Making social reporting part of community building

David Wilcox and Drew Mackie

Thursday, 19 April 12

Slides based on a set developed for a workshop run by Drew Mackie and David Wilcox at Manchester Forward March 2012. The aim was to explore how social reporting could contribute to community building, as described here http://socialreporter.com/?p=2113

We could start talking about lots of social media tools that might be useful

Thursday, 19 April 12

There are plenty of social media tools, but that’s not the place to start

... but we should choose methods last and put context and people first

Thursday, 19 April 12

In developing any project or process think first about the context, then purpose, people, and finally about the tools. More here on that http:// www.socialbysocial.com/book/where-do-you-want-go

Today that means ...
• Describing a community and its challenges • Matching SR value to community building e.g. social media to build networks

• Choosing appropriate methods for

activities - e.g. events, stories, updates

• Working through what that means for you
Thursday, 19 April 12

At the workshop we invented a fictitious place to give us a context, some challenges (purpose), and people in order then to think about the tools. We had done this before with the Social by Social game http://socialbysocial.net/notes/Social_by_Social_game In this instance we used the fictitious town of Slapham, that we have been using for another game. http://socialreporter.com/?p=1946 Here’s the cards that we used in the game http://www.scribd.com/doc/90102394

Social Reporting Introduction to Social Reporting, Social Media & Network Mapping Social Reporting Cards

Slapham Scenario

A Month in the Life of a Network Builder

Discussion & Hands on work Community Building

Network Mapping Exercise Network Mapping

Thursday, 19 April 12

Here’s the workshop sequence: an introduction, development of the scenario, an exploration of network mapping, then considering what might work for community builders. More here in Drew Mackie’s networks library https://www.evernote.com/pub/admaque/sharednetworks Here’s the cards we used in the game http://www.scribd.com/doc/90102394

Elements of social reporting

Joining up Making sense

Social reporting

Helping out Scrutinising

(if no-one else will)

Thursday, 19 April 12

The key elements of social reporting, as I see them. More here on that http://socialreporter.com/?p=1305

Where social reporting may be most useful

Thursday, 19 April 12

Suggestions on how social reporting and community building relate.

Propositions - 1
Social reporting is a lot like community building

• • • • • •
Thursday, 19 April 12

Listening is the first skill Go where people are: in-boxes, social spaces You can’t be sociable outside if not sharing inside Gathering content can be as valuable as creating Tell stories, start conversations Build their networks, not just yours

Talking points

Propositions - 2
Digitally offers opportunities ... and challenges .... so

• • • • •

Offer a mix of media - text, pictures, audio, video Blend and connect online and face-to-face Help people tell their stories Keep the overhead low (no high maintenance sites) Fit into your workflow: light, mobile

Thursday, 19 April 12

somehow pointless - a bit like tryingmeasures may art orabstruse and complicated but are the to analyse seem love.

Thinking about network roles
Network Analyst

meat of the analyst's work. An analyst may not be a good networker or capable of building a network but they do know how networks work.

Ne

Analysts do know about the mechanics of networks. They plies to many Network Builder are familiar with concepts of centrality and use specialisedare works are the Network Builders are out there in the real world interacting k culture to be software of draw networks. with other people who are members to various and analyse them. These diagrams and sof arily know much They will be good networkers themselves and probably measures may seem abstruse and complicated but are the me s the right prism have a working knowledge of centrality but their central meat of the analyst's work. An analyst may not be a good and me skill is being able to connect other people. They have networkerare able to spotof building a network but they do or capable the etworks is persuasive communication skills and ne knowcreating, strengthening or how networks work. love. usefulness of a potential link in
Network thinker extending a network. the idea of networks Network Analyst the concepts and maps

An

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ut the mechanics of networks. They Networker ptsNetwork Builders are out there in the fun role. Networkers are out there doing it. At any of centrality and use specialisedThis is the real world interacting with other people who and conference the bars are networks. analyse them. These diagramsare members of various full of them. Twitter and Facebook are full of there in Networkistas Network Builders are out it. abstruse and complicated but are the Networkers don't necessarily know the networks they are part of. They will be good networkers themselvesby Drew Mackie and probably with other people who are membe They know how to create work. An analyst may not be a good of centrality but theirand sustain links between themselves and have a working knowledge other people. But what they will call "my network" is usually just a list central of building abeing able they do They will are good of these skill is network but to connect other people. They network. Networks be made up networkers them of contacts and a list isn't a have ork. have a working knowledge of cen

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Network Builder

individual but overlapping spot the persuasive communication skills and are able tolists. Networkers often feel that the total network can't (or shouldn't) be analysed and are too able to connect othe skill usefulness of a potential link in creating, strengthening or is being busy networking to be bothered. extending a network. persuasive communication skills a acting
Networker building “my” network

This is the fun role. Networkers are out there doing it. At any conference the bars are full of them. Twitter and Facebook are full of Networke it. Networkers don't necessarily know the networks they are part of. They know how to create and sustain links between themselves and fu This is the Thursday, 19 April 12 other people. But what they will call "my network" is usually just a list t conference Drew Mackie offers this analysis of networking types - Networkistas of contacts and a list isn't a network. Networks are madeit. Networker up of these Networkthere doing it. At any Thinker are out individual but overlapping lists. Networkers often feel that the total A network thinker feels that the IDEA are full applies to many real world phenomena. There is an assertion that networks are the way things work and that we h em. Twitter and Facebook of networksof Theynetworks as know need know to adopt a network culture tocomplex situations in communitiesThinkers don't necessarily they may feel that analysis of networks is somehow pointless - a bit the networks to view areeffectiveof.the modern world. and organisations. be analysed andmechanics of networks but see they be network can't (or shouldn't) In fact know much about the are too busy networking part in the right prism with which other people to be bothered. ustain linksanalyse art or love. like trying to between themselves and

