The Kingdom of Spain’s  path towards stability and growth 

April 2012

Highlights
Integrated  European  response to  the  financial  crisis  combined  with  reforms at the national level Strong  democratic  mandate  for  structural  reform  and  structural  fiscal  consolidation An aggressive two‐pronged approach: 1. Public sector reform: fiscal consolidation and discipline Budget austerity towards 2013 Strengthening the structural fiscal framework 2. Private sector structural reform Labour Market Reform Financial Sector Reform Prudent approach to Funding and Debt Management
1

Spain: the process towards adjustment Public sector reform: fiscal discipline and sustainability Private sector structural reforms: towards balanced growth Funding and debt management

2

Macroeconomic Outlook
Since 2011 growth prospects have deteriorated worldwide National  demand  will  impact heavily  on  overall  growth,  partially  compensated by the contribution of external demand
Macroeconomic scenario (Year‐on‐year growth rates in percent)

2010
Final Consumption Expenditure Private consumption Government consumption Gross Fixed Capital Formation 0.6 0.8 0.2 ‐6.3

2011
‐0.7 ‐0.1 ‐2.2 ‐5.2

QI
0.4 0.4 0.6 ‐4.9

2011 QII QIII
‐5.4 ‐0.3 ‐2.1 ‐5.4 ‐4.0 0.5 ‐3.6 ‐4.0

2012 (f) QIV
‐6.2 ‐1.1 ‐3.6 ‐6.2 ‐3.1 ‐1.4 ‐8.0 ‐8.8

National Demand*
Exports of goods and services Imports of goods and services

‐1.0
13.5 8.9

‐1.7
9.0 ‐0.1

‐0.8
13.1 6.0

‐1.9
8.8 ‐1.3

‐1.4
9.2 0.9

‐2.9
5.2 ‐5.9

‐4.4
3.5 ‐5.1

External demand*

0.9

2.5

1.7

2.7

2.2

3.2

2.7

GDP
Other macroeconomic variables

‐0.1

0.7

0.9

0.8
20.9 ‐1.6 ‐2.6

0.8
21.5 ‐1.6 ‐2.5

0.3
22.9 ‐2.5 ‐2.2

‐1.7
24.3 ‐1.7 ‐0.9

Unemployment rate (in %) 20.1 21.6 21.3 Unit Labour costs ‐2.6 ‐1.9 ‐2.0 Net lending(+)/borrowing(‐) with RoW (% of GDP) ‐4.0 ‐3.4 ‐6.2 Source:  Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad and National Statistics Institute. * Contribution to GDP growth.

3

The deleveraging process will continue into 2012
Non‐financial  firms have  continued  investing  heavily  abroad and  deleveraging at a high pace The  deleveraging  process  will  be  a  temporary  drag on  private  consumption expenditure during 2012
Sectoral Balances.  Net Lending(+)/Borrowing(‐) (Percent of GDP)
8 6 4 2 0 ‐2 ‐4 ‐6 ‐8 ‐10 ‐12 Public 1.3 2.4 Private 1.9 6.4 5.4 5.1 4.4 8 6 4 2 0 ‐2 ‐4 ‐6 ‐8 ‐10 ‐12

Households and Non‐financial Firms.  Net Lending(+)/Borrowing(‐) (Percent of GDP)
Non‐financial firms Households 1.0 ‐1.7 ‐6.9 ‐8.9 ‐10.7 2009 2010 2011 ‐1.7 6.9 3.8 0.6 1.6 2.3

‐2.6

‐2.7 ‐7.5

‐4.5 ‐4.7 ‐7.8 ‐10.7 2005 2006 ‐11.5 2007 ‐11.2 2008 2009 ‐9.3 2010 ‐8.5

‐5.3

2011 2012(f)

Source:  Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas and  National Statistics Institute. (f) Forecast

2005 2006 2007 2008 Source:  National Statistics Institute.

