in but also His ability
to govern earthly happenings. One area in which His involve-
ment can clearly be seen is that of wars. The following table
which lists a number of the significant wars in history reveals a
repetitive use of a Friday-Saturday New Year’s Day pattern.
Wars & Battles
Year Event V.E. Nisan 1
B.C. 336 Philip Murdered (Summer) Fri. Fri.
March 25 April 8
B.C. 334 Battle of Granicus Mon. Sat.
(May/June) March 26 March 17
B.C. 333 Battle of Issus (Autumn) Tue. Fri.
March 25 April 4
B.C. 168 Maccabeean Revolt Thu. Sat.
(December) March 24 March 12
A.D. 66 Jewish War began Sat. Sat.
March 22 March 15
A.D. 70 Titus attacked Jerusalem Thu. Sat.
March 22 March 31
A.D. 476 Odoacer became King Fri. Fri.
(Aug. 23) March 19 March 12
A.D. 489 Theodoric conquered Sun. Sun.
Odoacer March 19 March 19 ✽
132
Wars & Battles (cont.)
Year Event V.E. Nisan 1
A.D. 527 Justinian became sole Fri. Fri.
Emperor (Aug. 1) March 19 March 19
A.D. 535 Belisaruis subdued Italy Mon. Tue.
March 19 March 20
A.D. 1066 Battle of Hastings (Oct. 14) Wed. Wed.
March 15 March 29
A.D. 1099 Jerusalem captured Tue. Fri.
(First Crusade (July 15)) March 15 March 25
A.D. 1291 Acre conquered Tue. Sat.
March 13 March 3
A.D. 1429 Joan of Arc's victory Sat. Sun.
over England March 12 March 6
A.D. 1588 Spanish Armada defeated Sun. Mon.
(Aug. 8, July 29 O.S.) March 20 March 28
(March 10:O.S) (March 18:O.S)
A.D. 1775 American Revolutionary Mon. Sat.
War began March 20 April 1
A.D. 1789 French Revolution Fri. Fri.
March 20 March 27
A.D. 1914 World War I began Sat. Fri.
March 21 March 27
A.D. 1939 World War II began Tue. Wed.
March 21 March 22
A.D. 2001 Destruction of Tue. Mon.
World Trade Center March 20 March 26
Another type of year often used by the Lord for special occa-
sions was the year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Thurs-
day. It was in this type of year that such special events as the
Exodus, Jesus’ birth, Jesus’ resurrection, and the recent estab-
lishing of the nation of Israel occurred.


133
A listing of these and other happenings are included in the
following table.
Thursday Pattern
Significant Events
Year Event V.E. Nisan 1
B.C. 1916 Jacob entered Egypt Tue. Thu.
April 6 April 15
B.C. 1486 The Exodus Fri. Thu.
April 4 April 3
B.C. 1446 The Jordan Crossing Fri. Thu.
April 3 April 9
B.C. 1006 Temple Foundation laid Sat. Thu.
March 31 March 25
B.C. 986 Temple Dedication Wed. Thu.
March 31 March 25
B.C. 759 Isaiah's vision Fri. Thu.
March 29 April 4
B.C. 593 Ezekiel's first vision Mon. Thu.
March 27 March 30
B.C. 573 Ezekiel's vision Fri. Thu.
March 27 March 19
B.C. 536 Daniel's vision Tue. Thu.
March 27 March 29
B.C. 5 Jesus' Birth Wed. Thu.
March 22 March 9
A.D. 30 Jesus' Crucifixion, Thu. Thu.
Resurrection & Ascension March 23 March 23
A.D. 1431 Joan of Arc burned Mon. Thu.
at the stake March 12 March 15
A.D. 1776 Declaration of Independence Wed. Thu.
March 20 March 21
A.D. 1948 Jewish Nation established Sat. Thu.
March 20 March 11


134
Special repetitive numerical spans were also a part of the
Lord’s calendar patterns. One of several periods which appeared
frequently was one composed of forty days.
40-day and 40-year periods
Year Event Span
B.C. 1486 Moses’ first visit to Sinai summit. 40 days and
40 nights.
B.C. 1486 Moses’ second visit to Sinai summit. 40 days and
40 nights.
B.C. 45 Julian calendar began. 40 years to
5 B.C.
A.D. 26 Jesus’ temptation. 40 days and
40 nights.
A.D. 30 Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection 40th year prior
to A.D. 70.
A.D. 337 Constantine died 40th day after
Nisan 24
A.D. 1607 Jamestown settlement 40th day after
(arrived May 13 O.S.). Nisan 17.
A.D. 1776 Declaration of Independence 40th day after
(July 4). Pentecost.
A.D. 1906 San Francisco and Valparaiso, 120 days (three
Chili quakes (April 18, August 16). 40-day periods)
apart.
A.D. 1945 First atomic blast in history 80 days (two
(July 16). 40-day periods)
after Yiar 14
A.D. 1958 Submarine Nautilus’ transpolar 120 days (three
voyage (Aug. 4, Jerusalem time). 40-day periods)
after April 6.
A.D. 1961 Alan Shepard’s sub-orbital flight 40th day after
(May 5). Nisan 10.
135
A seventy-day period also appeared in the calendar patterns.
70-day periods
Year Event Period
B.C. 593 Ezekiel's first vision (Tamuz 5) 70th day after
Nisan 24.
A.D. 1492 Columbus’ discovery of 70 days from
New World Aug. 3 to Oct. 12.
A.D. 1776 Lee resolution 70th day after
Nisan 10.
A.D. 1789 French Revolution (July 14) 70th day after
Yiar 10.
A.D. 1869 Linking of transcontinental 70th day
railroad before Ab 10
A.D. 1914 World War I began (June 28) 70th day after
Nisan 24
A.D. 1926 First liquid propelled rocket flight 70th day prior to
(March 16) May 25, Pentecost
A.D. 1961 Yuri Gagarin’s historic flight 70th day before
summer solstice.
A.D. 1970 Peruvian earthquake (May 31) 70th day after
Nisan 15.
A.D. 2001 World Trade Center (Sept 11) 70th day after
July 4
(ordinal count)
Another span which appeared frequently was one composed
of one hundred fifty-three days.
136
153-day periods
Year Event Period
B.C. 592 Ezekiel’s vision 153rd day after
Nisan 1
(ordinal count)
B.C. 606 Nebuchadnezzar attacked Jerusalem 153 years after
(3rd year of Jehoiakim) 759 B.C. (Isaiah's
vision)
A.D. 30 Jesus’ miracle 153 fish netted
by disciples
A.D. 1774 First Continental Congress 153rd day after
Nisan 24
A.D. 1906 San Francisco earthquake 153 days prior to
the new moon
(Sept 18) for Tisri 1
A.D. 1923 Japan earthquake 153 days after
Nisan 15
A.D. 1939 World War II began (Sept. 3) 153 days after
Nisan 14 (April 4)
A.D. 1944 First V-2 rockets launched against 153 days after
Paris (Sept. 6) April 6
A.D. 1944 First V-2 rocket attack on London 153 days after
(Sept. 8) Nisan 15
A.D. 1945 End of World War II 153rd day after
(Sept. 2) April 3
(ordinal count)
A.D. 1952 First thermonuclear explosion 153 days prior to
(Nov. 1) April 3, 1953
A.D. 2001 World Trade Center Destruction 153rd day after
Nisan 17
The repetitive consistency of these calendar patterns reveals
clearly the Lord’s working within the historical context. By the
patterns' very simplicity and clarity, even a grade school child
can see God’s handiwork. This does not mean, of course, that all
137
patterns are simple and easy to understand. Nothing could be
farther from the truth, for many complex patterns appear in the
calendar code. Yet, in spite of this, the Lord has included a suffi-
cient number of the easy-to-understand patterns so that even a
child studying the code can see evidence of the Lord’s involve-
ment in history.
Something we all can learn from these patterns is that God
does truly exist. We need no longer listen to the theories of the
atheists and “no God” theorists. The calendar code puts to rest
once and for all time the arguments supporting a “no God” con-
cept. God does exist because His well designed calendar pat-
terns confirm that He does, and that ends the matter.
Because we are now aware that God exists, we now know
that the Bible is truly God’s Word, for God’s calendar and calen-
dar code came from the Bible only. No other book, no other
scriptures, and no other source contains God’s calendar code. The
Bible and only the Bible is the source of that code and the source
of God’s words.
Realizing that God exists and the Bible is His means of com-
municating with us makes the words of that book all the more
meaningful. This is especially true of the words and works of
Jesus, for Jesus made it unmistakably clear that He, as a member
of the Godhead, visited Earth to ransom His life in order to give
life and hope to humans. Because of the sin of Adam and Eve, all
humans have been cut off from God and condemned to a fiery
end. In order to give us a hope for a future life, Jesus, by visiting
Earth, taking on the nature of man, living a sinless life, and dying
took upon Himself the sins that separate us from God. Because
He rose from the grave after three days as He promised, He has
the power to forgive and remove all sins of those who repent of
their past and accept Him as their savior.
The Bible also tells us of God’s special day, the seventh-day
Sabbath. On the seventh day of the week of Adam’s creation,
God rested from His creative activity. Because of that rest, He
138
set apart the seventh day as a special day. As the Scriptures say
“And God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it:...”
3
This special recognition of the seventh day by the Lord has
never been changed or altered. It extends through all of history
even to our day. This fact is confirmed by the calendar code, for
this calendar code, of which the seventh-day Sabbath is an inte-
gral part, has itself never been changed. The identical patterns of
the Old Testament times extend through the New Testament times
as well.
If God had replaced the seventh-day Sabbath with the first
day of the week (Sunday) at Jesus’ resurrection as is claimed by
the church, then a change in the patterns would have taken place,
for a change in the day would have made a change in the patterns
since the seventh day was an integral part of the pattern code.
The fact that no change in the patterns has ever occurred settles
the issue once and for all time as to the validity of the seventh day
being God’s special day. It always has been, is, and always will
be special to Him.
The calendar code is another of God’s means of revealing
Himself to mankind. It is truly an exciting and fascinating code,
for it covers all the periods of history whether past, present, or
future. It also is another means by which we can learn of God’s
awesome infinite knowledge and being. There is so much more
we can learn from God. Since the calendar code is of the Bible,
it points us directly to the Bible as the true source of knowledge
of the Almighty. Since this is so, let us turn to that Holy Book to
learn of our Creator and of the One who determines the number
of our days, not only in this life, but also of a future life as well.
139
Predictions
Since the calendar code reveals God's involvement in his-
tory, could we locate years for future events by extending that
code forward? Extending the code into the future is not difficult.
What makes our task difficult is our partial knowledge of the
code and sub-codes. For example, Ezekiel received a vision in a
Thursday New Year's Day year on the fifth day of the fourth month,
a Sabbath in the fifth year of Jehoiakin. Daniel, many years after
Ezekiel had received his vision, also received a vision. His vi-
sion also occurred in a Thursday New Year's Day year on a Sab-
bath but on the 24th day of the first month. Now why did both
visions occur on their respective dates? The answer is because
they were 70-days apart, and a 70-day period is significant to the
Lord. However, this only gives us a partial answer, for other peri-
ods in nearby years were also 70-days apart and Sabbath days.
Why were they not chosen by the Lord for the visions? We do not
have an answer to this because we have but a partial knowledge of
the code.
One instance in which we have a fuller knowledge of the code
is revealed in Ezekiel's second vision (Ezek. 8:1). That vision,
which occurred on the fifth day of the sixth month, was also a
Sabbath, but since there are 52 Sabbaths in a year, why was that
particular day selected. The answer appears to be because it was
the 153rd day (ordinal count) after Nisan 1, the New Year's Day.
The number 153 was mentioned only once in the Scriptures and
that occurred after Jesus' resurrection, but it has appeared several
times in the code throughout history. The Lord, by tying the date
of Ezekiel's second vision to the New Year's Day, makes that code
more understandable than that of his first vision.
From this, we can see the difficulty in applying the code to
future events. Our lack of knowledge of a part of the code pre-
vents us from being able to predict all future events accurately.
140
As an example of this, back in 1962, during the Cuban Missile
crisis, many people became frightened that World War III, was
about to begin. Even with my limited knowledge of the code, I
felt that a third world war would not begin in 1962 but would
begin three years later in 1965. History shows that I was right in
one situation and wrong in the other. In the 70's, though, I achieved
another success, for I located beforehand a year in which a major
earthquake should occur, and it did so.
To answer the question, can we predict events with the calen-
dar code? With careful study we can achieve moderate success in
it, and that is about the best we can do at the present time.
141
Chapter Notes
Chapter I
1. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Gen. 2:2-3.
2. Ibid., Ex. 20:8-11.
3. Ibid., Ex. 31:16-17.
4. Irving Werstein, The Many Faces of World War I, New York: (Julian
Messner, 1963), p. 17.
5. Ibid., p. 18.
6. Louis L. Snyder, The War, (New York: Julian Messner, 1960), p. 26.
7. Ibid., p. 38.
8. William Whiston, A. M., (Josephus) Antiquities of the Jews. (New York:
Virtue, Emmins, and Co.), p. 693.
9. Ibid., p. 820.
10. Ibid., p. 822.
11. Benjamin Ide Wheeler, Alexander the Great, (Freeport, New York:
Books for Libraries Press, 1900), pp. 365-368.
12. Wheeler, p. 284.
13. “New Persian Empire of the Sassanidea,” Library of Universal His-
tory (New York: Union Book Co., 1906), Vol. 5, pp. 1689-1690.
14. Harold Lamb, Constantinople, (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1957),
pp. 115 and 118.
15. Lamb, pp. 143-144.
16. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Jer. 5:15.
142
17. Ibid., Jer. 6:19.
18. Ibid., Lev. 26:3-6.
143
Chapter Notes
Chapter II
1. Frank W. Lane, The Elements Rage, (Philadelphia: Chilton Books,
1965), p. 201.
2. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Gen. 6:13-14, Gen. 19:24-25.
3. Ibid., Num. 16:32-33.
4. Ibid., Ex. 19:18
5. Ibid., Matt. 27:51.
6. Ibid., Matt. 28:2.
7. Bryce Walker and the editors of Time-Life Books, paraphrased from
Planet Earth: Earthquake, (Alexandria, Virginia: © 1982 Time-Life
Books, Inc.) p. 23.
8. “Major Earthquakes,” The World Alamanac and Book of Facts 1984,
(New York: Newspaper Enterprise Association, Inc., 1983), p. 698.
9. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Lev. 23:39.
10. “Major Earthquakes,” The World Alamanac and Book of Facts, p. 698.
11. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Ezek. 8:1.
12. Ibid., John 21:1-10.
13. Ibid., John 21:11.
14. “Major Earthquakes,” The World Alamanac and Book of Facts, p. 698.
15. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Jer. 25:11.
16. Ibid., Dan. 9:24.
144
17. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Rev. 6:12-13.
18. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Nahum 1:3.
19. Lane, p. 61.
20. Billye Walker Brown and Walter R. Brown, Hurricanes and Torna-
does, (Reading, Massachusetts, Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1972),
p. 157.
21. Richard M. DeAngelis and Elmer R. Nelson, Hurricane Camille, U.S.
Department of Commerce, ESSA’s Climatological Data, National Sum-
mary, Vol. 20, No. 8, 1969.
22. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Ezek. 8:18
145
Chapter Notes
Chapter III
1. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Gen. 1:1-31.
2. Ibid., John 12:1-13
3. “Calendar,” The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia, (New York: Isaac
Landman, 1940), Vol. 2, p. 632.
4. “Calendar,” History of, The Jewish Encyclopedia, (New York: KTAV
Publishing House, Inc., 1925) vol. III, p. 499.
5. Ibid., Vol. III, p. 499.
6. R.A. Torrey, Difficulties in the Bible, (Chicago: The Moody Press,
1907), p. 106.
7. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Matt. 12:39-40.
8. Ibid., Luke 24:1-3.
9. Ibid., Matt. 12:40.
10. William Whiston, A.M. (Josephus), Antiquities of the Jews, (New York:
Virtue, Emmins, and Co.), Vol. 1, p. 293.
11. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Mark 15:42.
12. Ibid., Lev. 23:6-7.
13. Ibid., John 19:14-16.
14. Ibid., Matt. 28:4.
15. Ibid., Luke 23:56.
16. Ibid., Luke 24:10-12.
146
17. “Easter,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th Ed., (New York: Charles
Scribner’s & Sons, 1878), Vol. VII, p. 614.
18. Ibid., p. 615.
19. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Matt. 28:19-20.
147
Chapter Notes
Chapter IV
1. “Lee, Richard Henry,” The World Book Encyclopedia, (Chicago: World
Book Inc., 1985), Vol. 12, p. 154.
2. “Articles of Confederation,” Encyclopedia Americana, (Danbury, Con-
necticut: Grolier Inc., 1974), Vol. 2, p. 413.
3. “Louisiana Purchase,” Encyclopedia Americana, Vol. 17, p. 800.
4. “Israel, State of,” Encyclopedia Judaica, (Jerusalem, Israel: Keter Pub-
lishing House Ltd., 1971), Vol. 9, pp. 364-365.
5. Portland (Me.) Press Herald, May 13, 1948, p. 1, Col. 5.
6. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Acts 2:1-6.
7. Ibid., Psalm 33:6-9.
8. Ibid., I Chron. 29:11-12
148
Chapter Notes
Chapter V
1. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Gen. 6:14.
2. Sarah R. Riedman, Men and Women Behind the Atom, (London:
Abelard-Schuman Limited). pp. 71-72.
3. Ibid., p. 75.
4. Ibid., p. 76.
5. Ibid., p. 79.
6. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Hag. 2:10-20.
7. The New York Times, August 7, 1945, p. 99, Col. 1.
8. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Num. 1:1-3.
149
Chapter Notes
Chapter VI
1. “Christopher Columbus,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th Ed., (New
York: Charles Scribner’s & Sons, 1878), Vol. VI, p. 172.
2. Ibid., p. 173.
3. “John Smith,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th Ed., (New York: Charles
Scribner’s & Sons, 1878), Vol. 22, p. 175.
4. Robert E. Peary, Northward Over the Great Ice, (New York: Frederick
A. Stokes Company, 1898), p. 10.
5. Ibid., p. 14.
6. Robert E. Peary, Nearest the Pole, (New York: Doubleday, Page and
Company, 1907), pp. 58-59.
7. Robert E. Peary, The North Pole, (New York: Frederick A. Stokes Com-
pany, 1910), pp. 134-135.
8. Ibid., p. 288.
9. Commander William R. Anderson, Nautilus 90 North, (Cleveland: The
World Publishing Company, 1959), p. 208-209.
10. Goddard Library, Dr. Goddard’s Diary. Worcester, MA: Clark Univer-
sity, March 16, 1926.
11. "World War II", The World Book Encyclopedia, (Chicago: World Book
Inc., 1985) Vol. 21, P. 395
12. The Holy Bible, King James Version, II Ki. 25:8.
13. Ibid., Jer. 52:12-14.
150
14. William Whiston, A. M., (Josephus) Wars of the Jews, (New York:
Virtue, Emmins, and Co.,), p. 822.
15. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Ezek. 20:1-2.
151
Chapter Notes
Chapter VII
1. Huston Smith, The Religions of Man, (New York: The New American
Library, 1958), p. 93.
2. Ibid., p. 93.
3. Ibid., p. 93.
4. Kenneth Morgan, The Path of the Buddha, (New York: The Ronald
Press Company, 1956), p. 76.
5. Jean Bothwell, The Story of India, (New York: Harcourt, Brace and
World, Inc., 1952), pp. 44-45.
6. “Confucius and His Religion,” Library of Universal History, (New York:
Union Book Company, 1906), Vol. II, p. 687.
7. “Confucius,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, (New York: Charles Scribner’s
Son’s, 1878), Vol. VI, p. 260.
8. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Acts 7:2-4.
9. Ibid., Gen. 12:1-2.
10. Ibid., Gen. 15:2-18.
11. Ibid., Gen. 22:16-18.
12. Ibid., Ex. 1:22.
13. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Num. 33:3.
14. Ibid., Ex. 16:1.
15. Ibid., Ex. 16:4-26.
152
16. Ibid., Ex. 19:1.
17. Ibid., Ex. 19:10-11.
18. Ibid., Ex. 19:16-20.
19. Ibid., Ex. 20:1-17.
20. Theodore Brash, The Judaic Heritage, (New York: David McKay Com-
pany, Inc., 1969), p. 56.
21. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Ex. 24:16-18.
22. Ibid., Deut. 9:15-18.
23. Ibid., Ex. 34:1-2.
24. Ibid., Josh. 4:19.
25. “Mohammad,” Encyclopedia Americana, (Danbury, Connecticut:
Grolier Inc., 1974), Vol. 19, p. 293.
26. “Mohammed,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1966, Vol. 15, p. 643.
27. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Ex. 12:1-2.
153
Chapter Notes
Chapter VIII
1. “Chronology,” Encyclopaedia Britannica, (New York: Charles
Scribner’s Son’s, 1878), Vol. 5, pp. 725, 730, 733, 735, 744, and 745.
2. “History,” The Volume Library, (New York: Educators Association,
1938), pp. 268 and 272.
3. The Holy Bible, King James Version, Gen. 2:3.
154
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A.D. 1918 Ibid., P. 230
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171
A
Ab (Fifth Month)
Second Day, 102
Seventh Day, 102
Tenth Day, 16, 74, 103, 135
Nineteenth Day, 97
Abraham, 4, 113, 114, 115, 126
Adam, 4, 129, 137
Alaska, 30, 96
Aldrin, Edwin, Jr., 102
Alexander The Great, 17, 18, 19
Almighty, 30, 45, 51, 71, 82, 102,
110, 126, 127, 128, 129, 138
Anders, William A. 101, 102
Anderson, William, U.S.N., 96, 97
Apollo 8: 101, 128
Apollo 11: 101, 102
April,
Third Day, 39, 83, 136
Fifth Day, 39, 51, 52, 55
Sixth Day, 11, 12, 55, 95, 97,
99, 134, 136
Seventh Day, 37, 55, 56
Eighth Day, 11, 52
Eleventh Day, 38
Twelfth Day, 100
Fourteenth Day, 23
Fifteenth Day, 24
Eighteenth Day, 31, 62, 134
Twenth-fifth Day, 62
Twenty-sixth Day, 88
Armstrong, Neil, 102
Articles
of the Barons, 64, 65
of Confederation, 67
August
Third Day, 86, 88, 97, 135
Fourth Day, 97
Twelfth Day, 83
Seventeen, 43
B
Bastille, 24
Becquerel, Henri, 77, 78, 79
Belisarius, 19-22, 26, 132
Bible (Lord’s) Calendar, 7, 8, 25,
26, 31, 35, 36, 45, 47, 48, 49,
50, 51, 59, 62, 64, 70, 71, 81,
97, 98, 100, 101, 102, 103,
104, 127, 128, 129, 130
Borman, Frank, 101, 102
Buddhism, 104, 106, 110
Index
172
C
Calendar, Islamic, 124, 127
Calendar, Jewish, 47, 49
Calendar Code, 7, 15, 17, 19, 33,
45, 49, 51, 104, 110, 122, 127,
129, 134, 136, 137, 138
Camille, Hurricane, 42, 43, 44
Collins, Michael, 102
Columbia 102
Columbus, Christopher, 85, 86, 87,
88, 135
Confucius, 110, 111, 112, 113
Congress, First Continental, 65, 66,
67, 136
Constantine, 134
Constitution, United States, 65, 68
Crucifixion, 12, 14, 30, 35, 36, 39,
46, 47, 50, 51, 55, 57, 61, 62,
64, 83, 128, 133, 134
Crucifixion, Friday, 50, 51, 52, 54,
56, 57, 58
Crucifixion, Wednesday, 50, 51,
52, 54, 56
Crucifixion, Year, 47, 49, 51, 55,
68, 82
Curie, Pierre and Marie, 77, 78
D
Daniel, 31, 34, 133
Dates
B.C. 4001: 47
B.C. 1916: 133
B.C. 1486: 56, 70, 133, 134
B.C. 1446: 56, 122, 133
B.C. 1006: 56, 122, 127, 133
B.C. 1001: 46, 47
B.C. 1000: 72
B.C. 986: 56, 122, 133
B.C. 759: 56, 122, 133, 136
B.C. 725: 122
B.C. 606: 136
B.C. 593: 8, 9, 11, 133, 135
B.C. 592: 8, 9, 32, 35, 136
B.C. 573: 8, 9, 133
B.C. 536: 31, 133
B.C. 520: 76
B.C. 336: 17, 131
B.C. 335: 17
B.C. 334: 17, 25, 131
B.C. 333: 25, 131
B.C. 331: 18
B.C. 6: 122, 128
B.C. 5: 57, 133, 134
A.D. 26: 134
A.D. 28: 50
A.D. 29: 50
173
A.D. 30: 11, 12, 14, 23, 45,
46, 50, 51, 52, 55, 56, 57, 64,
68, 70, 82, 98, 128, 133, 134,
136
A.D. 31: 50
A.D. 32: 50
A.D. 33: 50
A.D. 66: 14, 15, 25, 131
A.D. 70: 15, 25, 60, 131, 134
A.D. 337: 134
A.D. 387: 62
A.D. 455: 62
A.D. 476: 25, 131
A.D. 489: 26, 131
A.D. 527: 26, 132
A.D. 533: 21, 22
A.D. 535: 26, 132
A.D. 536: 22
A.D. 537: 22
A.D. 620: 124
A.D. 622: 124, 128, 129
A.D. 629: 125
A.D. 630: 125
A.D. 632: 125
A.D. 1066: 132
A.D. 1099: 132
A.D. 1215: 64
A.D. 1216: 65
A.D. 1290: 31
A.D. 1291: 132
A.D. 1429: 132
A.D. 1431: 133
A.D. 1492: 86, 135
A.D. 1588: 132
A.D. 1607: 88, 134
A.D. 1755: 34
A.D. 1763: 23
A.D. 1770: 23
A.D. 1773: 23
A.D. 1774: 23, 65, 136
A.D. 1775: 23, 24, 26, 132
A.D. 1776: 57, 66, 68, 133,
134, 135
A.D. 1780: 35
A.D. 1786: 67
A.D. 1787: 24, 67, 68
A.D. 1788: 24, 68
A.D. 1789: 24, 132, 135
A.D. 1795: 68
A.D. 1800: 47, 68
A.D. 1803: 69
A.D. 1805: 47
A.D. 1812: 25, 26
A.D. 1833: 35
A.D. 1859: 72
A.D. 1861: 25
A.D. 1868: 75
A.D. 1869: 74, 135
A.D. 1870: 76
A.D. 1879: 76
A.D. 1895: 77
A.D. 1900: 39, 40, 42
174
A.D. 1906: 31, 134, 136
A.D. 1907: 50, 79
A.D. 1909: 95
A.D. 1914: 10, 11, 12, 132,
135
A.D. 1917: 11
A.D. 1923: 33, 136
A.D. 1925: 37
A.D. 1926: 98, 135
A.D. 1931: 12, 80
A.D. 1932: 35
A.D. 1936: 36
A.D. 1937: 13, 15
A.D. 1938: 13, 14
A.D. 1939: 12, 81, 128, 132,
135, 136
A.D. 1941: 12
A.D. 1942: 81
A.D. 1944: 98, 136
A.D. 1945: 81, 134, 136
A.D. 1948: 56, 57, 69, 133
A.D. 1952: 83, 136
A.D. 1953: 83, 136
A.D. 1957: 99
A.D. 1958: 96, 100, 134
A.D. 1959: 47
A.D. 1960: 47
A.D. 1961: 100, 134, 135
A.D. 1964: 30
A.D. 1965: 38, 39
A.D. 1968: 101
A.D. 1969: 43, 102
A.D. 1970: 34, 135
A.D. 1973: 46
A.D. 1983: 47
A.D. 2001: 132, 135, 136
A.D. 2003: 47
A.D. 8000: 47
Day
Third, 53, 54, 118, 119
Fortieth, 66, 68, 76, 89, 100
Seventieth, 34, 66, 74, 88, 98,
100, 102, 135
Eightieth, 99
Eighty, 134
One Hundred Twentieth, 31,
83, 97, 102, 128
Days
Six, 6, 7, 118, 120, 121, 129
Forty, 31, 32, 35, 37, 83, 97,
121, 122, 134
Seventy, 34, 66, 74, 88, 98,
100, 102, 135
One Hundred Twenty, 31, 83,
97, 102, 128, 134
December
Second Day, 81
Twenty-First Day, 101
Declaration of Independence, 57,
66, 133, 134
Drake, Edwin, 72, 73, 75
175
E
Earthquake, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,
34, 35, 134, 135, 136
Easter (Festivals), 61
Easter Sunday, 50, 52, 62
Edison, Thomas, 75, 76
Egypt, 84, 114, 116, 117, 118, 119,
127, 133
Elul, (Sixth Month)
Fifth Day, 8, 35, 43, 44
Twenty-four, 76
England, 62, 65, 79, 85
Eve, 4, 129
Exodus, 5, 24, 29, 56, 122, 127,
129, 132, 133
Ezekiel, 7, 8, 9, 11, 32, 35, 43, 64,
103, 127, 133, 135, 136
F
February, 25, 75
Ferdinand, Franz, 10, 127
First Day of the Week, 58, 60, 61,
63
Fortieth Day, 66, 68, 76, 89, 100,
134
Fortieth Year, 14, 122, 134
Forty-day & Year Periods (Spans),
31, 35, 37, 83, 97, 121, 122,
134
Forty Days and Nights, 32
Friday, 12, 13, 17, 25, 26, 50, 51,
54, 55, 56, 57, 61, 70, 131,
132, 133
Friday Crucifixion, 50, 51, 52, 54,
56, 57, 58
G
Gagarin, Yuri, 100, 135
Gage, Thomas, Gen., 23, 24
Galilee, Sea of, 32
Galveston, 39, 40, 41, 42
Gautama, Siddhartha, 105
God(s), 3-5, 16, 19, 29, 49, 51, 57,
63, 71, 87, 102, 104, 114, 119,
120, 122, 123, 126, 129, 130,
136, 137, 138
Goddard, Robert, 97, 98
Good Friday, 50, 52
Gulfport, 43
H
Hagar, 114
Haggai, 81
Hegira, 124, 128
Hezekiah, 122, 128
Hinduism, 104, 107, 109
Hurricanes, 28, 39, 40, 42, 43
176
I
Isaac, 115
Isaiah, 122, 133, 136
Ishmael, 115
Islam, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128
Islamic Calendar, 127, 128
Israel, 6, 7, 44, 46, 69, 84, 103, 117,
119, 121, 127, 129
Israel, State of, 57, 69, 70, 132, 133
Israelites, 5, 84, 100, 115, 117, 118,
122, 128
J
Jamestown, 88, 134
Jeremiah, 26, 34
Jerusalem, 14, 15, 30, 45, 46, 48,
66, 70, 97, 98, 100, 102, 103,
131, 132, 136
Jesus, 4, 11, 12, 30, 32, 35, 36, 39,
46, 47, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55,
56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 66, 68,
82, 83, 95, 97, 99, 100, 126,
128, 136, 137
Jesus, Birth of, 56, 57, 132, 133
Jesus, Crucifixion of, 12, 14, 30,
35, 36, 39, 46, 47, 50, 51, 55,
57, 61, 62, 64, 83, 128, 133,
134
Jesus (Lord), Resurrection of, 11,
12, 30, 51, 52, 54, 57, 59, 61,
62, 89, 95, 97, 99, 122, 128,
132, 133, 134, 138
Jews, 3, 14, 16, 17, 53, 54, 55, 61,
70, 76, 125
Joan of Arc, 132, 133
Jordan (River), 56, 122, 133
Josephus, 14, 15, 103
June
Third Day, 34
Seventh Day, 66
Eighth Day, 125
Tenth Day, 66
Thirteen, 99
Fifteenth Day, 64
Twenty-one, 68
Twenty-eighth Day, 10, 11,
135
July
Fourth Day, 66, 135
Seventh Day, 13
Sixteenth Day, 81, 82, 102,
124, 128, 134
Twenty-Second Day, 102
Twenty-Fourth Day, 102
177
K
Khadija, 123, 124
Kislev (Ninth Month)
Twenty-Fourth Day, 81
Koran, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130
L
Law, 6, 29, 70, 71, 117, 119, 120,
121
Lord(s), 4-7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 17, 19,
23-26, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34,
35, 36, 42, 43, 45, 46, 48, 49,
52, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60,
61, 62, 64, 70, 71, 81, 84, 88,
89, 95, 100, 103, 104, 106,
113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118,
119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 127,
131, 132, 136, 137, 138
Lord’s (Bible) Calendar, 7, 8, 25,
26, 31, 35, 36, 45, 47, 48, 49,
50, 51, 59, 62, 64, 70, 71, 81,
97, 98, 100, 101, 102, 103,
104, 127, 128, 129, 130
Louisiana Purchase, 69
Lovell, James A., Jr., 101, 102
M
Magdalene, Mary, 57, 58, 60
Magna Carta, 64
Manna, 6, 117, 118
March
Sixteenth Day, 98, 135
Seventeen, 98
Eighteenth Day, 37, 129
Twenty-First Day, 35, 62
Twenty-second Day, 51
Twenty-third Day, 51
Twenty-seventh Day, 30
May
Fifth Day, 100, 134
Tenth Day, 74
Thirteenth Day, 68, 88
Fourteenth Day, 67, 69
Twenty-fifth Day, 98, 135
Twenty-seventh Day, 98
Thirty-first Day, 34, 135
Mecca, 124, 125
Medina, 124, 125
Meteor Shower, 35
Millennium, 122
Monday, 7, 8, 25, 26, 50, 125, 131,
132, 133
Month, First (Nisan)
First Day, 7, 8, 9, 12, 32, 39,
99, 102, 128, 136
Ninth Day, 42
Tenth Day, 9, 42, 46, 66, 100,
122, 134, 135
Fourteenth Day, 23, 30, 35, 36,
46, 50, 51, 55, 136
178
Fifteenth Day, 24, 25, 35, 54,
55, 99, 117, 135, 136
Sixteenth Day, 49, 56
Seventeenth Day, 11, 89, 122,
128, 134, 136
Twenty-Fourth Day, 31, 65,
134, 135, 136
Month, Second (Yiar)
First Day, 83, 84
Tenth Day, 88, 135
Fourteen, 83, 134
Fifteenth Day, 117
Twentieth Day, 100, 102
Twenty-eighth Day, 74, 78
Month, Third (Sivan)
Fifth Day, 118
Seventh Day, 68, 70, 119, 121
Fourteenth Day, 121
Month, Fourth (Tamuz)
Fifth Day, 8, 11, 68, 135
Sixteenth Day, 64
Month, Fifth (Ab)
Second Day, 102
Seventh Day, 102
Tenth Day, 16, 74, 103, 135
Nineteenth Day, 97
Month, Sixth, (Elul)
Fifth Day, 8, 35, 43, 44
Twenty-four, 76
Month, Seventh, (Tisri)
First Day, 32, 33, 136
Twenty-second Day, 31
Month, Ninth, (Kislev)
Twenty-fourth Day, 81
Moses, 4, 29, 32, 84, 116, 117, 118,
119, 121, 122, 126, 127
Mount Sinai, 29, 30, 32, 70, 84,
100, 117-122
Muhammad, 123, 124, 125, 126,
128, 129
Muslims, 3, 125, 126, 128, 130
N
Napoleon, 69
Nautilus, 96, 97, 134
Nebuchadnezzar, 72, 102, 103, 136
Nebuzaradan, 74, 102, 103
New Moon(s), 12, 26, 31, 32, 47,
48, 49, 51, 127, 128, 129, 136
New Year’s Day(s), 7, 8, 12-18, 21,
24, 25, 26, 31, 32, 51, 56, 57,
68, 69, 82, 99, 122, 128, 131,
132
Nisan (Abib, First Month)
First Day, 7, 8, 9, 12, 32, 39,
99, 102, 128, 136
Ninth Day, 42
Tenth Day, 9, 42, 46, 66, 100,
122, 134, 135
Fourteenth Day, 23, 30, 35, 36,
46, 50, 51, 55, 136
179
Fifteenth Day, 24, 25, 35, 54,
55, 99, 117, 135, 136
Sixteenth Day, 49, 56
Seventeenth Day, 11, 89, 122,
128, 134, 136
Twenty-fourth Day, 31, 65,
134, 135, 136
Noah, 4, 29, 72, 126
North Pole, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97
November
First Day, 34, 83, 136
O
October
First Day, 18
Eleventh Day, 87, 88
Twelfth Day, 87, 88, 135
Nineteenth, 76
One Hundred Fifty-third Day, 32,
33, 65, 83, 99, 136
One Hundred Fifty-three, 32, 33,
42, 135, 136
One Hundred Twentieth Day, 31,
83, 97, 102, 128, 134
P
Palos, Spain, 86, 88
Paris, 24, 99, 136
Passover, 24, 33, 34, 35, 46, 55,
56, 83, 88, 121
Passover Sabbath, 54, 55
Peary, Robert, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93,
94, 95, 96, 97
Pentecost, 66, 68, 70, 98, 121, 135
Preparation Day(s), 55, 56
Promontory Point, 74
R
Railroad, 73, 74, 75
Resurrection, 11,12, 30, 51, 52, 54,
57, 59, 61, 62, 89, 95, 97, 99,
122, 128, 132, 133, 134, 138
Rocket, 97, 98
Rocket V-2, 99, 136
Roentgen, 77, 78
Roosevelt (Ship), 91, 92, 93, 94
Rutherford, Ernest, 78, 79, 80
S
Sabbath, 5-10, 13, 54, 55, 56, 58,
59, 60, 68, 70, 110, 118, 120,
121, 122, 129, 130, 131, 137,
138
Sabbath, Passover, 54, 55
Sabbath (Saturday) Resurrection,
54, 58, 59, 60
Sarah, 114, 115
180
Saturday(s), 8, 13, 15, 17, 21, 24-26,
40, 50, 52, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59,
62, 70, 119, 131, 132, 133
Sea of Galilee, 32
September
First Day, 33, 135
Third Day, 136
Fifth Day, 65
Sixth Day, 86, 99, 136
Eighth Day, 40, 42, 99, 136
Ninth Day, 42, 87
Thirteenth Day, 22
Seventeenth Day, 68
Eighteenth Day, 12, 32, 136
Twenty-fourth Day, 124
Twenty-seventh Day, 31
Seventieth Day, 34, 66, 74, 88, 98,
100, 102, 135
Seventy-two-hour Period, 52, 53
Seventy-two Hours, 52
Seventy Weeks, 34
Seventy-year (Day) Period, 34, 88,
98, 134, 135
Shepard, Alan, 100, 134
Sinai, Mount, 29, 30, 32, 70, 84,
100, 117-122
Sivan (Third Month)
Fifth Day, 118
Seventh Day, 68, 70, 119, 121
Fourteenth Day, 121
Solstice, Summer, 68, 135
Solstice, Winter, 101, 102, 128
Sputnik, 97, 99, 100
Sunday, 18, 24, 26, 38, 50, 52, 54,
59, 131, 132, 138
Sunday Resurrection, 50, 52, 53,
58, 59
Synecdoche, 53
T
Tamuz (Fourth Month)
Fifth Day, 8, 11, 68, 135
Sixteenth Day, 64
Temple, 14-17, 25, 48, 56, 60, 61,
74, 76, 103, 122, 127, 128, 133
Ten Commandments, 6, 29, 59, 70,
119, 120, 121, 122
Three Days and Three Nights, 51,
52, 53
Thursday, 7, 8, 9, 25, 50, 54, 55,
56, 57, 69, 82, 118, 122, 131,
132, 133, 137
Tisri, (Seventh Month)
First Day, 32, 33, 136
Twenty-second Day, 31
Titus, 15, 16, 60, 131
Tornadoes, 28, 35, 36, 37, 38
Torrey, R. A., 50, 51
Tuesday, 17, 25, 26, 50, 131, 132, 133
181
V
Vernal Equinox, 8, 9, 11, 12, 26,
31, 39, 49, 51, 68, 102, 127,
128, 129
Vision, Isaiah's, 56
Visions, (Major) Ezekiel’s
First, 7, 8, 10, 64, 127, 133, 135
Second, 7, 8, 9, 35, 43, 136
Third, 7, 9, 10, 133
V-2 Rocket, 99, 136
W
War(s)
Jewish (A.D.70), 25, 131
American Revolution, 22, 23,
24, 26, 132
French Revolution, 24, 25,
132, 135
War of 1812: 25, 26
American Civil, 25
World War I, 10, 11, 12, 98,
132, 135
World War II, 12, 13, 45, 81,
83, 99, 128, 132, 135, 136
Wednesday, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 57,
132, 133
Wednesday Crucifixion, 50, 51, 54,
56, 59
World Trade Center, 132, 135, 136
X
X Rays, 77, 78, 79
Y
Yiar (Second Month)
First Day, 83, 84
Tenth Day, 88, 135
Fourteen, 83, 134
Fifteenth Day, 117
Twentieth Day, 100, 102
Twenty-eighth Day, 74, 78

