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Respiratory Diseases - Diseases of the Human Respiratory System

You may take breathing for granted, thinking that it is just an involuntary reflex action. But for the millions of people who suffer from respiratory diseases, each breath is a major accomplishment. Those people include patients with chronic lung problems, such as asthma, bronchitis,and emphysema, but they also include heart attack and accident victims,premature infants, and people with cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, or AIDS. In this booklet, however, we propose to discuss some of the common respiratory diseases. The human respiratory system not only provides oxygen to each cell of the body but also removes body wastes, filters out infectious agents, and provides air needed for speech.Although the lungs are able to with stand abuse in the form of smoke and other pollutants, a number of disorders impair its function. Some of these maladies are temporary and relatively harmless; others may be life-threatening. Any chronic breathing problem or other cough should be checked promptly. Take care of your lungs and they will take care of you. The word antibiotic comes from the Greekanti meaning 'against' and bios meaning 'life' (a bacterium is a life form).' Antibiotics are also known as antibacterials, and they are drugs used to treat infections caused by bacteria. Bacteria are tiny organisms that can sometimes cause illness to humans and animals. The singular word for bacteria is bacterium. The first antibiotic was penicillin. Such penicillin-related antibiotics as ampicillin, amoxicillin and benzylpenicilllin are widely used today to treat a variety of infections - these antibiotics have been around for a long time. There are several different types of modern antibiotics and they are only available with a doctor's prescription in industrialized countries. An antibiotic is given for the treatment of an infection caused by bacteria. Antibiotics target microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and parasites. However, they are not effective against viruses. If you have an infection it is important to know whether it is caused by bacteria or a virus. Most upper respiratory tract infections, such as the common cold and sore throats are generally caused by viruses - antibiotics do not work against these viruses. Some patients may develop an allergic reaction to antibiotics - especially penicillins. Side effects might include a rash, swelling of the tongue and face, and difficulty breathing. If you have ever had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic you must tell your doctor and/or pharmacist. Reactions to antibiotics can be very serious, and sometimes fatal - they are called anaphylactic reactions.

BIOLOGY CLASS AT VALLE DE PARRAS COLLEGE, SECONDARY, FIRST GRADE.

MARCH 5 2012