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The White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release April 14, 2012

WEEKLY ADDRESS: Its Time for Congress to Pass the Buffett Rule
WASHINGTON, DC In this weeks address, President Obama urged Congress to pass the Buffett Rule, a principle of fairness that says if you make more than $1 million a year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle class families. Meanwhile, if you make under $250,000 a year like 98 percent of American families do your taxes shouldnt go up. The President has been pushing Congress to pass the Buffett rule to help ensure we have a system thats fair, where everyone plays by the same set of rules and we can continue to make the investments we need to grow our economy and help the middle class and those trying to get in it. Remarks of President Obama Weekly Address The White House April 14, 2012 One of the fundamental challenges of our time is building an economy where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules. And as many Americans rush to file their taxes this weekend, its worth pointing out that weve got a tax system that doesnt always uphold the principle of everyone doing their part. Now, this is not just about fairness. This is also about growth. Its about being able to make the investments we need to strengthen our economy and create jobs. And its about whether we as a country are willing to pay for those investments. In a perfect world, of course, none of us would have to pay any taxes. Wed have no deficits to pay down. And wed have all the resources we needed to invest in things like schools and roads and a strong military and new sources of energy investments that have always bolstered our economy and strengthened the middle class. But we live in the real world, with real choices and real consequences. Right now, weve got significant deficits to close. Weve got serious investments to make to keep our economy growing. And we cant afford to keep spending more money on tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans who dont need them and didnt even ask for them.

Warren Buffett is one of the wealthiest men in the world. But he pays a lower tax rate than his secretary. Thats just the way the system is set up. In fact, one in four millionaires pays a lower tax rate than millions of hardworking middle-class households. As Warren points out, thats not fair and it doesnt make sense. Its wrong that middle-class Americans pay a higher share of their income in taxes than some millionaires and billionaires. This week, Members of Congress are going to have a chance to set things right. They get to vote on what we call the Buffett Rule. Its simple: If you make more than $1 million every year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle-class families do. On the other hand, if you make less than $250,000 a year -- like 98 percent of American families do -- your taxes shouldnt go up. Thats all there is to it. Its pretty sensible. Most Americans support this idea. One survey found that two-thirds of millionaires do, too. So do nearly half of all Republicans. We just need some Republican politicians to get on board with where the country is. I know theyll say that this is all about wanting to raise peoples taxes. They probably wont tell you that if you belong to a middle-class family, then Ive cut your taxes each year that Ive been in office, and Ive cut taxes for small business owners 17 times. But the thing is, for most Americans like me, tax rates are near their lowest point in 50 years. In 2001 and 2003, the wealthiest Americans received two huge new tax cuts. We were told these tax cuts would lead to faster job growth. Instead, we got the slowest job growth in half a century, and the typical American family actually saw its income fall. On the flip side, when the most well-off Americans were asked to pay a little more in the 1990s, we were warned that it would kill jobs. Instead, tens of millions of jobs followed. So weve tried this trickle-down experiment before. It doesnt work. And middle class families have seen too much of their security erode over the past few decades for us to tell them theyre going to have to do more because the wealthiest Americans are going to do less. We cant stop investing in the things that will help grow our economy and create jobs things like education, research, new sources of energy just so folks like me can get another tax cut. So I hope youll ask your Member of Congress to step up and echo that call this week by voting for the Buffett Rule. Remind them that in America, prosperity has never just trickled down from a wealthy few. Prosperity has always been built by a strong, thriving middle class. Thats a principle worth reaffirming right now. Thank you, God bless you, and have a great weekend.

[PRESIDENTIAL WEEKLY ADDRESS ASSESSMENT PHASE A.a START OF]


[ Old English e, earlier se < Indo-European]

1house \'has\ n, pl hous \'ha-zz also -sz\ often attrib, [ME es hous, fr. OE hs; akin to OHG hs house] (bef. 12c) 1 : a building that serves as living quarters for one or a few families : home The White House 2 a (1): a shelter or refuge (as a nest or den) of a wild animal (2): a natural covering (as a test or shell) that encloses and protects an Office of the Press Secretary animal or a colony of zooids b : a building in which something is For Immediate Release housed a carriage ~ April 14, 2012 3 a : one of the 12 equal sectors in which the celestial sphere is [13th divided in astrologyFrench relaisser "let go" <seat of relaxare century. Via Old b : a zodiacal sign that is the Latin a planet's greatest relax)] "loosen" (see influence
[14th century. Via Old French adresser < assumed Vulgar Latin addrictiare "direct to" < Latin directus (see direct)]