4

Rapid adjustment in the residential construction sector
The adjustment in the construction sector has been especially intense  in terms of labour Nominal  price  adjustment has  been  very  heterogeneous between  Regions, ranging from declines of 35% to 17%
15% 14% 13% 12% 11% 10% 9% 8% 7% 6% 2000 2007 2009 2010 Employment (FTE) Residential Investment Source: National Statistics Institute.

Relative Size of the Construction Sector (Employment over total employment and residential  investment over GDP)
13.9%
140

Nominal Price Adjustment in Ireland, UK and Spain (Index 2005=100)

11.8%

12.2%

‐1.
10.2%

3 m

120

illio nJ

100

ob s
8.0% 6.9%

9.0% 8.3% 7.5% 8.0%

80 60 40 20 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

2011

Ireland

UK

Spain

Source: Ministerio de Fomento, CSO and ONS. 5

The labour market
Clear  sign  of  duality:  hours  worked  per  employee  have  increased while  unemployment  rises,  mainly  in  the  construction  and  industry  sectors (89% of total job losses) Wage per hour  worked did  not  react  to  shedding  of  labour.  Only  in  2010 and 2011 it managed to stabilise
Unemployment rate and hours worked per employee
102 101 100 99 98 97 96 95 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 25 20 15 10 5

8% 6% 4% 2% 0% ‐2% ‐4% 2001

Wage Per Hour Worked of Employees (Growth rate in percent, and moving average)

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Hours per employee (Left scale, 2000=100) Unemployment rate (Right scale)

Source: National Statistics Institute.

Source: National Statistics Institute. 6

2011

Wage moderation and lower price pass‐through
Since  2009  unit  labour costs  have  contracted  by  5.9% due  to  wage  moderation and the increase in productivity Export  prices  have  moderated their  growth  rate,  despite  growing  energy costs
Nominal Unit Labour Costs (Index 2005=100)
120 115 110 105 100 95 2005 2006
UK

Export Price Indexes (Index 2005=100)
135 130 125 120 115 110 105 100 95 90

2007
Spa i n

2008

2009

2010
Fra nce

2011
Ita l y

2005

2006

2007 UK

2008 Spain

2009 Germany

2010

2011 Italy

Germa ny

Source: Eurostat.

Source: Bank of Spain. 7

Deleveraging has also affected export orientation
The  gap  between  exports  and  imports  of  goods  and  services  has  diminished, posting a surplus in the last quarter of 2011 Spain has maintained the relative share vis‐à‐vis main peer countries due to higher extensive and intensive margins of Spanish exporting firms 
Exports less Imports of Goods and Services (In percent of GDP)
40% 30% 20% 10% 0% ‐10% ‐20% ‐30% ‐40% 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% ‐2% ‐4% ‐6% ‐8%

Exports of Goods and Services (Index 2005=100)
140 130 120 110 100 90 80
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Exports (Left scale)

Imports (Left scale)

Balance (Right scale)

UK

Spain

Germany

France

Italy

Source: National Statistics Institute.

Source: Eurostat. 8

Spain: the process towards adjustment Public sector reform: fiscal discipline and sustainability Private sector structural reforms: towards balanced growth Funding and debt management

9

The Government’s fiscal policy: discipline & sustainability
The  deterioration  in  economic  indicators  entailed  a  deviation  in  the  2011  target  deficit: from 6% to 8.51% of GDP  2/3 of the deviation was attributable to Autonomous Regions The  new  Government  took  office  in  December  2011  and  adopted  immediate  measures by Royal‐Decree to compensate for the 2011 deviation in the deficit target:  €15 bn (1.4% of GDP)
Approved on 31/12/2011

€8.9  bn  cuts  in  spending:  minimum  wage  &  civil  servants’ wage  freeze,  20%  reduction  in  subsidies  to  political  parties  and  social  agents,  rationalisation  of  administrative structures, no new public employment in 2012 €6  bn  in  tax  increases:  temporary  increase  in  Personal  Income  tax,  selective  tax rate increase on real estate, oil subsidies removal New  Programme  against  tax  evasion  under  evaluation:  €8  bn  additional  revenue expected