HeavenlyDesigns in EarthlyPatterns
Donald L. Morse

Curry Printing & Graphics Lewiston, Maine

ii

Copyright © 1994 by Donald L. Morse All Rights Reserved Revised 2005

iii Preface For millennia people have debated the existence of God. as existing religions either change with the times or slowly fade into the shadows of their past glory. the concept that encourages only a faith in God with no tangible evidence to support it encourages also a multiplicity in religions. . Many arguments about God and so called “proofs” of God’s existence have been bandied about. Many can be taken in by misguided zealots and false teachers and be led not toward but away from God. new religions and ideas of God appear on the scene. that that question would have been answered eons ago. many religions having many diverse and even contradictory views. Many religions have appeared and many differing beliefs about God have come and gone over the years. They all claim to tell the “truth” when in fact many do not. Why is this? Why is it that the religions have not provided us with the answer to such an important question? Some would say that the religions do provide us with an answer and the answer is faith. That is exactly what we have in the world today. yet no solid tangible evidence has been offered to verify the existence of the Almighty. and yet all claiming to represent God. the nagging question still hangs in the deep recesses of many people’s minds . It seems that no matter how many religions form or how many ideas of God abound.Does God truly exist? One would think that with all the many religions and beliefs that abound in the world. “Does God exist?” is as timely today as it ever was. Such a diversity of beliefs while to some may seemingly appear to be a benefit. actually can be very harmful. and yet the question. Even in our time. However. What makes the task of verification even more difficult is that nearly all religions and cults claim to be from God and represent Him.

That is the purpose of this book to prove. With a proper recognition of the seventh day as a special day to God. hold fast that which is good” (I Thess 5:21). and settle the issue once and for all time .the matter of God’s existence. It verifies. they cannot offer us tangible evidence of God’s existence. the existence of God. that He made it an integral part of His calendar pattern code. God set aside the seventh day as His special day. It confirms the atoning work of Jesus Christ. It is absolutely possible to verify the existence of God. and it reveals the seventh-day Sabbath as God’s special day and the means by which the calendar code was deciphered. Because most who teach religion reject the Sabbath. was so special to Him. This day. . Because they have no knowledge of this code. they are unaware that such a code exists and cut themselves off from it. that God truly exists. the seventh-day Sabbath. one can decipher God’s calendar code and verify with tangible evidence. verify. That is exactly what this book does. in fact. by means of the calendar code. for at the week of Adam and Eve’s creation.iv Saint Paul in his first letter to the church at Thessalonica admonished the church to “Prove all things.

Usually the 40-day periods are computed either as cardinal or ordinal numbers. Often when one computes a series of regnal years. Trying to locate the exact date or year of an event which happened two or more millennia earlier is no small task. Webster’s New International . 1. thus making difficult one’s task to locate either the true year of a reign or the combined total of successive reigns. In some ways the present-day calendar is the same as the original . Too many happenings have occurred in the past to be included in any single volume. namely. 2.in other ways it is not. The present-day Jewish calendar descended from the Bible calendar. equinox and new moon dates and times are calculated for Jerusalem time and are a product of Z2 Computer Solutions. that seemingly reliable source in which we trust. and the period from Jesus’ resurrection to His ascension. is often a roadblock to serious research and frequently must first be removed before one proceeds. Oregon. It appears that tradition. However. appear to be spans located between two sabbaths (Saturdays). many other hindrances appear in the path of the researcher during the course of research to make his task a most difficult one. A third problem is that of tradition. Moreover. the accession years of some monarchs may be recorded differently from others. The study of chronology is fraught with pitfalls. as time passes. Bend. In addition to these three problems. to say the least. 4. Moses’ two visits to the Sinai summit. Another problem which arises is that not all sources agree on a given date or year in which an event occurred. additional events occur which make history an unending study. nor could it be. Unless otherwise stated. in at least three instances. 3.v Notes This book is not a complete study of all the significant events in history.

vi Dictionary gives a concise explanation of today’s calendar. “A lunisolar calendar in use among Hebraic peoples, reckoning from the year 3761 B.C., the date traditionally given for the Creation. It received its present fixed form from Hillel II about 360 A.D. The present names of the months, which are Babylonian-Assyrian in origin, replaced older ones, as Abib, Bul, etc., at the time of the Babylonian Exile. Nineteen years constitute a lunar cycle, of which the 3d, 6th, 8th, 11th, 14th, 17th, and 19th years are leap years. The year 5682 (A.D. 1921-22) was the first year of the 300 lunar cycle. The common year is said to be a defective, regular, or perfect (or abundant) year according as it has 353, 354, or 355 days. The leap year has an intercalary month, and a total of 383 (defective), 384 (regular), or 385 (perfect, or abundant) days. The calendar is complicated by various rules providing for the harmonious arrangement of festivals, etc. (see JEWISH HOLIDAYS), so that no simple perpetual calendar can be constructed. The following table gives the months in order, with the number of days assigned to each. Only three months vary in length. They are: Heshvan, which has 30 days in perfect years; Kislev, which has 30 days in regular and perfect years; and Adar, which has 30 days in leap years. The ecclesiastical year commences with Nisan and the civil year with Tishri.... MONTHS OF THE JEWISH YEAR Tishri ......30 5 Shebat . 30 7 Nisan ... 30 Heshvan ..29 (r. & d.) 6 Adar .... 29 or 8 Iyar ...... 29 or 30 (p.) 30 (l.) 9 Sivan ... 30 Kislev .....29 (d.) or Veadar . 29 10 Tammuz29 30 (r. & p.) (occurring only 11 Ab ........ 30 Tebet .......29 in leap years) 12 Elul .... 29" In the original Lord’s calendar, the beginning of a new month

“1 2 3 4

vii was determined by observations made of the new moon, but this is not always now true of the present-day Hebrew calendar. Because of changes made by Hillel II and others over the centuries, the beginnings of the months for the present-day calendar were to be determined by other means. Consequently, the months in the present-day calendar often begin a day or two later than originally. These changes have caused a loss of the historical patterns which were in the original calendar and prevent the locating of those earlier patterns. In order to return the present-day calendar to its original Old Testament form, one must delete the alterations of Hillel II and others and begin the months with the new moons. Then, and only then, can one locate the Lord’s true calendar code. The following symbols are used on the charts. Vernal Equinox (V.E.) and Nisan 1 fall on the same day or within 24 hours of each other. Vernal Equinox occurred after sunset. ✽ Vernal Equinox, New Moon and Nisan 1 fall on same day or within 24 hours of each other.

viii

Acknowledgements
I want to thank my son, David, for the many hours he spent typing and retyping the manuscript. Mark, also, who spent countless hours checking and rechecking the dates, calculations, etc., with me, deserves special recognition for his effort. Michael, Stephen, and Jonathan also deserve recognition for assisting me when called upon. My wife, Ann, and daughter, Elizabeth Ann, certainly should be recognized for their patience because of the many hours I spent away from them in the writing and preparation of this work. A special thanks goes to Miss Nathalie Alward, who unselfishly took time to read and reread the manuscript, making many helpful suggestions. Finally, I would like to thank the Lord, the One who is the originator and determiner of the calendar code and controller of all happenings, for guiding me by His Spirit in the writing and completing of this work.

Donald L. Morse

.................................................................... 154 Sources ............................ 72 Explorers ................................. 28 The Crucifixion and Resurrection .................... 85 Religions ............................ v Wars ............... 139 Chapter Notes .................................................................................................................................. 45 Documents ..................... 171 I II III IV V VI VII VIII ................................................................................................ iii Notes... 104 Conclusion ................................................... 3 Natural Disasters ................. 131 Predictions ................... 64 Discoveries and Inventions .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 164 Index ......................................ix TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Preface ......................................................... 141 Bibliography ..............................................................

HeavenlyDesigns in Earthly Patterns .

2 .

and it is truly difficult for one to know where to turn. The pantheist searches for a god in nature. The agnostic says that we cannot know of God. Scholars and philosophers have pondered over it. From the earliest of times man has searched and struggled to find its answer. Should one turn to the ancient religions of the Far East with their many gods in earth and sky or look to the Middle East for the God of Eden? It seems that nearly everyone has an opinion of God. The Jews and Muslims look heavenward to a monotheistic god. But it is not. The question. Even great religions have formed because of it. The idea that there is . as have many throughout history. one would think that by now one way or the other the issue of God’s existence would be settled. Perhaps today it is even more challenging for one to locate God than in the past. It did not begin in the nineteenth century with atheism and develop into Communism with its many adherents. Many today. With the proliferation of these many beliefs and opinions. yet the polytheist acknowledges many gods.3 Chapter I WARS Does God exist? Of all the questions with which man has been confronted. The atheist states that there is no God. still ask. “Does God exist?” The no-God concept which has deceived and confused many into believing that no heavenly Ruler exists is not a recent movement. “Does God exist?” is as perplexing and as challenging today as it was millennia ago. Today one is surrounded by countless numbers of religions and beliefs. while the Christians acknowledge a triune God. yet even today no tangible evidence of a Creator God has been offered. In earlier times what one believed depended on the culture in which one lived. whether believer or non-believer. this truly is one of the most baffling and enigmatic.

and beliefs of God but very little truth of God. man began to develop his own ideas of God. concepts. “Does God exist?” Since the religions of the world cannot answer clearly and satisfactorily the nagging question.” (Ps. At one time in history such confusion over the existence of God did not exist. the Lord Himself became incarnate in the form of Jesus Christ to share additional truths with mankind. It was not until after their sin and fall from favor that the Lord ended His garden visitations. we should know of that also. 3:8-19). nearly four thousand years ago. however. It is no wonder that many still ask. To prevent mankind from being totally misled and misguided by these man-made religions and to prevent a further erosion of man’s belief in Him. many ideas. and man’s loss of knowledge of God began to appear. on the other hand. Many prefer to follow their own beliefs and ideas of God rather than accept instruction from the Lord. Abraham. there is no God. and Moses as guiding beacons of truth. the Lord at selected times in history sent forth men. As centuries melted into millennia. 14:1) The question. a source does exist which not only contains . “The fool hath said in his heart. Adam and Eve knew their Maker well. exclaimed. Unfortunately. as has been so true in the past. If. which became the foundation for the earliest religions. then we should know of it. Moreover. “Does God exist?” is a legitimate one and demands an answer. Thus. we find today. the truths have not been well received. The Psalmist. He does not.4 no God is not new. “Does God exist?” can any source do so? Yes. If God exists. for He often visited their Edenic homeland and conversed with them (Gen. such as Noah. It is absurd for one to spend a lifetime worshiping and trusting in a non-existent God just as it is a folly for one to live a lifetime ignoring God if in fact He exists. To fill the void left by this lack of knowledge. additional ideas of God were formed and incorporated into these evolving religions.

That source is the Bible. That purpose is to reveal God in history.1 By consecrating the Sabbath. And God blessed the seventh day. To prevent the Israelites from perishing in the wilds. At the end of the creation week. something special happened which has largely been ignored by the world. This special use of the Sabbath happened shortly after the Exodus had occurred. we must turn in the Bible to the creation story in the book of Genesis. Because many have rejected the Sabbath as a day special to the Lord. This recognition sets the Sabbath apart for a unique purpose. Thus. while wandering in their journey through the wilderness.5 God’s words but also gives us information which makes it possible for us to see clearly God’s working in history even to the present day. lacked adequate food for their sustenance. That special happening was the Lord’s blessing and sanctifying of the seventh day and selecting that day to be a holy day or Sabbath. it will be found by means of the Sabbath and not by any other means. and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made. Many. the Lord has granted to that day a special recognition which the other days of the week do not have. The Israelites. they have rejected this unique revelation from God and thus have failed to find evidence of Him within the historical context. the Lord again made use of that day as a means of revelation. the Lord provided daily a special food called . To begin our quest to locate this revealing information of God. many years after the consecrating of the Sabbath at the end of the creation week. The Bible relates this as follows: And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made. He made the seventh day special because it was the day on which He rested from His creative work. and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made. if substantive evidence of God’s involvement in history is to be located.

nor thy daughter. nor thy maidservant. and all that in them is. thy manservant. the Lord was revealing to Israel His special recognition of that day. If the Sabbath had meant nothing to the Lord after the creation week. Six days shalt thou labour and do all thy work: but the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work. the Lord again comments about the Sabbath to the nation of Israel. thou nor thy son. Because evidence did appear by means of the withheld manna and the Sabbath commandment. A part of this double portion was to be held over for the seventh day.2 The fact that the Sabbath was included in the Ten Commandments is additional evidence of the Lord’s special recognition of that day. the sea. The Bible relates the Sabbath commandment as follows: Remember the sabbath day.6 manna. By withholding the manna from the Sabbath. to keep it holy. no evidence would have appeared in support of the Sabbath. He not only asserts that they should observe the Sabbath but that they also recognize it as a sign between them. or Sabbath. and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day and hallowed it. after the giving of the Law. Another significant happening with the Sabbath at that time was the including of that day in the Ten Commandments. Sometime later. In the Sabbath commandment the Lord again makes reference to the creation week and the special blessing He had bestowed on the Sabbath at that time. for no food would be provided on that day. nor thy cattle. nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth. . it is apparent that the Lord recognized that day in a special way. This food was to be gathered early each morning with a double portion taken on the sixth day of the week.

That is not so here. 8:1). however. Because the Sabbath has been set apart by Him in this fashion.7 Wherefore the children of Israel shall keep the sabbath. and was refreshed. the New Year’s Day occurred. From them we not only can construct the full calendar years for the years of the visions but also locate the actual historical years in which the visions occurred. It is a sign between me and the children of Israel forever: for in six days the LORD made heaven and earth. we discover that those visions occurred on Sabbath days. which gives a Thursday-MondayThursday pattern for the years of the visions. With the knowledge of these patterns and the knowledge that .3 The weight of evidence makes clear that the Sabbath has a special meaning to the Lord. 40:1). and that for the third another Thursday. For each of these three Sabbath happenings we can extend the calendar back to the beginning of the year in order to find the day of the week on which Nisan 1. to observe the sabbath throughout their generations for a perpetual covenant. Now the Bible record indicates that Nisan 1 for the year of the first vision occurred on a Thursday. That is why we find on constructing the Bible calendar for the years of the prophet Ezekiel’s first two major visions (Ezek. additional evidence of this Sabbath recognition can be found. that for the second a Monday. We do this to locate the New Year’s Day pattern for these three years. 1:1-28. These three Sabbaths on which these visions occurred are a beginning for deciphering the calendar code. and on the seventh day he rested. for the Lord has provided for us three separate happenings that have occurred in three separate years. and He does not give the other six days that recognition. Usually it is difficult if not impossible to locate accurately a year of an Old Testament happening because often a happening or event occurs in a single year. something that is also true of a significant vision that occurred several years later (Ezek.

the year of his second vision. it is possible to locate these years with tables of equinoxes and moons recently produced by astronomers and scholars.. we find that Ezekiel's first vision. occurred in 593 B. also supports the Scriptures. Tamuz 5. here only his significant visions.C. and the day of the vision. This calendar for 593 B. shows us that the New Year’s Day.C.C. was a Sabbath. and we are considering. . for Nisan 1 occurred on a Monday and the day of the vision. 593 B.C. Using these tables. The following year. fell on a Thursday and Saturday (Sabbath day) respectively just as the Scriptures had indicated. Elul 5.8 the Bible calendar is luni-solar. Nisan 1. 592 B.

C. the day of the vision.. 573 B. . Nisan 1 occurred again on a Thursday. and Nisan 10.C.9 592 B. was a Sabbath. In Ezekiel's vision of 573 B.C.

we can find evidence of His involvement in all of history. Although the festivities had been dampened by the attack. Once we have deciphered the calendar code by means of the Sabbath. The rest . Again. As the car carrying the royal couple crossed a bridge. watched the oncoming procession with burning hatred in his eyes. and another struck Sophie. It missed its mark and exploded near several spectators injuring a number of them. the speeches were given and the program completed about noon. the motorcade hurriedly departed for the Town Hall. someone in the crowd hurled a grenade at the Archduke’s automobile. and yet unbelievable as it sounds. In June. who had vowed to kill the Archduke. heir to the throne of the Austria-Hungary empire. one of seven assassins located at strategic positions on the Appel Quay. 1914 the Archduke with his wife. One bullet pierced the Archduke’s jugular vein. Gavrilo Princip. As it proceeded along the Appel Quay. the Lord had connected the beginning of that war to the date of Ezekiel’s first vision. As the procession drew abreast of him. one of the major historical happenings in the twentieth century was World War I. Now the event that precipitated the world into World War I was the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand. It was on June 28 that they motored down the Appel Quay. which paralleled the Miliaca river. Large crowds lined the Appel Quay to watch the royal motorcade. He yanked a Browning automatic from his pocket and fired directly at the royal couple. paid a visit to Sarajevo. Dutchess of Hohenberg. the motorcade moved out. For example.4 After the explosion.10 These calendar records verify the accuracy of the Holy Scriptures and reveal the Lord's involvement in the historical context. he bolted past police and cavalry guards and leaped upon the running board of the royal touring car. even in our time. the capital of the Austrian province of Bosnia. Sophie. Of especial interest is the fact that the Lord has not limited His involvement in history to just Old Testament times.

He is as involved today in the affairs of the world as He ever was. 1917. In A.D. The date of the assassination. but since the vernal equinox of today occurs two days earlier than in A.5 Princip later died of tuberculosis in an Austrian prison. June 28.11 of the fusillade went wild. This can clearly be seen in the 1914 calendar. the Lord is revealing to us His continuing involvement in major world affairs. occurred on April 8. 30. the Archduke and Dutchess were already dead. But the shots he fired were the spark that set off the explosion of World War I. Jesus’ resurrection day. Another date in World War I that also reveals the Lord’s influence in history was April 6. corresponded with Tamuz 5 in the Lord’s calendar.D. the date today which most nearly corresponds to the anniversary . and not on just any chance calendar date. His involvement is not limited to that time period. Police and cavalrymen leaped for the killer and beat him with their fists until he was nearly senseless. 30. That is why the Archduke’s assassination occurred on a special date. Before they could handcuff him and remove him from the scene of his ghastly deed. On April 6.D. the Congress of the United States declared war on Germany. 1914 Tamuz 5. was the identical date on which the Lord appeared to the prophet Ezekiel in 593 B. Nisan 17. Although the Old Testament period is replete with examples showing the Lord’s involvement in the affairs of that time. Tamuz 5. A. By means of these identical dates. the date of the Archduke’s assassination.C.

A five-week . . which took orders from the radical Leftist government at Canton. Louis L. which they completed in January 1932. This identical pattern occurred in A. Here they were opposed by the Chinese Nineteenth Route Army. for in the year 1939.12 date of the Resurrection is April 6. without consulting the legal Reijiro Wakasuki cabinet. In addition to this pattern World War II also contained a year having an identical New Year’s Day with a year in World War I.” Several Chinese bandits exploded a small bomb on the tracks of the Japanese-controlled South Manchurian Railway. . Snyder in his book. not from the Nationalists at Nanking. 1931.D. The War. That year was 1941. It is obviously of some significance that the United States Congress should declare war on the Central Powers on the anniversary of Jesus’ resurrection. Another war associated with a Friday New Year’s Day pattern was the Manchurian War of 1931. Then the Nipponese forces turned southward to strike at the heart of the Chinese dragon. In that year the New Year’s Day (Nisan 1) fell on a Friday just as happened in 1914. the year the United States entered the war. The damage was small. On September 18. But this was enough for Tokyo’s hotheads. This was “banditry” and it would be settled by force.000 Chinese soldiers. the Japanese went ahead with the conquest of all Manchuria. . Meanwhile. . the year of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection. World War II also contained significant patterns. tells of the attack as follows: In early September 1931 came the first of the China “incidents. . the year the war began. the new moon for the New Year’s Day (Nisan 1) occurred within twenty-four hours of the vernal equinox. . and quickly captured Mukden with its barracks of 10. the year signaling the beginning of World War I. Japanese forces struck. 30.

20.000 lives.” The cabinet of Prince Fumimaro Konoye. Snyder describes the beginning of this war in the following excerpt. the Japanese destroyed and pillaged the countryside. One after another the leading cities of China were overrun: Nanking (December 1937). raped women and killed children. Whether this is true or not is not important here. On July 7. The Japanese commander in the area reported that the Chinese had attacked his troops first. the great port of Canton (Oc- .000 of them Chinese.” The Japanese war minister agreed: “China must be chastised for her insincerity. urged caution. the curtain was rung up again in China. They are getting too bold. The soil of China was drenched in blood. slaughtered prisoners of war. The China-Japan War that began in 1937 began in a year having a Saturday New Year’s Day. The Friday New Year’s Day pattern is evidently one of several year patterns that the Lord associates with significant wars. Another pattern that emerges to a position of some prominence as we extend our research to other wars in history is the Saturday (Sabbath) New Year’s Day pattern. the Japanese premier. But it was too late. What is significant is that the war began in a year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Friday. this time at the Marco Polo bridge near the village of Lukouchiao. It was an exercise in cruelty that shocked the world. 20 miles west of Peiping. 1937. Japanese troops streamed into North China. Infuriated by Chinese resistance. “We came to teach the Chinese a lesson.6 Some scholars consider the Manchurian War to be the true beginning of World War II.13 battle cost 23.

.D. 66 the Jews rebelled against Rome in hopes of establishing their own nation. They took it by treachery. some of the seditious had the impudence to throw stones at him. but they were hereby more provoked.14 tober 1938). 30. the Lord. who lived at the time of this rebellion tells us that King Agrippa . and Hankow (October 1938). Josephus. and cast reproaches upon the king. And this was the true beginning of our war with the Romans. to Florus. he sent their rulers. And at this time it was that some of those that principally excited the people to go to war made an assault upon a certain fortress called Masada. while he retired into his own kingdom. and slew the Romans that were there. together with their men of power.7 About 1900 years prior to these twentieth century wars.. So when the king saw that the violence of those that were for innovations was not to be restrained. nay. led by organized Chinese resistance had virtually ceased. and got him excluded out of the city. who was at that time governor of the temple.D. and being very angry at the contumelies he had received. This destruction occurred in the fortieth year after His crucifixion. until Caesar should send one to succeed him. shortly before His death in A. At the same time Eleazar. the son of Ananias the high priest. The Chinese. persuaded those that officiated in the Divine service to receive no gift or sacrifice for any foreigner. a very bold youth. that he might appoint whom he thought fit to collect the tribute in the country. foretold of an impending destruction of Jerusalem and the temple. . and put others of their own party to keep it.8 . . In A. . to Cesarea.attempted to persuade the multitude to obey Florus.

D. the firmest of all the other engines had battered the wall for six days together without ceasing. till the workmen.D. and what would tend . and threw them backwards headlong. they also beat many of those that went down the ladders again. others of them they met and slew. some of the ladders they threw down from above when they were full of armed men. nay. and slew them with their swords before they could bring their shields to protect them. 66. some of them they thrust down. fell on a Saturday. Four years later in A. and fought with them. Josephus describes this destruction in the following manner: . brought their ladders to the cloisters.15 New Year’s Day in the year A. Other Romans did indeed undermine the foundations of the northern gate. Now the Jews did not interrupt them in so doing but when they were gotten up. but the vast largeness and strong connexion of the stones were superior to that engine. and after a world of pains removed the outermost stones. and set over against the western edifice of the inner temple. for in A. Titus attacked Jerusalem and destroyed both the city and the temple. for before these were brought. the year the rebellion started. and to the other battering rams also. 70. a great slaughter was made of the Jews also at the same time. Once again a calendar pattern appears. .D. as deeming it a terrible thing. and stood still unhurt. while those that bear the ensigns fought hard for them. without making any impression upon it. . Whereupon Titus gave orders that the battering rams should be brought.two of the legions had completed their banks on the eighth day of the month Lous (Ab). yet was the gate still upheld by inner stones. exactly as happened in the year 1937. they fell upon them. despairing of all such attempts by engines and crows. 70 the New Year’s Day again fell on a Saturday.

when those that guarded the holy house fought with those that quenched the fire that was burning the inner (court of the) temple.9 After this slaughter and unsuccessful advance. But as for that house. according to the revolution of ages.) upon which it was formerly burnt by the king of Babylon. and were occasioned by them. At which time one . On hearing of this.16 to their great shame. (Ab. Other Jews who had battled for several hours and who had no replacements retired to the inner court of the temple to gain a much-needed rest. if they permitted them to be stolen away. and proceeded as far as the holy house itself. long ago doomed it to the fire. resolved to storm the temple early the next day with his entire army. the Romans withdrew and debated how best they might penetrate the walls. While waiting for this conflagration to subside. They finally decided to set fire to the large wooden gates and wait until these portals were either sufficiently weakened or burned through. Titus. By the end of the second day all was in readiness. These actions made it possible for a lightning advance by the legion before the Jews could make adequate preparations to defend themselves. but these Romans put the Jews to flight. for upon Titus’s retiring. the Roman commander. and now that fatal day was come. the Romans consolidated their position by advancing and encamping near the walls and also clearing the road of large stones and rubble. so that the soldiers might force their way in. God had. it was the tenth day of the month Lous. although these flames took their rise from the Jews themselves. the seditious lay still for a little while. for certain. and then attacked the Romans again. Many of the Jews stood their ground and fought bravely to the end. and the Romans battered their way through the fire-weakened gates.

. As the flames went upward. and being hurried on by a certain divine fury.10 Thus was the temple destroyed and with it many historic records burned.C. he set fire to a golden window. In 334 B. he crossed the Danube and put to flight a coalitian of Illyrians who had invaded Macedonia. Al- . the year of Alexander’s accession to power. of course. this calendar pattern. and without any concern or dread upon him at so great an undertaking. It was in this year that the well-known battle of Granicus occurred. a series of battles by Alexander the Great also reveals the Lord's involvement. the Jews made a great clamour.C. snatched somewhat out of the materials that were on fire. for whose sake it was that they kept such a guard about it. was assassinated in 336 B. Because he was only twenty years old at the time of his accession and was considered by many but a youth. From here.C. since that holy house was perishing. Alexander quickly executed his enemies and rivals in order to consolidate his power. and now they spared not their lives any longer. through which there was a passage to the rooms that were round about the holy house. In 335 B.C. Alexander set out to conquer the Persians. Alexander's father.17 of the soldiers. New Year’s Day in 336 B. a year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Tuesday. without staying for any orders. such as so mighty an affliction required. at which time Alexander ascended to the throne. Alexander advanced into Thrace. and being lifted up by another soldier. About four hundred years prior to this temple destruction. nor suffered any thing to restrain their force. Philip II. would be consistent with those associated with the great wars of history. fell on a Friday... and ran together to prevent it. on the north side of it. a year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Saturday. Because the Lord chose Alexander to be a great military leader.

a year beginning with a Sunday New Year’s Day. It sufficed only to oppose the centre of the enemy’s line. this line extended. he turned sharply with an ob- . he quickly set them to flight. Far out beyond either wing. Many historians consider this to be not only the most important battle of Alexander’s career. the hetairoi. ominously menacing the flanks. against the left of the enemy’s centre. Alexander saw his opportunity at a glance. B. in his book Alexander the Great. He prepared as usual to open his attack by a charge of the picked cavalry. The shifting of the Persian line to the left had opened a gap in their front. and he watched his opportunity with the eye of a hawk until the point developed. In the 331. Alexander set a reserve column in the rear of each flank. by a quick manoeuvre.C. nor by weight of masses was this battle to be won. . . shifting toward the left and keeping their left wing still far beyond his right. into a flying wedge. The Persians followed suit. . . however. . Not by force of numbers.) the two armies stood arrayed against each other. Benjamin Wheeler. Massing his attacking force. To protect his line from being surrounded..C.18 though Alexander’s army was much smaller than that of his Persian opponents. the battle of Gaugamela was fought. The Macedonian force numbered about forty thousand infantry and seven thousand cavalry. He began by a sidewise movement of his line to the right. but also the greatest battle of the ancient world. . On the morning of October 1 (331 B. headed by the hetairoi cavalry. but by dispositon of troops and direction of the thrust. a part of the phalanx. so that by facing about it could meet an attack on the flank or rear. The question was one of finding precisely the point to strike. gives us an insight of this battle.

A few moments of standstill. . the title: General of the East. . melted away. The Shah. .19 lique movement to the left. The whole centre and the left. smote at the opening. Alexander. another young general. and burst into the midst of the very centre of the host. disgraceful flight.. The calendar patterns within which Alexander made his conquests are the evidence which support this fact. then came the break and turn. Belisarius. turned and fled for his life. but was instantly in confusion and directly in flight.12 Eight hundred and sixty years after Alexander’s rout of the Persians at Gaugamela. believed that a Divine Being was assisting him. Belisarius was twentyfive years old at the time. 11 The young Alexander succeeded not only because of his military ability but also because the Lord determined that he should succeed. finally. Earlier he had been honored by having had bestowed on him by the Emperor Justinian I. was also engaged in battle with a Persian army. confused. . which in the sudden panic gave it no support. himself. and it was imperative that he win this battle in order to be worthy of such a designation. evidence that God was on their side. and before Alexander had reached the scene the Persian right had joined the rest of the vast army in furious. There was. The first rank reeled back upon the second. straight toward the spot where the Shah was posted. whose charioteer was pierced by a spear. .. struck by the cavalry of the right wing. . whereas the Macedonian phalanx had room enough to display its full power. and this was to be his first major confrontation. for He had put it into Darius’s mind to move his forces to a place where his vast multitude would be useless. .