WEEKLY ADDRESS: Its Time for Congress to Pass the Buffett Rule
[13th century. < French passer < Latin passus "step"]

con gress \'k-grs also -rs, Brit usu 'k-"gres\ n [L congressus, fr. congredi to come together, fr. com- + gradi to go more at grade] (1528) 1 a : the act or action of coming together and meeting b : coitus 2 : a formal meeting of delegates for discussion and usu. action on some question 3 : the supreme legislative body of a nation and esp. of a republic

[Early 17th century. Via French < Latin praesidere "sit in front of" < sedere "sit"]

WASHINGTON, DC In this weeks address, President Obama urged Congress to pass the Buffett Rule, a principle of fairness that says if you make more than $1 million a year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle class families.
1rule \'rl\ n [ME reule, fr. AF, fr. L regula straightedge, rule, fr. regere to keep straight, direct more at right] (13c) 1 a : a prescribed guide for conduct or action b : the laws or regulations prescribed by the founder of a religious order for observance by its members c : an accepted procedure, custom, or habit d (1): a usu. written order or direction made by a court regulating court practice or the action of parties (2): a legal precept or doctrine e : a regulation or bylaw governing procedure or controlling conduct

meanwhile adverb
1. during period: during the period of time between two events I'll meet you later; meanwhile I'll leave you to your food. 2. while something is happening: at the same time as something is happening I tried to keep everybody calm, meanwhile struggling to open the car door.

1push \'psh\ vb [ME possen, pusshen, prob. fr. OF pousser to [Early 18th century. < French, exert pressure, fr. L pulsare, freq. of pellere to drive, strike "footstool, sideboard"] more at felt] vt(13c) President has been pushing Congress to pass the Buffett rule to help ensure we have a The 1 a : to press against with force everyone drive orby theb : to set of rules and we can continue to make system thats fair, where in order to plays impel same move or endeavor to move away orgrow our economy and help the middle class and those trying to get the investments we need to ahead by steady pressure without striking in it. [ Old English grwan < Indo-European]

Meanwhile, if you make under $250,000 a year like 98 percent of American families do your Microsoft Encarta 2009. 1993-2008 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. taxes shouldnt go up.

1in vest ment \in-'ves(t)-mnt\ n [1invest] (1597) 1 a archaic: vestment b : an outer layer : envelope 2 : investiture 1 3 : blockade siege

[Late 16th century. < French remarquer < marquer "to mark"]

PreConditions
The West now seeks continued negotiations under any circumstances, as evidenced by its announcement, prior to the commencement of the first round of talks, that a second round of talks was already scheduled for May; The West has accepted Iran's right to pursue a nuclear program for civilian purposes, including the enrichment of uranium to 3.5%-5%; The West, which in the past has dictated conditions to Iran, was now negotiating mutual accommodations; The West has accepted Tehran's demand that these talks be without preconditions. Full Disclosure about the Iranian Nuclear Program Military Aspect has to be a given for any future truly productive negotiations.

Remarks of President Obama Weekly Address The White House April 14, 2012
From Far Away, From Far To Far Away, Came to Find the One Heart I Once Lost... Left Home , To Return Home Back to... That Piece of me rendered gone by those reckoned in me a person i chose to be not... I'm Missing you My Love... Like the First Time I Dreamed Of this Moment As if We Were've never been Apart... Sweet Center of my World... I'm Missing You...

1fun men \"fn-d-'men-tl\ adj (15c) da tal 1 a : serving as an original or generating source : primary a discovery ~ to modern computers b : serving as a basis supporting existence or determining essential structure or function : basic 2 a : of or relating to essential structure, function, or facts : radical One of the fundamental challenges of our time is building an dealing with general principles rather than ~ change ; also: of or economy where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays ~ science b :rules. practical application by the same adhering to fundamentalism 3 : of, relating to, or produced by the lowest component of a everyone [ vvree w n] [ Old English faeger "beautiful" <complex vibration or everybody [vvree b ddee]
Germanic, "suitable"] pronoun
every person: every person, whether of a defined group or in general Everyone is going to come to the office party. This is not just for one area; it will affect everyone around the country.