These measures came into force in 1 January 2012
10

The Government’s Fiscal Policy: Fiscal Consolidation Path
Net Lending(+)/Borrowing(‐) of the General Government 2011‐2013
In percent of GDP Central Government Autonomous Regions Local Governments Social Security Administrations 2011 ‐5.1 ‐2.9 ‐0.4 ‐0.1 2012 ‐3.5 ‐1.5 ‐0.3 0.0 2013 ‐2.1 ‐1.1 ‐0.2 0.4

General Government

‐8.5

‐5.3

‐3.0

Source: Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas. 

The  commitment  is  to  continue  with  the  fiscal  consolidation  path in  accordance with realistic and strict projections and assumptions Firm commitment with compromises agreed at EU level The public deficit objective for 2013 remains unaltered Structural  Balance  commitments  will  be  reinforced.  In  2012,  the  adjustment in structural terms will be around 4.0 p.p. of GDP
11

Central Government Budget Bill for 2012 (I)
The  consolidation  effort  of  the  Central  Government  amounts  to  2.5%  of  GDP, approximately €27 billion. It’s the largest fiscal adjustment to have taken  Draft Presented  place in democracy 03/04/2012 Reduction  in  the  expenditure  of  Ministries  of  €13.4  billion,  a  16.9%  reduction vs 2011 Budget Elimination of corporate tax rebates, taxes on tobacco and the temporary  increase in Personal Income tax adopted in January 2012 (€12.3 billion) Income  related  measures  and  40%  of  expenditure‐side  measures  are  in  place and not subject to be modified by the budgetary process
Net Funding(‐)/Borrowing(+) Requirements in percent of GDP 2011 2012 Central Government ‐5.1 ‐3.5 Autonomous Communities ‐2.9 ‐1.5 Local Governments ‐0.4 ‐0.3 Social Security Administrations ‐0.1 0.0 Reduction ‐1.6 ‐1.4 ‐0.1 ‐0.1
Measures adopted in the Central Government Budget (% of GDP) 1: Increase in Income 2: Expenditure reduction (excl. Committed expenses) 3=1+2: Fiscal Consolidation Effort 4: Increase in Committed Expenses 5=2+4: Total Expenditure reduction 6=5+1: Total Adjustment in Net Borrowing Requirement 0.8 1.7 2.5 ‐0.9 0.8 1.6

TOTAL

‐8.5

‐5.3

‐3.2

Source: Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas. 

Source: Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas.  12

Central Government Budget Bill for 2012 (II)
Personal Income Tax and Corporate Tax measures account for 77% of  total income‐side measures In  the  expenditure  side,  most  of  the  reduction  stems  from  capital  transfers and current transfers
Income‐side measures (In € bn, budgetary terms)
14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 12.3 4.1 0.2
Tax Deferral

Expenditure‐side adjustment (In € bn, Excl. Regional Financing System, budgetary terms)
2 0 ‐2 ‐4 ‐6 ‐8 ‐10
0.8 ‐0.4 ‐4.0 ‐0.4 1.5 ‐1.1 ‐4.3 ‐8.1 Financial expenditures Public Employees Goods and Services Real Investment Public Pensions Current Transfers Capital Transfers Total

0.8
Amortisation Scheme

1.1
Financial Expenditure

2.5
Installments

0.8
Foreign Dividends

2.5
Special Tax

0.4
Stamp and Duty Taxes

Income tax

Corporate Income Tax

Other Taxes

Total

Current expenditures

Capital Expenditures

Source: Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas. 