The fall of the standard-bearer of Baresmanes. but the pursuing Persian column was cut in two by an impetuous charge of the barbarian cavalry in the Roman army. The Romans continued their resistance. . . The Romans . but the Persians had the advantage of numbers. and a closer fight began along the entire line with swords and spears. Those Persians who advanced farthest were completely surrounded and slain. Perozes placed his infantry in the center and his cavalry upon each wing.20 The Emperor Justinian I now conferred upon Belisarius the title of General of the East. asking him to have his bath prepared for the morrow. . as he would need that kind of refreshment after taking Daras. while they were also more accustomed to this style of warfare than the Romans. The Persian reinforcement arrived the next morning. He was soon confronted by a Persian army of forty thousand men under Perozes the Mihran. consisting of Romans and allies. as the Romans had also done. after which he assailed the Romans with a shower of darts and arrows. the Romans fought to more advantage. The Romans replied with their missile weapons. increased the general confusion. and arranged his infantry so that one-half should from time to time relieve the other half. the latter being mainly Massagetae. thus deciding the battle in favor of the Romans. and after some exchange of messages with Belisarius. and when the missile weapons on both sides became exhausted. the commander of the Persian left. Thereupon Belisarius assembled an army of twenty-five thousand men at Daras. and were protected by huge wattled shields. and the Persian column vainly attempted an orderly retreat. who sent an insolent message to Belisarius. . Then the Persian corps of the Immortals and other troops furiously charged the Roman right and forced it to a hasty retreat.

13 New Year’s Day in the year A. Atop the short mast a great lantern was secured. the Vandal King. Because Gelimer. 530. whereupon the entire Persian army broke and fled. the year of this battle. When the men on the galley shouted response and ran up the square sail. the fleet anchored briefly off Sicily and finally reached Africa in the beginning of September.21 attacked it in front and on both flanks. the Massa-Goth. the Patriach and the Emperor went in procession down to the shore at the tip of the palace point. The scarlet-tipped sail would mark it in daylight. .when the stone piers of the Hagia Sophia were rising within the scaffolding. had . among whom were many of the Immortals. fell on a Saturday. This vessel.D. After the Nika revolt in 532. Icons were carried behind them above waving myrtle branches. Then the robed Patriach Epiphanius gave his blessing to the war galley moored close in shore. . leaving five thousand dead. carrying Count Belisarius and his staff and navigators. Baresmanes was slain by Sunicas. Be that as it may. Some scholars feel that he had visions of restoring Rome to her ancient glory. Belisarius again assembled his troops and in June 533. the masthead light in darkness. . . . .14 After departing from Constantinople with great fanfare. would guide the convoy of ships to Africa. the upper part of the sail was seen to be painted scarlet. Others dispute this by saying that he wanted simply to conquer the Vandals in Africa. Justinian began to extend the boundaries of his empire westward. and a frightful carnage ensued. Marching choirs joined their voices in the refrain.

It was a bloodless and resounding victory. . With such good fortune bestowed on him. . and go on to Africa. and his troops were in high spirits. Occupy the island if you can do so without trouble. Belisarius wasted no time in assembling his troops. He marched rapidly towards Carthage and on September 13. He rode in with a silver organ sounding. one of the smallest yet most significant wars in history began. For many .” Belisarius carried out his part perfectly. There the Goths will suspect nothing. tossing gold coins to the inhabitants. And the councilors had weighed the risks with him. If you run into trouble. His fleet was well outfitted for the trip.22 not prepared for this assault. and in doing so they seized the weapons of the scattered Gothic outposts. This was the American Revolutionary War. The next day he entered Carthage and partook of the feast that had been prepared for the Vandal King. . Two years after this conquest. . With zest the diligent Procopius relates how Belisarius paraded into Syracuse on the last day of his year as Consul. he sent detachments of his soldiers sight-seeing. the landing of the troops went unopposed. Landing again at Catana.15 In 536 Belisarius stormed Naples and in 536-37 he took Rome. defeated Gelimer. “as if some accident made you put in to Sicily. .” they told him. Belisarius was sent forth to take over the island of Sicily from the Goths. The conquests of Belisarius in the years 533-537 occurred in a similar patterns as other wars. Many centuries after the battles of Belisarius had faded into history. forget it. Again Belisarius had been given overriding authority as Autocrater. . “Land where you landed before. He took over Syracuse from its surprised commander.

It was because of this latter act that the wellknown Boston Tea Party was formed. In the year A. 14. and in 1773 the Tea Act was passed. over a period of time a series of acts developed by the British were imposed on the new colonists. To make matters worse. the colonists’ smoldering concepts of revolution turned into flames of war. Nisan 14 was the date on which the Lord Himself was crucified. At first these acts were a mere annoyance. This move came as a result of a decision drafted by the British Cabinet and sent to Lt. 1775.23 years the new American settlements. the Quartering and Stamp Acts. Thomas Gage. 1775. This was bitterly opposed by many colonists. It was not long before a move could be made which would precipitate the revolution. the British drew up a proclamation which recognized the Indians as the sole owners of the colonists’ land. The date. On Apr.D. By 1774 when the Intolerable or Coercive Acts were passed the die was cast and war was inevitable. . Several other acts legislated by the British. Commander in Chief in North America. which were scattered along the East Coast. and seventeen centuries later on the anniversary of that date. which were certain to increase tension were the Navigation Acts. However. In 1770 the Boston Massacre occurred. the Revenue or Sugar Acts. The first important act was the British decision in 1763 to keep a standing army in North America. Gage received orders to use force in Massachusetts. General Gage received his marching orders! This consistency in dates reveals with a certainty the Lord’s involvement in the American Revolution. is a significant date in history because in the year 1775 that date and Nisan 14 coincided. but as one act followed another in rapid-fire succession. were friendly with their mother country. 30. April 14. and the Townshend Acts. The colonists were not consulted about this move. in October of 1763. Gen.

Three. when the people of Paris stormed the Bastille.” During the spring and summer of 1788 there was unrest in many cities of France. New Year’s Day in the year 1788 fell on a Sunday. for New Year’s Day in 1775 fell on a Saturday. the peasants were tired of supporting the old feudal system. April 15. Nowhere was this more apparent than in France. An assembly was convened under the direction of the Controller General in hopes that additional taxes could be levied. The Lord was involved in the beginning of the French Revolution. and eventually led to a revolt of the so called “aristocratic bodies. and in 1789. The plan failed. the Passover Feast Day. One was the fact that France had the largest population in Europe and could not feed it adequately. The dust had barely settled from the American Revolution before another revolution began. As the eighteenth century was drawing to a close. a rapidly expanding unrest was building among the people of France. however. Over the years in western Europe subtle changes were occurring which contributed to the removal of the feudal regimes. including Paris and Grenoble. Several factors contributed to this violent upheaval. This increasing unrest exploded into a great revolution. and in 1787 the king’s treasury was empty. coincided with Nisan 15. It was on this day in 1775 that the Patriot leaders in Boston learned of General Gage’s preparations and took steps to counter them. The Passover Feast Day was one of the holy convocation days that the Lord set apart in the year of the Exodus. Two. this time in the Old World. The American Revolution had been costly to the French. New Year’s .24 In addition to this evidence showing the Lord’s involvement in the revolution. New Year’s Day in 1775 was wholly consistent with the New Year’s Days for the years in which other major wars began. the following day. the peasants observing the successes of the American colonists against the British Empire were encouraged to revolt and bring down their own system of government.

this action was taken in a year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Friday. March 15 Sat.25 Day fell on a Friday. March 26 Tue. On February 8. That is the Friday-Saturday pattern. March 31 Fri. Mon. 333 A. 23) V.C.D. peace reigned for nearly a half century before the American Civil War erupted. 66 A. A sampling of wars reveals this pattern in both the Old and New Testament periods. March 19 Nisan 1 Sat. March 22 Thu.D. These wars have been associated with special patterns because the Lord has intended that they do so. 1861. 334 B. Although the Lord has considered a variety of patterns in determining war beginnings. After the War of 1812 had ended. This was in the War of 1812. which was declared by the United States in June of that year. March 25 Sat.C. seven southern states set up the Confederate States of America.D. 70 A. March 17 Fri. Consistent with other significant wars. New Year’s Day in 1812 fell on a Saturday. 476 Event Battle of Granicus (May/June) Battle of Issus (Autumn) Jewish War began Temple Destroyed Odoacer proclaimed king (Aug. Throughout all of history major wars have occurred in special patterns in the Lord’s calendar. Wars & Battles Year B. March 22 Fri. it appears from a study of His calendar that He favors one pattern in particular. It was not long after the French Revolution had begun that the British and Americans were again battling one another. April 4 Sat.E. March 12 . Significantly.

From this we can deduce that the Lord has been and is involved in significant world events.”17 The special and consistent patterns in the Lord’s calendar in which the major wars have occurred throughout history are clearly the evidence of the Lord’s involvement in the affairs of the world. “Hear O earth: behold.D. saith the Lord: . I will bring evil upon this people. In the book of Leviticus the Lord promises that the nations and peoples who obey Him shall dwell in peace. March 20 Nisan 1 Sun. new moon. 1812 War of 1812 Of this sampling of wars. The two years that did not do so. 527 A.26 Wars & Battles (cont. because they have not hearkened unto my words. March 19 Fri. nor to my law. March 19 ✽ Mon.D. March 19 Mon. 535 contained a different pattern. “Lo.D.D. In both instances the Lord was involved in major events in history. does not necessarily mean that major wars must always occur. 1) Belisarius subdues Italy V. I will bring a nation upon you from far. however. .”16 Again. several began with a Friday or Saturday pattern.D. 535 Event Theodoric conquered Odoacer. Sun. He says. The fact that the Lord has been involved in major wars. one in which the vernal equinox. and New Year's Day in each year occurred within 24 hours. March 19 ✽ Fri. but rejected it. A. March 20 Fri. In the book of Jeremiah the Lord Himself tells us of His involvement in these events. April 1 Sat. . 489 and A.) Year A. Justinian became sole emperor (Aug.D. O house of Israel. .D. 1775 American Revolutionary War began A. March 19 Tue. 489 A. March 14 A. March 20 Sat.E. even the fruit of their thoughts.

Then I will give you rain in due season. and the trees of the field shall yield their fruit.18 . And I will give peace in the land. . and do them.27 If ye walk in my statutes. and the vintage shall reach unto the sowing time: and ye shall eat your bread to the full. and the land shall yield her increase. and ye shall lie down. . and dwell in your land safely. and keep my commandments. And your threshing shall reach unto the vintage. and none shall make you afraid: .

Other phenomena that seem to precede tremor or quake activity are the electrical conductivity of the earth’s surface rocks. The Chinese have noted that shortly before a large earthquake strikes. Some seismologists theorize that changes in the earth’s magnetic field may cause the tectonic plates to shift. Others believe that the gravitational pull of the moon on the earth’s surface may contribute to a shifting of these plates.28 Chapter II NATURAL DISASTERS Of all the natural disasters with which mankind must contend. Others feel that the continental drift builds up tremendous pressures deep within the crust causing the edge of one plate to slip past another which may cause a violent shaking at the earth’s surface. The Algonquin Indians believed that a great tortoise supported the . for the earthquake often gives no warning and frequently strikes its death blow in the still of night. The hurricane and cyclone signal their approach by their whistling winds. and farm animals show unusual behavior patterns. Is it possible that sounds and vibrations that are imperceptible to humans are being sensed by these animals and account for their strange behavior? Milk maids. when drawing water from a well have noted a marked change in the level of the well water shortly before a large tremor or quake. developed a number of theories to account for earthquakes. Many scientists have worked long hours trying to locate the cause of earthquakes. This is not often so with the earthquake. an increase in radon in deep well water. none can be more frightening than the earthquake. and increased water pressure within the earth. Even the fast-moving tornado with its silhouetted black funnel screams a warning for all to seek safety. dogs tend to whine and bark. Frank W. Lane in The Elements Rage relates that “Millennia ago the ancients. who knew nothing of scientific investigation.

2 The belief in Divine retribution was reinforced centuries after these happenings when Moses. When He descended to the peak of Mount Sinai to give His law. and all that appertained to them. and all the men that appertained unto Korah. because the LORD descended upon it in fire: and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace. and the whole mount quaked greatly. and all their goods. the leader of the Exodus. And the earth opened her mouth. went down alive into the pit. and swallowed them up.3 The earthquake was not always used by the Lord to destroy people’s lives and property. the mount shook violently. Sometimes the earthquake was a display of His mighty power when something of especial significance to Him was taking place here on earth. They believed in a Creator God and attributed major earthquakes and other disasters to Him. and their houses. a Levite. was challenged by a band of rebels led by Korah. The Scriptures tell us that the Lord caused a violent earthquake to split open a part of their wilderness habitat and swallow the malcontents. and the earth closed upon them: and they perished from among the congregation.29 earth and that when the earth shook he was shuffling his feet. Later Japanese theorists thought a giant catfish was responsible for the quaking. Early Japanese believed that quakings in the earth were caused by a spider. Support for such an idea came about because of the Great Flood of Noah’s day and the later destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. And mount Sinai was altogether on a smoke. the Ten Commandments.”1 A quite different view of earthquakes was held by those who lived in the Middle East. They. to the world.4 . The Mongolians believed that earthquakes were caused by a pig.

. and as the ground heaved under them. and came and rolled back the stone from the door. at Jerusalem time was Nisan 14..m. . During this period of time. Please stop it. or has He been involved in quakes of recent times? An answer to these questions can be gleaned from a study of several large earthquakes beginning with the mighty Alaska quake. landslides occurred and the water in the bays and harbors violently sloshed about. the day of Jesus crucifixion.there was a great earthquake: for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven. In many of these homes. and lasted about four minutes. for the earthquake occurred near sunset on March 27 (Nisan 13). has His involvement been limited to only those long ago quakes. It began at 5:36 p. she broke into a mumbled prayer: “Lord. and the rocks rent. Jesus Christ. giant fissures formed. She and her mother rushed from their home.the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom. The Alaska earthquake of March 27.”6 Has the Lord truly played a role in the earthquakes that overthrew the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah and for the earth’s quaking at Sinai and Golgotha? If so.30 Another momentous event to the Almighty was the death of His Son.. “. Another earthquake that apparently did not happen by chance .”7 Evidently the girl was correct in attributing this earthquake to the Lord. A giant earthslide destroying seventy-five or more houses occurred in Anchorage’s Turnagin Heights. which. and sat upon it. that’s enough now. 1964 was the most powerful American earthquake ever recorded. and the earth did quake. . The Scriptures record that at the very moment of Jesus’ death “. as the earth heaved and rolled. . families had just begun their evening meal when they felt the steep bluff give way and their homes slipping and sliding toward the sea. Probably the most poignant response to the battering from the earthquake was given by a 16-year-old girl..”5 Again at Jesus’ resurrection. on the cross.

For six minutes San Francisco rocked and swayed as wave after wave of seismic shocks assaulted the city. three significant alignments occurred. Countless explosions rent the air and flames spread rapidly as gas lines burst and kerosene lamps toppled onto hot woodstoves. Screams and groans from trapped and injured victims pierced the dawn. The 40-day periods are frequently set apart by the Lord and appear often in His Word. At precisely 5:13 a. No military assault in those days could have destroyed a city so quickly.10 The Chile quake which happened on August 16 was responsible for the loss of 20.C. 1290. Chile.9 One of the most written about earthquakes in the United States is the great San Francisco quake.000 lives.31 but occurred because the Lord intended it to happen was the Chihli. the New Year’s Day itself fell on the day of the equinox. The Lord caused the rain for the Great . and three. The number120 is alluded to in Genesis 6:3 where the Lord says that “his (mankind’s) days shall be an hundred and twenty years. April 18. the new moon that began the Bible calendar for that year occurred within twenty-four hours of the vernal equinox. A significant aspect of these two quakes is that they took place 120 days apart. on April 18. sleeping San Franciscans were jolted awake by a mighty shock which announced the arrival of the big one.” The number 120 also contains three consecutive 40-day periods. This monstrous earthquake in San Francisco was followed in the same year by another huge quake in Valparaiso. September 27. China quake of September 27. the date of the earthquake. No alarm clocks were needed on that fateful April morning in 1906. coincided with Tisri 22. the last day of the Feast of Tabernacles.8 In that year in the Lord’s calendar.m. One. the date of this quake was Nisan 24 in the Lord's calendar. What had been just a few moments before a peaceful haven quickly became a hell on earth. It was on Nisan 24 that the prophet Daniel received a vision in 536 B. Two.

which they did. the San Francisco earthquake was also tied in to another special number. the Lord in 592 B. the Lord used the number 153 as a means to reveal His power over nature. Shortly. An angel commanded the prophet Elijah to journey to Mount Horeb to receive a message from the Lord. for the earthquake occurred on the 153rd day before September 18.13 In all three instances. In John. 24:18). September 18 was the day of the new moon for Tisri 1. Ezekiel’s vision.12 Because of this. they found that it held 153 fish. In addition to being locked into these 40-day periods. they did not recognize Him. 7:17). He retained Moses on the summit of Mount Sinai for a period of 40 days and 40 nights (Ex. 19:8).C. they saw Jesus standing on the shore. Later. In the book of Ezekiel. This appearance occurred on the 153rd day after Nisan 1. after drawing the net to the shore and emptying it. John relates that sometime after the Lord had risen. Jesus commanded them to cast the net from the other side of the vessel. 4:2). they went to the Sea of Galilee and entering into a boat cast forth their nets. They fished throughout the night but did not catch anything.32 Flood to last a full 40 days and nights (Gen.11 This number also appears in the Gospel of John in a story relating to Jesus’ meeting with His disciples at the Sea of Galilee. His disciples discovered that their provisions were nearly depleted. Jesus called to them inquiring about the size of their catch. He demonstrated His power in the heavens by a miraculous appearance to that prophet on the 153rd day after Nisan 1. They informed Him that they had not caught any fish. the netting of the fish. As the soft light of dawn lightened the sky. the number 153. but. Tisri 1 was the New Year’s Day for the civil calendar year. Almost instantly the net was filled to the breaking point. perhaps because of the distance. and the San Francisco quake. . That journey took 40 days (1Ki. and Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness lasted 40 days (Matt. made a second appearance to the prophet Ezekiel. On hearing this. In an earlier incident in the Lord’s use of this same number.

The scorching flames not only produced gale force winds which raged across the city. and in the San Francisco earthquake He displayed His power over the land by causing that quake to occur on the 153rd day prior to Tisri 1. the collapsing tinder-dry bamboo structures contributed greatly to the spread of the inferno. but also consumed much of the oxygen. suffocating large numbers who could not escape. nature played a role here. The intense heat drove many to seek refuge in Tokyo Bay.3 wiped out at the very least the lives of 100. but this safe haven was short-lived. gas lines burst setting ablaze in a matter of minutes the city of Tokyo. Simultaneously with the first shock many buildings collapsed killing and trapping startled and frightened inhabitants. During this period of violent shaking. The Lord decreed that this earthquake should occur in a significant pattern in His calendar. and it did so. This disastrous rampage of the elements cannot be solely attributed to nature. . Another earthquake that reveals signs of the Lord’s involvement was the great Japan earthquake of September 1. These three happenings cannot be attributed to mere coincidences.14 This monstrous quake of magnitude 8. for they not only were unrelated but also were many centuries apart. The quake had triggered a tsunami which rose its ugly head and swept the struggling survivors back over the land from which they had escaped. for it occurred on the 153rd day after the Passover Feast Day. but this role was one that was subservient to the will of the Creator. The quake struck at noon and rocked the city for about six minutes. 1923.000 people and quite possibly double that number. Obviously.33 He revealed His power over the sea by determining that 153 fish should be netted by His disciples as He stood on the shore after His resurrection. Many were killed instantly when the wave slammed them into trees and structures in its path. Because in many homes the noon meals were being prepared over open flames.

In the book of Jeremiah. beams. On June 3.34 The Passover Feast Day commands a role in yet another major earthquake. and these nations shall serve the king of Babylon seventy years. and to anoint the most Holy. roof trusses. 1970. the public health ministry said floods triggered by Peru’s devastating earthquake may have killed more than 17.000. which was All Saints Day. reported 140 dead.”16 It is no coincidence that the Peru earthquake struck on the seventieth day after the Passover Feast Day.”15 In the book of Daniel this number represents a time period which contains clues denoting when the Messiah should appear. . This earthquake struck on November 1. That quake devastated parts of Peru on the seventieth day after the Passover Feast Day. 175 miles north of Lima. Because it was a special holy day. 1755. the Lord informs Jeremiah that He intends to punish Judah for a seventy-year period. Portugal quake. the churches were filled to capacity. Many were trapped and mangled while others were killed outright. Ninety percent of the homes and commercial buildings were destroyed in the quake and the accompanying aftershocks. and an astonishment. “Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city.000 persons in the Andes city of Yungay. Huaras. About the midst of the services came the first shock. Another large and violent earthquake that destroyed much property and took many lives was the great Lisbon. the Peruvian quake of May 31. . The number seventy often stands out in the Scriptures. Early news reports indicated that hundreds and perhaps thousands died in the quake. Over three-fourths of the buildings in the city .000. a city of 22. to finish the transgression. “And this whole land shall be a desolation. It happened on that day because the Lord intended that it do so. and walls onto the worshipers. Final estimates indicate that the death toll was nearly 67. It was certainly a destructive quake. hurling timbers. .

17 The Lisbon earthquake occurred 80 days. Elul 5 was the anniversary date of Ezekiel's second vision in 592 B. Although the Richter Scale was not in use at that time. . the tornadoes continued into the next day. scientists speculate that the Lisbon quake was of magnitude 8 or greater. This was no safe haven. causing tens of thousands of lives to be lost. when she is shaken of a mighty wind. destroying property and taking many lives. for example. The shock waves from this quake spread over an area of a million or more square miles. Nisan 15. This series of deadly tornadoes began on March 21. A second shock a short while later destroyed many additional buildings and killed thousands more. In the year 1932. 5. two 40-day periods. which was the date of the Passover Feast Day. To escape the rapidly spreading flames. and. as well. a series of more than twenty violent tornadoes swept through Alabama. Moreover. And the stars of heaven fell unto the earth. there was a great earthquake. even as a fig tree casteth her untimely figs.C. They were felt as far south as the West Indies and as far west as the New England states. many fled to the quay area of the River Tagus. which was the anniversary date of Jesus’ crucifixion. for shortly after they had arrived a seismic sea wave forty or more feet in height rolled over the quay killing additional thousands. And I beheld when he had opened the sixth seal. some feel that it was to this quake that the book of Revelation was referring in the sixth chapter. and the sun became black as sackcloth of hair. after Elul. lo. Because the Lisbon earthquake was followed by a dark day in 1780 and a meteor shower in 1833. and the moon became as blood.35 were destroyed. which in 1932 was the date Nisan 14. other forms of disasters have also occurred on significant Bible calendar dates. In addition to earthquakes.

another series of tornadoes ripped through the South. . . Radio and press reports indicated that much of Northport was destroyed. . . The book of Nahum tells us that “. yet the workers were forced to work agonizingly slowly lest in removing a weight. four years after the Alabama tornadoes. the storm first struck LaCrosse. Often superhuman effort was required to lift the heavy timbers from the injured. the anniversary date of Jesus’ crucifixion. Mississippi. many deaths and considerable damage were the result of the deadly twisters which slashed through these cities. National guardsmen patrolled the ruins and no one was allowed to enter without a permit. Other workers joined firemen in controlling fires. Whenever possible. These storms slammed into Tupelo. A most significant fact is that these tornadoes struck on Nisan 14.”18 In April 1936. Reportedly. In Tupelo. and temporary telephone lines were draped over tree limbs or large bushes. many fires ignited and burned intensely. in northeast Mississippi. These fires seriously hampered rescue workers. a much heavier structure should shift a few inches and crush those trapped. Electricians worked feverishly to restore electrical services. The fact that these tornadoes were associated with meaningful dates in the Lord’s calendar would appear to indicate that the Lord Himself played a role in their development. No one will ever know the number of trapped victims who could have been saved but succumbed to the flames. Rescuers worked long into the night to extricate trapped victims. It was of utmost importance to work with speed. being force-fed by the many twisted and broken gas lines. Arkansas. Again.the Lord hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm. University students cut classes to assist in helping the injured and to return the area to some form of normalcy. Georgia. then rolled east into Tupelo.36 These tornadoes were extremely powerful and wreaked much havoc. tow trucks or even automobiles assisted in lifting or skidding heavy framework aside. . and Gainesville. .

1. of course. never knew what had struck them. Georgia. Gainesville’s business district was devastated by the tornado and accompanying fires which trapped workers just after they had reported for duty. on March 18.980 injured. Illinois.20 Forty years after this monster had completed its deadly work.000 houses were destroyed or damaged and four small towns practically wiped out. at least 700 injured and damage in excess of $5.37 Only a few hours after the Tupelo disaster. At about 1 p. One of the most destructive American tornadoes of all time occurred in the spring of the year 1925. To make matters worse.000. in a matter of minutes. The toll of this great tristate tornado was: 689 people killed. a series of more than three dozen tornadoes ripped through the midwest.m. City fireman G. This high forward speed would account for the tornado catching so many people unprepared. on April 7. this storm formed and blasted its way through southeast Missouri. the devastated area was threatened by rain-swollen rivers. Eleven huge steam locomotives were flipped onto their sides in the railroad yard. a vicious tornado snaked its way through Gainesville. It continued on a rampage through Illinois and into Indiana. Loggins estimated from 80 to 100 persons were killed. Many. it had entered and departed a town before the inhabitants could perceive what had happened. Some 3. Like a fast-moving freight train.000. It was impossible to keep an accurate record of the . Billye and Walter Brown in their book Hurricanes and Tornadoes relate that more than 150 of 200 city blocks were destroyed in Murphysboro. M. Two hundred and thirty-four people were killed and another 800 injured. and property losses of some 17 million dollars.19 Its forward speed was reported to be nearly 60 miles per hour.

It smashed barns and houses alike snapping timbers and beams as if they were matchsticks.38 number of twisters that actually formed. Neither homes. From Illinois the tornado system bore down on Indiana. Other vehicles were lifted and thrown aside injuring or killing the occupants. packed in their families and headed south. that the frightful attack began. the first funnel dipped down near Dubuque. several twisters formed to the east in Illinois. spring-like weather to wash windows and install screens. and Algonquin. 1965. filling stations nor churches were spared. April 11. Suddenly. factories. a tornado ripped through the Fox River Valley uprooting trees. It was on Palm Sunday. many homeowners took advantage of the balmy. It raced across open farmland zigzagging here and there striking farm after farm. Others prepared back yard plots for spring planting. Boating enthusiasts struck out for nearby lakes and ponds for relaxation. Iowa. They raced through Rockford. About two hours after the first attack. the mass of twisters split up. Powerful lightning bolts blasted earthward accompanied by loud claps of thunder. At Crystal Lake. After charging through Indiana. But it was too late for some. After attending church. the hardest hit Illinois town. .m. By now many in Indiana had seen and heard news reports on television and radio of the devastation in Illinois. snapping off electric light poles and smashing houses. Many farm animals were destroyed by this onslaught. many tossed their luggage into their cars. When they saw the sky darken. Some sources list a low of thirty-seven. ominous black clouds formed overhead and short powerful wind gusts rattled windows and shook wood-frame houses. The twisters bore down on the slower moving vehicles and blew several off the highways. Friendly neighbors gossiped over white picket fences as children wobbled unsteadily on their bikes on nearby streets. at about 1:20 p. Dixon. As the day wore on. while others record that as many as forty-five appeared.

the hurricane in coastal areas can cause extensive flooding and be accompanied by giant sea waves. Nisan 1. often travels hundreds of miles in distance and devastates an area of fifty or more miles in width. unmercifully in the year 1900. The tornado usually cuts a narrow path of destruction. Usually its forward travel is limited to a few miles or less. Many of the buildings were low. one-story structures having slate roofs. Moreover. Texas. In a brief ten-hour period. Another type of storm equally as destructive as the tornado. thousands were injured.000. In 1900. though there have been some notable exceptions to this. then April 3 is the date which now represents the anniversary of Jesus' crucifixion. It is twentyeight miles long and about three miles across at its widest point. but since the equinox occurs two days earlier in the new style calendar of today. This heavier roofing material replaced light-weight .39 one group assaulting northern Ohio and the other battering Michigan. The city of Galveston was located on the northeast end of the island. In the Julian calendar of Jesus' day the crucifixion date was April 5. The hurricane. in 1965 fell on April 3. which in the Gregorian or new style calendar is the anniversary of Jesus' crucifixion. A death-dealing hurricane of exactly this type pounded Galveston. These three dozen or more tornadoes slashed through the midwest in a special year. Galveston is an island located off the Texas coast. the highest point of land on the entire island was not more than fifteen feet above sea level. Property damage estimates ranged as high as $200. in contrast to the tornado. the year the hurricane struck.000. and countless numbers were left homeless. In many places the land elevation was five feet or less above the high water mark. often less than a hundred yards wide. more than 250 people were killed. These extremely low elevations made the island vulnerable to much flooding and damage should a heavy storm hit. and at times even more destructive than the twister. is the hurricane.

But there appeared to be no escape. rainy weather of fall settled upon them. and angry surging waters were swirling into homes. Families from the mainland hitched up their wagons. It was ideal weather for swimming and picnicking. To make the raging storm even more terrifying. Barefooted children would frolic on the wet-packed sand often racing a wave as it rushed shoreward. These people were never to be seen or heard of again. Often during the height of a storm hundreds would stroll to the beaches to watch and listen to the pounding of the surf. Wind-driven torrential rain added to the misery. balmy days.40 wooden shingles following a fire which years earlier had raced through the city. By mid-evening the storm surge sent a succession of giant waves across the island. Seasonal storms would come and go. and they appeared to pose no threat. rode to the beaches. All bridges to the mainland had either been washed out or flooded. dusk melted into darkness and brilliant stabs of lightning accompanied by booming thunder illuminated the dreadful scene. and joined in the pleasantries. On arising that morning the islanders could see ominous black clouds bearing down on them and hear the angry pounding of surf in the distance. The inhabitants of Galveston felt secure on their island in 1900. As the day wore on the wind gusts increased in intensity and a heavy downpour soaked those who dared venture outside. Others were badly mutilated as they were repeatedly slammed into trees and . Frightened and screaming throngs of people struggled to escape the horror. By early evening hurricane winds were approaching one hundred miles an hour. The month of September. The hurricane turned the island into bedlam. and scores headed for the beaches before the cold. if that were possible. These waves swept entire families into the gulf. 1900 was ushered in with several pleasant. September 8. Few Galvestonians paid much attention to the hurricane off to the east until Saturday.

and timbers became deadly weapons as they were flung by wind and wave into many who were trying to escape the storm’s fury. In the city of Galveston there appeared to be no escaping death. Isaac Cline. While the benumbed residents struggled to keep from being struck by these death-dealing tiles. He realized at that moment that many on Galveston Island would never live to see the light of day. head meteorologist at the Galveston weather station. many of his neighbors took refuge in the Cline homestead. and Isaac went home for lunch. By that hour all telegraph wires were down and only one phone line was operating...41 buildings. Before this onslaught the house disintegrated and its inhabitants were dumped into the angry waters. Because of the darkness and the driving rain. Several people had either legs or arms slashed by these lethal weapons. made a number of trips during the day to the bay and then to the gulf to observe conditions in those areas.M. In the darkness. boards. Later in the evening other huge waves carrying all sorts of broken timbers and debris rolled across the island and slammed into his house. when all of a sudden a four-foot surge of water nearly engulfed him. Cline looked through the open doorway at the raging water swirling about his home. At 3:30 P. As the wind approached hurricane strength. and Joseph his brother. monstrous waves rushed shoreward and crashed upon the hapless victims. planks. Several others were nearly decapitated. Meanwhile. It seemed that the storm was determined to destroy them. clutch- . Cline. it was impossible to see these missiles coming. Because his house was on a slightly higher elevation than those of his neighbors.M. it ripped the slate tiles from the roofs and spun them through the air like rotating knives cutting down all in their paths. Cline records that gulf waters had overflowed half the city. having been on duty since 5:00 A. Joseph returned to the weather station. He found the water waist deep around his residence.M. At about 7:30 P.

did so 153 days after Nisan 9-10. Cline himself was knocked unconscious by it as well.42 ing tightly his wife and child managed in the blackness of the night to grasp onto a part of a wall. Throughout much of the night they stayed together. What was more unbelievable was that his brother and his two daughters grounded but a short distance away. work crews loaded wagons with the grisly remains and dumped them miles out into the gulf. For a brief time. and Nisan 10 was the actual date on which the triumphal entry occurred. Intermingled with the debris were the remains of thousands of the dead. To speed up the process of removing the dead and to prevent an occurrence of the plague hundreds of bodies were stacked one upon the other and set afire. The stench from these burning funeral pyres overspread much of the gulf coastal area. This was hurricane Camille. Nearly sixty-nine years after the Galveston disaster. Cline found his make-shift raft settling down on a strip of high ground near the center of the island. Nisan 9 was the date on which the Lord entered the town of Bethany in preparation for His triumphal entry into the Holy City. a large timber carried on the crest of a huge wave struck his wife and knocked her from the make-shift raft. which slammed into the Mississippi coast on . As dawn filtered through the blackness of night and the storm began to abate. 1900. Many bodies were mutilated beyond recognition. He later found his wife’s body. the grim task of clean-up began. which battered Galveston on September 8-9. Once the storm had ended. but on reviving he discovered that he still clutched the child tightly. This powerful storm. During the horror of the night hours that followed he clung to the baby tormented by the belief that they were being swept out into the gulf. but he never knew whether she died from being struck by the timber or had drowned. but in the early hours of the morning. As dazed survivors searched for their loved ones. another powerful hurricane whalloped the gulf-coastal region. Thousands of tons of debris were strewn about the island.

And it did. This date was the anniversary date of the prophet Ezekiel’s second vision. Trees and light poles were snapped off as easily as one might break a wooden toothpick.21 This killer hurricane pummeled Pass Christian on Elul 5. the hurricane winds abated. received a double punch. DeAngelis of the Environmental Data Service and Elmer R. What the winds could not destroy the tidal surge could. Interestingly enough. Total damage has been estimated at $1. 1969. Camille charged inland with its center just west of the city of Gulfport. though the torrential rain continued. a giant wave or series of waves slid over the seawall and destroyed the apartment complex. Sometime during that night of terror. It was their last party. The homes in the coastal region. Those who chose to ride out the storm in their homes and not flee inland before the storm’s arrival were subjected to an indescribable night of terror. as in the Galveston storm. Richard M. All electric power was lost and roads became impassable because of downed wires. In Pass Christian. All lives were lost. Hurricane Camille ranks high as one of the most destructive killer storms ever to hit the U. Nelson of the United States Weather Bureau wrote the following summary of Camille.43 the night of August 17. As the storm moved inland. . the Lord tells Ezekiel in that vision that “Therefore will I also deal in fury: mine eye shall not spare.S. Much flooding occurred in the Virginias because of this. twenty-three people lost their lives because they rejected two different warnings from police to leave the Richelieu Apartment house.42 billion with 258 deaths and 68 additional persons missing. . Shrieking winds with gusts of up to 200 miles an hour devastated coastal and inland regions. . They chose to stay and hold a hurricane party.