Microsoft Encarta 2009. 19932008 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

[ Old English manig < Indo-European, "many, often"]

And as many Americans rush to file their taxes this weekend, its worth pointing out that weve got a tax system that doesnt always uphold the principle of everyone doing their part.
[ Old English manig < Indo-European, "many, often"]

[ Old English faeger "beautiful" < Germanic, "suitable"]

Now, this is not just about fairness. This is also about growth. Its about being able to make the investments we need to strengthen our economy and create jobs. And its about whether we as a country are willing to pay for those investments.
1wheth \'hwe-thr, 'we-, (")(h)w-\ pron [ME, er fr. OE hw ther, hwether; akin to OHG hwedar which of two, L uter, Gk poteros, OE hw who more at who] (bef. 12c) 1 archaic: which one of the two 2 archaic: whichever one of the two
[12th century. Via Old French payer "pacify" < Latin pacare < pax "peace"]

In a perfect world, of course, none of us would have to pay any taxes. Wed have no deficits to pay down. And wed have all the resources we needed to invest in things like schools and roads and a strong military and new sources of energy investments that have always bolstered our economy and strengthened the middle class.
[ Old English strengu < Germanic, "strong"]

1in vest ment \in-'ves(t)-mnt\ n [1invest] (1597) 1 a archaic: vestment b : an outer layer : envelope 2 : investiture 1 3 : blockade siege

1world \'wr(-)ld\ n [ME, fr. OE woruld human existence, this world, age (akin to OHG weralt age, world); akin to OE wer man, eald old more at virile, old] (bef. 12c) 1 a : the earthly state of human existence b : life after death used with a qualifier the next ~ 2 : the earth with its inhabitants and all things upon it 3 : individual course of life : career 4 : the inhabitants of the earth : the human race 5 a : the concerns of the earth and its affairs as distinguished from heaven and the life to come b : secular affairs

But we live in the real world, with real choices and real consequences. Right now, weve got significant deficits to close. Weve got serious investments to make to keep our economy growing. And we cant afford to keep spending more money on tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans who dont need them and didnt even ask for them.
[ Old English n(o)d < Indo-European]

[13th century. < weal1]

Warren Buffett is one of the wealthiest men in the world. But he pays a lower tax rate than his secretary. Thats just the way the system is set up. In fact, one in four millionaires pays a lower tax rate than millions of hardworking middle-class households.
hard work \'hrd-'wr-ki\ adj (1772) : ing industrious diligent 1house hold \'has-"hld, 'ha-"sld\ n (14c) : those who dwell under the same roof and compose a family ; also: a social unit composed of those living together in the same dwelling

When Consciousness becomes more 2 artificial voices talking at the same time then Consciousness exists no more Crime is IntentionalTurning People Insane to have your mind at peace that is

They Say they Are Chinese or once they were before they forgot how it is to be human.

As Warren points out, thats not fair and it doesnt make sense. Its wrong that middle-class Americans pay a higher share of their income in taxes than some millionaires and billionaires.
The Director needs an update. Punishment is not Punishment any moreHe Should knowWhy is he Punishing me while I deserve it?

When some so called Down to Earth People want People flying with their mind to save the day then perhaps poetry is more important than words based on a sandy nothing.

Inspiration is intentional when you are using your free will and your free will alone with experience that you chose to create whatever you want as an inner world. Anything else is Human Rights Violation or Enslavement. Usually it is the same thing. In the end they may say they taught you freedom by enslaving you first to understand the price of this valueAm I supposed to say Thanks? Thank You then

This week, Members of Congress are going to have a chance to set things right. They get to vote on what we call the Buffett Rule.
People who abandon the Constitution they wrote only a few years ago are building Empires on the SandKeep Talking, I am not Going AnywherePlease doGood night!