Source: Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas.  13

Budgetary execution of the Central Gov. up to Feb 2012
The  cumulative  deficit  of  the  Central  Government  reached  €20.7  billion  (+49.3 % yoy): Expenditure  up  by  27%  yoy due  to  frontloading  in  current  transfers among  Public  Administrations  with  zero  net  effect  on  General  Government deficit Income  down  by  5.7%  yoy,  pending  full  effect  on  tax  collection  of  income side measures
0% ‐1% ‐2% ‐3% ‐4% ‐5% ‐6% Aug Apr Oct Nov Feb Sep Jun May Mar Dec Jan Jul 2010 2011 2012 ‐1.94% ‐2.9%

Deficit(‐)/Surplus(+) of the Central Government  excl. Autonomous institutions (EDP)  (% of GDP)

Current Transfers between Public Administrations in January  and February of each year (In Euro bn) 9
8 7 6 5 4 Ja n Feb

‐5.5%

3 2 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Source: IGAE. 

Source: IGAE. 

14

Draft Budgetary Stability Reform
Guaranteeing  debt  sustainability at  all  levels  of  government;  60%  Draft proposed by  debt to GDP target and zero structural deficit by 2020 Govt. on 27/01/2012 Ex‐ante budgetary control via:  To be approved in 
i. Expenditure ceilings    ii. Expenditure growth capped below nominal GDP
April 2012

Reinforced  monitoring  system via  quarterly  reports  of  sub‐national  units in National Accounting terms Ex‐post auditing and sanctioning system
Budgetary and Financial  Sustainability GENERAL RULES: • Budgetary balance or surplus • No structural deficits • Expenditure growth capped  below headline GDP growth • Expenditure ceiling for all levels  of Government • Expenditure ceilings also  introduced at the Regional and  Local Government levels • Budget surpluses to be dedicated  to debt reduction • Correction of deficits and debt  thresholds • Early warning system → adoption  of corrective measures • Establishment of sanctions in case  of non‐compliance • Reporting in terms similar to the  ones under EDP • Scope of information to be  published broadened Budgetary Planning and Control • Reinforcement of Budgetary  control Preventive and Corrective Arm • Affects all levels of Government:  Central, Regional, Local and Social  Security Transparency and Disclosure • Surveillance at all stages of  budgetary approval process

Source: Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad.

15

Additional related measures adopted
Fund for the Payment to Suppliers FFPP, up to €35 bn Approved  13/04/2012 Settling the accounts payable of local governments Commercial  debt  is  transformed  into  financial  debt  in  favorable terms  liability‐side of the FFPP The transaction will inject liquidity into the real economy Designed  for  local  corporations,  but it  may  be  extended  for  Regional Governments Approved ICO‐CCAA, € 10bn, up to €15 bn 03/02/2012 Designed  for  regional  governments.  Two  tranches:  i)  paying  maturing  financial  debt  ii)  settling  commercial  debt  of  Regional Governments Provides liquidity to Regional Governments Regional  Governments  that  make  use  of  the  line,  voluntarily  accept being subject to strict financial and fiscal conditionality Transitory part of permanent solution 16

Spain: the process towards adjustment Public sector reform: fiscal discipline and sustainability Private sector structural reforms: towards balanced growth Funding and debt management

17

Financial sector reform: Initial Steps
Despite the provisioning already conducted (approx. €105 bn, 9.8% of  GDP)  the  uncertainty  associated  with  the  valuation of  land  and  real  estate assets requires further consolidation and provisioning
2009 Creation of FROB
‐ Liquidation of non‐viable  entities ‐ Support restructuring process of viable entities

2011 Regulatory Reform of the Savings Banks Law to Strenghthen Capital Base  and Confidence

Royal Decree‐ Royal Decree‐ Law for the  Law for the  Reform of the  Reform of the  Financial Sector Financial Sector Approved by  Approved by  Parliament  Parliament  16/02/2012 16/02/2012

13.2%  reduction  in  branches  and  10.5%  in  staff  since end 2008  Number of savings banks decreased from 45 to 15 Over 90% of the assets managed by savings banks  transferred to commercial banks Improved  Governance  structure  by  means  of  new  legislation 