”22 Is it possible that this Old Testament warning to Israel on Elul 5 also applied to the Gulf Coast when Camille smashed into that area on the identical date? .44 neither will I have pity: and though they cry in mine ears with a loud voice. yet will I not hear them.

In keeping within the consistency of His calendar patterns the Lord made it a point in His earthly visitation nearly two millennia ago not to depart from the patterns He had founded in the beginning but to function within them. . who were made in the very image of the Eternal Himself. to become a leader who desired to conquer the world. He works in this fashion because He is a highly intelligent and organized being. each step occurring at a higher level than the preceding and culminating in the creation of the progenitors of mankind.45 Chapter III THE CRUCIFIXION AND RESURRECTION The Lord works within selected calendar patterns when controlling the major events in history. The Lord’s calendar enlightens one’s understanding of events in history. The book of Genesis reveals that the Creation itself was composed of a series of consistent sequential steps. He plans carefully and executes His will accordingly.D. He does not permit the events and happenings here on earth and in the universe to occur by chance or in a slipshod manner. That is why He rode triumphantly into Jerusalem in A. 30 on the identical date on which the Paschal Lambs were set aside in Old Testament times. It is wholly another concept to understand that the sequence of events that led up to Hitler’s ascendancy and the beginning of World War II were happenings determined not by chance or accident but by the Almighty Himself.1 A second reason for the Lord’s working within these calendar patterns is to make it possible for us here on earth to understand more fully His deep involvement in the affairs of mankind. Hitler. It is one thing to consider that World War II began because of a sequence of events that made it possible for a madman.

printed a set of tables giving the dates of all new and full moons from 1001 B. and went forth to meet him. they probably assumed they were the remains of oversized bison.D. and if they considered them at all. it is now possible for us. when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. Many years ago the Arizona Indians may have stumbled upon dinosaur skeletons.2 Each year on Nisan 14. and cried.46 That date was Nisan 10 and is supported fully in the triumphal entry passages in the Gospel of John. of course. paleontologists know better. through His perfect and sinless life.D. represented the most complete and absolute sacrifice possible. Because of recent rapid advances in technology and knowledge in general. . to locate the precise date of the crucifixion though nearly two millennia have passed. with the assistance of an IBM 360 computer. through A. On the next day much people that were come to the feast. These experts not only can distinguish the differences between a bison’s skeleton and a dinosaur’s skeleton. Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany. 30 on that same date. but can often reassemble these skeletons with little difficulty. the chosen lambs were slaughtered. Realizing that the Lord’s calendar is a luni-solar calendar. we in the twenty-first century are indeed fortunate to have at our disposal the most complete and up-to-date series of calculations of the phases of the moon ever produced. Because Jesus. . Dr. Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord. Took branches of palm trees. This is not as incredible as it sounds. . Herman Goldstine of the advanced study at Princeton. it was entirely fitting that His triumphal entry on Nisan 10 and His crucifixion on Nisan 14 should have occurred on these very significant dates. .C. Today. In the year 1973. Jesus died on the cross. with the aid of the calendar patterns. and in A.

1960 through 2003. 8000. Circular 112 gives phases of the moon from the year A.D.47 1651. is an exeptionally accurate record of these moon phases for that period. For centuries many have tried to pinpoint the true date and year of Jesus’ crucifixion but have failed. Circular 119 continues these phases from A. Goldstine’s book. 112 and 119.D. This is a software program for IBM PC/AT compatible computers. 1800 through the year 1959. to A. The United States Naval Observatory completes the task with circulars Nos. Goldstine’s work ended and lists the new moons to the beginning of the nineteenth century. the present-day Jewish calendar instead of beginning with the new moon as in the distant past now often begins two to three days after the occurring of the new moon. we must use the original Old Testament calendar and not one that was altered centuries later. to A. 1650 .D. and Solar Positions New and Full Moons A. If we are to truly locate the true crucifixion year.D. One of the most recent and extensive records listing the new and full moons is that produced by Z2 Computer Solutions of Bend. Welther of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in 1983 published a book titled Planetary. Oregon. which is titled New and Full Moons 1001 B.C.1805. This will not work. As time has passed alterations have been made in that calendar by Hillel II and others that destroy its reliability for locating the times and dates of ancient happenings.000 years from 4001 B.C. To complement Dr. which covers a range of 12. The Jewish calendar. This book continues the calculations from the point at which Dr. Dr. Because of these alterations. In Jesus’ day certain rules and procedures were adhered to in . Owen Gingerich and Barbara L. They have failed for a number of reasons. does not now fulfill that role. 1651. though originally the true Bible calendar. One reason for failure is that they have tried to locate the crucifixion year by using the Jewish calendar of today.D. His book. Lunar.

however. announcement was made far and wide by means of fire-signals to inform the communities outside of Jerusalem.3 At times inclement weather prevented visual observation of the moon. these observers returned quickly to Jerusalem and reported to the council the hour at which they had first located the crescent. The Bible calendar was a luni-solar calendar which means that its very structure was determined by the movements of the sun and moon. The new moon can not occur before a . the council determined that the lengths of the months should alternate between twenty-nine and thirty days. the day on which the testimony was given became the first day of the new month instead of the thirtieth day of the old month. that is. The Sanhedrin was then able to locate the first day of the new month and proclaim it by fire-signals sent from mountain tops. When this happened. It was lunar in that each month began with the new moon. Late in the old month. the Jewish council. The determining of the new moon and the establishing of the first day of the month was performed by members of the Sanhedrin. the new moon was considered as beginning on the day following the thirtieth.48 the constructing of the Bible calendar. If two trustworthy witnesses had made deposition to that effect on that day. On observing the new moon. If no witnesses appeared. the Sanhedrin sent forth expert observers to hill or mountain tops to watch the waning of the old moon until they could sight the thin crescent of the new moon in the twilight sky. the council proclaimed a new month to begin on that day. From before the destruction of the temple certain rules were in existence. Once the council had proclaimed the new month. On the thirtieth day of the month a council would meet to receive the testimony of witnesses that they had seen the new moon.

a noted Jewish historian. If the moon could not be exactly determined.4 The Bible calendar is solar as well as lunar. there is one last rule to be considered prior to establishing a true and accurate first-century calendar. Nothing but failure can come from ignoring that code. If the month of Nisan arrived and the sun was at such a distance from the vernal equinox that it could not reach it by the 16th of the month. A clear understanding and knowledge of how these patterns are used by the Lord in history is essential if one is to locate accurately the many significant years. then this month was not called Nisan. and the new year would not begin until the following new moon. explains how the Bible calendar is controlled by the position of the sun. Because this is so. Cyrus Adler. including the crucifixion year. The full months were not to be less than 4 nor more than 8. so that the year could not be less than 352 days nor more than 356. contained within the pattern code. another reason accounting for the fact why many fail to locate the true crucifixion year is their attempt to locate that year with absolutely no knowledge of God’s calendar patterns.5 What is meant here is that if winter fell as late into the month of Nisan as the 16th day. then that month became a leap-year month for the present year. A third reason to account for the crucifixion year not being located is that far too many rely on tradition in place of the Bible . accounts for why the true crucifixion year has not up to this point been found.49 lapse of 29 1/2 days and 2/3 of an hour. one month was to have 30 days and the next 29. That. but Adar Sheni (second). perhaps more than any other reason. In addition to the error of using today’s Jewish calendar in place of the Bible calendar.

D 33 Vernal Equinox Monday Tuesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Nisan 1 Tuesday Sunday Thursday Tuesday Sunday Friday Nisan 14 Monday Saturday Wednesday Monday Saturday Thursday It is of interest to note that in no year did Nisan 14. the Crucifixion day. the evangelist.D. A. by means of the Scriptures only. R. Tradition tells us that Jesus was crucified on Good Friday and that He rose on Easter Sunday. Year A. but everything in the Scripture is perfectly harmonized by Wednesday crucifixion. He relates: There is absolutely nothing in favor of Friday crucifixion. 30 A. 32 A.D. Torrey. discovered that the crucifixion day was not a Friday but a Wednesday. and that there could not have been one because the . 29 *A. fall on a Friday. In discussing the day of crucifixion. Dr. It is remarkable how many prophetical and typical passages of the Old Testament are fulfilled and how many seeming discrepancies in the Gospel narratives are straightened out when we once come to understand that Jesus died on Wednesday and not on Friday. Torrey. it is now possible to locate the year of Jesus' crucifixion. 28 A. However. published a booklet titled Difficulties in the Bible.D.50 and calendar records.D. in 1907. 31 A.6 With the aid of a list of vernal equinoxes and new moons calculated for Jerusalem time. this belief is not on as solid a footing as some seem to think. This shows that there was no Friday crucifixion. even without the help of the latest astronomical and calendrical data. Nearly a century ago.D.

instead of occurring on a Friday. for Jesus Himself in one of His discourses indicated that He would be locked in death’s grip for a three-day and three-night period. As a consequence. They have been so certain that the crucifixion had occurred on a Friday that they have refused to believe that it could not have done so. 30. Thus we discover that both the year and month of the crucifixion began with a new moon that occurred within twenty-four hours of the equinox. God made certain that those events could only happen in a special year. The year A. actually occurred on a Wednesday as Dr.the night of March 22-23.D. The Julian calendar date for the crucifixion was April 5. then support for such a happening would have appeared in the foregoing tables. The fact that no supporting evidence appears here clearly explains why scholars have been unable to locate the crucifixion year. If a Friday crucifixion had truly occurred. Torrey and others have suggested. Because Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection were so meaningful to God. A Wednesday crucifixion is consistent with the Scripture record and supports fully the events that transpired during the crucifixion week. Moreover. the New Year’s Day also began with that date. 30 was that special year. . The Wednesday of the crucifixion was Nisan 14 in A. Once the date of Jesus’ crucifixion is located it is an easy task to find the correct date of the resurrection. for the vernal equinox and the new moon that determined the beginning of the year for God’s calendar occurred in the same night .51 Bible calendar as determined by these accurate astronomical computations reveals the impossibility of such an occurrence. The tables reveal that the crucifixion of Jesus. they have been on a fruitless search hunting for that which never took place.D. This pattern which does not happen on a yearly basis clearly reveals the involvement of the Almighty in determining the dating of the crucifixion.

On Wednesday. This idea.52 But he answered and said unto them. however. the Lord was crucified. and found not the body of the Lord Jesus. so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.8 Tradition would have us believe that the Lord was crucified on Good Friday and resurrected on Easter Sunday. bringing the spices which they had prepared. Early the next morning (Sunday) the women visited the tomb and found it empty. An evil and adulterous generation seeketh after a sign. for it is not possible for one to compute a literal three-day and three-night or seventy-two-hour period from a late Friday crucifixion to an early Sunday resurrection. At the very best this span would cover about thirty-six hours. His body was removed from the cross and placed in the tomb.D. 30. and certain others with them. they came unto the sepulchre. Late that day after His death.7 This three -day and three-night period to which the Lord referred equalled seventy-two hours. appears to contradict the Lord’s statement that He would be in the grave for a period comprised of three days and three nights. April 8. and there shall no sign be given to it. It fitted precisely into the calendar of the year A. Three days and three nights later on Saturday. And they entered in. April 5. And they found the stone rolled away from the sepulchre. Now upon the first day of the week. Jesus rose. In explaining this discrepancy some scholars say that the Lord did not actually intend to convey to His listeners a seventy-two-hour period when He used the expression of “three days and three nights” but He was . very early in the morning. but the sign of the prophet Jonas: For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly.

Examples of these passages are Matt. “ . as Lord. The Jewish historian. 20:19. That is to say. .53 actually referring to a much shorter length of time. and be raised again the third day. The weakness in this argument is that time spans were not always treated as a figure of speech. Another argument that weakens the idea that Jesus may have been expressing a synecdoche is His referral to Jonah’s three day and three night entombment in the huge fish. who lived about the time of Jesus. and that when he had been there three days. Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly. 16:21 “. . . They do this because they are aware that the Jews in Jesus’ day sometimes did treat periods of time in this manner. Josephus. . . they consider that a part of a day represents a whole day. ..” Matt. Additional Bible passages which have been misunderstood are those relating to a third-day resurrection. . Jesus was expressly conveying to us that the three-day and three-night period of His own entombment should be understood in a literal sense as well.a figure of speech in which a part is representative of the whole. knew it to be so. . ”10 If in fact Jonah’s account is literal.. that Jonah was in the fish’s or whale’s belly a full three-day and three-night period.” Those who accept the Sunday resurrection interpretation believe that Jesus died and His body was placed in a tomb on a . “It is also related that Jonah was swallowed down by a whale.. he was vomited out upon the Euxine sea.” and Mark 9:31 which records that “. There is nothing in this passage to indicate otherwise. These scholars consider this passage to be a synecdoche -. and Jesus. . “. he shall rise the third day. also supported this time span when writing of Jonah’s entombment.”9 It is apparent here that Jesus accepted as literal the Old Testament account of Jonah 1:17. and the third day he shall rise again. . It was not unusual for a three-day and three-night period to be treated as a literal seventy-two hour span. then by referring to Jonah’s account. . and as many nights.

Thursday night and Friday would have been the second night and second day. then Wednesday night and Thursday would have been the first night and first day of the entombment. The weakness in this interpretation is that these third-day passages apply equally as well to the idea of a Wednesday crucifixion -. In the first day ye shall have . commonly referred to as the first day. Thus. called convocations differed from the Saturday Sabbath. and Friday night and Saturday would have been the third night and third day. . the second day. For example. a Saturday resurrection is completely harmonious with a third-day resurrection. It is only by misreading or misinterpreting a passage that we might arrive at a conclusion differing from this. It is said that Jesus was crucified on a Friday because it was “. and that He rose on a Sunday. Because the expression “the third day” aligns itself with a Sunday in this interpretation. These additional sabbaths.Saturday resurrection. then Friday must have been the day of crucifixion. . that His body lay in a sepulchre on a Saturday. the third day. The Bible strongly supports a Wednesday crucifixion. What was not realized was that the Jews observed several sabbaths throughout the year in addition to the Saturday Sabbaths. And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the feast of unleavened bread unto the Lord: seven days ye must eat unleavened bread.the day before the sabbath. if Jesus’ body were placed in the tomb late Wednesday just prior to sunset. The convocation sabbaths were yearly institutions and fell on specific dates within the months and each year on different days of the week. One such day as this was the Passover sabbath which yearly occurred on Nisan 15. and was also called the first day of the feast of unleavened bread. it is therefore concluded that Sunday must have been the day on which the Resurrection occurred. The Saturday Sabbaths were a weekly institution.”11 It is reasoned that since the Jews observed the Sabbath every Saturday beginning at Friday sunset.54 Friday.

Nisan 15. Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered. for in that week fell both the Passover sabbath and the seventh-day Sabbath. 30. April 6. Thus. We have no king but Caesar. Behold your King! But they cried out.13 The Passover sabbath. which always fell on a Saturday. Nisan 14. the day being determined by the calendar each year. April 5. In addition to this. and about the sixth hour: and he saith unto the Jews.D. away with him. It specifically states that it was on the preparation for the Passover. two preparation days also fell within that week. And it was the preparation of the passover. for that yearly sabbath was Wednesday. And they took Jesus. Now the Bible is very clear on which preparation day the Crucifixion occurred. The preparation day. The other was the preparation for the Passover. April 7. Away with him. One was the preparation for the weekly Sabbath which always fell on a Friday. it was not uncommon for two sabbaths to fall within one week -. This day could fall on any weekday. and led him away.12 Since the Passover sabbath fell on a different weekday each year and since the Jews also observed on a weekly basis the seventh-day Sabbath. Nowhere does it say that it was the preparation for the seventh-day Sabbath. Jesus could not have been crucified on Friday. crucify him. the crucifixion date can be precisely pinpointed by both the Bible and calendar records.55 an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work therein. the seventh day of the week. in A. the crucifixion year. This actually happened during the crucifixion week. fell on Thursday. for that . Then delivered he him therefore unto them to be crucified. Pilate saith unto them.one sabbath being the yearly convocation or Passover sabbath and the other the seventh-day Sabbath.

On studying column A below one can see how well the Thursday New Year’s Day for A.C. shows how misplaced a Saturday New Year’s Day. was Nisan 16. the year of the Wednesday crucifixion.D. A Thursday New Year’s Day pattern is representative of years having a special or religious significance to the Lord. 30. Year Event New Year’s New Year’s Day Day A B Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday B. the Jordan crossing and the birth of Jesus. A Friday crucifixion year has a Saturday New Year’s Day. It is incompatible with the Thursday pattern and does not belong with it. . one can see a consistent Thursday New Year’s Day pattern. From the Exodus to the forming of the Jewish state in 1948. fits into place. the anniversary of the wave sheaf offering. and there is no evidence to support the idea that Jesus was crucified on that date. on the other hand.C.1006 B. The Bible clearly refers to the yearly preparation day when it says: “And it was the preparation of the passover. 986 B. is not related to these types of happenings.1486 B. A Wednesday crucifixion year has a Thursday New Year’s Day. . A Saturday New Year’s Day pattern. a New Year’s Day representing a Friday crucifixion year. on the other hand. such as the Exodus. Friday. Column B.C.56 was the preparation for the weekly Sabbath. April 7.C. ” Moreover. .C. is in a Thursday calendar pattern code. Another reason the evidence weighs in favor of a Wednesday instead of a Friday crucifixion is that the year of the Wednesday crucifixion fits properly into the calendar puzzle while a Friday crucifixion year does not. 759 The Exodus The Jordan crossing Temple foundation laid Temple dedication Isaiah's vision .1446 B.

This clearly explains why those who hold to the traditional view of a Friday crucifixion have never been able to locate the year of the Lord’s crucifixion. he appeared first to Mary Magdalene. we . Another passage that might be worthwhile to consider so as to remove any doubts in the reader’s mind as to the true day of crucifixion is Mark 16:9.C. out of whom he had cast seven devils. Only a year having a Thursday New Year’s Day can be inserted into a Thursday New Year’s Day pattern. “Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week.57 Year Event New Year’s New Year’s Day Day A B Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Thursday Saturday Thursday Thursday B.1948 Jewish nation established If eons ago God had planned a Friday crucifixion for Jesus. Because they are Thursdays and not Saturdays verifies that Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday and not on a Friday.D. then the New Year's days in the above chart would all be Saturdays and not Thursdays. 5 Birth of Jesus * A.D.1776 Declaration of Independence A. However. They have been trying to force a year which begins with a Saturday into a Thursday pattern and it simply cannot be done. 30 Crucifixion. Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus A.” Through a quick reading of this passage it is possible to conclude that Jesus rose on the first day of the week.D.

the time being indefinite. to support the traditional view that the Lord was crucified on a Friday and resurrected on a Sunday. Mark 16:9 is of little value to the Bible scholar. Actually it would be better to read this passage with all commas removed so that the ambiguity of this passage may be seen.” we get the impression He rose on the first day of the week. In several cases this is an incorrect use of the word Sabbath and can easily mislead those who are unaware of such a practice. When we read this passage without commas. and the comma following the word “week” was placed there by translators who were in favor of a Sunday resurrection. Another factor to be considered here is that Mark 16:9 and the remainder of the chapter are not included in the two oldest manuscripts. it can clearly be seen that there is absolutely nothing.” If we hesitate after “week. Because the King James translators believed in a Sunday resurrection. This practice is not an uncommon one with Bible translators. we have a choice of either hesitating after the word “risen” or the word “week. This second interpretation will support the fact that Jesus rose late Saturday and several hours later met Mary early on the first day of the week. for in some of the latest translations the word “Sabbath” is referred to as Saturday in the New Testament regardless of whether it is a yearly or weekly Sabbath. neither scriptually nor historically. Because a double meaning can be gotten from this passage.58 must remember that in the original Greek. With this questionable authenticity in addition to the double meaning contained within it. Because of this. many scholars believe that these passages are not a part of the original inspired Scriptures. commas were not used. He appeared to Mary Magdalene early on the first day of the week. Both the Scriptures and the . it cannot be used as a support for either the Saturday or Sunday resurrection interpretations. Once all the facts have been gathered and compiled. if we hesitate after “risen. it seemed reasonable to them to place a comma after the word “week” in Mark 16:9.” we find that sometime after He had risen. On the other hand.

As best can be determined. at a most important time in the early church. For centuries it has been taught that the assembling on Sunday for worship is a commemorative event in honor of Jesus’ Sunday resurrection. Thus. then would it not appear reasonable for one to worship on Saturdays instead of Sundays if one intended to commemorate the true day of resurrection? Saturday meetings would honor the Lord in two ways. instead of recording the events as they happened while fresh in their minds. apparently waited for years to chronicle these events. Possibly these writers were so busy at the beginning of the emerging church that they simply did not have or could not take the time to compile a written record of what actually happened as it occurred. Since the facts now reveal that the Resurrection did not occur on that day but on a Saturday.59 historical record as revealed by the Lord’s calendar support the idea of a Wednesday crucifixion and Saturday resurrection. it is clear that certain factors contributed to the loss. It is unfortunate that the truth of the Saturday (Sabbath) resurrection was lost so soon after the Lord’s Ascension. for it causes one to wonder whether additional truths may have been lost during the course of church history. By the time they recorded the happenings related to Jesus’ life and ministry thirty or more years later. many important details may have been omitted. They would not only honor the true day of His resurrection. There are a number of reasons to account for the loss of the Saturday (Sabbath) resurrection so early in Christian history. no one other than the angel who rolled the stone from the tomb entrance actually . but also would honor the original weekly Sabbath of the Ten Commandments. Although some of the reasons we will never know. the church was left without a written record and had to depend on word of mouth and hearsay. the years directly after the Ascension. Another factor that contributed to the loss of the true resurrection day can be attributed to the lack of eyewitnesses to the Resurrection event. One is the fact that the gospel writers.

the first day of the week. and Joanna. and departed. and Mary the mother of James.”15 After the Sabbath had ended. and they believed them not. for the Scriptures disclose that they “. and stooping down. and because much activity by Jesus’ followers occurred on the following day. and ran unto the sepulchre. Moreover. . It was Mary Magdalene. he beheld the linen clothes laid by themselves. . wondering in himself at that which was come to pass. The Scriptures say they “ . they visited the tomb. became as dead men. A third factor which contributed to the loss of the true crucifixion and resurrection days was the fact that it was not possible to verify these happenings even a few years after they had occurred. who were guarding the tomb. The knowledge did not exist on how to calculate accurately the lunations into the past. Because of the loss of these .D.16 Because it appears that no one observed Jesus’ Saturday resurrection other than the angel. The soldiers. And their words seemed to them as idle tales. for they disbelieved the women’s story. 70. it evidently was assumed by many in the early church that the Lord rose on the first day and not on the seventh day of the week. apparently became unconscious before this happened. . and other women that were with them. rested the sabbath day according to the commandment.”14 The women who followed Jesus certainly did not see His Sabbath resurrection. Then arose Peter. which told these things unto the apostles. They soon discovered that Jesus was missing and relayed this information to His disciples. . The disciples apparently had not seen the resurrection either. any records that may have been available showing earlier significant calendar dates had been destroyed in the great temple fire as a result of Titus’ attack on the Holy City in A. This was on the first day of the week.60 saw Jesus return to life.

the first day of the week would be identified with the Resurrection festival. with much of it based on hearsay. The Encyclopaedia Britannica relates: But though the observance of the Paschal Festival at a very early period became the rule in the Christian church. the true dates of the Lord’s crucifixion and resurrection were soon lost to history. on the 14th day of the moon.61 temple records and the lack of knowledge on how to proceed in thorough scholarly research. and the Easter festival would immediately follow. errors relating to the days and dates of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection were well entrenched within the church. entirely irrespective of the day of the week. An especially sharp division arose between Christians of Jewish and Gentile descent. the point at issue really was the date of the termination of the Paschal fast. at evening. early in the fourth century. Christians were left to follow their own instincts. by the time of Constantine. Tradition. unfettered by Jewish traditions. Because all these factors contributed to the loss of the true crucifixion and resurrection days. With the Jewish Christians. then. on the other hand. With the Gentile Christians. and the preceding Friday would be kept as the commemoration of the Cruci- . a difference as to the time of its observance speedily sprang up between Christians of Jewish and Gentile descent. As a consequence. soon determined that which should be accepted as fact concerning these happenings. the early church soon became divided as to when these events may have taken place. These were naturally different in the Jewish and Gentile churches. this fast would end at the same time as that of the Jews. whose leading thought would be the death of Christ as the true Paschal Lamb. and an unhappy severance of Christian union. which led to a long-continued and bitter controversy. No rule as to the date of the Easter festivals having been laid down by authority.

and those of Egypt a week later still. . This code has given us a means by which we can observe the Crucifixion. the fast continuing with increasing strictness till the midnight of Saturday. to April 25. As a matter of fact. and it appears from an epistle of Leo the Great (Epist. That is why no church. Ambrose (Epist. Resurrection. 23) that in 387 the churches of Gaul kept Easter on March 21. The record from history reveals that the early church was not on as sure footing concerning the dates of the Crucifixion and Resurrection as the church today would like us to believe. and other events in a new perspective. has yet been able to locate the true dates of these momentous events.) that in 455 there was eight days’ difference between the Roman and Alexandrine Easter. The Lord’s calendar code. has enabled us to remove the shroud of hoary tradition and finally reveals to us the true days and dates of the Crucifixion and Resurrection. 64 Ad Marcian. while the churches of Italy postponed it to April 18. the church today is not certain of these dates either. whether from the past or present day. irrespective of the day of the month.62 fixion. This new perspective should be of especial benefit to the church. As time progressed the idea of an Easter Sunday resurrection began to be accepted. for it gives the church the opportunity to cleanse itself of past errors and rededicate itself to the truths which the Lord so desires for it.17 The dissentions and heated arguments in the early church over the days and dates of the crucifixion and resurrection are simply more evidence showing the early loss of the true times of these events. though the early Christians did have considerable difficulty in settling on which Sunday Easter should be observed each year.18 It was not until the seventh century that the Easter dispute was finally settled in England. on the other hand. We learn from St.

and teach all nations. lo. and of the Son. as one mighty and pure spiritual force.63 If this is done. even unto the end of the world. and the Great Commission of Matthew 28. I am with you alway. will become that which has been completed.19 . baptizing them in the name of the Father. Amen. instead of being something that should be completed. could move forward in fulfilling its lofty purpose of serving both God and man. the church then. and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and. Go ye therefore.

64 Chapter IV

DOCUMENTS
The Lord’s involvement in major happenings in history can be seen in many areas. His involvement is not limited merely to major wars and natural disasters. A study of the dates associated with the writing or implementing of several significant documents in history makes clear this fact. On June 15, 1215, at Runnymede, King John, with an assemblage of barons observing, placed his seal upon a set of proposals called the Articles of the Barons. These Articles soon came to be known as the Magna Carta or the Great Charter. The Magna Carta granted to the barons and merchants and eventually to the populace rights and liberties of which they had been deprived. John did not of his own volition choose to sign the Great Charter. It was in the face of open rebellion by his barons that he was forced to do so. The benefit of this magnificent document was that it not only placed King John but also all succeeding English kings under the law of the land and granted to the populace certain freedoms and rights that they never before had. Moreover, from the Magna Carta evolved the many freedoms that the Democracies of western civilization now enjoy. The dating of the approval of the Articles of the Barons reveals to us a new type of calendar pattern. In 1215, June 15 fell on Tamuz 16, a date of no particular significance. We find, though, that when we transfer the Bible calendar year for the year 1215 to the year 30, the year of the Lord’s crucifixion, and realign the months to that year, we then discover that the Articles were approved on the anniversary date of the prophet Ezekiel’s first vision! The signing of the Magna Carta did not end the struggle between John and the barons. Actually neither side fully intended

65 to abide by the Articles completely. Nevertheless, after John died in 1216, other English kings in the years that followed agreed to the terms of the charter. It eventually came to be recognized as part of the fundamental law of England. As English emigrants colonized America, they carried with them these ideals of freedom which were embodied in the English law. Because they cherished and believed in these ideals, many of these ideals eventually became part of the framework of the Constitution of the United States. Early colonists in the New World enjoyed an air of freedom never before felt. Perhaps this feeling came when they first conceived the idea of leaving their homeland for a new world over the horizon. Perhaps it came during their long voyage across the vast Atlantic, or as they trudged the muddy roads and streets of Boston, or Philadelphia. They may not have known when the idea of freedom first bathed their souls, but they knew that it had done so, and they had no intention of losing it. The British Parliament under King George III having not lived in the New World, had no perception of the colonists’ feelings. The colonists were their subjects, so they thought, and they were to obey all laws enacted, and pay all taxes levied. The demands of the Parliament were most annoying to the colonists. In order to make clear to the mother country their position on these matters, a delegation of colonial leaders was selected, and they met in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774 in the First Continental Congress. The date September 5, 1774, the date of the First Assembly, was the 153rd day after Nisan 24. Nisan 24 was the anniversary date on which an angel communicated with the prophet Daniel (Dan 10:4-14). Because Britain ignored the resolutions drawn up by the colonial leaders, matters soon worsened. By the following spring fighting had erupted between the colonials and English troops at both Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. Congress acted

66 swiftly, and voted to organize an army and navy. George Washington was appointed Commander in Chief. At first, many colonials hoped that the war would cause Britain to reverse its stand on what appeared to them to be unacceptable policies. But as the war continued, the idea of complete independence from Britain began to be nurtured in their hearts. One who best exemplified this change in thought was Richard Henry Lee of Virginia. At first he felt that a policy of economic pressure was the best means of retaliating against the British. However, by 1776 he began to think in terms of complete independence and introduced a resolution: . . . these united colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown; and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.1 The date June 7, 1776, the date Lee introduced this resolution in Congress, is significant, for that was the 70th day (ordinal count) after Nisan 10, the anniversary date of Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Three days later on June 10, Congress voted to name a committee to write a declaration of independence. Included on this committee were Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson was asked by the other committee members to draw up a first draft of the document. He completed this task in about two weeks. Early in July, the Congress approved the Lee resolution, and then began to debate Jefferson’s draft. The delegates removed a few passages and made minor changes in its style, but other than that, the document was kept intact. On July 4, the 40th day after Pentecost, the Congress adopted the final draft of the Declaration of Independence.

Many states ignored or annulled the acts of Congress. were guaranteed sovereignity and independence and were given all powers not specifically granted to Congress. . Under these articles the states retained most of the assigned powers. Lacking the power to regulate foreign commerce it could not establish a uniform commercial policy for the country. issuing money. on the other hand. Without the power to tax.2 It was becoming apparent to many that a stronger central government was needed if the new nation was to succeed. the government was in constant financial difficulty. after struggling for weeks and making no apparent progress in the revisions.67 Following the adoption of the Declaration. and in many cases they refused to do so. The convention was supposed to begin on May 14. Often as the summer drew on with little or no progress . Eleven days later it formally opened in Independence Hall. Alexander Hamilton recommended that Congress call a convention of special delegates from all the states to meet in Philadelphia in the spring of the following year. Under this arrangement the central government was . 1787. but few of the fifty-five delegates had arrived by that date. Consequently. The states. and carrying on foreign relations. but lacked the powers of drafting troops or regulating trade. always dependent on the willingness of the states to accept its measures. They then set about writing a completely new constitution. the new nation entered for the next half-dozen years a very critical and unstable period. The Congress had the powers of conducting war. they set the articles aside. at a meeting of delegates at Annapolis in 1786. From the beginning the delegates had intended to revise the Articles of Confederation. The Articles of Confederation were the cause of this weakness. . for it lacked a strong central government. However.

we find that Tamuz 5. on 1788. Also. At that time. Farmers who lived west of the Appalachian Mountains shipped much of their produce down the Mississippi to the Port of New Orleans. June 21 was the 40th-day (ordinal count) after Sivan 7 (May 13) the day of Pentecost. 30. falls on June 21. while the southern boundary extended to the thirty-first parallel north latitude. One problem that concerned them dealt with the storing of produce and other goods at New Orleans. New Hampshire was the ninth state to ratify the Constitution putting it into effect on June 21. But knowing full well that the future of the tiny nation depended on them. 1788. Florida and the Louisiana Territory belonged to Spain. they despaired of ever completing the task. a day within 24 hours of the summer solstice and a Sabbath day. Moreover. many knew that the Spanish could close this port if they so desired. It is significant to note that the New Year's days for the years 1776 and 1787 occurred within twenty-four hours of the vernal equinoxes in their respective years. That very day thirty-nine signatures were affixed to the document that was to become the Constitution of the United States.D. This plan worked well until the year 1800. on the overlay. In the following year.68 being made. In that year Spain returned a part of her New World possessions to France by the . the leaders of government could then devote their time to solving other pressing matters. Once the signing and ratifying of the Constitution had been completed. To prevent that from happening a treaty between the two nations was signed in 1795 which gave the Americans the right to store for shipment dutyfree goods at New Orleans. Jesus'. crucifixion year. by placing an overlay of A. Step by step and little by little the bits and pieces began to come together until finally on September 17 the Constitution was finished. the western boundary of the United States ended at the Mississippi River. they persevered and slowly began to make headway. Because this port came under Spanish jurisdiction.