[ Old English macian < Indo-European, "kneading"]

Its simple: If you make more than $1 million every year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle-class families do. On the other hand, if you make less than $250,000 a year -- like 98 percent of American families do -- your taxes shouldnt go up.
1on \'n, 'n\ prep [ME an, on, prep. & adv., fr. OE; akin to OHG ana on, Gk ana up, on] (bef. 12c) 1 a used as a function word to indicate position in contact with and supported by the top surface of the book is lying ~ the table b used as a function word to indicate position in or in contact with an outer surface the fly landed ~ the ceiling I have a cut ~ my finger paint ~ the wall c used as a function word to indicate position in close proximity with a village ~ the sea stay ~ your opponent d used as a function word to indicate the location of something ~ the left ~ the south side of the house ~ the farm

[ Old English lssa < Germanic]

1sup port \s-'prt\ vt [ME, fr. AF supporter, fr. LL supportare, fr. L, to transport, fr. sub- + portare to carry more at fare] (14c) 1 : to endure bravely or quietly : bear 2 a (1): to promote the interests or cause of (2): to uphold or defend as valid or right : advocate ~s fair play (3): to argue or vote for ~ed the motion to lower taxes b (1): assist help bombers ~ed the ground troops (2): to act with (a star actor) (3): to bid in bridge so as to show support for c : to provide with substantiation : corroborate ~ an alibi

Thats all there is to it. Its pretty sensible. Most Americans support this idea. One survey found that two-thirds of millionaires do, too. So do nearly half of all Republicans.
[Early 19th century. < French < million (see million)]

1find \'fnd\ vb, found \'fand\ find [ME, fr. OE findan; akin to OHG findan to find, ing L pont-, pons bridge, Gk pontos sea, Skt patha way, course] vt(bef. 12c) 1 a : to come upon often accidentally : encounter b : to meet with (a particular reception) hoped to ~ favor 2 a : to come upon by searching or effort must ~ a suitable person for the job b : to discover by study or experiment ~ an answer c : to obtain by effort or management ~ the time to study d : attain reach the bullet found its mark

[ Old English sum "one, somebody" < IndoEuropean, "together with"]

We just need some Republican politicians to get on board with where the country is.
pol ti i cian \"p-l-'ti-shn\ n (1589) 1 : a person experienced in the art or science of government ; esp: one actively engaged in conducting the business of a government 2 a : a person engaged in party politics as a profession b : a person primarily interested in political office for selfish or other narrow usu. short-sighted reasons
[13th century. < Old French cuntre < assumed Vulgar Latin (terra) contrata "(land) lying opposite" < Latin contra "against"]

[12th century. < Old Norse reisa < Germanic]

I know theyll say that this is all about wanting to raise peoples taxes. They probably wont tell you that if you belong to a middle-class family, then Ive cut your taxes each year that Ive been in office, and Ive cut taxes for small business owners 17 times.
thing \'thi\ n [ME, fr. OE, thing, assembly; akin to OHG ding thing, assembly, Goth theihs time] (bef. 12c) 1 a : a matter of concern : affair many ~s to do b pl: state of affairs in general or within a specified or implied sphere ~s are improving c : a particular state of affairs : situation look at this ~ another way d : event circumstance that shooting was a terrible ~ 1each \'ch\ adj [ME ech, fr. OE lc; akin to OHG iogilh each; both fr. WGmc *aiw- ever, always (whence OE always) + *galkaz having the same form, like (whence OE gelc like) more at aye, like] (bef. 12c) : being one of two or more distinct individuals having a similar relation and often constituting an aggregate

But the thing is, for most Americans like me, tax rates are near their lowest point in 50 years. In 2001 and 2003, the wealthiest Americans received two huge new tax cuts.
re ceive \ri-'sv\ vb, re ceived re ceiv [ME, fr. AF ing receivre, fr. L recipere, fr. re- + capere to take more at heave] vt(14c) 1 : to come into possession of : acquire ~ a gift 2 a : to act as a receptacle or container for the cistern ~s water from the roof b : to assimilate through the mind or senses ~ new ideas

1near \'nir\ adv [ME ner, partly fr. ner nearer, fr. OE nar, comparative of nah nigh; partly fr. ON n r nearer, compar. of n- nigh more at nigh] (13c) 1 : at, within, or to a short distance or time sunset was drawing ~ 2 : almost nearly was ~ dead 3 : in a close or intimate manner : closely ~ related 4 archaic: in a frugal manner

[13th century. < weal1]