Quarterly  reporting  on  real  estate  exposures  and  impaired  assets since January 2011 Core  capital  equivalent  requirements  increased  to  8%/10%.  Process  complete  in  September 2011

18

Financial sector reform
Royal Decree‐Law for the Reform of the Financial Sector

Significant  increase in  provisions and  capital buffers on  land and real  estate exposures

Incentives to  merge

Deadlines • Main 31st Dec  2012 • In case of merger:  integration plans  submitted by 31st May 2012; If  accepted, 31st Dec  2013

Financial burden  mainly on  financial  institutions

1. Improve confidence, credibility and access to capital markets by focusing on  the asset‐side 2. Reactivation of the real estate market and credit supply 3. Trigger the final round of consolidation in the Spanish banking sector
19

Increase in provisions & capital buffers on real estate exposures
Strong balance sheet restructuring due to significant price adjustment Implicit decline in the value of collateral considering the average LTV of  the portfolios: 87% for land and 82% for housing under development
Provisions/buffer to be added to existing coverage
Capital add‐on        Specific Provisions   
(against profits) (against retained  earnings, capital  increases or  conversion of  hybrids)

Generic Provisions   
(against profits)

Land             (31% ‐‐‐> 80%) (€ 73 bn) Housing under  Problematic    development     Assets         (27% ‐‐‐> 60%) (175 bn) (€ 15 bn) Other Assets      (25%‐‐‐>35%) (€ 87 bn) Non      Construction  Problematic  and real estate  Assets         developers  (148 bn) normal portfolio

31% ‐‐‐> 60%

20%

27% ‐‐‐> 50%

15%

25% ‐‐‐> 35%

90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

80% 20% 29% 31% 31% Land 23% 27% 27% Ongoing  Developements 65% 15%

Ca pi ta l  Buffer Addi ti ona l  Provi s i ons Current Provi s i ons

25%

35% 10% 25%

Finished Properties  and Housing

7% 10 bn

Source: Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad.

Expected amount 25 bn 15 bn Source: Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad.

20

The reform will spur a second wave of integration 
Implementation  calendar  full  on  track.  Milestones:  March  31st:  all  institutions  presented  cleanup plans   April  20th:  deadline  for  the  Bank  of  Spain to assess  all  plans.  → if  cleanup  plans  are  not  approved:  banks  will  be  required  further  measures,  including   the  obligation  to  present  a  merger  proposal May  31st:  deadline  for  mergers  proposals June  30th:  mergers  approved  by  the  Ministry of Economy  December  31st  2012:  end  of  process.  Compliance  with  all  the  cleanup  measures Strict  conditionality  of  new  integration  processes… Submission  of  integration  plan to  the  Ministry of Economy by May 30th to be fully  operative as of January 1st 2013 Resulting  entity  with  balance  sheet  20%  higher than largest participating institution Improvements in corporate governance Reduction  of  exposure  to  RRE and  construction Increase in credit to productive activities …but also rendering some advantages Deadline for provisioning and capital buffer  increase extended one additional year Writedown of  impaired  assets  against  equity allowed Extension  of  FROB’s  margin  of  action  allowing for acquisition of Co‐Co’s
21

The labour market reform: complete overhaul of the regulatory framework
MAIN OBJECTIVES
Creating effective mechanisms for  Improving efficiency and reduce labour  internal flexibility; adjusting internal  market duality wage bargaining, reform the collective  bargaining system Enhancing young workers’  employability Incentivising permanent  contracts 

MEASURES

A) Reduction of dismissal costs        A.1) Clarification of objective causes  A) New types of contracts      for fair dismissal                      A.1) Permanent contract  A) Firm‐level wage bargaining  A) Temporary Employment  A.2 ) Unfair dismissal: severance pay  directed at SMEs with 50 or  45 days up to 42 months to 33 days  prevails over national, regional or  Agencies authorised to act as  fewer workers and self  sector agreements  private agencies  per year worked up to 24 months       employed                    A.3) Fair dismissal: severance pay of  A.2) Part‐time contract        20 days per year, up to 12 months   A.4) Elimination of “procedural wages”  B) New bonuses for hiring of  B) Improved professional  young workers and long‐term  training; individual right to  unemployed and for  professional training conversion of temporary  contracts