69 secret Treaty of San Ildefonso. It is not only New Orleans that I cede. who was feeling a financial pinch because of his military expenditures. who was then President. The Louisiana Purchase Treaty was signed in a Thursday New Year's Day year. “I renounce Louisiana .. Minister to France. Because of this. At midnight. especially West Florida. independent state. . the People’s Council convened in the Tel Aviv museum and approved the Proclamation of Independence. By then the Americans had adopted the strategy of trying to purchase the land from France. finally agreed to accept the Americans’ offer. This was land which France had ceded to Spain at the end of the Seven Years’ War. a few hours later.. The Mandate was over. On May 14. Napolean. . left Haifa on board a British destroyer. which declared the establishment of the State of Israel. This action not only could destroy westward expansion but also lead to another war. . the day preceding the end of British rule. Sir Alan Cunningham. With a declaration of despair he stated.4 The Associated Press in May 1948 wrote: The Jewish state will be proclaimed sovereign at mid- . the Jews in Palestine announced the forming of a new. A recent significant event that occurred in a Thursday New Year's Day year was the founding of the nation of Israel. . to the United States. he instructed Robert Livingston. to make an attempt to persuade France to transfer the Floridas.. 1948. The negotiations between the two nations extended into the spring of 1803. for he feared that if the French acquired New Orleans they might close the Mississippi River entirely to the Americans. it is the whole colony without reserve . In May 1948. This action alarmed Thomas Jefferson. the last British high commissioner.”3 The Americans truly received a bargain which would not be fully appreciated by them for many years.

the multitude came together. And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost. for on that date. This was a Sabbath. and began to speak with other tongues. And when the day of Pentecost was fully come. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire and it sat upon each of them. The “cabinet” made its decision after a nine-hour discussion behind closed doors.5 The British mandate ended Friday at midnight. and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind. The British have announced they will terminate their mandate at 12:01 a. that the Lord made His Sinai visitation and gave to the world His law. as the Spirit gave them utterance. devout men.70 night Friday. Saturday. Now when this was noised abroad. and were confounded.6 The establishment of the State of Israel was no accident in history. the Ten Commandments. because that every man heard them speak in his own language.D. they were all with one accord in one place. This date is significant because it was on Sivan 7. 30.C.. the Lord again set apart Sivan 7 for a special purpose. In the Lord’s calendar it was the date. the 13-man “cabinet” decided early today. also a Sabbath. The fact that it was established on the anniversary of the . In A. which was also a Sabbath. Sivan 7. The sabbath begins at sundown Friday and ends at sundown Saturday. And there were dwelling at Jerusalem Jews.m. the Holy Spirit descended from heaven. out of every nation under heaven. 1486 B. Religious dignitaries had granted the political leaders exemption from the Orthodox law which prohibits even writing on the Jewish sabbath.

and it was done.8 . Thine. we continually discover evidence of the Lord’s involvement in the significant affairs of the world. By the word of the LORD were the heavens made.. and in thine hand is power and might. O LORD. thine is the kingdom.. O LORD. This is as it should be. for the Scriptures clearly attest to the sovereignty of the Almighty. and the victory. As we delve deeper into the events in history and study history in the light of God’s calendar code. is the greatness. and thou reignest over all. and the glory. and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth. and the power. Let all the earth fear the LORD: Let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him. He gathereth the waters of the sea together as an heap: he layeth up the depth in storehouses. Both riches and honour come of thee.71 date of the giving of the law and the gift of the Holy Spirit is absolute evidence of the Lord’s involvement in the forming of that nation.. and thou art exalted as head above all. and the majesty: for all that is in the heaven and in the earth is thine. For he spake. he commanded.7 The calendar code is the result of the Lord’s involvement in worldly affairs and a confirmation of the truths contained in the Holy Scriptures. and it stood fast.

but not in the quantities that would be required by today's world. man skimmed crude oil from oil pools that had seeped to the surface from underground springs. the patriarch Noah. or pitch. For millennia man had used oil. .72 Chapter V DISCOVERIES AND INVENTIONS Sometimes great happenings in history take place with very little fanfare. found natural gas and used it for fuel. people no longer were confined to dimly-lit rooms and flickering candles and were much more able to enjoy the evening hours. The Egyptians coated their mummies with oil during the process of embalming. American Indians discovered that oil was useful both as a fuel and medicine hundreds of years before the white man came. By the mid 1800’s kerosene became available as a fuel. the Chinese. pitch it within and without with pitch. Possibly. . the builder of the ark. This collected oil. and Kentucky. and a millennium later King Nebuchadnezzar used pitch to pave the streets of Babylon. They not only scooped petroleum from surface pools. About the time of the invention of the oil lamp. the demand for kerosene increased rapidly.”1 As far back as 1000 B. As improvements occurred in the kerosene lamp and more homes used it for lighting. used large quantities of this residue. It is not until years later that the importance of an event can be fully appreciated. One such event was the successful drilling for oil in Titusville. George Bissell. for he was to “. Pennsylvania by Edwin Drake in 1859.C. The remains of these wells can be found in Pennsylvania. was then forced into the cracks and seams of boats and larger vessels to make them watertight. In early times. Ohio. . Because of the improved lighting provided by this new lamp. but also dug wells searching for oil that was not accessible to them. while drilling for salt.

The casing was to keep the earth from caving in as the drill pierced deeper and deeper into the earth and to let the oil rise to the surface once the drill bit had been removed. This engine was to operate a drill which had been placed within an iron pipe or casing. Drake finally conceived of drilling a well using a six-horse-power steam engine. long-lasting lubricant that would withstand the heat generated by long. Drake soon discovered that the method of collecting oil by hand was much too slow and laborious.73 a businessman from New Haven. Whale oil and animal fats were adequate for lubricating the axles of slow-moving horse drawn buggies and wagons of the day but were entirely unsatisfactory for the speedy railroad trains. Nebraska to Sacramento. A roadbed was also to be completed between Chicago and Omaha. To entice developers to accept such a difficult project. and formed the Pennsylvania Rock Company. It was to extend from Omaha. The development of the oil well could not have happened at a more opportune time. not wanting to be bypassed by the coming oil boom. After considerable experimentation and failure. The trains’ high speed axles required a high-quality. the government offered gener- . set up their own drill rigs for oil production. He set about to improve the collecting of oil by having the men dig a well by pick and shovel in a manner similar to that of an 18th century farmer digging for water. In the early 1860’s the U. He joined with a partner. This plan worked well. This method also proved unsatisfactory. Jonathan Eveleth of New York City. They hired a man named Edwin Drake to go to Pennsylvania to oversee the oil procuring operation. hot. Connecticut. dusty trips. government proposed that a transcontinental railroad bed be laid. became interested in developing oil as a fuel. in other parts of the nation. Almost paralleling the discovery of a new well was the laying of another hundred miles of track which caused an increased demand for the lubricant. for Drake had devised a much easier and faster means for procuring oil. California. Soon others.S.

When the moment arrived for the driving of the last spike.. that two companies would lay the roadbed. As each railroad worked toward the other. Utah.000 a mile. the work became a contest to see which could lay the most track in the shortest time. . which was the 70th day (ordinal count) before Ab 10. fell on Yiar 28. To increase their workforce.000 to $48. As May 10.M. finally. and cannon salutes were a part of the celebrations planned for the great day.74 ous land grants and loans ranging from $16. the word “Done” flashed across the wires signaling that the spikes had been driven and the nation linked by rails of iron. It was agreed. while the Union Pacific hired thousands of European immigrants. the Central Pacific hired thousands of Chinese laborers. Ab 10 was the anniversary date of the burning of the first temple by Nebuzaradan. major telegraph lines were opened to record the momentous event. The Union Pacific had to cross the rugged Rockies. All supplies had to be transported long distances. the date of the rail-joining approached. Both companies faced a gigantic task. the place chosen where the last spike was to be driven. gaily-decked trains rumbled in from the east and the west. the pealing of church bells. The Central Pacific had to cross the jagged Sierra Nevada Mountains in Eastern California. At Promontory Point. excitement throughout the nation increased. The signal to announce the commencement of the hammer blows was three dots. The Central Pacific was to push eastward from Sacramento and the Union Pacific was to strike westward from Omaha. May 10 in 1869. At 2:47 P. Throngs of spectators and dignitaries poured from the cars to observe the driving of the Golden Spike which would link the nation from coast to coast. Parties. Washington time.

This got him into trouble. In his free time on the train Edison enjoyed experimenting with chemicals. young Thomas. he so annoyed a teacher by his incessant questioning that the teacher called him “addled. He was the seventh and last child of Samuel and Nancy Edison. When he was nine years old. slowly and laboriously performed every experiment to verify the author’s results. and on entering school. a young genius. Even as a young child Edison revealed evidence of his exceptionally inquisitive mind. He constantly asked questions at home. 1847. The newspaper business was especially profitable because the Civil War was in progress. Thomas Edison.” His mother. Ohio. Having expended most of his energies on . Within a very short time he made enough money from his sales to be able to purchase his own small printing press. she bought him a chemistry book. This machine tallied the votes of legislators on a big board. on February 11. was beginning to make a name for himself.75 During the years that Edwin Drake was attempting to improve on oil recovery methods and the railroads were struggling to link the East and West. Edison was born in Milan. angered by this comment. for one day a stick of phosphorus burst into flames and caught the baggage car on fire. removed him from school after only three months of formal schooling. she began to instruct him at home. Because he did not trust the author’s findings. Edison’s paper was the first paper to be printed on a moving train. In 1868. When he was twelve years old. An angry conductor threw him and his equipment off the train at the next stop. Edison filed papers for his first invention. an electric vote-recording machine. Edison got a job on the Grand Trunk Railway selling newspapers for the Detroit Free Press. He advanced rapidly under her tutelage because she made his lessons fun and exciting and encouraged him to be inquisitive and to search for answers to difficult and perplexing questions. Being a former teacher herself.

Edison made a number of improvements on the stock ticker. By 1876 he had tired of manufacturing and moved to Menlo Park. he was quite annoyed to discover that no one wanted it. Edison had the machine repaired and operating within two hours. J. Arriving nearly penniless. the date of the beginning of Edison's successful experiment was the 40th day after Elul 24. where he established a factory for the producing of his many inventions. October 19.. Sometimes the discoveries would outpace the disseminating of this newly-acquired . He reasoned that a thin filament would not only burn brighter but also require much less elecricity to illuminate it.76 the perfecting of the machine and very little on the salability of it. the anniversary date on which the Jews worked to restore the temple in 520 B. exciting discoveries were also being made in the world’s many scientific laboratories. He performed thousands of experiments and searched the world over before discovering that a thin. In October 1879 he succeeded in making a lamp burn for more than 40 hours. With this money he set up a small business manufacturing tickers. the central transmitter broke down. he visited the Laws’ Gold Indicator Company. During the same period that Edison’s laboratory was humming with activity. From that day on. The indicator was a machine that transmitted changes in gold prices to subscribers.C. rodlike devices. Laws immediately gave him a job. It was at Menlo Park that he began his serious study of the incandescent lamp. Edison differed from other experimenters in the field of electric lighting in that he believed that the bulb filament should be made of a high-resistant. The following year he moved from Boston to New York. so many in fact that in late 1870 he was paid the sum of $40. One day soon after Edison’s arrival. carbonized thread worked successfully. he vowed never to create another invention that was not needed. N.000. Quickly spotting the trouble. hair like structure instead of thick.

Becquerel. discovered that uranium ore affected photographic plates in the same manner as X. One of the more significant discoveries of the late 19th century was that of X-rays by the German physicist. Two scientists who were excited by Becquerel’s experiments were Pierre and Marie Curie. In addition to frequently repeating Roentgen’s experiments.rays. the ore from which uranium is obtained. gave off radiation. a French physicist.77 knowledge throughout the scientific community and a duplicating of effort would occur. In order to understand more thoroughly Becquerel’s findings. through a series of experiments. Roentgen found that he could photograph bone structures with the rays. Additional experimentation revealed to him that the rays would pass through some substances easily. After further investigation he deduced that powerful invisible rays were being beamed from the tube when the current was flowing. too. Roentgen received many honors. With this knowledge. such as bone or metal. Wilhelm Roentgen. For his outstanding discovery. scientists also began a search for other substances that might have fluorscent characteristics. but were stopped by others. In 1895 while experimenting with a Crookes Tube (an evacuated glass tube through which an electric current was passed) he noticed a strange fluorescence on a barium screen that happened to be near. such as flesh. Roentgen’s X-rays fascinated the scientific community. They then concentrated their efforts on pitchblende. The discovery of these invisible rays given off by the uranium ore spurred him to test other substances to see if they. One scientist in particular who was stimulated to pursue research in this area was Henri Becquerel. They found that this ore . they duplicated many of his experiments. including the first Nobel Peace prize in physics. He found that all substances which contained uranium radiated rays. These rays he called X-rays.

Shortly after his arrival in England. as Professor Thomson was affectionately known.A. For this work they received. He was born in New Zealand in 1871. the gas could take up only a certain amount of current. At first. Rutherford’s earliest product was a detector for electromagnetic waves. Thomson.. and named them radium and polonium. From the discovery of X-rays by Roentgen. and once saturated.78 produced a larger amount of radioactivity than would be expected from it. In 1895 Rutherford won the coveted 1851 exhibition scholarship for study at Cambridge University in England. From this they finally isolated small amounts of two highly radioactive new chemical elements. asked Rutherford to join him in the study of X-rays. regardless of how high the voltage. the 1903 Nobel prize for physics. his younger colleagues in the laboratory ignored him. Sarah Riedman tells us in her book Men and Women Behind the Atom: A number of important results came out of these experiments: they found that the longer the column of gas that was exposed to X-rays. European physicists were beginning to gain an insight into the structure of the atom. and the experiments of Becquerel and the Curies. J. he began serious research at the Cavendish laboratory. but he soon won their respect as well as that of Sir J. degree in mathematics and physics. J. the director. . To locate the source of these rays they slowly and painstakingly analyzed a large quantity of that ore. By 1893 he had taken his M. J. it could not take up any more current. X-rayed gases lost their conductivity when blown through porous plugs. One physicist of that period who contributed greatly to our present-day knowledge of the atom was Ernest Rutherford. the greater its conductivity-an effect opposite to that seen in a copper wire. Shortly after its completion. along with Becquerel.

the type Becquerel had observed emanating from uranium salts. . During tests on the element thorium. he and a young chemist. . was the first major result of Rutherford’s research.4 In the spring of 1907.”3 From these and other tests. Rutherford made even more startling findings. . Rutherford and Soddy also noticed that the remainder of the thorium recovered its original properties at the identical rate it was discharging the radioactive particles. With the help of fifteen assistants in a well-equipped laboratory. . As Riedman relates: “This discovery. While observing this happening. high order of magnitude. observed that the radioactive emanations discharging from the thorium appeared to disintegrate and become lost. Rutherford next became interested in other forms of radiation. it began to dawn on Rutherford that within the tiny atom was locked an enormous amount of energy. when working at McGill University in Montreal. He found that uranium radiations ionized gases in the same way as X-rays.79 These effects fitted into the theory that the X-rays produced a definite quantity of positive and negative ions in the gas. It seems probable that atomic energy in general is of a similar. . . he intensified his study of atoms. that radioactivity consists of the spontaneous transformation of atoms. Frederick Soddy. Rutherford returned to England. accepting a vacancy at the University of Manchester. Rutherford wrote: There is no reason to assume that this enormous store of energy is possessed by the radio-elements alone. Using the same methods. although the absence of change prevents its existence being manifested.2 Later. One of his goals was to compute the number .

Lise Meitner and Otto Frisch concluded that Hahn and Strassman had actually produced a fission reaction. two Austrian physicists. With Dr. Word soon spread throughout the scientific community of the Meitner-Frisch hypothesis which led quickly to confirmatory experiments in many of the world’s leading laboratories. In the thirties a number of discoveries were made which gave scientists additional knowledge of the atom’s structure. The following year James Chadwick discovered the neutron. In 1931 Harold Urey discovered deuterium. Rutherford devised a series of tests to make such an accomplishment possible. detected a single atom was one of the great landmarks in the history of physics. As Riedman relates: This experiment. . for they found that one gram of radium ejected thirty-four billion alpha particles every second. In the spring of 1939 after studying the results of the Hahn and Strassman experiments.5 By his many experiments Rutherford was able to deduce that the atom was composed of a central core or nucleus of protons around which revolved a proportionate number of electrons.80 of alpha particles given off each second by a single gram of radium. He eventually succeeded in splitting an atom of nitrogen by bombarding it with alpha particles and separating the protons from its nucleus. The scientists’ achievement in producing fission was another step toward releasing the enormous power contained in the atom. Hans Geiger assisting. It was another leap in the direction of establishing modern atomic theory. barium and krypton. a heavy isotope of hydrogen. by which Rutherford. The results were astounding. It can truly be said that Ernest Rutherford is one of the great immortals of atomic physics. for the first time. Four years later Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman bombarded uranium with neutrons and produced two separate elements.

government aid and interest in the project sharply increased. and laborers finally completed the task. fell in the Lord’s calendar on Kislev 24. President Franklin D. produced the world’s first manmade chain reaction. a number of scientists who feared that this power might be developed by unfriendly nations approached the U.81 Because World War II was imminent. Shortly thereafter an initial allotment of government funds ($6. relays of scientists. S. Large engineering and chemical firms such as Stone and Webster. work began in earnest on atomic bomb development. government in the spring of 1939 in an attempt to get federal support for further research. This achievement made possible the development of the atomic bomb. The United States Army Corps of Engineers joined the project to help in the construction of fullscale plants for the production of fissionable materials. Working around the clock. The development of the bomb was truly an all out effort by free peoples to produce a weapon that would quickly bring to an end the largest war in history. Their first attempt to acquire aid was unsuccessful. headed by physicist Enrico Fermi. that the prophet Haggai spoke for the Lord. engineers. I. It was on this date millennia ago. 1942. Roosevelt on receiving a letter from Albert Einstein promptly appointed an advisory committee on uranium. Both Canadian and British scientists worked jointly with the Americans to produce the super bomb. Farrell. government poured enormous sums of money into the project. leading scientists. for on July 16. S. The whole . and E. the date of this great happening. describes the instant of explosion. 1942. an eyewitness.6 Once a chain reaction had been achieved.. Inc. Brigadier General Thomas F. By December 2. The lighting effects beggar description. duPont de Nemours & Company became involved in construction and plutonium production. December 2. 1945. The U. However. occurred the first atomic bomb blast in history.000) was made for the purchase of uranium oxide. As work progressed.

I am become Death. Robert Oppenheimer’s mind.7 As the first searing rays of blazing light assaulted their eyes. The shatterer of worlds. the scientists felt a surge of pride tempered by the chilling fear that they may have unwittingly made available a means by which the human race could annihilate itself. In that blinding instant thoughts of fragments from the Hindu epic.82 country was lighted by a searing light with the intensity many times that of the midday sun. crevasse and ridge of the near-by mountain range with a clarity and beauty that cannot be described but must be seen to be imagined. It was golden. gray and blue. Jesus' crucifixion year. It had to be witnessed to be realized. to be followed almost immediately by the strong. mental and psychological effects. violet. It was that beauty the great poets dream about but describe most poorly and inadequately. Bhagavad-Gita flashed into J. This monstrous explosion occurred in a Thursday New Year's Day year — a year identical to A. Thirty seconds after the explosion came first the air blast pressing hard against the people and things. Words are inadequate tools for the job of acquainting those not present with the physical.D. It lighted every peak. . awesome roar which warned of doomsday and made us feel that we puny things were blasphemous to dare tamper with the forces heretofore reserved to the Almighty. purple. That would be like the splendor of the Mighty One . 30. . sustained. . If the radiance of a thousand suns Were to burst at once into the sky.

August 12. the date of this awsome blast is significant. 1952. This was the brightest light ever seen on earth. 1953 warned mankind of the terrible results if such power were ever unleashed. or three 40-day periods after Yiar 1. The intense heat generated turned millions of gallons of water into steam and removed the island of Elugelab forever. demolish the great cities of the world. wipe out the cultural achievements of the past--and destroy the very structure of a civilization that has been slowly and painfully built up through hundreds of generations. Seven years after the atomic bombing of Japan and the end of World War II. the date of the explosion was the 80th day (two 40-day periods) after Yiar 14. This date. they could have observed the flash. . This occurred on August 12. in the second month that the Paschal Lambs were slain for those who were unable to participate in the Passover of Nisan.83 July 16. 1952. the anniversary date of Jesus’ crucifixion. was the 120th day (ordinal count). President Truman in his last State of the Union message in January. November 1. The war of the future would be one in which man could extinguish millions of lives at one blow. another significant date in history. It was on Yiar 1 millennia ago that . 1953. scientists succeeded in exploding the world’s first thermonuclear device. man moves into a new era of destructive power. Nine months after this historic happening the Russians exploded their first megaton class thermonuclear weapon. for it is the 153rd day prior to April 3. capable of creating explosions of a new order of magnitude. . From now on. If spacemen had been walking on the moon at that time. This enormous blast occurred in the Central Pacific on November 1. he said. 1953. . It was on Yiar 14.

It is understandable why they so reason. Take ye the sum of all the congregation of the children of Israel. after their families. with the number of their names.84 the Lord spoke to Moses and commanded him to count the Israelites who were able to bear arms. in the second year after they were come out of the land of Egypt. saying. all that are able to go forth to war in Israel: thou and Aaron shall number them by their armies. From twenty years old and upward.8 Many today question whether the development of thermonuclear weapons is a step forward for humankind. in the tabernacle of the congregation. And the LORD spake unto Moses in the wilderness of Sinai. for they realize that a bad judgment or miscalculation on the part of a nation that possesses such weapons could bring to an end the world as we now know it. every male by their polls. on the first day of the second month. by the house of their fathers. .

it was suddenly attacked by a hostile fleet. it is believed that he often frequented the nearby quay and watched the graceful caravels entering and leaving the harbor. Because of the significance of his voyages. On a later voyage he nearly drowned. The maps of Strabo and others of but two thousand years ago show that the known world covered but a small portion of the earth’s surface.85 Chapter VI EXPLORERS Thousands of years ago. Even then. He shipped aboard a war galley to battle the Barbary pirates. This pleasantry surely contributed to his love for the sea and his longing to explore distant lands. It has been only within the past five hundred years that man’s knowledge of the earth’s land areas has become anywhere near complete. Although little is known of his youth. Many historians believe that Columbus was born in the late summer or early autumn of the year 1451 in Genoa. when men went in search of new lands. the regions they explored were fairly near their homeland. Columbus is recognized as one of the great explorers in history. they traveled to more distant lands. His first seafaring adventure came when he was about twenty years old. the Bechalla. he leaped into the blood-stained sea. As men became more knowledgeable in the art of shipbuilding and the handling of sailing vessels. Although we now know that the Vikings may have visited parts of the East Coast of North America. the distances traveled were not great when compared to those of our day. it was not until after Columbus’ voyages that an intense interest in these lands was shown. As the convoy swept along the coast of Portugal. Using the oar to stay afloat. formed part of a convoy bound for England. Christopher’s vessel caught fire and sank. His ship. . he struggled to shore. Grabbing an oar.

The fleet headed directly for the Canary Islands. After much discussion. where the remaining provisions would be placed aboard. he later traveled to Spain and made his requests known to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. when the three tiny caravels slipped away from Palos. The gold. Columbus became interested in the East Indies trade. Columbus reasoned that there must be a faster and easier way to acquire these items than by caravan. and he prepared for his historic voyage. He was convinced that the shortest route to the Indies was by sailing westward. It was early in the morning of August 3. He was rejected more than once. He wanted three ships to be fully equipped and maintained at the king’s expense. King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella gave Columbus all that he requested. The caravans required many months to make the round trip and could carry very few items compared to what a ship could carry. Columbus’ task to acquire ships and items for the voyage seemed to him insurmountable at times. and spices of the Eastern trade were much desired by the Europeans. Not overwhelmed by this rejection. It was not until they had conquered the last Moorish stronghold in Spain early in 1492 that they could seriously contemplate Columbus’ plan. Minor adjustments and repairs were made at that time. the fleet weighed anchor. but not Columbus. Some Portuguese attempted to sail around Africa to reach the Eastern trade. He demanded the governorship of any and all lands he might discover. He demanded a large percentage of the profits that might come because of his discoveries. 1492. he was rejected by King John II of Portugal in 1482. he expected these privileges to be passed on to his sons! Needless to say. His rejections came because of what seemed to be unreasonable demands. He expected to have bestowed on him the title “Admiral of the Oceans”. On September 6. gems. .86 As a young man. and he requested a title of nobility. Spain. Moreover.

By October 10. In the morning as the sun slid over the horizon. but that the wind might not reverse itself so as to enable them to return home. Columbus named the island and took solemn possession of it in the name of Ferdinand and Isabella. An abstract of the Admiral’s diary written by Bishop Las Casas records that on September 16 they arrived at the Sargasso Sea. Columbus lulled them into thinking that the distance traversed was not as great as it truly was. the sweetness of the mornings being most delightful. a lookout sighted the faint outline of an island in the moonlight and shouted his discovery to the captain. Columbus carried two log books. Once the excitement of departure had left and the crew had settled into their daily routine. the weather like an Andalusian April. To assuage this fear. bearing the royal banner of Spain and accompanied by his two captains and many of the crew.m. October 12. “and thenceforth.m. Columbus headed due west. they had most temperate breezes. His secret log book recorded the true distances the ships traveled each day. Those members of the crew who had been doubtful .. all agreed that if no land appeared within three days they would turn homeward. At 10:00 p. After they all had given thanks to God for a safe passage.”1 The main concern of the crew at this point in time was not that they were fearful of dropping off the edge of the world. The second book contained false figures indicating a shorter distance of travel.87 and on September 9 the last land was sighted. But it was so distant and dim that no one could affirm that it came from land. By giving the crew the coordinates from this false log. they had a chance to enjoy their voyage. Weeks passed and no land was sighted. Columbus ordered the sails reefed and altered his course to run parallel to the island until daybreak. Columbus. They sailed onward. Columbus saw a speck of light bobbing in the distance. and only the song of the nightingale wanting. the night of October 11. went ashore. About 2:00 a. Often the sea was calm with gently rolling swells and the weather delightful. writes the Admiral.

and discovered the New World the night of October 1112. Yiar 10. located a suitable site for their settlement. Because the seventyday period is a significant Bible span. After several weeks of exploring the coastal area and the James River they. Wingfield to be their first president. they chose E. they were able to secure their vessels to the trees lining the shore. Before leaving their vessels. fell on April 26. Though many settlements were established shortly after his discoveries. the use of this period in Columbus’ voyage reveals the Lord’s involvement in that event. Godspeed. From this tiny colony came the United States of America. and Discovery weighed anchor and headed down the Thames River. on May 13. Columbus’ voyages opened the way for the settlement of the Western Hemisphere.2 Christopher Columbus departed on his historic voyage August 3. May 13. It was late in December 1606 that the ships Sarah Constant. in Bible times was the date on which the paschal lamb was to be chosen for those unable to observe the Passover in the month of Nisan. the arrival date at the site which was named .3 In the year 1607. M. the year in which the Jamestown explorers discovered and named Cape Henry. Stormy weather hindered their passage. He stepped ashore and claimed the land for his sovereigns on the morning of October 12. and it was not until March 1607 that they reached the West Indies. It seemed that ships were shuttling between the two hemispheres almost daily. Because the water was deep. the date. none was of more consequence than the Jamestown settlement of 1607. Yiar 10.88 of the success of the voyage and had urged the Admiral but a few days before to return home sought his pardon for the error of their ways. After replenishing their supplies they sailed northward to Chesapeake Bay. The entire voyage from his August 3 departure at Palos to his proclamation on October 12 at San Salvador covered a period of seventy days. The date. discovering land on April 26.

Peary describes one such storm as follows: At six p. When Peary was three years old his father died. During his school years he was an avid reader and especially enjoyed books on Arctic exploration. He was an amateur who was entering unexplored territory for the first time. Though the ascent at the top of the plateau was not as steep as the earlier climb. he became a draftsman for a period of time before working as a civil engineer for the United States Navy. Though he had designed lightweight sledges.89 Jamestown. After graduation.. One cause for its difficulty was that it was Peary’s first attempt at cold-weather exploration. He had made no provision for dog teams on that trip. became more intense. instead of waning. was the 40th day after Nisan 17.m. Pennsylvania. This trek was difficult. Christian Maigaard. Robert Peary was born. This task by itself took nearly four days. her native state. his interest in polar exploration. and every indication pointing to a pro- . Peary and his companion began to push inland. On graduating from high school. In 1886 with a companion. a strong headwind hampered their efforts. he journeyed inland from Disko Bay over the Greenland ice sheet. 1856. To make matters worse. it was still difficult to make headway. After arriving at the top of the ice plateau. and he and his mother moved to Maine. As time passed. they still needed to be hauled by him and his companion. About two and a half centuries after Jamestown was settled. he majored in engineering at Bowdoin College. Moreover. rain. Often heavy sleet. or snow would bring their exploration to a standstill. the explorers were forced to work these sledges with their loads up to a 2000-foot elevation in order to arrive only at the top edge of the ice-cap. the clouds growing blacker and blacker every moment. that his birth occurred at Cresson. It was on May 6. Nisan 17 in that year was the anniversary date of the Lord’s resurrection. the well-known Arctic explorer.

and at midnight reached the tent. utterly impracticable. and gulches to the ice-foot. even had the loose snow rendered it possible. until the sinking of the sledges in the soft snow. Truly. the wind had settled down to a south-easterly gale loaded with snow. Too tired and sleepy from our struggle with the storm to build a hut. I decided to take the instruments and go back to the tent and await more favourable weather. rain had fallen. Here we forded the glacier river.90 tracted storm. but we were not yet done with it. When I awoke we were completely snowed under. threatening every moment to level the tent. and the continual clogging of our snow-shoes. instead of snow. with the wind and snow driving in one incessant. and the edges of the crevasses. the Inland Ice had given us a savage welcome. the rain falling in sheets. hoods pulled up.5 On this first reconnaissance Peary and Maigaard managed to . compelled us to stop and wait the cessation of the storm at an elevation of 7525 feet. keeping our course by the wind. We could do nothing but climb over the crest of the mountain dam and down the cliffs to the valley. sullen roar across the drift above us.4 During another storm he relates: When we resumed our march on the 15th. the sides of the gullies. the wind dashing first up and then down the valley. we lay down behind our sledges and fell asleep. and here we lay for forty-eight hours. At the level of the brink of the ice-tongue overlooking the ragged descent through the crevasses. and the glacier river a roaring torrent. and against this we advanced with goggles on. and the hard blue pinnacles were like oiled steel. and heads down.

Once these forward teams had completed their tasks. an organized plan of assault of the polar region began to develop in his mind. 184 feet long. Roosevelt. Also required would be relays of dog teams led by hardy souls who could withstand the rigors of the north to break trail and set up camps far ahead of the main assault force. They were prevented from exploring farther because of a diminishing food supply. The purpose of this odd shape . the return trip was much less arduous. Between 1891 and 1897. As his knowledge and expertise in Arctic exploration increased. of shallow draft which could maneuver around constantly changing ice fields or floes. to prepare for this difficult trip. During the next four years. He would need a specially made ship--one that could withstand the crushing and grinding forces of the ever-changing ice floes. which was built to Peary’s specifications was designed specifically for use in the Arctic region. Fortunately. The ship. With this boost Peary discovered that he could skim along at a fast pace for hours on end.91 explore inland about 100 miles. he directed a number of exploratory probes from bases at Etah in Inglefield Land and Fort Conger on Ellesmere Island. These trips with the help of scientific instruments greatly broadened our knowledge of Arctic conditions. he returned several times to the Arctic region for further explorations. Peary took advantage of the now steady tail wind by rigging sails onto the sledges. The sides of the vessel were of steel-sheathed heavy oak and curved outwards and upwards from the keel. Peary returned from this trip with copious notes and photos. they were to backtrack to the ship and await the return of Commander Peary after he had reached the pole. It was a small vessel. In 1898 Peary announced his intention of sledging to the North Pole. His objectives had been fulfilled. and his first-hand experience of Arctic exploration prepared him for his later expeditions. giving a bowl-shaped appearance below the water line.

the pressure was terrific. For a minute or so. Its slow resistless motion was frightful yet fascinating. This was the crucial moment. The force generated by two large ice fields when shoved together by wind and tide can build up to thousands of tons of pressure. The commander was standing on the bridge and in the following account describes his observations. the Roosevelt. of the 16th. came full against the Roosevelt’s starboard side amidships. .This continued until a corner of the floe itself. was an old pressure ridge which rose higher than the bridge deck. However. driving it bodily before it. About 10 p. was forced upward and ended up resting on the combined ice floes. with no intervening cushion of smaller ice and held the ship mercilessly between its own blue side and the unyielding face of the ice-foot. .m. which seemed an age. At the first shock the Roosevelt reeled and shook a bit. When trapped between two such merging ice fields. one encounter with extra thick ice closing in on his vessel had even Commander Peary concerned about the ship’s ability to last.92 was to prevent the ship from being crushed. The Roosevelt encountered the crushing force of most ice fields with comparative ease. as I was on the bridge taking a look about before turning in. then heeled slightly toward the crowding ice and turned it under the starboard bilge. instead of being crushed. The Roosevelt’s ribs and interior bracing cracked like the discharge of mus- . thousands of tons of smaller ice which the big floe drove before it. some portions of which were higher than the rail. a large floe moving on the flood-tide pivoted around the point of Sheridan and crashed into the smaller ice about the ship. the Roosevelt had easily and gracefully turned under her sloping bilges. but the edge of the big floe rose to the plank sheer and a few yards back from its edge. .

the deck amidships bulged up several inches. On July 17. He had discovered on his previous explorations that as the polar days lengthened. crumpling up its edge and driving it in-shore some yards. At Sydney. . After returning home and enjoying a brief respite. the pioneers departed Sydney and not long there- . Peary spearheaded a drive northward attaining 87o 06' north latitude. the sun not only made slush traps three and four feet deep but also melted the thinnest ice thus forming serpentine channels or leads. . The big floe snapped against the edge of the ice-foot forward and aft and under us. constantly changing ice conditions. while the main rigging hung slack and the masts and rigging shook as in a violent gale. After wintering on the ice-locked vessel. His purpose in arriving sooner was to provide as much ice as possible between him and his goal.”6 In 1905. 1908.93 ketry. Peary loaded the vessel with coal and completed his roster of supplies. It was impossible to traverse these leads by sledge and much time was lost skirting them. He returned to the ship bitterly disappointed at his failure to reach the pole. A diminishing food supply. the Roosevelt slipped out of her berth at the foot of East Twenty-Fourth Street. the ship shook herself free and jumped upward till her propeller showed above water. Peary on his ship Roosevelt steamed to Cape Sheridan. then came to rest. Then with a mighty tremor and a sound which reminded me of an athlete intaking his breath for a supreme effort. He modified his earlier plans so that on this next trip his sledges would be in the vicinity of the pole earlier in the year. and adverse weather forced him to turn back at this point. New York. Ellesmere Island. In July. and to the encouraging cheers of thousands of spectators headed north. The staunch vessel steamed to Sydney. the commander prepared once again to make one final journey north in an attempt to reach the pole. . Cape Breton.

the next at Cape Colan.7 By late winter all was in readiness for the polar dash. and storage buildings on shore had to be built. and the final station at Cape Columbia itself. . Early the next morning before daylight. Peary used a shuttle system: The plan was to establish stations along the route. taking them forward to Cape Richardson. The next station was Porter Bay. Thousands of pounds of supplies needed to be transported to Cape Columbia.94 after began battling ice floes to Ellesmere Island. the commander sent forth the vanguard team of Bartlett and Borup to cut a trail for the main body of the expedition. the supplies were cached. the commander arose. and the dog teams were chafing to return to work. instead of sending each party through Cape Columbia and back. about twelve miles from the ship. deposit their supplies. The long winter night was ending. Rather than send each dog team the full distance to the cape. The first party was to go to Cape Belknap. and hunting could be done along the way. They also were assigned the task of building igloos at designated points along the path to be used as way stations by Peary and his crew. Supplies needed to be unloaded from the Roosevelt. about twenty miles away. Parties would thus be going back and forth the whole time. and return the same day. the trail would constantly be kept open. return part way and pick up the supplies at Cape Belknap. The second party was to go to Cape Richardson. deposit their supplies. the next at Sail Harbor. By early September they had achieved their goal and had moored at Cape Sheridan. Much of the winter was spent in preparing for the difficult march to the pole in the spring. the point from which Peary would strike out for the pole. On February 28.

It seems all so simple and commonplace. It was clear. it was but another work day. Bartlett.”8 Commander Peary probably would have been somewhat surprised had he learned that after twenty-three years of heartache. he signaled the lead team to head north. often stretching many miles in length would collide and create monstrous pressure ridges. though. The ice was not smooth and level as ice usually is when frozen on lakes. and four Eskimos.95 He first peered out through the tiny peep-hole in the igloo to observe the weather conditions. He directed the loading of the sledges and as the first traces of light appeared. this tiny crew made the final spurt to the pole arriving there in the morning of April 6. the trail breaker. The remaining skeleton crew. turned back at this point. Peary records this historic moment in his diary. Matthew Henson. These jagged ice ridges would shove upwards as high as fifty feet. Mine at last! I cannot bring myself to realize it. 1909. My dream and goal for twenty years. was composed of Peary. Because of heavy winds and constantly changing polar tidal currents. The prize of three centuries. The trip was very slow and difficult. the toughened old explorer who had become inured to such weather. After making final adjustments to their sledges and resting briefly. To Peary. which was to make the final dash to the pole. no doubt. felt that he had achieved his goal wholly by his own struggles. for he could see the stars shimmering against the black sky. and struggle. frostbite. until by April 1 he was within one hundred and fifty miles from the roof of the world. huge ice fields. It was no day to challenge the elements. Peary. When several of these ridges were encountered in a day. “The Pole at last. fifteen-hour work days were required in order for the party to reach the next camp. Day after day Peary shoved onward. for the mercury hung at -50o. and the wind whistled in strong gusts about the camp. Little did he realize that the Lord had been involved in his achievement . he had arrived at his destination on the anniversary date of Jesus’ resurrection. But it was biting cold.

Though this later trip was no less dangerous than Commander Peary’s trek. the Nautilus maintained an inner temperature of about 70oF. the Sea Valley Gateway was found.9 . The greatest danger of the Nautilus trip was the possibility that a malfunction could occur and trap the ship and its crew beneath the impenetrable ice pack. By July 26 it was plowing through the channel between Yunaska and Herbert Islands in the Aleutian chain.S. at last. According to Commander Anderson. and the crew of the nuclear submarine Nautilus. Alaska. we established our position by quick radar sweeps. a deep-water channel leading to the North Pole. After traversing the Strait. the Nautilus had made a record run from Honolulu to the Strait. our deepwater gateway to the western Arctic Basin. Commander Anderson relates: Just north of Point Franklin. While gliding through frigid Arctic waters beneath a huge ice field. Alaska. another epochal trip to that region was achieved. the submarine cut through the Chukchi Sea and worked its way along the ice pack in the Arctic Ocean to a point just east of Point Barrow. From here it set a course to pass just west of St. This second trip was made in 1958 by Commander William Anderson. Lawrence Island to enter the Bering Strait.N. it was much more comfortable. the Nautilus slipped silently from Pearl Harbor and headed for the Aleutian Islands.96 and had already determined the date on which he should arrive at the pole. In late July 1958. for it had covered 2. U. aimed directly toward the Barrow Sea Valley. Anderson was searching for the Barrow Sea Valley. They showed that we had rounded the corner of the pack and were.. Forty-nine years after Peary’s successful assault on the Pole. After several disappointing probes along the ice pack.900 miles in just over six days.

M. This transpolar voyage was an historic happening. In that calendar the date of the Pole crossing was Ab 19 (August 4. and the Nautilus many years after Peary’s achievement arrived at the Pole on the one hundred twentieth day or three forty-day periods after that identical date. Jerusalem time). the anniversary date of Jesus’ resurrection. for nearly a year earlier that attention had been arrested by the launching of the Sputnik satellite. This date was the one hundred twentieth day after April 6. Though undersea exploration was significant. performed flawlessly under the ice pack and on August 3 at 11:15 P. Two days later the Nautilus exited the ice pack north east of Greenland and completed the first transpolar voyage in history. This truly captivated the public. it had not always been this way. Eastern Daylight Saving Time. for thirty years earlier many people scoffed at the idea of moonwalks and orbiting satellites. along the Sea Valley. it could not match the ushering in of the Space Age. received much ridicule for his vision of interplanetary travel. Once in the channel a final course correction was made and speed increased to 18 knots. he . both achievements. the submerged Nautilus cut through the North Geographic Pole. were tied directly to the same date. the father of American rocketry. and it appears in the Lord’s calendar as such. that voyage did not long hold the public’s attention. Robert Goddard. that of Peary’s and that of Anderson’s. What makes these dates especially important is that Commander Peary arrived at the North Pole on April 6. and sent the submarine down well below the ice pack. When questioned about his plan to send a rocket to the moon.97 A few hours later. so much so that he became very close-mouthed and secretive about his experiments. In other words. they arrived at deep water and swung the bow of the Nautilus northward. Of course. according to Anderson. The submarine. the anniversary date of Jesus’ resurrection! Although Commander Anderson’s transpolar voyage was an historic achievement.

Tried rocket at 2:30. May 25 in the new-style calendar is the anniversary date of Pentecost which occurred on May 27. at Auburn. Goddard pressed on in his work. . after the lower half of nozzle had burned off. Goddard's successful flight took place at 2:30 P. It also is the grandfather of the many rockets that now frequently shuttle men and women to and from earth orbits.98 would evade the issue by stating that he was only interested in probing the earth’s upper atmosphere. and by World War I had developed several types of military rockets that could be launched successfully from a lightweight hand launcher.10 Robert Goddard’s liquid-fueled rocket was the forerunner of the mighty rockets which carried the astronauts to the moon. After the Armistice was signed he returned with vigor to the designing of rockets for lunar exploration and probing deep space. 1926. Goddard’s flight of March 16 was an important flight in the annals of history.m. . Ignoring the ridicule. E and Mr. Sachs in a. 30. Roope came out at 1 p. & went 184 ft. Dr. For Bible calendar calculation. . indicating that the 70-day (ordinal) count begin with March 17. Goddard jotted the following brief but pertinent information about the flight: March 16. Massachusetts. In his diary.5 secs. he progressed slowly but steadily and on March 16.M.. Brought materials to lab. The date of March 16. Went to Auburn with Mr.D. the flight occurred after sunset Jerusalem time. It rose 41 ft. Because of this. In this. in 2. he successfully launched the first liquid fueled rocket.m. Less than a score of years after Goddard launched his first liquid-fueled rocket. A. the German war machine blasted its first operational V-1 rocket to England in June of 1944. 1926 was a special date because it was the 70th day before May 25. .

September 8. the Germans struck Paris with a much larger rocket. the 153rd day after Nisan 15. The Bomarc..Hitler opened a new age in air warfare. The British called it the buzz bomb. was the beginning of many missile attacks on London with V-2 rockets.99 The following account mentions these deadly missiles attacking London. Hawk. or V-1. the V-2.11 In 1944. The Germans called their new secret weapon the Vergeltungswaffe (Vengence Weapon). was the 153rd day after April 6. on September 6. On June 13. the anniversary date of Jesus' resurrection. Two days later. The major powers recognized that a new weapon had been developed. scientists realized that the orbiting of earth satellites was not a dream to be fulfilled a generation later but a happening that was already within their grasp. September 6. After World War II ended. precision and destructive power of the V-2 missile. Nearly three months after this attack. and they intended as quickly as possible to adapt it to their arsenals. Soon IRBM (Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile) and ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) became household words.. the New Year's Day. Billions of dollars were fed into missile development and soon the world was introduced to a new vocabulary. The military in many of the free nations had been much impressed by the speed of delivery. he sent the first flying bombs over London. As development of the ICBM progressed. and Nike-Ajax were but a few of the many types of missiles being developed. interest in rocket development increased greatly. June 13 was the 80th day after Nisan 1. . Golem. The world was awakened to this fact in October 1957 when the Soviet Union announced its successful launching of the Sputnik I satellite. This launching was followed in rapid-fire suc- . This date.

m. Though Shepard’s flight was not as impressive as that of the Soviet cosmonaut’s. Freedom 7. the Soviet Union rocketed the first human. into an earth orbit. (Moscow time). Shepard’s flight. Yuri Gagarin. is a special date in history. mankind was again on the threshold of a great space adventure. a German rocketry pioneer and director of the United States’ Marshall space flight center when speaking of Gagarin’s achievement said that “This date will be long remembered in history.. the Lord’s involvement can be seen. was sub orbital lasting only fifteen minutes. though.m. it nevertheless was another step in man’s space venture. In 1961. This time. equaling or excelling many of the other momentous steps in world progress.S. Gagarin radioed that the flight was proceeding normally and that he was feeling well. for April 12 was the 70th day before the summer solstice. Seven years after these epochal flights. Soviet news reported that the five-ton Vostok space craft was launched at 9:07 a. April 12. On April 12. At 9:22 a. The following month on May 5 the American astronaut Alan Shepard was also rocketed into space in the Mercury space ship. Werner Von Braun. the anniversary day of Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem. unlike Gagarin’s. 1961. The late Dr.R.100 cession by the orbiting of Sputnik II in November and the United States’ Explorer I satellite early in 1958. Yiar 20 is also the 40th day after Nisan 10. Major Gagarin safely landed in a pre-arranged area of the U.m. in the Lord’s calendar. . 10:11) and His guiding the Israelites through the Sinai wilderness. May 5 corresponded to the date Yiar 20. He had boldly charged into the unknown. the date of the historic launching and return to earth of the first human in space. It is of interest to note that even in Shepard’s brief jaunt into space. 1961.S..” It would appear that the Lord was involved in determining the date of Major Gagarin’s flight. At 10:55 a. Yiar 20 is the anniversary date of the Lord’s removing of the cloud from the tabernacle (Num. Man had not gingerly entered the unexplored regions of space.

James A. About six hours later at 2:00 P.. After completing nearly two orbits. “You’re on your way. then leaped upwards on a blinding tail of flame to boost its precious cargo to a frontier yet unexplored. the commander told the control center. Many people arose early to watch the firing of the Saturn third-stage rocket. Lovell. tiny rainbows slowly and gracefully performed a quadrille down the giant’s glistening side. the winter solstice occurred. At precisely 7:51 a. At the time the area was in predawn darkness. and the Apollo 8 astronauts Frank Borman. tongues of brilliant flame blasted from the monster’s tail.m. Jr. Anders were assigned the task to chart a path to the moon.” “Roger. Eastern Standard Time. Millions of manhours and billions of dollars had been spent preparing for the great moon journey and Apollo 8 was a critical test and a rehearsal of all the maneuvers required for such a mission. 1968. director of flight operations radioed. orbit it several times and successfully return to earth.101 the journey was not a simple orbital path around the earth but a trail-blazing path to the moon. The Lord’s calendar is closely tied in with the seasons of the . the spacecraft struck out for the moon from a point over the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii. It would be a critical test of the rocket and all its components. Apollo 8 was a forerunner for the Apollo 11 moon landing. at 7:51 a.M. “You’re really on your way now. For an instant the bird stood poised. The year was 1968. and William A.m. As a shaft of light from the rising sun danced on the frosted skin of the space vehicle. we look good here. The rocket lifted off its launch pad on December 21. They were to be the first humans to give up earth’s gravity for that of another object..” Borman.” Chris Kraft. Sound waves in an ever increasing crescendo of ear-splitting noise rumbled across the flatlands and beat upon the eardrums of the onlookers. The mammoth rocket stood poised on the launch pad early the morning of December 21.

captain of the guard. The giant Apollo 11 lifted off launch pad 39A at Cape Kennedy. Florida. the darkness was upon the face of the deep. and the 120th day after Nisan 1 (ordinal count).T. to keep the calendar in its proper alignment. and the gathering together of the waters called he Seas: and God saw that it was good. blasted out of an earth orbit for man’s first moonwalk. The astronauts themselves in keeping with the solemnity of the occasion. unto Jerusalem: . On Christmas eve while the camera scanned a cratered. a servant of the King of Babylon. and void.” Lovell continued with verse 5. desolate moon close up. . Thus. (E. “And in the fifth month. “And God called the dry land earth. . 1969. Jr. . And the earth was without form. . Edwin Aldrin. after the lunar lander had returned to the command ship.” Frank Borman ended the presentation with verse 10.S. This was Ab 7. at 8:32 a. Neil Armstrong.102 year because of its dependence upon the vernal equinox. . “And God called the light Day. on the seventh day of the month. acknowledged the power and greatness of the Almighty by reading excerpts from His holy book.” Seven months after this trail-blazing moon flight. the Bible. .). it was no coincidence that this rocket began its historic flight on the day of the winter solstice. . In the Lord’s calendar this was Ab 2. the Columbia’s engines were fired in order to send the astronauts homeward. . the anniversary of the date on which King Nebuchadnezzar’s troops arrived at the gates of Jerusalem in preparation for the destroying of the great city. and Michael Collins. July 16 was the 70th day after Yiar 20 (cardinal count). astronaut Armstrong stepped onto the moon.m.”12 On July 22. on July 16. Anders read the first words from the book of Genesis: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. and the darkness he called Night. Four days later on the night of July 20-21. came Nebuzaradan.. the first day of spring. . Columbia.

. This was Ab 10. . and the king’s house. the anniversary date of the destruction of Jerusalem and of the first (Solomon’s) temple. . Now in the fifth month. . . . that certain of the elders of Israel came to enquire of the LORD. the prophet Ezekiel received a vision from the Lord on this date.14 In addition to this. captain of the guard. the daring moonwalk adventure also happened on special dates in the Lord’s calendar. and sat before me. Then came the word of the LORD unto me. 13 According to Josephus.15 As in so many of the other major events in history. . This consistency in special dates again reveals the Lord’s continued involvement in the affairs of mankind. that the second temple was destroyed. .103 On July 24. into Jerusalem. the astronauts returned safely to earth. in the fifth month. And burned the house of the Lord. . though many years after the destruction of this first temple. . . . And it came to pass in the seventh year. it was also on Ab 10. in the tenth day of the month. . the tenth day of the month. came Nebuzaradan. and all the houses of Jerusalem.

Buddhism Buddhism.C. and it was into this life of luxury and splendor that Siddhartha was born. Some religions. His father. was a ruling noble of the Gautama clan. by a young man named Siddhartha Gautama. when reflecting on his youth Siddhartha related that he had three palaces. was founded about the sixth century B. we should look then to the Bible as our main source of knowledge of this Divine Being. Because He has chosen the Bible calendar as the means of revealing His presence and the Bible as the source of His words. evolved merely from the ideas or ideals of men living millennia ago. Siddhartha was born in northeastern India near the town of Kapilavastu in what is now Nepal. By means of special patterns and dates and the exercising of His will on world events. such as Buddhism and Hinduism. Suddhodana’s goal by surrounding his son with luxuries and luxurious living was to protect Siddhartha from the evils of the . one for the summer and one for the season of rains. This position enabled him to acquire much wealth. one for the winter season. He wore the finest of silk clothing and palace attendants daily administered to his needs. Later in life. tradition tells us. the Lord has made clear to us His interest in and His control over earthly affairs. While yet a young man he married a neighboring princess named Yasodhara.104 Chapter VII RELIGIONS Through the revelations of the calendar patterns we have seen the involvement of God in several major events in history. Not all religions have this divine spark of inspiration which can only come from the Creator. Suddhodana. who bore him a son whom they called Rahula.

After this experience. For six long years he subsisted on a starvation diet searching for enlightenment. I actually took hold of my spine. Despite his father’s plan this was not to be the case. yet he received no enlightenment. according to legend. As time passed. for venturing forth in his chariot Siddhartha observed an old man. he withdrew from practicing asceticism and chose a more moderate lifestyle. Siddhartha resolved to live the life of an ascetic as a monk.’”1 He often practiced holding his breath for long periods and also not bathing until the dirt grew so thick upon his body “that it fell off of its own accord. “Thus he became Buddha. His discovery was that human suffering came from craving due to ignorance. or the Enlightened One. whereupon he resolved to search out the meaning of life. a decomposing corpse and an ascetic. one bean a day during one of his fasts. As Huston Smith in The Religions of Man relates “Having turned his back on mortification. a sick man. while Siddhartha was sitting under a fig tree (bo tree) in concentrated meditation.”3 One evening. that ‘when I thought I would touch the skin of my stomach.”2 Siddhartha nearly died from being an ascetic.” It appears that Siddhartha’s enlightenment evolved from his . He recognized that the extremes of asceticism on the one hand and indulgence on the other were not the paths to the enlightenment for which he was seeking.105 world. Gautama devoted the final phase of his quest to a combination of rigorous thought and mystic concentration along the lines of raja yoga. a wave of knowledge permeated his being and illuminated his mind with the enlightenment he had sought. he became more and more agitated over what he had seen. He returned to his palace greatly troubled by the misery that lay around him. and that the path to its removal came from right living and mental discipline. At one point “He ate so little. One night in his twenty-ninth year he slipped quietly from his palace leaving both wife and son and plunged into the forest.

Kenneth Morgan in The Path of the Buddha relates: All through the Buddha’s teaching. who can help them or free them from the result of their past evil deeds. No outside help or supernatural force was involved. the only means of escape from this great day of retribution has been provided not by humans. runs an unbroken thread of truth describing how sinful humans cannot by themselves remove their sins and escape the Great Judgment which will occur at an appointed future date. either in heaven or on earth” could free humans from their past evil deeds is very different from the words of the Lord as revealed in the Bible. he shut out the very source which could have enlightened him the most. either in heaven or on earth. but by the Lord Himself when He gave His life as a sacrifice on the cross. This was a path devoted to self-reliance and self-improvement. it arouses his self-confidence and energy. . repeated stress is laid on self-reliance and resolution. Because the Buddha rejected the supernatural. . He then adopted a more moderate lifestyle and deduced that this was the path humans should take to alleviate pain and suffering.4 The Buddha’s teaching that “no one. The Buddha again and again reminded his followers that there is no one. For mankind. Since the Lord is the Creator and most fully understands life. Buddhism makes man stand on his own feet. it is to Him humans should turn and not just to self introspection if they are to learn the true meaning and purpose of life.106 past experiences with life. his conclusions and goals for mankind are not in harmony with those of the Eternal. He had lived both a life of luxury and deprivation and had found no solace in either. Consequently. From the beginning of Genesis through the book of Revelation. . .

Around 1500 B. the Ganges. It was not until many. for spiritual cleansing. From the very beginning the Aryans considered themselves better than the native people they found living in India. many years had passed that the Aryans could live peacefully with their neighbors. In spite . Unlike the earlier valley dwellers.107 Hinduism Hinduism is a religion from which Buddha received inspiration and is today a major religion of India. Recent excavations have unearthed a large bath in Mohenjo-Daro which may have been used for spiritual as well as physical cleansing. they overpowered the earlier dwellers and usurped the land for their own use. migrating bands of light-skinned Aryans arrived in India. The rich soil deposited by the Indus provided them with adequate farm and pasture lands. Some dwellers managed to escape the onslaught and fled southward. Other excavations have unearthed a large number of seals. Nevertheless. for traces of present-day Hindu forms of worship have been found in the religion of the Harappan civilization which four thousand years ago inhabited the Indus River valley. Large numbers of pilgrims flock daily to bathe in the nearby rivers and streams and especially so in their most sacred river. for a few of the figures resemble the gods worshiped in India today. the Aryans were not city dwellers. The Hindu religion is a very old religion. frequent clashes over land rights occurred between neighboring villages. Over the years as their numbers increased and they spread throughout the valley. Even today Hindus believe in the purifying power of water and consider bathing a means of purifying the soul. along with Indus writing are figures of animals and gods. Perhaps these seals were used during religious exercises. Engraved in the seals. They preferred to live in tiny villages near the banks of the Indus River.C. These warlike tribesmen struggled through high Himalayan mountain passes to reach the Indus River valley.

was composed of rulers and warriors. Merchants and farmers belonged to the third order. he or she is born again as another living creature. the Vaisyas. Thus. a Hindu of low caste by faithfully fulfilling his duties has the hope of moving to a higher level in . these early invaders often intermarried with the natives and even adopted some of the superior aspects of their urban culture. In India today the separation of the castes is not as clearly defined as it once was. Later. the Kshatriyas. the Brahmans. Hindus believe that when a person dies. historians think. a farmer may be reborn as a merchant. in order to maintain their racial and cultural identity while being greatly outnumbered.”5 In the beginning four major castes were formed. had become alarmed about the races intermingling. was made up of priests and scholars. or rebirth. who. the Sudras. One reason the caste system may have lasted so long is the Hindu belief in reincarnation. was made up of unskilled workers. then he may be reborn in a higher form. or outcasts. If a person lives properly and faithfully carries out all duties in this present lifetime. A beggar may be reborn as a farmer. They thought that by dividing the people into classes and making laws to prevent marriage between them. In 1950 and 1955 laws were passed granting full social status to outcastes and making discrimination against them a punishable offense. The struggle of Mahatma Gandhi to achieve for India independence from Britain and his goal to weaken the distinct divisions in the caste system contributed considerably to the reduction of the discriminatory nature of that system. They were supposed to establish and preserve the ideals of the nation. The next caste in line. the Aryans developed a caste system prohibiting such intermarriage. All others who did not belong to any of these groups were called Pariahs.108 of this. The highest caste. Jean Bothwell in The Story of India says that the idea of the caste system “originated with the Hindu priests. it would keep the races apart. The lowest order. and so on.

possibly as an animal or insect. According to legend.109 the next life. Below this supreme spirit or being are a trio of gods: Brahma. he apparently does not incarnate himself for the salvation of the world. the preserver. on the other hand. Nirvana is a state of bliss or happiness free from all earthly cares and problems. Hindus worship many lesser gods. Perhaps his diminished importance comes from the fact that the creation occurred eons ago and this act has little effect on the twentieth-century Hindu. There is always the possibility. Vishnu. Some scholars suggest that the number of gods honored may approach a million or more. It is incredible that any religion would need as many gods. he is recognized as a very powerful god who maintains order in both the world and universe. as more of a god of compassion and love is still regarded as an important deity. Hindu mythology records that he lives on Mount Kailas in the Himalayas where he meditates while sitting on a tiger’s skin. Shiva (Siva). Hindus believe in a supreme spirit called the Brahman. Hindus believe that one of Vishnu’s attributes is his ability to become incarnate in order to overcome evil in the world. Unlike Vishnu. In addition to the great gods. the creator. Brahma as a creator is not as important to the Hindu of today as to the Hindus of long ago. he finally will reach the ultimate level called Nirvana. that if a person fails to fulfill that which is expected of him in this lifetime. he may be reborn in a lower form. To the Shavites. but only to appear occasionally in visions to his more devout worshipers. and Shiva. Vishnu. the destroyer. the third deity in the triad of Hindu gods is a more remote figure than Vishnu. The truth of the matter is that Hindu- . of course. Hindus who worship him. he has already experienced nine chief incarnations. Hindus also believe that if a person over many lifetimes lives properly and continually moves upward after each rebirth.

Confucianism While Hinduism was evolving in India. At thirty my mind was fixed in the pursuit of it. He loved music. is a man-made religion. In later years in reflecting on different periods during his life he relates the following: At fifteen years I longed for wisdom. he became a great teacher and was called K’ung-Fu-Tze which means the philosopher. for at age fifteen he set his mind on learning. singing. When he was in his seventies he married a much younger woman who became the mother of Confucius. Because they do not contain that code those scriptures can neither verify the existence of the Almighty. When Confucius was three years old. If the Spirit of the Almighty had been the inspiration behind the Hindu scriptures. changes were also occurring in the Far East. In the year 551 B. and studying the sacred and classic books. which left mother and child nearly destitute. Though it was a strain on the young mother to rear him with limited resources. nor verify the existence of the pantheon of gods that Hindus worship. like Buddhism. We may glean from legends that his father’s name was Shuh-Liang (Heih) whose family name was K’ung. she succeeded and trained him well. At forty I saw clearly certain principles. Since the Bible is the only source that contains that revelatory code of the Almighty. As Ch’iu K’ung grew into manhood. Master Kung as he was also called is known to millions as Confucius. then it is to that source Hindus should turn if they desire to be in contact with the true creator of heaven and earth. his father died.110 ism. At fifty I understood the rule given by . Shuh-Liang Heih lived in the state of Lu and was a military man renowned for his feats of strength and daring. then those scriptures would have contained the Sabbath and the calendar code. Very little is known of Confucius’ ancestry. in China.C. a great Chinese philosopher was born. His name was Ch’iu K’ung.

Most of them were devoted followers and attended to his every need. “one corner of a subject. word of his knowledge and wisdom spread far and wide. After his death a number of them labored to compile his sayings so they would not be forever lost. and the pupil cannot of himself make out the other three. In order to provide for his family.111 heaven. He was so moved by her death that he gave up his job and went into mourning for three years. As time passed. During this period. he still managed to set aside time to visit the capital. He was a dependable worker and was soon promoted to the position of superintendent of parks and herds in the district of Tsow.6 When Confucius was nineteen years old. He especially enjoyed studying books on history and government. It was mainly due to . Confucius attracted a large group of disciples. he continued his studies in the sacred books. He willingly accepted whoever attended his presentations. he had decided not to return to his government position but to begin teaching. he married and set up a home of his own. When Confucius was twenty-four his mother died. At seventy the desires of my heart no longer transgressed the law. People of all walks of life visited him. He became so absorbed in these books that by the time the mourning period had ended. I do not repeat my lesson. At sixty everything I heard I easily understood. It was here that he acquired much knowledge from the ancient texts. Although his daily duties kept him very busy.” he said. others hoping to gain some new insight into life. Some came for the sake of curiosity.”7 Over the years. but he preferred those who sincerely wished to learn. “When I have presented. he worked at a local granary. It was these books in particular that helped him develop ideas on how people and governments should get along.

Thus. He believed that a fundamental change in the government must occur. Confucius did not desire to concentrate on developing new ideas.112 their efforts that an accurate record of his teachings were passed on. Confucius had hoped that he would be given a high government position so that he could put his ideas into practice. and starvation were partners in oppressing and destroying the populace. Confucius may appear to have been overly austere when passing judgment on his generation. and he began to realize that such would not happen. His aim was to impart knowledge from the ancient texts. as years passed. China in his day was composed of various feudal states which were constantly at war. a reform that would make its objective not the pleasure of the rulers but happiness for their subjects. and an avoidance of war. Though he would like to have obtained a high government office. Confucius was deeply distressed by this misery and dedicated his life to alleviate the sufferings of the people. he was not given one. we do not know. Why this is so. a lessening of severe punishments. The result was constant misrule and misery to the masses of the people. Perhaps the rulers felt that he lacked the flexibility needed for one of high standing. Off and on. . A number of these pupils who eventually received important positions did well because they were more compromising than their teacher. Rising taxes. forced labor. He pressed for a reduction of taxes. Confucius served under a number of rulers in minor government positions. conditions during that period may have warranted just such a condemnation. for he believed he could have made a significant change if he had but three years in office. Although to many. the principles they had learned from him had little practical effect in his day. However. he talked more earnestly to younger men about his principles in order to prepare them for positions of authority.

In effect. Two millennia of Chinese history are a testament to the power of the words of this obscure teacher of Lu. should be the guiding principles by which all should live. He truly must be counted as one of the most influential men in world history. Confucius regarded the human race as one large family.. Confucius urged humans to live by high standards and to shun evil. peace and happiness would reign throughout the land. another of the great men of history. His goal was to search through these texts. So Abraham. the truly virtuous man who desires to establish himself should seek to help others as well. When it comes to these qualities. Abraham was born in or near the city of Ur in the lower Mesopotamian valley. and disseminate that knowledge during his discourses. One of his disciples echoed this theme when he said that “. the Lord spoke to him and asked him to depart from his homeland. Confucius’ teachings have had a profound effect upon the history of China. It mattered little what their place was in society. He would make of his seed great nations and multitudes of people.113 for he believed that these texts contained many of the answers for solving the problems in society. lived Abraham. locate that which was most pertinent. His father was Terah and his brothers. Judaism In the very distant past. then. If all would live according to the laws of heaven and earth. After his death people from all levels of Chinese society came to recognize and live by the ideas and ideals which he espoused. in . When Abraham was about 70 years of age. nearly back to the time of the Flood. few in history can equal this noted patriarch. Abraham’s distinction as a great historical figure arises from his faith and trust in the Lord. Nahor and Haran.” Sincerity and reciprocity..within the four seas all men are brothers. The Lord promised that if he would do so.

The Lord. . . and thereafter dominion over Canaan. however. Because of the plague. After a period of time had elapsed they arrived in Charran (Haran) where they remained until Terah died. Abraham was getting on in years and became concerned that if he died childless. and make thy name great. . disclosed to Abraham what was to happen to his progeny--four centuries of servitude in an alien land.10 After abiding ten years in Canaan. therefore. But God appeared and repeated His promise and. Lot chose the southern Jordan valley for his flocks while Abraham moved into the uplands near Hebron. Sarah despaired of ever providing an heir for Abraham. the call to Abraham was renewed. to visit Hagar. Journeying with him were Sarah. and Lot. his nephew. because of her beauty. unto a land that I will shew thee. enter his harem. and from thy kindred. his servant Eliezer of Damascus would inherit all his property. they decided to split up. and I will bless thee. a concu- . the Pharaoh quickly returned Sarah to Abraham and ordered them out of Egypt.8 After his father’s death in Haran. get thee out of thy country. his wife. and from thy father’s house. Back in Canaan. prevented this evil by bringing some form of plague upon the Pharaoh and his house. Terah. Here they settled until a severe famine drove them into grain-rich Egypt. Not wishing to become enemies. She urged him. departed. And I will make of thee a great nation. During their stay in Egypt the Pharaoh desired to have Sarah. his father. and being seventy-five years old.114 obedience to the Lord’s request. in a fiery night vision. her handmaiden. Now the LORD had said unto Abram (Abraham). a quarrel broke out between Abraham and Lot over grazing land.9 Abraham and his entourage departed Haran and journeyed southward to Moreh in Canaan.

was born. gathered wood for the offering. Ishmael. saith the LORD. Abraham bound his son tightly and placed him on it. He arose early one morning. for because thou hast done this thing. From this union his son. Abraham did not waver in this matter. Moreover. because thou hast obeyed my voice. and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven. By the 15th century B. and thy seed shall possess the gate of his enemies. now called Israelites.By myself have I sworn. thine only son: That in blessing I will bless thee. The centuries following Abraham’s death witnessed a significant increase in the Hebrew population. At that moment the Lord spoke and commanded Abraham not to harm Isaac. Because at that time the Israelites lived in . the mountain of sacrifice came into view. . Sarah herself conceived and Isaac. It was through Isaac that the Lord put Abraham’s faith and trust to the test. and with Isaac and two helpers departed for the land of Moriah.11 Abraham lived many years after this trial and finally died at a very old age. and as the sand which is upon the sea shore. .115 bine. He and Isaac pushed on up the rugged slope to the place of sacrifice. numbered into the hundreds of thousands. The Lord requested of Abraham that he offer his son as a sacrificial offering to Him. And in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed. one of the special ancestors of the Hebrews. if he desired a child.C. He prepared then to plunge a knife into Isaac’s body. Thirteen years later. the Lord commended Abraham for his great faith and promised Abraham that bounteous blessings would be given to him and his descendants. the Hebrews. and hast not withheld thy son. On the third day of their journey. At this time Abraham asked his servants to remain at a base camp until he returned. After building an altar. was born. .

. She saw the basket and had it brought to her. When Moses was grown. Because others knew of this deed. and the cry of the child moved her to compassion. Every son that is born ye shall cast into the river. and every daughter ye shall save alive. accompanied by several young maidens. When she found that she could no longer conceal him. A bush burned brightly. To curb this alarming population growth and to keep the Israelites under control. He saw an Egyptian overseer flogging a worker. the daughter of the Pharaoh. She then deposited the tiny craft among the reeds of the Nile.”12 About this time the child Moses was born. To protect his life his mother. which moved him to slay the Egyptian and bury the body. arrived at the shore to bathe. while watching over the flock. “And Pharaoh charged all his people. a voice. who was hired by the princess. In the solitude of this shepherd life. He also married Zipporah.116 Egypt. the Pharaoh commanded that all newborn Hebrew males be slain. kept him hidden. the princess adopted Moses and he was brought up as an Egyptian. he noticed a most unusual sight. She determined to keep the infant and rear it as her own. one of Jethro’s daughters. Moses received his call from the Lord. but was not consumed. On one of his travels throughout the pasture. Moses’ sister being near by was able to recommend as Hebrew nurse the child’s mother. The Egyptians could forsee being overrun and conquered by them. he went out to the fields to observe the Hebrew slaves at work. she made a small boat or basket of papyrus and placed the infant in it. There. and tended Jethro’s flocks. he led his flock to the back of the desert near Mount Horeb. The cover was removed. He decided to investigate this phenomenon. this rapid population increase alarmed the Egyptians. Not long thereafter. Later. but as he neared the bush. There he lived with Jethro. saying. a priest. Jochebed. and left his sister to observe the result. he feared for his own life and fled to Midian.

on the fifteenth day of the second month after their departing out of the land of Egypt. attempted to cross on the sea bed in like manner but were drowned in the tumultuous waves formed when the huge walls of water came crashing together. The Lord’s Word reveals that this noted event happened about the middle of the first month. which is between Elim and Sinai. Not many days thereafter they arrived at the Red Sea (Sea of Reeds) . the Lord promised to provide manna on a daily basis .117 that of the Lord’s. on the fifteenth day of the first month. after identifying Himself. As a test of their obedience to His law. and Moses and the Israelites set forth on a journey to the Promised Land. . commanded him to halt.”13 On the identical date in the second month. and by means of Divine assistance were able to cross over on the bed of the sea to the other shore. . and set about to deliver the Israelites. Aaron. and all the congregation of Israel came unto the wilderness of Sin. Moses balked at this request but later acquiesed to the Lord’s will. This he did with deep misgivings. . And they took their journey from Elim. manna. meanwhile. The Egyptians. The Israelites were finally freed of the bondage which they had so long endured. for the people. “And they departed from Rameses in the first month. the Israelites arrived at an area called the wilderness of Sin. . Moses returned to Egypt with his brother. who were now in hot pursuit of the Israelites because of the Pharaoh’s change of heart. addressed Moses directly and commissioned him to deliver the Israelites from Egyptian bondage and lead them as a nation into the wilderness of Sinai. . The Pharaoh would hear of no such plan and stood solidly against it. A series of harsh judgments and plagues from the Lord were finally required to force the Pharaoh to give in to Moses’ demands. At first. Yiar 15.14 It was here that the Lord spoke to Moses about providing a special food. The Lord then. .

118 excepting on His holy day, the seventh-day Sabbath. On that day no manna would appear. That day was to be a sabbath of rest. So that the people would not lack food on the Sabbath, the Lord produced a double portion every sixth day. A part of this double portion was set aside for the Sabbath meals. The Scriptures tell of this ingathering as follows: Then said the LORD unto Moses, Behold, I will rain bread from heaven for you; and the people shall go out and gather a certain rate every day, that I may prove them, whether they will walk in my law, or no. And it shall come to pass, that on the sixth day they shall prepare that which they bring in; and it shall be twice as much as they gather daily. . . . And it came to pass, that on the sixth day they gathered twice as much bread, two omers for one man: and all the rulers of the congregation came and told Moses. . . . [The following day] Moses said, Eat that to day; for to day is a sabbath unto the LORD: to day ye shall not find it in the field. Six days ye shall gather it; but on the seventh day, which is the sabbath, in it there shall be none.15 Not long after the introduction of the manna, the Israelites again set forth on their journey. They arrived in the vicinity of Mount Sinai on a Thursday, which was the identical weekday on which they had departed Rameses in the first month. “In the third month, when the children of Israel were gone forth out of the land of Egypt, the same day came they into the wilderness of Sinai.”16 On this date of arrival, Thursday, Sivan 5, the Lord spoke to Moses and commanded him to prepare the Israelites for the third day following, for upon that day He intended to descend upon the summit of Mount Sinai.

119 And the LORD said unto Moses, Go unto the people, and sanctify them to day and to morrow, and let them wash their clothes, And be ready against the third day: for the third day the LORD will come down in the sight of all the people upon mount Sinai.17 On the morning of Saturday, Sivan 7, a shroud of darkness enveloped Sinai and brilliant stabs of lightning and deafening rumbles of thunder were seen and heard. Accompanying this frightful sight was a long, loud blast from a trumpet. At some point during these proceedings, the Lord Himself descended to the summit of the mount. The Scriptures graphically relate these happenings. And it came to pass on the third day in the morning, that there were thunders and lightnings, and a thick cloud upon the mount, and the voice of the trumpet exceeding loud; so that all the people that was in the camp trembled. And Moses brought forth the people out of the camp to meet with God; and they stood at the nether part of the mount. And mount Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because the LORD descended upon it in fire: and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount quaked greatly. And when the voice of the trumpet sounded long, and waxed louder and louder, Moses spake, and God answered him by a voice. And the LORD came down upon mount Sinai, on the top of the mount: . . .18 It was on this glorious occasion that the Lord gave to Israel and the world, His law, the Ten Commandments. These commandments are as follows: And God spake all these words, saying, I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt,

120 out of the house of bondage. Thou shalt have no other gods before me. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth: Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me; And shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments. Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain. Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it. Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee. Thou shalt not kill. Thou shalt not commit adultery. Thou shalt not steal. Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour’s.19 It is significant to note that the Lord, in order to impress on the Israelites the importance of the Sabbath, made it a special point to recognize and honor it by descending to Sinai and giving His law to mankind on that special day. Also of significance is

He therefore destroyed the tablets and for 40-days entreated the Lord to spare the Israelites from death. and on the following morning.”20 Now after the giving of the law. a special date in Israel and later also in the church. later came to be recognized as the day of Pentecost. the Lord remained on the Sinai summit for a lengthy period. On the following Sabbath. And Moses went into the midst of the cloud. . Sivan 7. Theodore Brash in his book The Judaic Heritage tells us that “What began with Passover was concluded at Pentecost by the revelation on Mount Sinai and the giving of the Ten Commandments. descended the Sinai slopes carrying with him the newly engraved tablets.21 During the 40-day period. Moses. Shavuot is the birthday of the Jewish religion. And the LORD said unto Moses. he discovered that the Israelites had transgressed the law by worshiping a golden calf. He commanded Moses to ascend the mount.22 At the end of his 40-day fast. Moses was commanded to prepare two new stone tablets. and gat him up into the mount: and Moses was in the mount forty days and forty nights. and the cloud covered it six days: and the seventh day he called unto Moses out of the midst of the cloud. Upon arriving at the base of the mountain. Hew thee two tables of stone like unto the first: and I will write upon these . And the glory of the Lord abode upon mount Sinai. and he remained there forty days. the fourteenth day of Sivan. This Moses did. . After the forty days had ended.121 that the date of the giving of the law. he was to again ascend Mount Sinai. . the Lord wrote the Ten Commandments on stone tablets.

and present thyself there to me in the top of the mount. This event happened on Nisan 10. . and king Hezekiah's rededication of the temple in 725 B. .. thus making it possible for the Israelites to safely cross on the riverbed to the land of Canaan. and come up in the morning unto mount Sinai.24 In the year of the Jordan crossing the date Nisan 10 fell on the Sabbath.. the 40th year after the Exodus. The year of this happening was exactly one millennium prior to 6 B.C.122 tables the words that were in the first tables. and a year having a Thursday New Year’s Day. centuries after the Jordan crossing and another year having a Thursday New Year’s Day. What we find significant about 725 B.. As can be seen here. the identical date and Sabbath on which Jesus rose from death many centuries later. .C. the year of the Lord’s conception..C. In the year 1446 B. the Lord in Old Testament times has caused a number of significant events to occur in years having Thursday New Year’s Days. It is because of this consistent Thursday pattern as well as with a variety of other patterns that we have been able to decipher the calendar code and acquire a glimpse .23 The Lord again wrote the Ten Commandments (Decalogue) while Moses was on the summit.C.C.C. the identical day of the week on which the Decalogue was given. the year of Isaiah's vision in 759 B. and after 40 days had passed. Moses descended with the two new tablets. And be ready in the morning.. In the year 1006 B. “And the people came up out of Jordan on the tenth day of the first month. Additional Old Testament happenings occurring in Thursday New Year's Day years are the year of the temple dedication in 986 B. was that their worship service occurred on Nisan 17. the Lord separated the waters of the Jordan River.C. the foundation of the first temple was laid. which thou brakest.

Of his parents little is known. She listened intently as he related his strange encounter and became convinced that he had truly received a heavenly revelation. Islam Another religion. with Muhammad. It was not until he became a young man and entered the caravan business that he was able to provide for himself. named Khadija. which has its roots extending far back into Old Testament history is Islam. As time passed they began to show a mutual interest in each other and eventually married. an angel appeared and commanded Muhammad to “recite” the word of God. he was employed by a wealthy widow. He was kindly treated. While sitting in a cave in one of these contemplative moods. Muhammad was born about A. for they died while he was a child. 570. Badly shaken by this experience. the angel grasped him by the throat and compelled him to speak. Either because he misunderstood the request or failed to respond with alacrity.D. we can say truly that the Bible is the Word of God and is the only source to which humans should look for spiritual enlightenment. Though its roots may extend into the distant past. As they began to prosper. we are told. but shared the hardships of a poor family. Khadija. of the vision. She sent him on several caravan trips to other regions and soon discovered that he was very dependable and trustworthy. He often herded sheep and gathered wild berries in the desert. the religion of Islam really began in the seventh century A.123 of the Lord’s involvement within the historical context. he promptly returned home and informed his wife. Although her comforting words were an encourage- . Frequently his thoughts would turn to religion and the differing faiths in the region. At the age of twenty-five. Muhammad had more time to contemplate on the problems in the world and ways to solve them. He was cared for by his grandfather and later by an uncle. From this.D.

later called Medina. and was chosen as the starting point of the new calendar. She evidently exercised great control over Muhammad. indeed in the history of Islam. In 620 some visitors from the town of Yathrib. His cousin. who later became a leader (caliph) in the movement. for it was not until after her death that he began the practice of polygamy. . 622. It . on July 16. was the first male convert. A number of his party fled the city. For a time the doubts concerned him. the city [of the prophet]). Yathrib was hence called Medina (alMadinah. Since most of his converts appeared to be coming from Yathrib.preceded him to Yathrib. 622. The migration was termed Hegira (hijrah). Muhammad gained but few converts. heard Muhammad preach and twelve of them accepted his message. He himself. This date. It was not until some time had passed and he had gained fifty or more converts that he began to speak sharply against the idols of the Kaaba. At the beginning of his ministry. Abu Bakr. also accepted his message. he still had lingering questions and doubts about the angelic encounter. July 16. 622. he and his followers decided to move there in 622. and they began to persecute Muhammad and his followers. a cube-shaped shrine in Mecca. his first caliph. arriving there September 24. His attack on the sacred idols alarmed the Meccans. The following year seventy-three additional members were added to his group. accompanied by Abu-Bakr. but as time passed he was seized by the conviction that he had a message to convey and he began preaching.124 ment to him.25 Most of the inhabitants of Medina welcomed Muhammed. followed. became the earliest fixed point in Moslem chronology. It constituted a turning point in the career of Mohammed. . Ali. In 619 Khadija died. A number of his followers .

At first they were sympathetic with Muhammad’s goals because they felt that he would be a stabilizing influence in that city of unrest. what little they had heard of his doctrines seemed to be compatible with their own beliefs. on Monday. He then entered the structure and touched with his staff a black stone that is located therein and which. Furthermore.125 was here that he gained a large number of converts and began to exercise considerable political influence. the newly elected khalifah (caliph. In A. said to the sorrowing faithful: ‘If you are worshipers of Mohammed. This agreement contained a paragraph granting to the Muslims the right to enter Mecca and to visit the Kaaba for a thirty-day period that year. He then commanded that all the idols in the Kaaba be removed and destroyed. we are told. successor). A significant number of the Medina population were Jews. June 8. The truce did not last. they turned against him. and the following year. As additional converts embraced Islam the more able-bodied joined the attackers which increased the force to a small army. is sacred. Muhammad and his forces advanced upon the city and captured it. for he believed that many were secretly working with the Meccans in an attempt to overthrow him. Tradition says that Abu Bakr. He later massacred several hundred of them. It was also from here that he would send out bands of followers to attack caravans and bring back the spoils. If . however.D. know that he is dead. 629 Muhammad and the Meccans settled their disputes with a truce. When they finally discovered that he not only claimed to have had fresh revelations but also considered himself to be the sole prophet of that period in history. On exiting the cubicle he led his followers in the noonday prayer in the name of Allah. 630. Later he returned to Medina and lived there. Muhammad died. in 632. Muhammad went immediately to the Kaaba and circled it seven times. Two years later.

126 you are worshipers of God. He subdued any thoughts of rebellion by treating the conquered tribes fairly and by redirecting their attention from a plethora of obscure gods to the one god. If the JudeoChristian Scriptures were originally written under Divine impetus and are representative of the words of the Almighty. though in places it does not.’ Thus Mohammed’s life ended as his preaching had begun. Disturbing questions arise concerning the portions of the Koran that are not in agreement with the Judeo-Christian Scriptures. In the Koran. Muslims believe that these scriptures are the last and most revealing of the words of the Almighty and that wherever they disagree with the scriptures of other religions. of the man to the mission. After his death. then it is inconceivable that either He or His messenger should appear at a later time in history and contradict that which had been previ- . The Judeo-Christian Scriptures were written centuries before Muhammad’s birth and the writing of the Koran. but after a number of visitations accepted the visions and the messenger as reliable. Abraham. Moses. they supercede these other writings. Allah. In some areas the Koran parallels the Judeo-Christian Scriptures. a number of his followers compiled all of the angelic sayings into the Koran. During this period of conquest. know that God is living and does not die. At first he had concerns about the source of the visions. By means of a number of effective military thrusts he was able to acquire large tracts of land and many diverse tribes of people within a short period of time. amounting to self-effacement.26 Most scholars who study the life of Muhammad are in agreement that he was an able military leader and administrator. which became the sacred scriptures of Islam. Muhammad asserted that he frequently received visions from the Angel Gabriel. frequent mention is made of the creation story as well as of Noah. and Jesus. in the absolute devotion.

the Lord’s calendar shows us a relationship between the date of Ezekiel’s first vision and the date of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. Because this is so. is lunar only. For example. And the LORD spake unto Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt saying. The Lord’s calendar reveals that a millennial span separated the year 1006 B. a continual retrogressing of the months occurs so that a full cycle of the months through all the seasons of the year takes place in about thirty-two and a half years. Because it is not linked to the vernal equinox. but also that of the Almighty Himself. we ask. Can the Islamic calendar do the same? No. on the other hand. the year beginning the constructing of Solomon’s temple.C. It was lunar in that each month began with a new moon. . To do so would not only bring into question the integrity and motive of the messenger.. it cannot. They do not appear in the calendar of Islam.127 ously revealed as truth. This month shall be unto you the beginning of months: It shall be the first month of the year to you. Nisan (Abib) was linked to the vernal equinox so that a retrogressing of the months to other seasons could not happen. The calendar of the Koran. Why are they different? Has the Lord adopted a new calendar in place of the old? There certainly is no evidence to support such an idea. It was solar by the fact that the first month of the year. for the Lord’s calendar patterns appear only in the earlier calendar.27 This calendar was a lunisolar calendar. It is apparent from these facts that these two calendars are not the same. One area in which the Koran differs from the Judeo-Christian Scriptures is in the calendar. The Bible indicates that at the time of the Exodus the Lord revealed and gave to Isreal His calendar.

D. The Lord’s calendar reveals that the Apollo 8 moon venture began within 7 hours of the winter solstice. the year of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection. and in 1939. Can the Islamic calendar reveal that to us? No. then why does it not reveal these consistent patterns to us? Why is it that only by means of the Bible calendar we can make these discoveries? Another disturbing question that arises is. occurred within twenty-four hours of the vernal equinox as also happened in A. Can the Islamic calendar show us that span? No. the year of Jesus’ conception. the year in which World War II began. Of interest here is that the calendar of the Koran. the Bible calendar does so. though. for the year 622 reveals no significant pattern.128 from 6 B. is regarded as the beginning of the Muslim era.C. it cannot. The Hegira. the New Year’s Day in God’s calendar. Many Muslims consider the Hegira to be the most important happening in Muslim history. who lived in the seventh century not make . that must be included and should be of especial interest to the Muslims as regards the revelatory nature of the Bible calendar and the non-revelatory nature of the Islamic calendar concerns the year A. Can the calendar of Islam reveal that to us? No.. Many additional facts could be given but are certainly not needed to support the Bible calendar as the true calendar of the Almighty. why did Muhammad and his companions. 622. Now if the calendar of the Koran. the year of the Hegira itself. which occurred on July 16. after cleansing the temple. it cannot. In the year 622 the new moon for Nisan 1. it cannot. entered that edifice for worship on Nisan 17. The Bible calendar also reveals for 622 that the Hegira occurred on the 120th day after the vernal equinox.D. The Lord’s calendar reveals that King Hezekiah and the Israelites. 30. while on the other hand. which centuries later was the identical date on which Jesus rose from the grave. is truly the calendar of the Almighty. One other fact.

He blessed and sanctified that day. Muhammad cast away the very means by which he could have deciphered God’s calendar code. Both the Koran and the Judeo-Christian Scriptures acknowledge that the Almighty in six days prepared the earth for Adam and Eve’s habitation. and not by any other calendar. Why did Muhammad recognize the six days of Creation but reject or ignore God’s blessing and sanctifying of the Sabbath? Because he failed to make this recognition and because the Sabbath is an integral part of God’s calendar. the Lord rested from His labors. God's lunisolar calendar begins in the spring season. altered or supplanted by the lunar calendar of the Koran or any other calendar. It was revealed to Israel at the Exodus and extends from that time to the present day. It is only through the calendar patterns of God's calendar. that we can observe His involvement in history. the seventh day. The following day. Another question of concern that arises here is that concerning the seventh-day Sabbath. If they were truly representing the Lord. and because of this rest.new moon pattern of March 18 in the year 622 and recognize it as a part of God’s calendar code? Why would they begin a calendar in July which does not contain God’s calendar code in place of accepting the Lord’s calendar which began with Nisan in March of that year and one which does contain that code.129 note of the vernal equinox . Because the Bible calendar brings into focus serious questions concerning the calendar of the Koran and their understand- . they should have recognized God’s calendar code and have adopted God’s calendar for the Islamic nation. It has not been changed.

after all. the Bible. It is. and not the calendar of the Koran. as well as those in other religions. that is revealing God’s involvement in the historical context. it is to the Bible we must turn if we are to learn of God. to turn to the words of the Bible and live by them. for it is by God’s sacred promises in that Holy Book that we have an assurance of our fellowship with Him now as well as in the life hereafter. We invite Muslims. Muslims should make a reassessment of their beliefs in the light of God’s Word. and since this is so.130 ing of the Sabbath. the calendar of the Bible. .

23) Theodoric conquered Odoacer V. 336 B. the Lord makes clear to us not only His interest in but also His ability to govern earthly happenings. March 26 Tue. March 19 ✽ Nisan 1 Fri. The following table which lists a number of the significant wars in history reveals a repetitive use of a Friday-Saturday New Year’s Day pattern. March 17 Fri. March 15 Sat. 333 B.D. Fri. March 12 Sun.E. 70 A.C.D. April 8 Sat.D. Wars & Battles Year B. By exercising His control over the major events in history and making them occur on special dates and in selected patterns. April 4 Sat. March 22 Fri. March 22 Thu. One area in which His involvement can clearly be seen is that of wars.131 Chapter VIII CONCLUSION The Lord has chosen to reveal His involvement in history by the use of special dates and selected patterns in His calendar. March 25 Thu. 489 Event Philip Murdered (Summer) Battle of Granicus (May/June) Battle of Issus (Autumn) Maccabeean Revolt (December) Jewish War began Titus attacked Jerusalem Odoacer became King (Aug. March 31 Fri. 66 A.C.C. March 12 Sat. March 25 Mon. 334 B. March 19 .D. 476 A. 168 A. March 24 Sat. March 19 Sun.C.

April 1 Fri. 2001 Destruction of World Trade Center Sun. March 27 Fri.S. 535 Event Nisan 1 Fri.D. 527 A. March 22 Mon.D.D. March 19 ✽ Wed. March 29 Fri. 1775 American Revolutionary War began A.D.D. March 3 Sun. 1099 Jerusalem captured (First Crusade (July 15)) A. March 26 Another type of year often used by the Lord for special occasions was the year in which the New Year’s Day fell on a Thursday. 1914 World War I began A. 1066 Battle of Hastings (Oct. March 13 Sat.) V. It was in this type of year that such special events as the Exodus. March 15 Tue. 1789 French Revolution A. March 20 Fri. March 20 Wed. March 20 Sat. 1) Belisaruis subdued Italy A. 8. 1429 Joan of Arc's victory over England A.D. Jesus’ birth. March 20 Sat. March 20 March 28 (March 10:O.D.D. March 6 Justinian became sole Emperor (Aug. 1588 Spanish Armada defeated (Aug. . March 15 Tue. 1291 Acre conquered A. March 25 Sat.S) (March 18:O.D.S) Mon. March 21 Tue. March 12 Year A. Fri. Mon. and the recent establishing of the nation of Israel occurred.) A.D.E. March 27 Wed. March 21 ✽ Tue. March 19 Mon. July 29 O.132 Wars & Battles (cont.D.D. Jesus’ resurrection. March 19 Tue. 1939 World War II began A. 14) A.

1486 The Exodus B. March 19 Thu. March 20 Year Event Nisan 1 Thu. April 4 Fri. March 23 ✽ Mon. March 20 ✽ Sat. April 15 Thu.C. March 27 Wed. 30 Temple Dedication Isaiah's vision Ezekiel's first vision Ezekiel's vision Daniel's vision Jesus' Birth Jesus' Crucifixion. March 27 Fri. 1006 Temple Foundation laid B. Tue.D. 1446 The Jordan Crossing B. March 31 Wed. 1776 Declaration of Independence A. March 25 Thu. March 21 Thu. April 4 Thu. 5 A.C.D. 1948 Jewish Nation established . 593 B. April 3 Thu.C. March 12 Wed.C. April 6 Fri. April 9 Thu. March 31 Fri.C.C. March 29 Thu.C. 573 B. March 27 Tue.C.E. March 25 Thu. 1916 Jacob entered Egypt B.D. April 3 Sat. Thursday Pattern Significant Events V. 1431 Joan of Arc burned at the stake A. 986 B.C.D. March 30 Thu. March 23 Thu. March 29 Mon. March 22 Thu. 536 B. March 9 Thu. March 15 Thu.133 A listing of these and other happenings are included in the following table. March 11 B. 759 B. Resurrection & Ascension A.C.

4. .D. Chili quakes (April 18. 1906 San Francisco and Valparaiso. A.C. B. 337 Julian calendar began.). 1607 Jamestown settlement (arrived May 13 O.D. 120 days (three 40-day periods) apart. 1486 Moses’ second visit to Sinai summit. A.D. Jerusalem time). August 16). 80 days (two 40-day periods) after Yiar 14 120 days (three 40-day periods) after April 6.C.S.D. B. B.C. 40 days and 40 nights.D.D. 1486 Moses’ first visit to Sinai summit. 30 A. 70. 1945 First atomic blast in history (July 16). 40th year prior to A. Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection Constantine died 40 years to 5 B. 40 days and 40 nights. A. 40th day after Nisan 10.D. 26 A. A. Jesus’ temptation. 40th day after Nisan 24 40th day after Nisan 17. A. 40th day after Pentecost. A.134 Special repetitive numerical spans were also a part of the Lord’s calendar patterns. 1776 Declaration of Independence (July 4). One of several periods which appeared frequently was one composed of forty days. 1961 Alan Shepard’s sub-orbital flight (May 5). 1958 Submarine Nautilus’ transpolar voyage (Aug. 45 A.D.D.C.D. 40-day and 40-year periods Event Year Span 40 days and 40 nights.

D. 70th day after Nisan 10. . 1961 Yuri Gagarin’s historic flight A. 70th day after Nisan 15. 2001 World Trade Center (Sept 11) Another span which appeared frequently was one composed of one hundred fifty-three days. 1776 Lee resolution A. 3 to Oct.D.D.D. 12. 1914 World War I began (June 28) A. 1970 Peruvian earthquake (May 31) A.D. 1926 First liquid propelled rocket flight (March 16) A. 70th day after July 4 (ordinal count) A.C.D. 70 days from Aug. 70-day periods Event Ezekiel's first vision (Tamuz 5) Year B. 70th day before Ab 10 70th day after Nisan 24 70th day prior to May 25.D. 1869 Linking of transcontinental railroad A. 593 Period 70th day after Nisan 24.D.135 A seventy-day period also appeared in the calendar patterns. 1492 Columbus’ discovery of New World A. 1789 French Revolution (July 14) A. Pentecost 70th day before summer solstice. 70th day after Yiar 10.D.

C.D. This does not mean. 3) A.C.D. 1906 San Francisco earthquake A. 1) A. 606 Nebuchadnezzar attacked Jerusalem (3rd year of Jehoiakim) Jesus’ miracle A. even a grade school child can see God’s handiwork. 1944 First V-2 rockets launched against Paris (Sept. By the patterns' very simplicity and clarity.D. (Isaiah's vision) 153 fish netted by disciples 153rd day after Nisan 24 153 days prior to the new moon (Sept 18) for Tisri 1 153 days after Nisan 15 153 days after Nisan 14 (April 4) 153 days after April 6 153 days after Nisan 15 153rd day after April 3 (ordinal count) 153 days prior to April 3.D. 1953 153rd day after Nisan 17 B. 1939 World War II began (Sept. 1945 End of World War II (Sept.136 153-day periods Event Ezekiel’s vision Year B. 30 A.D.D. 1774 First Continental Congress A. 1952 First thermonuclear explosion (Nov.C. 2001 World Trade Center Destruction The repetitive consistency of these calendar patterns reveals clearly the Lord’s working within the historical context. that all . 1923 Japan earthquake A. 592 Period 153rd day after Nisan 1 (ordinal count) 153 years after 759 B. 2) A.D. of course. 1944 First V-2 rocket attack on London (Sept. 6) A.D.D.D. 8) A.

for many complex patterns appear in the calendar code. for God’s calendar and calendar code came from the Bible only. This is especially true of the words and works of Jesus. No other book. The Bible also tells us of God’s special day. Because of that rest. On the seventh day of the week of Adam’s creation. Because He rose from the grave after three days as He promised. living a sinless life. God does exist because His well designed calendar patterns confirm that He does. Yet. He has the power to forgive and remove all sins of those who repent of their past and accept Him as their savior. and that ends the matter. The Bible and only the Bible is the source of that code and the source of God’s words. Nothing could be farther from the truth. taking on the nature of man. visited Earth to ransom His life in order to give life and hope to humans.137 patterns are simple and easy to understand. He . Because of the sin of Adam and Eve. Because we are now aware that God exists. no other scriptures. Jesus. Something we all can learn from these patterns is that God does truly exist. the seventh-day Sabbath. We need no longer listen to the theories of the atheists and “no God” theorists. for Jesus made it unmistakably clear that He. all humans have been cut off from God and condemned to a fiery end. as a member of the Godhead. and dying took upon Himself the sins that separate us from God. the Lord has included a sufficient number of the easy-to-understand patterns so that even a child studying the code can see evidence of the Lord’s involvement in history. In order to give us a hope for a future life. Realizing that God exists and the Bible is His means of communicating with us makes the words of that book all the more meaningful. by visiting Earth. God rested from His creative activity. The calendar code puts to rest once and for all time the arguments supporting a “no God” concept. we now know that the Bible is truly God’s Word. in spite of this. and no other source contains God’s calendar code.

It always has been. present. then a change in the patterns would have taken place. It is truly an exciting and fascinating code. for this calendar code. . It also is another means by which we can learn of God’s awesome infinite knowledge and being. If God had replaced the seventh-day Sabbath with the first day of the week (Sunday) at Jesus’ resurrection as is claimed by the church. has itself never been changed. This fact is confirmed by the calendar code.”3 This special recognition of the seventh day by the Lord has never been changed or altered. Since the calendar code is of the Bible. As the Scriptures say “And God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it:. and always will be special to Him. It extends through all of history even to our day. it points us directly to the Bible as the true source of knowledge of the Almighty. let us turn to that Holy Book to learn of our Creator and of the One who determines the number of our days. or future. for a change in the day would have made a change in the patterns since the seventh day was an integral part of the pattern code.. for it covers all the periods of history whether past. not only in this life. The calendar code is another of God’s means of revealing Himself to mankind.. The identical patterns of the Old Testament times extend through the New Testament times as well. is. of which the seventh-day Sabbath is an integral part. but also of a future life as well. Since this is so.138 set apart the seventh day as a special day. There is so much more we can learn from God. The fact that no change in the patterns has ever occurred settles the issue once and for all time as to the validity of the seventh day being God’s special day.

but it has appeared several times in the code throughout history. why was that particular day selected. makes that code more understandable than that of his first vision. For example. His vision also occurred in a Thursday New Year's Day year on a Sabbath but on the 24th day of the first month. but since there are 52 Sabbaths in a year. Now why did both visions occur on their respective dates? The answer is because they were 70-days apart. From this. That vision. One instance in which we have a fuller knowledge of the code is revealed in Ezekiel's second vision (Ezek. which occurred on the fifth day of the sixth month.139 Predictions Since the calendar code reveals God's involvement in history. The number 153 was mentioned only once in the Scriptures and that occurred after Jesus' resurrection. Daniel. by tying the date of Ezekiel's second vision to the New Year's Day. for other periods in nearby years were also 70-days apart and Sabbath days. 8:1). we can see the difficulty in applying the code to future events. What makes our task difficult is our partial knowledge of the code and sub-codes. Why were they not chosen by the Lord for the visions? We do not have an answer to this because we have but a partial knowledge of the code. many years after Ezekiel had received his vision. and a 70-day period is significant to the Lord. this only gives us a partial answer. also received a vision. The Lord. Our lack of knowledge of a part of the code prevents us from being able to predict all future events accurately. could we locate years for future events by extending that code forward? Extending the code into the future is not difficult. a Sabbath in the fifth year of Jehoiakin. the New Year's Day. . However. Ezekiel received a vision in a Thursday New Year's Day year on the fifth day of the fourth month. The answer appears to be because it was the 153rd day (ordinal count) after Nisan 1. was also a Sabbath.

History shows that I was right in one situation and wrong in the other. In the 70's. though. for I located beforehand a year in which a major earthquake should occur. many people became frightened that World War III.140 As an example of this. . back in 1962. I felt that a third world war would not begin in 1962 but would begin three years later in 1965. during the Cuban Missile crisis. was about to begin. I achieved another success. and it did so. To answer the question. can we predict events with the calendar code? With careful study we can achieve moderate success in it. Even with my limited knowledge of the code. and that is about the best we can do at the present time.

6. p. (New York: Virtue. Alexander the Great. 14.. p. 5. Ibid.” Library of Universal History (New York: Union Book Co. New York: Books for Libraries Press. 18. 11. Ex.. Ibid.. . The Holy Bible. 31:16-17. p. (Josephus) Antiquities of the Jews.. Benjamin Ide Wheeler. Wheeler. A. 5. Emmins..).. M. p. p. Knopf. 3. 693. 1689-1690. William Whiston.141 Chapter Notes Chapter I 1.. 1960). 1957). p. 115 and 118. Constantinople. Irving Werstein. Harold Lamb. 284. and Co. 2. (New York: Julian Messner. 143-144. “New Persian Empire of the Sassanidea. New York: (Julian Messner. (Freeport. The Many Faces of World War I. 26. Ibid. Vol. 1900). 1906). pp. 365-368. Louis L. pp. King James Version. Jer. Ex. Inc. 8. 820. 17. 7. King James Version. The War. Snyder. 2:2-3. 10. Ibid. 38. Ibid. pp.. 15. 13. 12. pp. 822. 20:8-11. 16. Gen. Lamb. 5:15. Ibid.. 9. (New York: Alfred A. 1963). p. 4. p. The Holy Bible.

. Ibid.. 18. Jer. Lev. Ibid.142 17. 6:19.. 26:3-6.

7. 14. Jer. 698. Frank W. paraphrased from Planet Earth: Earthquake. 698.. 13. Ibid. Lev. 23. 8:1. Bryce Walker and the editors of Time-Life Books.” The World Alamanac and Book of Facts 1984.. 23:39. 4. “Major Earthquakes. 16:32-33. Ibid.. Ibid. 27:51. “Major Earthquakes. 19:18 5. The Holy Bible. Ezek. 6. Num. 201.) p. King James Version. Ibid. 28:2. Gen.” The World Alamanac and Book of Facts. (Alexandria. The Holy Bible. . The Elements Rage. 15. Ibid. Dan. 19:24-25. 2. 9. Matt. 9:24. 25:11. King James Version. Matt.. King James Version.143 Chapter Notes Chapter II 1. Inc. Ibid.. p. p. 10. (New York: Newspaper Enterprise Association. Ibid. p. John 21:1-10. The Holy Bible. Virginia: © 1982 Time-Life Books.. The Holy Bible. “Major Earthquakes. 8. 1965). Gen. 16.. 6:13-14. 12.. Lane. 1983).” The World Alamanac and Book of Facts. Inc. Ex. (Philadelphia: Chilton Books. King James Version. 698. 11. John 21:11. 3. p.

Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. 61. Richard M. 19. Massachusetts. Department of Commerce. 157. No. Hurricane Camille. ESSA’s Climatological Data. The Holy Bible. Billye Walker Brown and Walter R. Ezek. Lane. p. National Summary. p. (Reading. 22. 18..S. 1972). Nahum 1:3. King James Version. U. 8:18 . 8. Brown. King James Version. King James Version. 20. 6:12-13. The Holy Bible. The Holy Bible. Nelson. 1969. 20. Hurricanes and Tornadoes.144 17. Rev. Vol. DeAngelis and Elmer R. 21.

Vol. (New York: Virtue. Lev. 2.. 1:1-31. Matt.. 23:6-7. (New York: Isaac Landman. 9. 12. 10. 16. 7. Ibid. 8. King James Version. “Calendar... Emmins. 4. Ibid. 6.. King James Version. p. The Holy Bible. Mark 15:42. Ibid. Matt. The Holy Bible. 12:40. Ibid.. 1907).). 632.A. 106. Ibid. John 12:1-13 3. III. The Jewish Encyclopedia. John 19:14-16. 293.145 Chapter Notes Chapter III 1.. Matt. The Holy Bible. 12:39-40.M. 11. III. Torrey. R. 1. (Josephus). p. Vol.” The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia.. Luke 23:56. Ibid. 1940). A. Gen. and Co. Vol. 2. (Chicago: The Moody Press. Ibid.” History of. p. 14. 13. Antiquities of the Jews.. Ibid. Ibid. 5. “Calendar.. 499. William Whiston. 15. 1925) vol. p. Difficulties in the Bible. p. . Luke 24:10-12. 499. King James Version. (New York: KTAV Publishing House. Inc. Luke 24:1-3. 28:4.

“Easter. (New York: Charles Scribner’s & Sons. Ibid. King James Version. 18. Vol. 614. The Holy Bible. 19.” Encyclopaedia Britannica. VII. 28:19-20. 9th Ed. .146 17. 1878).. 615. Matt. p. p..

8. Vol. 12. 1948. Col. State of. 364-365. 5. Richard Henry. p. “Articles of Confederation. 154. I Chron. Psalm 33:6-9.” Encyclopedia Judaica. 2. Vol. (Jerusalem. 1985). Connecticut: Grolier Inc..) Press Herald. King James Version. 6. pp.” The World Book Encyclopedia. Vol. Ibid. 9. Ibid. 4.. 1971). “Lee. 800. p. 1. 7. Portland (Me. (Chicago: World Book Inc. 5. (Danbury. “Israel. 1974). 413..” Encyclopedia Americana.. Israel: Keter Publishing House Ltd. Vol. p. p. 17. May 13. 3.147 Chapter Notes Chapter IV 1. 29:11-12 . “Louisiana Purchase. 2. Acts 2:1-6.” Encyclopedia Americana. The Holy Bible..

Ibid. 99. The New York Times. 75. 76. 2:10-20. 6:14. 4. 79.148 Chapter Notes Chapter V 1. 1945. Sarah R. Ibid. Gen. The Holy Bible. King James Version. Num. 5. 6. 2. 71-72. August 7. 1. Hag. The Holy Bible. 3. King James Version. Riedman. (London: Abelard-Schuman Limited). pp. 8. Col. 7. Men and Women Behind the Atom. p. King James Version. The Holy Bible. Ibid.. p. . p. p... 1:1-3.

(New York: Charles Scribner’s & Sons. Nautilus 90 North. p. Ibid. Robert E. (Cleveland: The World Publishing Company. Peary. 13. (New York: Frederick A. 1926. Peary. Northward Over the Great Ice. Stokes Company. 288. 134-135. The Holy Bible... p. (New York: Doubleday. 175. 8. 1898). 1959). . p. Worcester. 21. p. Vol. March 16. VI. p. (New York: Charles Scribner’s & Sons.. “John Smith. p. 5. Vol. 22. Ibid.. 1910). 10.” Encyclopaedia Britannica. 395 12. The North Pole. Jer. p.. The World Book Encyclopedia. Robert E. 2. 173.. 10. 52:12-14. Peary. (Chicago: World Book Inc. 208-209. Ibid. 25:8. 1878). Commander William R. Stokes Company. Goddard Library. "World War II". pp. Page and Company. King James Version. 9th Ed. Anderson. 3. 172. 1907).149 Chapter Notes Chapter VI 1. 7. 9th Ed. 6. Goddard’s Diary. 4. 9. Nearest the Pole. MA: Clark University. “Christopher Columbus. Robert E. 14. 58-59. 11. 1985) Vol. P. II Ki. pp..” Encyclopaedia Britannica. Dr. Ibid. 1878). (New York: Frederick A.

20:1-2. 822. M. Ezek. 15.150 14.. The Holy Bible.). William Whiston. (New York: Virtue. and Co.. p. . King James Version. A. Emmins. (Josephus) Wars of the Jews.

King James Version.151 Chapter Notes Chapter VII 1.” Encyclopaedia Britannica. p. 13. 12. 15:2-18. King James Version. The Holy Bible.. 12:1-2. 9. VI. Ibid. Ibid. (New York: The Ronald Press Company. Brace and World. p. 33:3. 260. p. 14. Jean Bothwell. 11. Vol. (New York: Charles Scribner’s Son’s. Num. 93. The Holy Bible. 16:1. The Story of India. 8.” Library of Universal History. p. Inc. The Religions of Man. Gen. 16:4-26. Ibid. 2. Gen. 7. Kenneth Morgan. Ex. pp. “Confucius. 1878). Acts 7:2-4. 15.. (New York: Union Book Company. 1958). “Confucius and His Religion. 5.. The Path of the Buddha. 687. 1952). 1956). . Vol.. Ibid. (New York: The New American Library. 6. 1:22. p. (New York: Harcourt. 3. II. Ex.. Gen. 4.. 44-45. Huston Smith. 76.. Ibid... 93. 93. 1906). 10. Ibid. Ibid. Ibid. p. Ex. 22:16-18.