[ Old English f st "firm" < Germanic]

We were told these tax cuts would lead to faster job growth. Instead, we got the slowest job growth in half a century, and the typical American family actually saw its income fall.
cen ry \'sen(t)-sh(-)r\ n, pl -ries [L centuria, irreg. fr. tu centum hundred] (1533) 1 : a subdivision of the Roman legion 2 : a group, sequence, or series of 100 like things 3 : a period of 100 years esp. of the Christian era or of the preceding period of human history 4 : a race over a hundred units (as yards or miles)
[14th century. < Old Norse innkoma "arrival"; later < in-2 + come]

[Mid-16th century. < modern Latin Americanus < America]

On the flip side, when the most well-off Americans were asked to pay a little more in the 1990s, we were warned that it would kill jobs. Instead, tens of millions of jobs followed.
warn \'wrn\ vb [ME, fr. OE warnian; akin to OHG warnn to take heed, OE w r careful, aware more at wary] vt(bef. 12c) 1 a : to give notice to beforehand esp. of danger or evil b : to give admonishing advice to : counsel c : to call to one's attention : inform 2 : to order to go or stay away often used with off vi: to give a warning warn n er

[14th century. Directly or via Old French < Latin experimentum "trial, test" < experiri "try out"]

So weve tried this trickle-down experiment before. It doesnt work. And middle class families have seen too much of their security erode over the past few decades for us to tell them theyre going to have to do more because the wealthiest Americans are going to do less.
be cause \bi-'kz, -'kz, -'ks, b-\ conj [ME because that, because, fr. by cause that] (14c) 1 : for the reason that : since rested ~ he was tired 2 : the fact that : that the reason I haven't been fired is ~ my boss hasn't got round to it yet E. B. White

[Mid-16th century. Directly or via French < Latin investire "clothe (in)" < vestis "clothing"]

We cant stop investing in the things that will help grow our economy and create jobs things like education, research, new sources of energy just so folks like me can get another tax cut.
[ Old English folc < Indo-European,"fill"]

ed ca u tion \"e-j-'k-shn\ n (1531) 1 a : the action or process of educating or of being educated ; also: a stage of such a process b : the knowledge and development resulting from an educational process a person of little ~ 2 : the field of study that deals mainly with methods of teaching and learning in schools ed ca u tion \-shnl, -sh-nl\ adj al ed ca u tion ly \-\ adv al

[14th century. Via French membre < Latin membrum "limb, part"]

So I hope youll ask your Member of Congress to step up and echo that call this week by voting for the Buffett Rule. Remind them that in America, prosperity has never just trickled down from a wealthy few. re mind \ri-'mnd\ vt (1660) : to put in mind of something : cause to remember remember re mind n er

[13th century. Via French < Latin prosperitas < prosperus "doing well"]

Prosperity has always been built by a strong, thriving middle class. Thats a principle worth reaffirming right now.
af firm \-'frm\ vb [ME affermen, fr. AF afermer, fr. L affirmare, fr. ad- + firmare to make firm, fr. firmus firm more at firm] vt(14c) 1 a : validate confirm b : to state positively he ~ed his innocence prin ple \'prin(t)-s(-)pl, -s-bl\ n [ME, fr. MF principe, principle, fr. OF, fr. L ci principium beginning, fr. princip-, princeps initiator more at prince] (14c) 1 a : a comprehensive and fundamental law, doctrine, or assumption b (1): a rule or code of conduct (2): habitual devotion to right principles a man of ~ c : the laws or facts of nature underlying the working of an artificial device

bless \'bles\ vt, blessed \'blest\ also blest \'blest\ bless [ME, fr. ing OE bltsian, fr. bld blood; fr. the use of blood in consecration] (bef. 12c) 1 : to hallow or consecrate by religious rite or word 2 : to hallow with the sign of the cross 3 : to invoke divine care for ~ your heart used in the phrase bless you to wish good health esp. to one who has just sneezed 4 a : praise glorify ~ his holy name b : to speak well of : approve

Thank you, God bless you, and have a great weekend [And God Bless the United States of America].
[PRESIDENTIAL WEEKLY ADDRESS ASSESSMENT PHASE A.a END OF] [PRESIDENTIAL WEEKLY ADDRESS ASSESSMENT PHASE A.b START OF] A like Africa

The White House

5 Cannot be 5 if 4 is not around Or IV to become V Toys , Invisible Toys I cannot see your Color Friend If I could I would probably kill uU lost your mind while building in the Trees And now u are accusing me because you cannot build Your True ColorsLike that Brown to Dark Color Your Shit Probably Have thinking how you gonna built a Dark Empire Too much Darkened ShitToo Much Coffee I guess That Poor Toilet sit

[13th century. Via French < Latin officium "doing work" < opus "work" + facere "do"]

Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release April 14, 2012
[13th century. Via Old French relaisser "let go" < Latin relaxare "loosen" (see relax)]

sec tary \'se-kr-"ter-, 'se-k-"ter-, in rapid speech also re 'sek-"ter-, esp Brit 'se-k(r)-tr\ n, pl -tar [ME secretarie, ies fr. ML secretarius, confidential employee, secretary, fr. L secretum secret, fr. neut. of secretus] (15c) 1 : one employed to handle correspondence and manage routine and detail work for a superior 2 a : an officer of a business concern who may keep records of directors' and stockholders' meetings and of stock ownership and transfer and help supervise the company's legal interests b : an officer of an organization or society responsible for its records and correspondence

weekly adjective
1. happening once each week: happening, produced, or done once a week or every week 2. calculated by week: worked out by the week weekly pay

adverb
1. once each week: once each week does the shopping weekly 2. every week: every single week

WEEKLY ADDRESS: Its Time for Congress noun (plural weeklies) to Pass the Buffett Rule
something published once each week: a newspaper or magazine published once a week

3. by week: by the week paid weekly

[13th century. Via French riule < Latin regula Microsoft Encarta 2009. 1993-2008 Microsoft "straight stick, standard"] Corporation. All rights reserved.

1pass \'pas\ vb [ME, fr. AF passer, fr. VL *passare, fr. L passus step more at pace] vi(13c) 1 : move proceed go 2 a : to go away : depart b : die often used with on 3 a : to move in a path so as to approach and continue beyond something : move past ; esp: to move past another vehicle going in the same direction b : to run the normal course used of time or a period of time the hours ~ quickly

noun

[ drss, drss]

(plural addresses)

1. physical location: the number, street name, and other information that describes where a building is or where somebody lives 2. written form of address: the address of a person or organization when written on a letter or an item of mail 3. or [ drss] formal talk: a formal speech or report 4. COMPUT number for location: a number that specifies a location in a computer's memory

addresses, plural noun


courtship: attention paid to somebody that is intended as courtship (archaic)

WASHINGTON, DC In singular addresses) President Obama urged Congress to pass the this weeks address, person present Buffett Rule, a transitive verb write directions on mail: to write or print on an item of$1 million awhere it is to be delivered principle of fairness that says if you make more than mail details of year, you 1. should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle class families.
2. transitive verb speak or make speech to somebody: to say something to somebody, or make a speech to an audience

verb

[ drss]

(past and past participle addressed, present participle addressing, 3rd

per cent \pr-'sen-tij\ n (ca. 1789) age 1 a : a part of a whole expressed in hundredths a high ~ of You should address him by his last name. students attended b : the result obtained by multiplying a 4. reflexive verb begin task: to set about doing some task number by a to putting our own national house in times the base "Through this program of action we address ourselvespercent the ~ equals the rate order." (FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT First Inaugural Address 1933) : a share of winnings or profits b : advantage profit no ~ in 2a going around looking like an issue 5. transitive verb deal with issue: to face up to and deal with a problem orold sack of laundry Wallace failure to address the main issue Stegner [ Old English macian < Indo- verb face somebody or something: to stand facing part : proportion archery target 3 : an indeterminate a dance partner or an 6. transitive European, "kneading"] 4 a : probability b : favorable odds 7. transitive verb GOLF prepare to hit golf ball: to take up the correct stance beside a golf ball before hitting it

3. transitive verb use correct title for somebody: to use the proper name or title in speaking or writing to somebody

Meanwhile, if you make under $250,000 a year like 98 percent of American families do your taxes shouldnt go up. [ drssb'l], adjective -addressable
[13th century. Via French < Latin taxare "censure, assess" < tangere "to touch"]

[14th century. Via Old French adresser < assumed Vulgar Latin addrictiare "direct to" < Latin directus (see direct)]

Microsoft Encarta 2009. 1993-2008 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

1fam ly \'fam-l, 'fa-m-\ n, pl -lies [ME familie, fr. L i familia household (including servants as well as kin of the householder), fr. famulus servant] (15c) 1 : a group of individuals living under one roof and usu. under one head : household 2 a : a group of persons of common ancestry : clan b : a people or group of peoples regarded as deriving from a common stock : race

1help \'help; Southern often 'hep also 'hep\ vb [ME, fr. OE helpan; akin to OHG helfan to help, [13th century. < French passer < Latin and perh. to Lith elpti] passus "step"] vt(bef. 12c) 1 : to give assistance or support to ~ a child with The President has been pushing Congress to pass the Buffett rule to help ensure we have a homework system thats fair, where everyone plays by the same set of rules and we can continue to make 2 a : to make more pleasant or bearable : improve the investments we need to grow our economy and help the middle class and those trying to get relieve bright curtains will ~ the room took an in it. aspirin to ~ her headache b archaic: rescue save [ Old English middel] 3 a : to be of use to : benefit b : to further the advancement of : promote

Remarks of President Obama Weekly Address The White House April 14, 2012

One of the fundamental challenges of our time is building an economy where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules.

And as many Americans rush to file their taxes this weekend, its worth pointing out that weve got a tax system that doesnt always uphold the principle of everyone doing their part.

Now, this is not just about fairness. This is also about growth. Its about being able to make the investments we need to strengthen our economy and create jobs. And its about whether we as a country are willing to pay for those investments. In a perfect world, of course, none of us would have to pay any taxes. Wed have no deficits to pay down. And wed have all the resources we needed to invest in things like schools and roads and a strong military and new sources of energy investments that have always bolstered our economy and strengthened the middle class. But we live in the real world, with real choices and real consequences. Right now, weve got significant deficits to close. Weve got serious investments to make to keep our economy growing. And we cant afford to keep spending more money on tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans who dont need them and didnt even ask for them. Warren Buffett is one of the wealthiest men in the world. But he pays a lower tax rate than his secretary. Thats just the way the system is set up. In fact, one in four millionaires pays a lower tax rate than millions of hardworking middle-class households. As Warren points out, thats not fair and it doesnt make sense. Its wrong that middle-class Americans pay a higher share of their income in taxes than some millionaires and billionaires. This week, Members of Congress are going to have a chance to set things right. They get to vote on what we call the Buffett Rule. Its simple: If you make more than $1 million every year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle-class families do. On the other hand, if you make less than $250,000 a year -- like 98 percent of American families do -- your taxes shouldnt go up. Thats all there is to it. Its pretty sensible. Most Americans support this idea. One survey found that two-thirds of millionaires do, too. So do nearly half of all Republicans. We just need some Republican politicians to get on board with where the country is.

I know theyll say that this is all about wanting to raise peoples taxes. They probably wont tell you that if you belong to a middle-class family, then Ive cut your taxes each year that Ive been in office, and Ive cut taxes for small business owners 17 times. But the thing is, for most Americans like me, tax rates are near their lowest point in 50 years. In 2001 and 2003, the wealthiest Americans received two huge new tax cuts. We were told these tax cuts would lead to faster job growth. Instead, we got the slowest job growth in half a century, and the typical American family actually saw its income fall. On the flip side, when the most well-off Americans were asked to pay a little more in the 1990s, we were warned that it would kill jobs. Instead, tens of millions of jobs followed. So weve tried this trickle-down experiment before. It doesnt work. And middle class families have seen too much of their security erode over the past few decades for us to tell them theyre going to have to do more because the wealthiest Americans are going to do less. We cant stop investing in the things that will help grow our economy and create jobs things like education, research, new sources of energy just so folks like me can get another tax cut. So I hope youll ask your Member of Congress to step up and echo that call this week by voting for the Buffett Rule. Remind them that in America, prosperity has never just trickled down from a wealthy few. Prosperity has always been built by a strong, thriving middle class. Thats a principle worth reaffirming right now. Thank you, God bless you, and have a great weekend.
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