B) Economic causes for dismissal: 3 or  more consecutive quarters of falling  profits 

B) Extinguished collective  agreements limited to 2 years 

C) Enhancing adaptation to  economic stance via:                C) Public Administrations allowed to  C.1) Functional mobility of workers    C) Internship contract for  workers under 30 C.2) Working‐time reduction         dismiss based on objective causes C.3) Elimination of red‐tape for  reduction of hours worked

C) Prohibition to chain  temporary contracts for more  than 24 months

Source: Government of Spain.

22

More reforms: an ongoing agenda
Transformation and simplification of the National Regulatory  Bodies,  avoiding  overlapping  competences  and  fostering  professionalism and less political influence
Approved by Govt. on  24/02/2012

New measures will be adopted to increase the competitiveness and flexibility  of the Spanish economy, and to streamline costs. €10  bn  savings  in  reforms  aimed  at  improving  the  efficiency  in  the  management of the main public services such as health and education Reduction  of  red  tape  and  bureaucratic  procedures,  and  removal  of  opening licenses for new SMEs Reinforcement  of  the  internal  market  at  national  level,  seeking  a  convergence towards a common regulatory framework in all 17 regions A centralised National Agency for debt issuance Measures to be presented shortly in Spain’s National Reform  Programme for 2012
23

Spain: the process towards adjustment Public sector reform: fiscal discipline and sustainability Private sector structural reforms: towards balanced growth Funding and debt management

24

Main features of funding strategy

Strong commitment with the Public Debt market Rigorous adherence to auction calendar Catering to market demand, at market rates 47% of medium and long‐term issuance already done Manageable  cost  of  issuance  and  debt  outstanding,  stable  duration and average life  Prudent management of refinancing risk
25

Projected Debt to GDP dynamics in 2012
The  projected  Debt/GDP  ration  at  end  2012  increases  by  11.3%,  reaching  79.8%  of  GDP… … 6.0  p.p.  of  GDP  are  due  to  accounting  issues:  transformation  of commercial  debt  from  regions  and  local  governments  to  public  debt  (FFPP),  ICO  line  for  regions  (ICO‐ CCAA), securitisation of the electric deficit (FADE), imputation of loans to UE countries  under financial assistance, reduction of the denominator, among other elements… In any case, the level will be below the EMU average (90.4%)
130 110 90 70 50 30 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Debt to GDP ratio of General Government (% of GDP, EDP)

Breakdown of the projected increase in 2012 Debt/GDP  ratio for General Government (% of 2012 GDP) Increase in Debt  Factor to GDP ratio
Funding Requirements (Incl. ESM) FFPP / ICO‐CCAA FADE Loans to Geece‐Ireland‐Portugal Change in nominal GDP Rest 5.3 3.9 1.0 0.9 0.6 ‐0.4

UK

Spain

Germany

France

Italy

Total

11.3
26

Source: Eurostat and OECD.

Source: Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas.

Funding Programme for 2012
In line with initial Treasury estimates The  bulk  of  net  issuance carried  out  through  medium‐ and  long‐term  issuance in order to contain refinancing risk Until  April  4th  the  Spanish  Treasury  has  already  funded  40.4  billion  (47.0%) of  the  total  expected  amount  of  medium‐ and  long‐term  gross  issuance  of  86  billion  euro,  well  ahead  of  its  funding  programme for  the  year Funding Programme. 2010‐2012
(Gross issuance, medium and long‐term bonds, in  billion Euro, *up to April 4th 2012) 100
97.0 94.5 93.8 95.6

Tesoro funding in 2012 (Billion Euro) 1: Funding requirement (=Net Issuance) 2: Redemptions of medium‐ and long‐term bonds 3: Net issuance medium‐ and long‐term bonds 4 = 2 + 3: Gross issuance of medium and long‐term bonds 5: Net increase in T‐Bills 6 = 5 + 3: Net change in outstanding debt 7: Forecast Outstanding Central Government Debt at end 2011
Source: Ministerio de Hacienda y Administraciones Públicas.