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Networker

usefulness Network Builder link in cr of a potential weaving the network extending a network.

of contacts a call "my Analyst network" is usually just a list Network ork. Networks are made up of these Analysts do know about the mechanics of networks. They are familiar with concepts of centrality and use specialised software to draw and individual bu analyse them. These Networkers measures maythat the total complicated but are the meat of the analyst's work. An analyst may not be a good networker or capable of often feel seem abstruse and diagrams and network can' building a network but they busy how networks work. nalysed and are too do knownetworking
Network Builder Network Builders are out there in the real world interacting with other people who are members of various networks. They will be good networkers themselves and probably have a working knowledge of centrality but their central skill is being able to connect other people. They have persuasive communication skills and are able to spot the usefulness of a potential link in creating, strengthening or extending a network. Networker This is the fun role. Networkers are out there doing it. At any conference the bars are full of them. Twitter and Facebook are full of it. Networkers don't necessarily know the networks they are part of. They know how to create and sustain links between themselves and other people. But what they will call "my network" is usually just a list of contacts and a list isn't a network. Networks are made up of these individual but overlapping lists. Networkers often feel that the total network can't (or shouldn't) be analysed and are too busy networking to be bothered.

to be bothere

Thinking about networks
Developing a social innovation network How can we help local groups, civil society organisations, agencies, share ideas and experience of doing "good stuff" locally and nationally. Move from models 1. and 2. to model 3

2. Cluster: Join in (if you can)

1. Portal: "join us"

nodes for ideas and support; people, events, hubs ideas via stories and conversations

3. Mesh: join up your own connections

Thursday, 19 April 12

While there may be more talk about networking, many organisations still operate as hierarchies, or in clusters of hierarchies. To achieve the soirt of civil society networking we are exploring here, we need more of a mesh.

Networks
• A CONVERSATIONAL network exists to share ideas and experiences. It may be as informal as friends who attend the same social functions. Or it may be more formal in the partnerships that allow different agencies to let each other know what is going on. • A COOPERATIVE network occurs between people or agencies who adapt their independent practices to promote a shared goal. • A COLLABORATIVE network is one in which its members share resources - skills, premises, funding, communication platforms etc - to achieve a shared goal.

Thursday, 19 April 12

Drew’s suggestions about different types of networks.

Belfast Community Tourism Network

Thursday, 19 April 12

An example of a network map from Drew’s library

Community & Agencies in Berwick upon Tweed

Thursday, 19 April 12

How you can map perception of assets

Collaborative attitudes and behaviours

Collaboration pyramid Oscar Berg
http://www.thecontenteconomy.com/2012/02/collaboration-pyramid.html

Collaboration depends on connecting, conversing, sharing, being visible, discovering, building trust
Thursday, 19 April 12

Oscar Berg writes about The collaboration pyramid (or iceberg) http://www.thecontenteconomy.com/2012/02/collaboration-pyramid.html While he is writing about enterprises, the same principles apply more widely: The majority of the value-creation activities in an enterprise are hidden. They happen below the surface. What we see when we think of collaboration in the traditional sense (structured team-based collaboration) is the tip of the iceberg – teams who are coordinating their actions to achieve some goal. We don’t see and thus don’t recognize - all the activities which have enabled the team to form and which help them throughout their journey. We see the people in the team, how they coordinate their actions and the results of their actions, but we rarely see the other things which have been critical for their success. For example, we don’t see how they have used their personal networks to access knowledge, information and skills which they don’t have in their team already but which are instrumental for their success. The layers which are below the surface are usually not recognized or valued. Below the surface you typically find: • The direct and indirect contributions from people outside the team – by the extended team, stakeholders and external contributors • Other kinds of broader and ad hoc collaboration (social collaboration) than those that fit within the traditional definition of (structured, team-based) collaboration • The ongoing community building that makes people trust each other and commit themselves to a shared purpose • The efforts of gaining the workspace awareness that is necessary for making the right decisions in any collaborative effort Bring those above the surface so they can be recognized and supported. If people can't do those things, even the traditional collaboration efforts will suffer or might not even happen. If we are to improve efficiency and effectiveness of collaborative efforts, we need to better support these layers. The first step towards improving these layers of collaboration and support other kinds of collaboration is to recognize their existence and value.

Subscribe to feeds in Google reader

Thursday, 19 April 12

A few examples of tools

Yammer - like long form Twitter

Thursday, 19 April 12

Building a site to report an event

Thursday, 19 April 12

Thursday, 19 April 12

An exploration of digital literacy drawn from Howard Rheingold’s book - more here http://socialreporter.com/?p=2079

Developing more sociable organisations
Curate content

Resources Events
Commission Host

Convene and catalyse
Capture stories and knowledge Visit Build networks

Explorations

Moving from central to social - and a knowledge ecology
Thursday, 19 April 12

I developed this diagram for a conversation with staff at Big Lottery Fund, where John Popham and I did some work in 2011 exploring how BIG could be more than a funder. The blog entries are here http://www.socialreporters.net/?p=256 I suggested the BIG might aim to do more in catalysing and convening. Events could be reported in ways that help build networks, with content curated to provide more resources. Visits to groups and other activities could be used to develop stories about local action, and build networks

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