Ex. Vol.. 17.. The Judaic Heritage. “Mohammad. Theodore Brash. Deut. 1974). 34:1-2. 19. (Danbury. Ex. 24:16-18. 24. 1969). 19:1. 26. 20:1-17. 1966. 23. Ibid. The Holy Bible. 643. p. “Mohammed.” Encyclopaedia Britannica. 293. 19. 22. King James Version.. p.” Encyclopedia Americana. Vol.. 19:10-11. Inc. 12:1-2. 18. 15. Josh. Ex. Ibid. 20. 27. Ibid.... Ibid. King James Version. Ex. Connecticut: Grolier Inc. (New York: David McKay Company. 25.. Ex.. p. Ex. Ex. Ibid. 4:19. Ibid. Ibid.152 16. 21. 56. 19:16-20. The Holy Bible. 9:15-18. .

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1970.) Evening Express. Chicago: Field Enterprises Educational Corporation.” The World Book Encyclopedia. New York: Frederick A.) Evening Express. 1936. Stokes Company. New York: The New American Library. Page and Company.) Evening Express. 1898.) Evening Express. Mohammed Marmaduke. August 18. 1 and 3. New York: Frederick A. Chicago: Field Enterprises Educational Corporation. 1932. June 3. The Faith of Mankind. Nearest the Pole. p. p. p. The Meaning of the Glorious Koran. Robert E. “Petroleum. Northward Over the Great Ice. 1970. 1936. April 6. Portland (Me. p. March 23. Peary. “Railroads. 1969. 13.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1948. 1932. New York: Thomas Y.” Encyclopedia Americana. New York: Doubleday. “Revolutionary War in America. May 13. Portland (Me. 1. 1. 1910. . 1974. 1976. April 7.” The World Book Encyclopedia.) Evening Express. Chicago: Field Enterprises Educational Corporation. Crowell Company. pp. Portland (Me.160 Parrinder. 9. Portland (Me. p. Portland (Me. The North Pole.) Evening Express. Stokes Company. Portland (Me. 1. Pickthall. 1976. 1. p. 1964. 1976. March 22.) Press Herald. “Railroads. 1. 1907. Geoffrey. ________. Portland (Me. 1959. p. ________. Portland (Me. New York: Americana Corporation.) Evening Express. June 1.

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1969. . Antiquities of the Jews. New York: Vintage Books. Samuel. Incorporated. Earthquake. Whiston. Hamilton. Incorporated. Norton and Company. Wright. et. Robert and Nancy. The Analects of Confucius. Arthur. John Noble. Helen. New York: Virtue. Alexandria. Wilford. Helen and Rapport. New York: Julian Messner. The Great Explorers. Alexander the Great. Waley. New York: David McKay Company. and Rapport. Incorporated. We Reach the Moon. To the Moon. Bryce. Incorporated. al. Incorporated. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. New York: W. New York: The New American Library. 1938. Wirsing. William.163 “Vandals. The Many Faces of World War I. 1900. Ware. New York: Harper and Brothers. W. Benjamin I. Samuel. 1955. Irving. Emmins. Wright. 1963. 1967.” Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1973. Virginia: Time-Life Books. Chronology of the Expanding World. New York: Books for Libraries Press. Walker. New York: Franklin Watts. 1969. Werstein. 1968. New York: Meredith Press. ________. Neville. Wheeler. and Company. 1966. 1957. James A. New York: David McKay Company. Wright. Williams. The Sayings of Confucius. 1982. Ancient India and its Influence in Modern Times. Chronology of the Modern World.

C. Chs. 1. Gen.C.. 3:14-17.. Gen. 1:1-2. 36 & 37 B. Ex.C.C... Dan. 4:1-7 B.. 3:2 B. 2046 The Holy Bible. 1486 Ibid. 47:28. II Chron. 17:3-6. 6:1. 10:1-6 B. 593 Ibid..C. Ezek. 5-7 B. 47:9. 968 Ibid.C. 783 Ibid.. 2:10-12 B.. 986 Ibid. 1899 Ibid.C.. 1446 Ibid. Ex. II Ki. Ex. 10:1-6 B. 712 Ibid. II Sam. 4:19 B. 25:24-26 B. 1009 Ibid. Ezek. 759 Ibid. Gen.164 Sources B.. I Ki. Isa.C. Josh. 45:6. 12:40-41 B.. Josh..C. 597 Ibid. 592 Ibid. Gen. Josh.C. 606 Ibid. 12:31-42 B. 18:9-11 B. 1080 Ibid. 5:4-5 B.C. 8:1 .C. II Chron.Isa. I Ki. II Ki. 49:33 B.C.C. 24:8 B.C. Gen..C.. 722 Ibid.. Jn.C. 1566 Ibid. Dan. 1006 Ibid. 6:1-3 B. 4:1-24. II Ki 14:23-25. II Ki. 12:31-33.. 21:11. 1916 Ibid. Jonah 1:1 B.C. Chs.C. Ezek. 2:1-10 B. Dan. Ch... I Ki.

C.. 333 Ibid. P. P.615 B. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1966). 4:1-17. 539 "Cyrus". 10:1-6 B.C.. P.. P. Ezra 1:1-4 B. Vol 14. 1966). 168 "Maccabees. 497-498 B.. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. Inc.C. Ezek. 839 B. Ezra 6:15 B. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Mt..C. 573 B. 76 B. Vol 6. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1966).C. 573 B. Vol 23.. 46 Ibid. Vol 4. Encyclopaedia Britannica... 536 The Holy Bible. 960. Encyclopaedia Britannica.. 100 "Caesar. Josh. 10:1-6 B. 4:1-24 B. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 3:14-17.C. Inc. Inc.C. 1:9-11 B. P..C. Books of". 1966). P. 573 Ibid. 960 B.C. Inc. Inc. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 334 "Alexander III". Inc.. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 616 .. 1966). 840 B. P. Dan. 571-575 B. P.. The Holy Bible. P.C. Inc. Mk. Ezra 6:19-22 B. 458 The Holy Bible.. 516 Ibid. Vol 1. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Ezra 7:8-28. 515 Ibid. P. 486 "Darius". Encyclopaedia Britannica. 538 Ibid. Josh. 9:20-26. P. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica..C. 840.C. 486-485 "Xerxes". 336 "Philip II". 40:1-4. 45 Ibid. The Holy Bible Dan..C. 465 Ibid.C. Gaius Julius".165 B. 1966). Dan. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica.C. 1966).C. Vol 7. P.C. Vol 17.

Inc. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1. 1966).D.AD 1978. Steinberg... Vol. 100 A.D. 70 William Whiston.. 1:26-38 B. Rev. Vol. 11. 1979).2 A. 1-22 A.D.. 26 Ibid. 2. P.D. A.D. 384 A. Chs. P. 274 A.166 B. 30 Ibid. 67 "Vespasian". P. Martin's Press. New York: St. The World Book Encyclopedia. P.. 307 Ibid. Inc. 1966).D. Historical Tables.. 5 A. Inc. 385.. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 20.D. Emmins & Co. Steinberg. 1966). Vol 5. The Holy Bible. Inc. Lk. P. 1979). Encyclopaedia Britannica.. (New York: Virtue. Vol.) Vol. (Chicago: World Book. Mt. 386 . Encyclopaedia Britannica. 98 The Holy Bible. The Works of Flavius Josephus. P. Mt. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Chicago: World Book.D. Martin's Press. 822 A. Vol 6. P. 4:1-25 A. PP.M. P.D. Lk.H. (New York: St. The World Book Encyclopedia. 3:15-17.. 330 S. Historical Tables 58BC-AD 1978. 28:1-20 A. 6 The Holy Bible. 10th Ed. 66 "Jews".D. 306 "Constantine".C. 10:1-6 A... 2:4-7 A. 384 A.D. 384-385 A. 887 A. 64 C. 5 Ibid. 1985).D. 6. 337 "Constantine I".. 10th Ed. P. 310 Ibid.D.. Mt. 313 Ibid.D. P. Ezek. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1985). 58 BC.C.. 269 "Claudius II". Dan. Ch.H. Inc.

Christianity and its Judaic Heritage. 16.AD 1978. The World Book Encyclopedia. (Chicago: World Book. 732 S.. (New York: Educators Association. 1966). 645 A. 864 A. 493 "Theodoric".D. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 14.167 A. P. Vol. Vol 22. (New York: The Ronald Press Company.D. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 387 Carl E.. Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. Vol. P. Inc. 476 "Odoacer".D. 510 A. Inc.D. 10th Ed. P. 1966).. Martin's Press. 751 "Merovingians". 1966). 1966). 13 A. 163 A.. Inc. Inc. 660 "Mu'a Wiya". 283 A. (New York: St. Vol 11. Inc... 1966). (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 304 A. P. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica.D. P. Vol 13.. 1979) P. Martin's Press. Steinberg.D. (New York: St.D. Historical Tables 58 BC-AD1978.. 259 A. Vol 15. 642 A. Vol 13. 1979) P. P. 565 "Justinian". 1985).AD 1978. 630 "Mohammed". 1966). 10th Ed. Inc. Purinton... 622 "Hegira". Vol 15. 14 . P. 410 S. Steinberg. 6 A. Martin's Press. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. P. 1966). P. P. 527 "Justinian". P. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Steinberg.H. 1979). 1961)..D. 197 A. Vol 4. Historical Tables 58 BC.H. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 58 A.. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 535 "History". Inc. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 10th Ed.D. The Volume Library. 1966).D. (New York: St.D.D.H. 1938). Encyclopaedia Britannica. P. 165 A. 489 "Odoacer". (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. Inc.D. Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 800 S. Inc.D. Historical Tables 58 BC.

P.D.H.. Saint. (New York: St. 1071 "Alp Arslan.D. 843 Ibid. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 390 . P.D. Vol 13. (New York: St.. Steinberg. P. Steinberg. Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1101 Ibid. 1979) P. Vol 11. 1966). Inc. 46 A. P31 A. 577 A.. Vol 14. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1979) P. Steinberg. 1966). P. 10th Ed.. Vol 11.. Pp.. 1054 Ibid. 1420 Ibid. 66 A. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica.D. 1966).D. P.D. P. Inc. 662 A.D.AD 1978. 987 "Hugh Capet".D. Vol 6. 10th Ed.D. P. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1215 "Magna Carta". Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1187 Ibid. Martin's Press. Encyclopaedia Britannica.AD 1978. 50 A. 10th Ed.. 1966).H.H. 1431 Ibid.. 1453 "Constantinople". P.D.D. Mohammed Ibn Da'ud".168 A. 1291 S. 92 A. P. Inc. 1966).. 1171 Ibid.D.AD 1978. 3 A. 14 A. Encyclopaedia Britannica.D. (New York: St. of Arc". (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britinnica... Inc. 1001 S. 812 A. 6 A.D. 36 A. Inc. Martin's Press. 22 A.. Inc. Martin's Press..D. Historical Tables 58 BC.. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1099 S. 1429 "Joan. Historical Tables 58 BC.. 1979) P. 36 A. 155 & 156 A. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. Historical Tables 58 BC.D.. 1066 "The Battle of Hastings". P. P. Vol 1. 1966).

1774 "Continental Congress.D.D. 1588 "Spanish Armada". Inc.. (Chicago: World Book.AD 1978. 776 &777 A. Inc. 1704 "Blenheim.. P. The World Book Encyclopeida. 9th Ed. Inc.D. The World Book Encyclopedia. 1966). 111 A. 440 A. 175 A. Vol 1. 438 A. John". Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1776 "Lee. Vol. 592 A. P. 154 A.D. (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. Historical Tables 58 BC. Encyclopaedia Britannica. (New York: St. Encyclopaedia Britannica.G. 358 . 7. (Chicago: World Book. Vol 6. P. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. Steinberg.D. Encyclopaedia Britannica.. Vol 14.. 18. 1949).D. 1517 "Luther.. 1787 "Constitution of The United States". 1521 Luther.D. 1775 "American Revolution". Inc. Vol 3. P. 1966). 1492 "Columbus. 774 A..D. 22. 1966).H. Wells. P.. 1211 A. 419 A. P. 4. The Outline of History. P.D. Martin's Press. Christopher". Vol. Martin". 1966). Encyclopaedia Britannica. 798B A. 1966). Inc. Vol 6. Encyclopaedia Britannica. P. 10th Ed. 1979). 450 A..D. Pp. Inc. Inc. The".. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 12. Vol 14.169 A. Inc. Vol. 1803 "Louisiana Purchase". 1878) Vol. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1480 H.. Inc.D. P. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Vol 14. 1966). 112 A. (New York: Garden City Publishing Co. 1985). Battle of". 1985).. 1966).D. P. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1520 S. Martin. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. Inc. P. 1789 "French Revolution". 1985). Inc. 1985). P. 1607 "Smith.. The World Book Encyclopedia. Richard henry".. Vol.. (Chicago: World Book. P. Inc. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Chicago: World Book.D. The World Book Encyclopedia.D.

793G & 793H A. P. State of". P.AD 1978. 1966). P. 5 .H. 15. 1979) P. Vol. 1941 Ibid. The World Book Encyclopedia. 1971). Inc. Inc. 23. Vol 23. 23. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 792S A.. 230 A. 1985). Vol.. The World Book Encyclopedia. Vol. 1869 "Railroad". Pp. 309 A. (New York: St. (Chicago: World Book. 1985). Israel: Keter Publishing House. 1.. Vol. 791D A.. 846 A.D.. P. P. 1861 "Civil War". 1917 S. 1948. 1918 Ibid. P. Inc. 1944 "World War II". Portland (ME) Press Herald. 21.D. Encyclopaedia Britannica. 1948 "Israel. Encyclopaedia Britannica.. 1985).D. Inc. 115 A.D. P.. Inc.D. (Chicago: World Book. Vol. Encyclopedia Judaica. (Chicago: World Book. 26-31 A. 9. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 228 A. The World Book Encyclopedia. 1812 "War of 1812".. 10th Ed. The World Book Encyclopedia. 1. Ltd. (Chicago: World Book. 1914 "World War I"..D. Inc. Inc. PP 364 & 365 A. (Chicago: World Book. 1985).D.D. Steinberg. P. 1985). Col. (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. 21. Encyclopaedia Britannica. The World Book Encyclopedia.D.D. 1939 "World War II". Martin's Press. The World Book Encyclopedia. Vol. 395 A.170 A.D. Vol. Vol. P.D. P. Inc. Vol. 1948 "Associated Press". P. 4.. 1859 "Petroleum".D. 1865 Ibid. 1985). 1945 "World War II". 1966). 752 A. 1942 "Atomic Bomb".D. 1966). Inc.D. Pp... 476 A. Historical Tables 58 BC. 16. (Jerusalem. (Chicago: World Book... May 13. 476 A.

171

Index
A
Ab (Fifth Month) Second Day, 102 Seventh Day, 102 Tenth Day, 16, 74, 103, 135 Nineteenth Day, 97 Abraham, 4, 113, 114, 115, 126 Adam, 4, 129, 137 Alaska, 30, 96 Aldrin, Edwin, Jr., 102 Alexander The Great, 17, 18, 19 Almighty, 30, 45, 51, 71, 82, 102, 110, 126, 127, 128, 129, 138 Anders, William A. 101, 102 Anderson, William, U.S.N., 96, 97 Apollo 8: 101, 128 Apollo 11: 101, 102 April, Third Day, 39, 83, 136 Fifth Day, 39, 51, 52, 55 Sixth Day, 11, 12, 55, 95, 97, 99, 134, 136 Seventh Day, 37, 55, 56 Eighth Day, 11, 52 Eleventh Day, 38 Twelfth Day, 100 Fourteenth Day, 23 Fifteenth Day, 24 Eighteenth Day, 31, 62, 134 Twenth-fifth Day, 62 Twenty-sixth Day, 88 Armstrong, Neil, 102 Articles of the Barons, 64, 65 of Confederation, 67 August Third Day, 86, 88, 97, 135 Fourth Day, 97 Twelfth Day, 83 Seventeen, 43

B
Bastille, 24 Becquerel, Henri, 77, 78, 79 Belisarius, 19-22, 26, 132 Bible (Lord’s) Calendar, 7, 8, 25, 26, 31, 35, 36, 45, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 59, 62, 64, 70, 71, 81, 97, 98, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 127, 128, 129, 130 Borman, Frank, 101, 102 Buddhism, 104, 106, 110

172 C
Calendar, Islamic, 124, 127 Calendar, Jewish, 47, 49 Calendar Code, 7, 15, 17, 19, 33, 45, 49, 51, 104, 110, 122, 127, 129, 134, 136, 137, 138 Camille, Hurricane, 42, 43, 44 Collins, Michael, 102 Columbia 102 Columbus, Christopher, 85, 86, 87, 88, 135 Confucius, 110, 111, 112, 113 Congress, First Continental, 65, 66, 67, 136 Constantine, 134 Constitution, United States, 65, 68 Crucifixion, 12, 14, 30, 35, 36, 39, 46, 47, 50, 51, 55, 57, 61, 62, 64, 83, 128, 133, 134 Crucifixion, Friday, 50, 51, 52, 54, 56, 57, 58 Crucifixion, Wednesday, 50, 51, 52, 54, 56 Crucifixion, Year, 47, 49, 51, 55, 68, 82 Curie, Pierre and Marie, 77, 78

D
Daniel, 31, 34, 133 Dates B.C. 4001: 47 B.C. 1916: 133 B.C. 1486: 56, 70, 133, 134 B.C. 1446: 56, 122, 133 B.C. 1006: 56, 122, 127, 133 B.C. 1001: 46, 47 B.C. 1000: 72 B.C. 986: 56, 122, 133 B.C. 759: 56, 122, 133, 136 B.C. 725: 122 B.C. 606: 136 B.C. 593: 8, 9, 11, 133, 135 B.C. 592: 8, 9, 32, 35, 136 B.C. 573: 8, 9, 133 B.C. 536: 31, 133 B.C. 520: 76 B.C. 336: 17, 131 B.C. 335: 17 B.C. 334: 17, 25, 131 B.C. 333: 25, 131 B.C. 331: 18 B.C. 6: 122, 128 B.C. 5: 57, 133, 134 A.D. 26: 134 A.D. 28: 50 A.D. 29: 50

173
A.D. 30: 11, 12, 14, 23, 45, 46, 50, 51, 52, 55, 56, 57, 64, 68, 70, 82, 98, 128, 133, 134, 136 A.D. 31: 50 A.D. 32: 50 A.D. 33: 50 A.D. 66: 14, 15, 25, 131 A.D. 70: 15, 25, 60, 131, 134 A.D. 337: 134 A.D. 387: 62 A.D. 455: 62 A.D. 476: 25, 131 A.D. 489: 26, 131 A.D. 527: 26, 132 A.D. 533: 21, 22 A.D. 535: 26, 132 A.D. 536: 22 A.D. 537: 22 A.D. 620: 124 A.D. 622: 124, 128, 129 A.D. 629: 125 A.D. 630: 125 A.D. 632: 125 A.D. 1066: 132 A.D. 1099: 132 A.D. 1215: 64 A.D. 1216: 65 A.D. 1290: 31 A.D. 1291: 132 A.D. 1429: 132 A.D. 1431: 133 A.D. 1492: 86, 135 A.D. 1588: 132 A.D. 1607: 88, 134 A.D. 1755: 34 A.D. 1763: 23 A.D. 1770: 23 A.D. 1773: 23 A.D. 1774: 23, 65, 136 A.D. 1775: 23, 24, 26, 132 A.D. 1776: 57, 66, 68, 133, 134, 135 A.D. 1780: 35 A.D. 1786: 67 A.D. 1787: 24, 67, 68 A.D. 1788: 24, 68 A.D. 1789: 24, 132, 135 A.D. 1795: 68 A.D. 1800: 47, 68 A.D. 1803: 69 A.D. 1805: 47 A.D. 1812: 25, 26 A.D. 1833: 35 A.D. 1859: 72 A.D. 1861: 25 A.D. 1868: 75 A.D. 1869: 74, 135 A.D. 1870: 76 A.D. 1879: 76 A.D. 1895: 77 A.D. 1900: 39, 40, 42

1973: 46 A. 128 Days Six. 1906: 31.D. 136 A. 12. 134. 66. 39 A. 134 Drake. 100. 1917: 11 A.D. 136 A.D. 102. 37. 79 A. 128. 1944: 98. 1938: 13. 1925: 37 A. 11.D. 34. 132. 99 Eighty. 100. 134. 66. 74.D. 1909: 95 A. 35. 57. 136 A. 118. 135 A. 1958: 96. 122.D. 1959: 47 A.D. 81.D. 1953: 83. 133. 83. 135 Eightieth. 1948: 56. 73. 100 Seventieth. 1952: 83. 76.D. 135 One Hundred Twenty. 1965: 38. 54. 101 Declaration of Independence. 1960: 47 A.D. 119 Fortieth. 6. 34. 83.D. 120.D. 102. 129 Forty. 83. 14 A. 1926: 98. 136 A. 132. 134 Seventy. 136 A.D. 53.D.D. 102 A.D. 136 A. 135. 97.D. 102.D.D. 133 A. 135. 88. 136 A. 1907: 50. 1931: 12. 80 A. 31.D. 1964: 30 A. 1957: 99 A. 98. 7. 1936: 36 A. 134 One Hundred Twentieth. 128. 15 A. 72. 134 December Second Day. 135 A.D. 32. 1961: 100. 31.D. 1914: 10. 1970: 34. 1968: 101 Day Third. 57. 69. 134 A. 1923: 33. 74. 89.D. 66. 31. 100. 88.D. 134.D. 136 A. 68. 135 A. 135 A. 81 Twenty-First Day. 2001: 132. 121.D.D. 1945: 81.D. 97.D. 97. 1939: 12.D. 1937: 13.D. 1969: 43.D.174 A.D. 8000: 47 . 118. 121. 2003: 47 A. Edwin. 102.D. 75 A. 98. 1932: 35 A.D. 1942: 81 A. 1983: 47 A. 1941: 12 A.D. 66.

97. 40. 37. 26. 29. 58. 129. 56. 55. 50. 135. 35. 118. 104. 58 G Gagarin. 32 Galveston. 133 Elul. 8. 109 Hurricanes. 138 Goddard. 66. 98 Good Friday. 81 Hegira. 25. 3-5. 103. 61 Easter Sunday. 42. 43. 136. 44 Twenty-four. 13. 79. 127. 130. 43 H Hagar. 76. 52. 114 Haggai. 128 Hezekiah. 35. 31. 105 God(s). 57. 60. Siddhartha. 43. 121. 76 Egypt. 52. Yuri. 68. 137. 97. 116. 129 Exodus. 32. 100. 117. 62 Edison. 25. Sea of. 64. 134. Thomas. 122. 50. 124. 75. 127. 7. 102. 28. 52 F February. 119. 133 Friday Crucifixion. 89. 31. 50. 132. 134 Forty-day & Year Periods (Spans). 104. 114. 43 . 10. 24. 76 England. 128 Hinduism. 51. 40. 119. 54. 87. 122. 127 First Day of the Week. 122. 134 Forty Days and Nights. 133. 100. 5. 136 Easter (Festivals).175 E Earthquake. 17. 122. 65. 19. 57. 83. 51. Franz. 70. (Sixth Month) Fifth Day. 14. 28. 84. 129. 12. 85 Eve. 33. 29. 114. 62. 51. 75 Ferdinand. 132. Robert. 8. 9. 61. 35. 39. 126. Thomas. 54. 29. 136 Friday. 120. 11. 71. 4. 16. 24 Galilee. 50. 107. 57.. 23. 61. 135 Gage. 122. 131. 63 Fortieth Day. 133 Ezekiel. 123. 41. 39. 63. 134 Fortieth Year. 32. 49. 35. 127. 56. 56. 135. 34. Gen. 32 Gulfport. 30. 42 Gautama.

39. 125 Joan of Arc. 68. 136 Jesus. 131. 134. 132. 133. 133. Crucifixion of. 134 July Tenth Day. 128. 84. 55. 46. 55. State of. 56. 133 Jesus. 46. 36. 55. 44. 128. 137 Jesus. 122. 14. 132. 32. 97. 61. 51. 127. 100. 83. 117. 15. 132. 61. 127. 53. 62. 127. 60. 124. 133 Jordan (River). 134 Twenty-Second Day. 54. 35. 135 Seventh Day. 30. 123. 13 Sixteenth Day. 52. 102. 35. 125 J Jamestown. 64 Twenty-one. 57. 89. 136. 99. 135 Fourth Day. 66. 115 Isaiah. 126. 115. 11. 39. 51. 54. 121. 6. 66. 81. 97. 133. 129 Israel. 59. 128. 30. 59. 136 Ishmael. 51. 122. 61. 66 Eighth Day. 132. 3. 56. 16. 69. 70. 14. 14. 50. 52. 97. 102 . 103. 57. 68 Twenty-eighth Day. 45. 57. 62. 58. 12. 82. 100. 76. Resurrection of. 133 Israelites. 10. 66 Thirteen. 99. 53. 117. 54. 128 Jesus (Lord). 48. 102. 122. 7. 47. 95. 103 June Third Day. 122. 70. 88. 11. 57. 17. 138 Jews. 134 Jeremiah. 11. Birth of. 103. 34 Jerusalem. 95. 84. 36. 118. 133 Josephus. 14. 100. 124. 46. 132. 30. 56. 46.176 I Isaac. 125. 70. 128. 99 Fifteenth Day. 30. 82. 12. 115 Islam. 57. 83. 126. 119. 50. 98. 4. 66. 102 Twenty-Fourth Day. 64. 34 Seventh Day. 69. 5. 26. 61. 128 Israel. 15. 47. 12. 128 Islamic Calendar.

. 42 Tenth Day. 128. 57. 118 March Sixteenth Day. 124. 48. 62 Twenty-second Day. 9. 50. 50. 127. 98. 101. 66. 64 122. 117. 74 Thirteenth Day. 62. 49. 127. 7. 30 May Fifth Day. 131. 124 Kislev (Ninth Month) Twenty-Fourth Day. 46. 123. 69 Lovell. 101. 119. 134 Tenth Day. 42. 36. 50. 55. 98. 34. 49. 121 Lord(s). 106. 14. 136 . 32. 34. 122 Monday. 7. 56. 133 Month. 37. 129 Twenty-First Day. 70. 35 Millennium. 30. 13. 104. 97. 95. 120. 102.. 64. 52. 8. 135 Seventeen. 39. 103. 128. 51. 132. 47. 68. 121. 138 Lord’s (Bible) Calendar. 35. 123. 36. 134. 8. 17. 6. 45. 125 Meteor Shower. Jr. 98 Thirty-first Day. 59. 54. 88. 67. 26. 71. 118. First (Nisan) First Day. 33. 42. 25. 4-7. 114. 100. 102 Twenty-third Day. 30. 12. 113. 6. 32. 126. 35. 117. 88 Fourteenth Day. 60. 29. 125 Medina. 104. 116. 58. 62. 84. 26. 23-26. 51 Twenty-seventh Day. 128. 25. 129. 51. 29. 23. 136. 115. 135 Mecca. 43. 10. 120. 125. 58. 35. 135 Twenty-seventh Day. M Magdalene. 100. 19. 59. 124. 53. 61. 103.177 K Khadija. 7. 98 Eighteenth Day. 81. 31. 70. 31. 8. 122. 48. 51 L Law. 119. 89. 57. 132. 127. 130 Manna. 137. 11. 46. 71. Mary. 9. 99. 70. 131. 130 Louisiana Purchase. 81 Koran. 71. 81. 100. 46. 100. 117. 45. 129. 69 Twenty-fifth Day. 64. 136 Ninth Day. 60 Magna Carta. 102. James A. 36. 98. 135 Fourteenth Day. 35.

12-18. 76 Month. 117. 134 Fifteenth Day. 121 Fourteenth Day. 49. 51. 32. 122. 96. 136 Ninth Day. 49. 7. 31. 88. 12. 134. 7. 128. 128. 84. 46. 99. 102. Fifth (Ab) Second Day. 72. 55. 103 New Moon(s). 82. 135 Fourteenth Day. 118. 136 Twenty-second Day. 29. 102 Twenty-eighth Day. 21. 36. 57. 100. (Elul) Fifth Day. 70. 118 Seventh Day. 24. 25. 128. 12. 121. 70. 100. 31. 8. 83. 3. Sixth. (Kislev) Twenty-fourth Day. 39. 117 Twentieth Day. 68.178 Fifteenth Day. 131. 122. 102. 32. 74. 32. 8. 32. 25. 124. 51. 102 Tenth Day. 51. 24. 122. 117-122 Muhammad. 74. 119. 11. 68. 135. 35. 100. 31 Month. 42. 103. 8. 136 Nebuzaradan. 126. 35. 128. 128. 135 Nineteenth Day. 42 Tenth Day. 116. 125. 134. Ninth. 44 Twenty-four. 68. 30. 54. 69. 125. 8. 81 Moses. 66. 134. 26. 4. 26. 136 Month. 83. 135 Sixteenth Day. 122. 102 Seventh Day. 11. 126. 126. 121 Month. 56 Seventeenth Day. 117. 89. 128. 99. 99. (Tisri) First Day. 127 Mount Sinai. 69 Nautilus. 130 N Napoleon. 65. 136 New Year’s Day(s). 64 Month. 119. 32. 127. 135. 97 Month. 136 Sixteenth Day. Second (Yiar) First Day. 78 Month. 48. Seventh. 132 Nisan (Abib. 129 Muslims. 33. 56. 50. 46. 9. 97. Fourth (Tamuz) Fifth Day. 9. 135 Fourteen. 136 Twenty-Fourth Day. 35. 47. 23. 30. 84. 123. 136 . 43. 102. 129. 31. 74. 29. First Month) First Day. 84 Tenth Day. Third (Sivan) Fifth Day. 103. 55. 134 Nebuchadnezzar. 16. 32.

133. 78. 136 Passover. 58. 83. Ernest. 59. 138 Rocket. 128. 66. 54. 61. 60 Sarah. 33. 120. 54. 97. 70.12. 136 Noah. 29. 74 R Railroad. 33. 135. 55 Peary. 68. 99. 88. 99. 134. 96. 92. 134 57. 55. 95. 117. 90. 35. 95. 98. 31. 25. 115 . 54. 42. 92. 51. 78 Roosevelt (Ship). 98 Rocket V-2. 99. 24. 93. 126 North Pole. 46. 122. 135. 94. 136 One Hundred Twentieth Day. 70. 91. 55. 52. 110. 80 S Sabbath. 135. 97. 60. 131. 34. 55 Sabbath (Saturday) Resurrection. 11. 56. 135 Preparation Day(s). 130. 93. 93. 76 One Hundred Fifty-third Day. 136 Roentgen. Spain. 68. 137. 55. 89. Passover. 4. 54. 77. 128. 118. 128. 132. 114. 94. 56 Promontory Point. 65. 88. 59. 79. 54. 97 Pentecost. 56. 87. 94 Rutherford. 102. 32. 122. 91. 24. 97. 83. 24. 73. 91. 18 Eleventh Day. 121. Robert. 30. 54. 56 Seventeenth Day. 32. 99. 138 P Palos. O October First Day. 74. 136 Sabbath. 99. 134. 75 Resurrection. 122. 88 Twelfth Day. 83. 11. 136 Sixteenth Day. 121 Passover Sabbath. 13. 97 November First Day. 134. 89. 121. 33. 96. 89. 129. 62. 34.179 Fifteenth Day. 58. 86. 5-10. 87. 55. 135 Nineteenth. 65. 72. 95. 136 Twenty-fourth Day. 88 Paris. 136 One Hundred Fifty-three. 31. 59. 49. 83. 35.

131 Tornadoes. 88. 136 Twenty-fourth Day. 128 Sputnik. 70. 54. 122 Three Days and Three Nights. 136 Ninth Day. 99. 100 Sunday. 36. 118 Seventh Day. 29. 34. 82. 54. 119. 40. 84. 56. 12. 138 Sunday Resurrection. 28. 131. 17. 132. 133 Ten Commandments. 59. 121 Solstice. 100. 52. 118. 135 Seventy-two-hour Period. 57. 8. 98. 103. 102. Winter. 25. 53 Seventy-two Hours. 13. 136 Eighth Day. 134. 69. 132. 135 Third Day. 42. 52 Seventy Weeks. 42. 62. 50. 135 Sixteenth Day. 132. 9. 98. 117-122 Sivan (Third Month) Fifth Day. 65 Sixth Day. 136 Twenty-second Day. 25. 68. 70. 131. 136 Fifth Day. 132. 51 Tuesday. 55. 31 Titus. 60. 135 Shepard. 119. 53. 35. 68 Eighteenth Day. 55. 99. 25. 61. 26. 8. 7. 70. 53 T Tamuz (Fourth Month) Fifth Day. 131. 18. 31 Seventieth Day. 11. 50. 68. 87 Thirteenth Day. 59 Synecdoche. 40. A. 135 Solstice. 8. 100. 59. 22 Seventeenth Day. 32 September First Day. 34 Seventy-year (Day) Period. 32. 52. 101. 48. 29. 21. 56. 64 Temple. 59. Summer. 60. 88. 57. 51. 26. 16. 66. 32. 54. 33. 76. 122. 24. 50. 133 Sea of Galilee. 121 Fourteenth Day. Alan. 15. 102. 53 Thursday. 24-26. Mount. 120. 14-17. 38 Torrey. 58. 58. 50. 97. 70. 74. 34. 74. 15. 131. 52. 99. 56. 30. 121.180 Saturday(s). 52. 6. 124 Twenty-seventh Day. (Seventh Month) First Day. 50. R. 119. 33. 100. 52. 17. 122. 127. 86. 50. 128. 134 Sinai. 37. 38. 133 .. 133. 32. 68. 137 Tisri.

10. 135. 54. 83. 84 Tenth Day. 136 Wednesday. 50. 79 Y Yiar (Second Month) First Day. 22. 134 Fifteenth Day. 56 Visions. 132 French Revolution. 135. 25. 117 Twentieth Day. 50. 8. 24. 54. 35. 59 World Trade Center. 56. 78 W War(s) Jewish (A. 133 Wednesday Crucifixion. 9. 68. 83. 128. 98. 55. 45. 52. (Major) Ezekiel’s First. 26. 9. 99. 99. 127. 78. 102 Twenty-eighth Day. 8. 10. 39. 131 American Revolution. 8. 7. 25. 136 Third. 12. 13. 12. 23. 51. 57. 132. 135 World War II. 49. 64. 83. 81. 133. 9. 11. 132. 136 X X Rays. 132. 133 V-2 Rocket. 12. Isaiah's. 31. 128. 26 American Civil. 26.D. 135 Fourteen. 51. 88. 127. 7. 132. 25 World War I. 74. 10. 43.181 V Vernal Equinox. 136 . 102. 11. 129 Vision. 100. 51. 24.70). 135 Second. 132. 77. 135 War of 1812: 25. 7.

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