75

36.8 ‐50.1 35.8 85.9 1.0 36.8 628.9

50 25 0

85.9

2010 Executed

2011 Executed

2010 Jan Projection

2011 Jan Projection

2012 Apr Projection

2010

2011

2012

Source: Secretaría General del Tesoro y Política Financiera. *up to April 4th 2012 27

2012 Apr Execution*

40.4

Main features of the execution for 2012
Despite  volatility in  European  Public  Debt  markets,  average  cost  at  issuance and average cost of debt outstanding remain subdued Stable duration and average life of debt portfolio. 
Cost of debt outstanding and cost at issuance  (As of March 31st , in percent)
4.07 4.02 3.90 3.00 2.56

6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0

8.0 6.0 4.0 2.0 0.0

Duration and Average Life (As of March 31st , in percent)
6.55 6.37 4.32 4.22

3.69

2012*

Average cost of Debt outstanding

Average cost at issuance

Duration

Average life

Source: Secretaría General del Tesoro y Política Financiera.

Source: Secretaría General del Tesoro y Política Financiera. 28

2012*

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2011

Changes to investor base in 2012‐Q1
Increase in national investor participation in 2012 linked to increased  issuance  during  the  first  months  of  the  year  and  liquidity  measures  adopted… …coupled  with  a  reduction  in  the  percentage  of  non‐residents’ holdings
Total unstripped Government debt by Holder (Registered. In percent of total portfolio)
60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
Credit Institutions Pension, Households & Spanish Insurance and non‐financials official Mutual Funds institutions Non‐residents

2009

2010

2011

2012

Source: Secretaría General del Tesoro y Política Financiera. * As of February 28th 2011.

29

Treasury Management System
Redemption  dates of  medium‐ and  long‐term  bonds  (principal  and  coupons) match the biggest inflows of tax revenues Excess liquidity is lent in the money market each month through repo  auctions Liquidity lines with banks provide an additional buffer
25 20 15 10 5 0 150 100 50 0

Monthly maturity structure in 2012 as of  April 4th 2012 (in billion Euros)

250 200

Average seasonal index of tax revenues of the  Central Government 2008‐2011 (Index 100=average)

Aug

Aug

Apr

Oct

Apr

Nov

Oct

Feb

Sep

Jun

Nov

Feb

Dec

Sep

Jun

May

Letras

Bonos

Obligaciones

Foreign Currency & Other

Source: Secretaría General del Tesoro y Política Financiera.

Source: IGAE.

May

Mar

Mar

Dec

Jan

Jul

Jan

Jul

30

More and updated information on the Spanish economy

http://www.thespanisheconomy.com

For data sources, please click links below each figure or table

31

Thank you for your attention
Íñigo Fernández de Mesa – General Secretary of the Treasury and Financial Policy  SecretariaTesoro@tesoro.mineco.es Ignacio Fernández‐Palomero – Deputy Director for Funding and Debt Management  ifernandez@tesoro.mineco.es Rosa Moral rmmoral@tesoro.mineco.es Leandro Navarro lnavarro@tesoro.mineco.es Pablo de Ramón‐Laca pramonlaca@tesoro.mineco.es Ignacio Vicente ivicente@tesoro.mineco.es Rocío Chico  mrchico@tesoro.mineco.es Carla Díaz cdiaza@tesoro.mineco.es For more information please contact: Phone: 34 91 209 95 29/30/31/32 ‐ Fax:34 91 209 97 10 Reuters: TESORO Bloomberg: TESO Internet: www.tesoro.es For more information on recent developments: www.thespanisheconomy.com
32

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful