As you read Heart of Darkness:  Keep track of where Marlow travels.

Do this by noting the page number any place he mentions moving from one specific point to another. Then discuss at least two specific important details concerning the place he goes and how long it takes to get there.  Find and discuss briefly four references to work or keeping busy in Heart of Darkness, and then provide a statement that explains Marlow’s position on the value of work. Find three examples we haven’t discussed in class of the futility (uselessness, incongruity) of the European presence in the Congo and discuss what Conrad seems to be suggesting in each instance. The Company’s Chief Accountant with the high starched collars is one example of this futility.  Select a passage (1-2 paragraphs) from the novel that exemplifies Conrad’s impressionistic style. Provide a short analysis (2-3 paragraphs) of the passage, focusing on those details that most clearly reveal aspects of impressionistic writing. Compare and contrast the native woman who is apparently Kurtz’s lover with Kurtz’s “intended” back in Europe. What general attitudes about women are being expressed, and how do those attitudes fit into the novel as a whole? Pick three of the following motifs (recurring images and/or ideas) and find at least five references to each. List the page reference and then discuss how the motif operates within the context of the novel as a whole. Choose from the following motifs: savages, grass, rivets, jungle, river, huts, disease, progress, madness, civilization, light, efficiency, death images (bones/skulls/heads on stakes).

Cite and discuss in some detail three instances when a character’s assumptions played a critical role in how that character acted or perceived someone else’s actions. Novel as a whole:  Respond to Kurtz’s final utterance. What is “the horror” to which he refers?  Discuss why Conrad would use the frame story structure for this novel.

Kurtz’s “intended” back in Europe. What general attitudes about women are being expressed, and how do those attitudes fit into the novel as a whole? Pick three of the following motifs (recurring images and/or ideas) and find at least five references to each. List the page reference and then discuss how the motif operates within the context of the novel as a whole. Choose from the following motifs: savages, grass, rivets, jungle, river, huts, disease, progress, madness, civilization, light, efficiency, death images (bones/skulls/heads on stakes). Cite and discuss in some detail three instances when a character’s assumptions played a critical role in how that character acted or perceived someone else’s actions. Novel as a whole:  Respond to Kurtz’s final utterance. What is “the horror” to which he refers?  Discuss why Conrad would use the frame story structure for this novel.

As you read Heart of Darkness:  Keep track of where Marlow travels. Do this by noting the page number any place he mentions moving from one specific point to another. Then discuss at least two specific important details concerning the place he goes and how long it takes to get there.  Find and discuss briefly four references to work or keeping busy in Heart of Darkness, and then provide a statement that explains Marlow’s position on the value of work. Find three examples we haven’t discussed in class of the futility (uselessness, incongruity) of the European presence in the Congo and discuss what Conrad seems to be suggesting in each instance. The Company’s Chief Accountant with the high starched collars is one example of this futility.  Select a passage (1-2 paragraphs) from the novel that exemplifies Conrad’s impressionistic style. Provide a short analysis (2-3 paragraphs) of the passage, focusing on those details that most clearly reveal aspects of impressionistic writing. Compare and contrast the native woman who is apparently Kurtz’s lover with

As you read Heart of Darkness:  Keep track of where Marlow travels. Do this by noting the page number any place he mentions moving from one specific point to another. Then discuss at least two specific important details concerning the place he goes and how long it takes to get there.  Find and discuss briefly four references to work or keeping busy in Heart of Darkness, and then provide a statement that explains Marlow’s position on the value of work. Find three examples we haven’t discussed in class of the futility (uselessness,

incongruity) of the European presence in the Congo and discuss what Conrad seems to be suggesting in each instance. The Company’s Chief Accountant with the high starched collars is one example of this futility.  Select a passage (1-2 paragraphs) from the novel that exemplifies Conrad’s impressionistic style. Provide a short analysis (2-3 paragraphs) of the passage, focusing on those details that most clearly reveal aspects of impressionistic writing. Compare and contrast the native woman who is apparently Kurtz’s lover with Kurtz’s “intended” back in Europe. What general attitudes about women are being expressed, and how do those attitudes fit into the novel as a whole? Pick three of the following motifs (recurring images and/or ideas) and find at least five references to each. List the page reference and then discuss how the motif operates within the context of the novel as a whole. Choose from the following motifs: savages, grass, rivets, jungle, river, huts, disease, progress, madness, civilization, light, efficiency, death images (bones/skulls/heads on stakes). Cite and discuss in some detail three instances when a character’s assumptions played a critical role in how that character acted or perceived someone else’s actions. Novel as a whole:  Respond to Kurtz’s final utterance. What is “the horror” to which he refers?  Discuss why Conrad would use the frame story structure for this novel.

automatically look for connections between the story and their own lives. “see” what they read. ask themselves questions about what they are reading. go back and reread when they don’t understand. stop to look a word up in the dictionary when they come across one they don’t know. look for characters with whom they can relate. try to figure out what an unfamiliar word means based on contextual clues. pay particular attention to the punctuation. try to connect what they already know to what they are reading. think about what that particular story is suggesting about the human condition. consciously appreciate specific words, sentences, and literary devices when they read. form opinions about characters as they read. wonder why some characters do or say certain things. look for reasons why characters do or say certain things. notice how characters are changing throughout the story. wonder why the author may have included certain details or used certain words. notice differences between characters’ points of view.

reflect back over the entire story after they have read. are confident that they could explain to someone else what they have read. don’t give up when they read something they don’t understand – they keep on reading! Strong Readers… automatically look for connections between the story and their own lives. “see” what they read. ask themselves questions about what they are reading. go back and reread when they don’t understand. stop to look a word up in the dictionary when they come across one they don’t know. look for characters with whom they can relate. try to figure out what an unfamiliar word means based on contextual clues. pay particular attention to the punctuation. try to connect what they already know to what they are reading. think about what that particular story is suggesting about the human condition. consciously appreciate specific words, sentences, and literary devices when they read. form opinions about characters as they read. wonder why some characters do or say certain things.

Strong Readers…

look for reasons why characters do or say certain things. notice how characters are changing throughout the story. wonder why the author may have included certain details or used certain words. notice differences between characters’ points of view. reflect back over the entire story after they have read. are confident that they could explain to someone else what they have read. don’t give up when they read something they don’t understand – they keep on reading! Strong Readers… automatically look for connections between the story and their own lives. “see” what they read. ask themselves questions about what they are reading. go back and reread when they don’t understand. stop to look a word up in the dictionary when they come across one they don’t know. look for characters with whom they can relate. try to figure out what an unfamiliar word means based on contextual clues. pay particular attention to the punctuation. try to connect what they already know to what they are reading. think about what that particular story is

suggesting about the human condition. consciously appreciate specific words, sentences, and literary devices when they read. form opinions about characters as they read. wonder why some characters do or say certain things. look for reasons why characters do or say certain things. notice how characters are changing throughout the story. wonder why the author may have included certain details or used certain words. notice differences between characters’ points of view. reflect back over the entire story after they have read. are confident that they could explain to someone else what they have read. don’t give up when they read something they don’t understand – they keep on reading!

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